Ms. Conn's AP English Assignments, 2012-2013

Ms. Conn's AP English Assignments
2012-2013

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 10th, 2013: Do Now: Choose from the following:
  • Fun Activity: Write your Senior Will. Begin it with the following: "I, ___________, being of ______________mind, and ______________body, bequeath...
  • Vocabulary Baseball using the SAT/College Vocabulary Lists
  • Movie clips from one of the works of literature studied this semester or a famous classic
  • How can students effectively prepare for college? Good luck on your Regents Exams! See you at graduation! In the future, pursue your passions, follow your heart, work hard, be kind to others (especially when it's not easy), do what's right and make the world a better place! It was a GREAT pleasure being your teacher for your last year of high school. All the best to you in college!

    Enjoy some free time to read good books! If you need recommendations, please ask.

    Friday, June 7th, 2013: SENIOR BBQ How can students effectively prepare for college? Get ready for Regents, if applicable, and graduation!!
    Wednesday, June 5th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Students' sharing of travels & ethnic backgrounds

    2. Ask Ms. Conn anything about English (literature, writing, vocabulary, etc.)!

    How can students effectively prepare for college? Get ready for Regents, if applicable, and graduation!!
    Tuesday, June 4th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Check out these useful sites for college (bookmark them!):
  • Purdue University's Writing Lab
  • Writing a College Paper (Dartmouth College)
  • College Writing Tips (University of Chicago)
  • VOCABULARY (Ms. Conn's lists)

    2. Graduation Gifts of Kindness (an activity!)

  • How can students effectively prepare for college writing? Get ready for Regents, if applicable, and graduation!!
    Monday, June 3rd, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Student Survey (yes or no questions).

    2. Discuss Do Now answers.

    3. Ask the Teacher Anything!

    How can students effectively share their insights on student behavior in the 21st century? Get ready for Regents, if applicable, and graduation!!
    Friday, May 31st, 2013: GRADUATION SPEECHES How can students effectively present graduation speeches--based on quality content and delivery? N/A
    Thursday, May 30th, 2013: GRADUATION SPEECHES How can students effectively present graduation speeches--based on quality content and delivery? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 31st (your specific presentation date will be assigned in class):
  • You will be writing your own graduation speech, which is worth 20% of the 3rd marking period. See the sample graduation speeches to guide you, since you will be following their formats (we will discuss all of the components of a graduation speech in class). Refer to the grading rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric for requirements.
  • Wednesday, May 29th, 2013: GRADUATION SPEECHES How can students effectively present graduation speeches--based on quality content and delivery? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 30th/FRIDAY, MAY 31st (your specific presentation date will be assigned in class):
  • You will be writing your own graduation speech, which is worth 20% of the 3rd marking period. See the sample graduation speeches to guide you, since you will be following their formats (we will discuss all of the components of a graduation speech in class). Refer to the grading rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric for requirements.
  • Tuesday, May 28th, 2013: GRADUATION SPEECHES How can students effectively present graduation speeches--based on quality content and delivery? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29th/THURSDAY, MAY 30th/FRIDAY, MAY 31st (your specific presentation date will be assigned in class):
  • You will be writing your own graduation speech, which is worth 20% of the 3rd marking period. See the sample graduation speeches to guide you, since you will be following their formats (we will discuss all of the components of a graduation speech in class). Refer to the grading rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric for requirements.
  • Friday, May 24th, 2013: SENIOR TRIP How can students effectively prepare to present graduation speeches--based on quality content and delivery? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, MAY 28th/WEDNESDAY, MAY 29th/THURSDAY, MAY 30th/FRIDAY, MAY 31st (your specific presentation date will be assigned in class):
  • You will be writing your own graduation speech, which is worth 20% of the 3rd marking period. See the sample graduation speeches to guide you, since you will be following their formats (we will discuss all of the components of a graduation speech in class). Refer to the grading rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric for requirements.
  • Thursday, May 23rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: Begin working on writing at least one paragraph of your graduation speech.

    2. Work Period:

  • Practice delivery, using the grading rubric, in small groups. Focus on eye contact, gesturing, posture, energy/enthusiasm, and vocal intonation.
  • Continue writing the graduation speech.

    3. Volunteer speakers will present excerpts and classmates will critique, offering both positive feedback and suggestions for improvement.

  • How can students effectively prepare to present graduation speeches--based on quality content and delivery? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 28th/WEDNESDAY, MAY 29th/THURSDAY, MAY 30th/FRIDAY, MAY 31st (your specific presentation date will be assigned in class):
  • You will be writing your own graduation speech, which is worth 20% of the 3rd marking period. See the sample graduation speeches to guide you, since you will be following their formats (we will discuss all of the components of a graduation speech in class). Refer to the grading rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric for requirements.
  • Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: Introduce the graduation speech, which is worth 20% of the 3rd marking period. The speeches will be presented next Tuesday, May 28th/Wednesday, May 29th/Thursday, May 30th/Friday, May 31st. See sample graduation speeches to guide you, since you will be following their formats (we will discuss all of the components of a graduation speech in class). Refer to the grading rubric-Graduation Speech Grading Rubric for detailed requirements.

    2. Work Period: If time allows, begin working on writing at least one paragraph of your graduation speech. Practice delivery, using the grading rubric, in small groups. Focus on eye contact, gesturing, posture, energy/enthusiasm, and vocal intonation. Continue writing the graduation speech.

    How can students effectively prepare to present graduation speeches--based on quality content and delivery? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 28th/WEDNESDAY, MAY 29th/THURSDAY, MAY 30th/FRIDAY, MAY 31st (your specific presentation date will be assigned in class):
  • You will be writing your own graduation speech, which is worth 20% of the 3rd marking period. See the sample graduation speeches to guide you, since you will be following their formats (we will discuss all of the components of a graduation speech in class). Refer to the grading rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric for requirements.
  • Tuesday, May 21st, 2013: "Abridged Shakespeare" Film How can students effectively view and analyze all of Shakespeare's plays in an abridged film version? N/A
    Monday, May 20th, 2013: "Abridged Shakespeare" Film How can students effectively view and analyze all of Shakespeare's plays in an abridged film version? N/A
    Friday, May 17th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Snacks on Friday!

    2. Discussion/Analysis:

  • Based on the handout comparing/contrasting the book, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, with the film, choose two directorial choices (from the film) and be ready to discuss reasons for the director's choices. Why did he (director=Milos Forman) make those choices? How did those choices either enhance or detract from the novel? Be ready to speak on two choices made by the director for 2-3 minutes (equivalent to one page of handwritten analysis, though you don't need to write your explanation).
  • Read the handouts on grammar, style, and proper citation in college writing. Be ready to discuss.
  • How can students effectively compare and contrast the film to the novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and understand proper grammar, style and citation in college writing? N/A
    Wednesday (May 15th) and Thursday (May 16th), 2013: Work Period: Work on the HW--DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 17th:
  • Based on the handout comparing/contrasting the book, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, with the film, choose two directorial choices (from the film) and be ready to discuss reasons for the director's choices. Why did he (director=Milos Forman) make those choices? How did those choices either enhance or detract from the novel? Be ready to speak on two choices made by the director for 2-3 minutes (equivalent to one page of handwritten analysis, though you don't need to write your explanation).
  • Read the handouts on grammar, style, and proper citation in writing. Be ready to discuss on Friday.
  • How can students effectively compare and contrast the film to the novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 17th:
  • Based on the handout comparing/contrasting the book, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, with the film, choose two directorial choices (from the film) and be ready to discuss reasons for the director's choices. Why did he (director=Milos Forman) make those choices? How did those choices either enhance or detract from the novel? Be ready to speak on two choices made by the director for 2-3 minutes (equivalent to one page of handwritten analysis, though you don't need to write your explanation).
  • Read the handouts on grammar, style, and proper citation in writing. Be ready to discuss on Friday.
  • Snacks on Friday--don't forget to bring in your snack/product to share with class.
  • Tuesday, May 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Film viewing of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"

    2. Discussion: How does the film compare and contrast to the novel? Analyze character development and narrator's perspective. Be ready to discuss why director made certain changes.

    How can students effectively compare and contrast the film to the novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 17th:
  • Based on the handout comparing/contrasting the book, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, with the film, choose two directorial choices (from the film) and be ready to discuss reasons for the director's choices. Why did he (director=Milos Forman) make those choices? How did those choices either enhance or detract from the novel? Be ready to speak on two choices made by the director for 2-3 minutes (equivalent to one page of handwritten analysis, though you don't need to write your explanation).
  • Read the handouts on grammar, style, and proper citation in writing. Be ready to discuss on Friday.
  • Snacks on Friday--don't forget to bring in your snack/product to share with class.
  • Monday, May 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Film viewing of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"

    2. Discussion: How does the film compare and contrast to the novel? Analyze character development and narrator's perspective.

    How can students effectively compare and contrast the film to the novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest? CONGRATULATIONS ON FINISHING THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM!

    Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!

    Friday, May 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Film viewing of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"

    2. Discussion: How does the film compare and contrast to the novel? Analyze character development and narrator's perspective.

    How can students effectively compare and contrast the film to the novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest? CONGRATULATIONS ON FINISHING THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM!

    Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!

    Thursday, May 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Reflections on the AP English Literature Exam!

    2. Film viewing of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"

    How can students effectively reflect on the AP English Literature Exam on the day of the exam? CONGRATULATIONS ON FINISHING THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM!

    Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!

    Wednesday, May 8th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read/Review the AP English Exam Strategies in a Nutshell.

    2. Review AP English Literature Exam packet's exemplary essays (this handout was distributed last week).

    3. Read the HW details/final reminders for tomorrow's AP Exam! Attention to all students who desire more practice tests: Practice Tests by Peterson's AP English Preparatory Materials

    4. Final Q & A

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam on the last day before the exam? Check out: AP English Exam Strategies in a Nutshell!

    Attention to all students who desire more practice tests: Practice Tests by Peterson's AP English Preparatory Materials.

    What should I do the night before (TONIGHT) and the morning of the AP English Literature Exam (TOMORROW, Thursday, May 9th)?
    Eat a hearty, nutritious dinner (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Relax. Watch a movie or play a game. Then, find a quiet spot and go through your notebook, review sheets, exam notes, study guides and details of the full-length novels/plays that you might write about in the free-response essay. Sleep well! Get up VERY early, enough time to get to school. Wear comfortable clothing and extra layers (a sweater/long-sleeve shirt in case the room temperature changes). Come to Room 232 for breakfast (bagels and cream cheese, bananas, muffins, and/or juice) and moral support at 7-7:30am. Turn OFF all electronic devices. Go to the assigned room (TBA) for the exam (EXAM STARTS AT 8AM, promptly!). Do not stress. Remind yourself that you have prepared thoroughly and that this test is a great challenge and opportunity you have been given, due to your hard work throughout high school. Be confident and proud of yourself, and you will succeed. It's your time to shine!

    What should I bring to the exam (TOMORROW, Thursday, May 9th)?
    Student ID, several pencils with erasers, several black pens (black ink is easier to read than other colors), a watch, something to drink (water is best), a quiet snack for the break (like lifesavers or mints), and tissues.

    How come we haven't figured out what score range we fall into (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5)?
    The total score ranges each year, as it is based on a variety of items including: AP distribution over the past three years, comparability studies, frequency distributions of scores on each section and the essays, and average scores on each exam section and essays. Though, to be a candidate for a 3 or higher, you need to get at least 1/2 of the multiple-choice questions correct. You CAN AND SHOULD answer all questions (remember, the AP English Literature Exam NOW does NOT take points off for wrong answers!). Keep that mind! Also, your essays must be strong, addressing the question thoroughly, with sophisticated language and thoughtful insight.

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 9TH AT 8AM! Best of luck to all of you!!

    STUDY YOUR PEERS' STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE YOUR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM PREPARATION:
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony: Prose Passage Essay Strategies
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Tuesday, May 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read/Review the AP English Exam Strategies in a Nutshell.

    2. Read/Share summary poems.

    3. Review AP English Literature Exam packet's exemplary essays (this handout was distributed last week).

    4. Read the HW details. Attention to all students who desire more practice tests: Practice Tests by Peterson's AP English Preparatory Materials

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam in the final days leading up to the exam? Check out: AP English Exam Strategies in a Nutshell!

    Attention to all students who desire more practice tests: Practice Tests by Peterson's AP English Preparatory Materials.

    What should I do the night before (Wednesday night, May 8th) and the morning of the AP English Literature Exam (Thursday, May 9th)?
    Eat a hearty, nutritious dinner (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Relax. Watch a movie or play a game. Then, find a quiet spot and go through your notebook, review sheets, exam notes, study guides and details of the full-length novels/plays that you might write about in the free-response essay. Sleep well! Get up VERY early, enough time to get to school. Wear comfortable clothing and extra layers (a sweater/long-sleeve shirt in case the room temperature changes). Come to Room 232 for breakfast (bagels and cream cheese, bananas, muffins, and/or juice) and moral support at 7-7:30am. Turn OFF all electronic devices. Go to the assigned room (TBA) for the exam (EXAM STARTS AT 8AM, promptly!). Do not stress. Remind yourself that you have prepared thoroughly and that this test is a great challenge and opportunity you have been given, due to your hard work throughout high school. Be confident and proud of yourself, and you will succeed. It's your time to shine!

    What should I bring to the exam (Thursday, May 9th)?
    Student ID, several pencils with erasers, several black pens (black ink is easier to read than other colors), a watch, something to drink (water is best), a quiet snack for the break (like lifesavers or mints), and tissues.

    How come we haven't figured out what score range we fall into (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5)?
    The total score ranges each year, as it is based on a variety of items including: AP distribution over the past three years, comparability studies, frequency distributions of scores on each section and the essays, and average scores on each exam section and essays. Though, to be a candidate for a 3 or higher, you need to get at least 1/2 of the multiple-choice questions correct. You CAN AND SHOULD answer all questions (remember, the AP English Literature Exam NOW does NOT take points off for wrong answers!). Keep that mind! Also, your essays must be strong, addressing the question thoroughly, with sophisticated language and thoughtful insight.

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 9TH AT 8AM! Best of luck to all of you!!

    STUDY YOUR PEERS' STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE YOUR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM PREPARATION:
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony: Prose Passage Essay Strategies
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Monday, May 6th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Write questions, concerns and/or final review requests for Wednesday, the day before the AP exam.

    2. Sharing of summary poems!

    3. Review AP English Literature Exam packet.

    4. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam in the final days leading up to the exam? Check out: AP English Exam Strategies in a Nutshell!

    What should I do the night before (Wednesday night, May 8th) and the morning of the AP English Literature Exam (Thursday, May 9th)?
    Eat a hearty, nutritious dinner (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Relax. Watch a movie or play a game. Then, find a quiet spot and go through your notebook, review sheets, exam notes, study guides and details of the full-length novels/plays that you might write about in the free-response essay. Sleep well! Get up VERY early, enough time to get to school. Wear comfortable clothing and extra layers (a sweater/long-sleeve shirt in case the room temperature changes). Come to Room 232 for breakfast (bagels and cream cheese, bananas, muffins, and/or juice) and moral support at 7-7:30am. Turn OFF all electronic devices. Go to the assigned room (TBA) for the exam (EXAM STARTS AT 8AM, promptly!). Do not stress. Remind yourself that you have prepared thoroughly and that this test is a great challenge and opportunity you have been given, due to your hard work throughout high school. Be confident and proud of yourself, and you will succeed. It's your time to shine!

    What should I bring to the exam (Thursday, May 9th)?
    Student ID, several pencils with erasers, several black pens (black ink is easier to read than other colors), a watch, something to drink (water is best), a quiet snack for the break (like lifesavers or mints), and tissues.

    How come we haven't figured out what score range we fall into (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5)?
    The total score ranges each year, as it is based on a variety of items including: AP distribution over the past three years, comparability studies, frequency distributions of scores on each section and the essays, and average scores on each exam section and essays. Though, to be a candidate for a 3 or higher, you need to get at least 1/2 of the multiple-choice questions correct. You CAN AND SHOULD answer all questions (remember, the AP English Literature Exam NOW does NOT take points off for wrong answers!). Keep that mind! Also, your essays must be strong, addressing the question thoroughly, with sophisticated language and thoughtful insight.

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 9TH AT 8AM! Best of luck to all of you!!

    STUDY YOUR PEERS' STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE YOUR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM PREPARATION:
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony: Prose Passage Essay Strategies
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Friday, May 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: AP ENGLISH EXAM PRESENTATIONS by the following students (#7-11 will present the multiple-choice question section):
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    2. Take additional notes regarding prose passage, poetry and free-response essay strategies.

    3. If time allows, sharing of summary poems!

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by learning strategies presented by their peers and composing summary poems of works of literature studied this year? STUDY YOUR PEERS' STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE YOUR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM PREPARATION:
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony: Prose Passage Essay Strategies
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Thursday, May 2nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: AP ENGLISH EXAM PRESENTATIONS by the following students (#1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section):
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas

    2. Take additional notes regarding multiple-choice question and prose passage essay strategies.

    3. Turn in HW (two summary poems): Compose summary poems for two other works of literature studied this year. Be ready to show and share tomorrow. This is worth about 10% of the 3rd marking period (it will count as classwork since it was assigned in class yesterday). The requirements include the following: you must rhyme in couplets (every two lines rhyme; aa bb cc dd ee ff gg), you must write 14 lines (7 couplets), and you must summarize the entire book (play or novel), from beginning to end.

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by learning strategies presented by their peers and composing summary poems of works of literature studied this year? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 3rd:
    50% of 3rd marking period:
  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1 (PROSE PASSAGE), essay #2 (POEM(s)) or essay #3 (FREE-RESPONSE)). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams, practice material given in class and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a PROJECT/PRESENTATION grade, about 50% of your 3rd marking period!
  • You will work in a group of three! See your chosen group members below and assigned section; #1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section on WEDNESDAY, May 1st; #5-7 will present essay question #1 (the prose passage) on Thursday, MAY 2nd; #8-9 will present essay question #2 (the poem(s)) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd; #10-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd: TBA
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony: Prose Passage Essay Strategies
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Wednesday, May 1st, 2013: 1. Do Now: AP ENGLISH EXAM PRESENTATIONS by the following students (#1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section):
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.

    2. Take additional notes regarding multiple-choice question strategies.

    3. Introduce HW due tomorrow.

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by learning strategies presented by their peers and composing summary poems of works of literature studied this year? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 2nd:
  • Read the summary poems for "The Awakening" and "The Metamorphosis" HERE
  • Compose summary poems for two other works of literature studied this year. Be ready to show and share tomorrow. This is worth about 10% of the 3rd marking period (it will count as classwork since it was assigned in class yesterday). The requirements include the following: you must rhyme in couplets (every two lines rhyme; aa bb cc dd ee ff gg), you must write 14 lines (7 couplets), and you must summarize the entire book (play or novel), from beginning to end.

    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 2ND/FRIDAY, MAY 3rd:
    50% of 3rd marking period:

  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1 (PROSE PASSAGE), essay #2 (POEM(s)) or essay #3 (FREE-RESPONSE)). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams, practice material given in class and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a PROJECT/PRESENTATION grade, about 50% of your 3rd marking period!
  • You will work in a group of three! See your chosen group members below and assigned section; #1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section on WEDNESDAY, May 1st; #5-7 will present essay question #1 (the prose passage) on Thursday, MAY 2nd; #8-9 will present essay question #2 (the poem(s)) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd; #10-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd: TBA
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung: Multiple-Choice Questions Strategies
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Tuesday, April 30th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read the summary poems for "The Awakening" and "The Metamorphosis" HERE

    2. Work Period: Compose summary poems for two other works of literature studied this year. Be ready to share tomorrow.

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam through summary poems? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 1st/THURSDAY, MAY 2ND/FRIDAY, MAY 3rd:
    50% of 3rd marking period:
  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1 (PROSE PASSAGE), essay #2 (POEM(s)) or essay #3 (FREE-RESPONSE)). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams, practice material given in class and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a PROJECT/PRESENTATION grade, about 50% of your 3rd marking period!
  • You will work in a group of three! See your chosen group members below and assigned section; #1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section on WEDNESDAY, May 1st; #5-7 will present essay question #1 (the prose passage) on Thursday, MAY 2nd; #8-9 will present essay question #2 (the poem(s)) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd; #10-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd: TBA
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Monday, April 29th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Check the multiple-choice answers from the HW:
    1.) D, 2.) B, 3.) A, 4.) E, 5.) B, 6.) A, 7.) B, 8.) E, 9.) D, 10.) A, 11.) C, 12.) E, 13.) D, 14.) C, 15.) B, 16.) E, 17.) C, 18.) D, 19.) D, 20.) C, 21.) D, 22.) D, 23.) B, 24.) A, 25.) B, 26.) D, 27.) E, 28.) E, 29.) D, 30.) B, 31.) C, 32.) E, 33.) C, 34.) A, 35.) D, 36.) D, 37.) B, 38.) E, 39.) D, 40.) E, 41.) A, 42.) A, 43.) E, 44.) C, 45.) A, 46.) D, 47.) B, 48.) C, 49.) E, 50.) C, and 51.) B

    2. Show HW packet (15% of 3rd marking period; ONLY HW assignment for the 3rd marking period; completed with annotations, process of elimination and essay writing process)

    3. Read and review exemplary essays for the prose passage essay, poetry essay and free-response essay.

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam through exemplary essay analysis? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 1st/THURSDAY, MAY 2ND/FRIDAY, MAY 3rd:
    50% of 3rd marking period:
  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1 (PROSE PASSAGE), essay #2 (POEM(s)) or essay #3 (FREE-RESPONSE)). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams, practice material given in class and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a PROJECT/PRESENTATION grade, about 50% of your 3rd marking period!
  • You will work in a group of three! See your chosen group members below and assigned section; #1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section on WEDNESDAY, May 1st; #5-7 will present essay question #1 (the prose passage) on Thursday, MAY 2nd; #8-9 will present essay question #2 (the poem(s)) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd; #10-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd: TBA
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Friday, April 26th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Fill out the AP English Exam booklets/bubble sheets.

    2. HW Reminders/Instructions

    How can students effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam through presentation preparation? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 29th (15% of 3rd marking period; ONLY HW assignment for the 3rd marking period):
  • Complete the full-length AP English Exam (set aside a full THREE HOURS to complete the exam).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 1st/THURSDAY, MAY 2ND/FRIDAY, MAY 3rd:
    50% of 3rd marking period:

  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1 (PROSE PASSAGE), essay #2 (POEM(s)) or essay #3 (FREE-RESPONSE)). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams, practice material given in class and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a PROJECT/PRESENTATION grade, about 50% of your 3rd marking period!
  • You will work in a group of three! See your chosen group members below and assigned section; #1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section on WEDNESDAY, May 1st; #5-7 will present essay question #1 (the prose passage) on Thursday, MAY 2nd; #8-9 will present essay question #2 (the poem(s)) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd; #10-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd: TBA
    1. Jennifer, Lesley, and Ghilary
    2. Aliaa, Sin Yi, and Saadman
    3. Motiur, Alex, and Jiyoung
    4. Martha, Sharon, and Justin S.
    5. Dhwanish, Aditya, and Anthony
    6. Eboni, Karl and Brandon M.
    7. Johnny, Tyler and Thomas
    8. Gurdarshan, Brian and Quintin
    9. Andre, and Jazmin
    10. Adam, Jerome and Kevin C.
    11. Adrian, Peter and Brandon D.

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Thursday, April 25th, 2013: 1. Do Now: In small discussion groups, finish presenting your notes and share specific, direct quotes (one quote per person) that show how the following free-response essay question prompts are relevant to The Kite Runner:
  • The journey as a major force in a work.
  • Transformation (literal and figurative).
  • How a minor character is used to develop a major character.
  • How time is a major factor.
  • Parent/child or sibling relationships and their significance.
  • The analysis of a villain with regard to the meaning of the work.

    Use sample essay scoring rubrics to examine if student presentations (in self-assessment) have the writing preparation and understanding of the text to write an effective essay on one of the essay question prompts.

    2. Introduce HW. Return The Kite Runner copies.

    3. Begin working on the AP English Exam booklets/bubble sheets.

  • How can students effectively prepare for the prose passage essay and free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 29th (15% of 3rd marking period; ONLY HW assignment for the 3rd marking period):
  • Complete the full-length AP English Exam (set aside a full THREE HOURS to complete the exam).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 1st/THURSDAY, MAY 2ND/FRIDAY, MAY 3rd:
    50% of 3rd marking period:

  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1 (POEM), essay #2 (PROSE PASSAGE) or essay #3 (FREE-RESPONSE)). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams, practice material given in class and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a PROJECT/PRESENTATION grade, about 50% of your 3rd marking period!
  • You will work in a group of three! See your chosen group members below and assigned section; #1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section on WEDNESDAY, May 1st; #5-7 will present essay question #1 (the prose passage) on Thursday, MAY 2nd; #8-9 will present essay question #2 (the poem(s)) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd; #10-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd: TBA
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.
    9.
    10.
    11.

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Wednesday, April 24th, 2013: 1. Do Now: In small discussion groups, present your notes and share specific, direct quotes (one quote per person) that show how the following free-response essay question prompts are relevant to The Kite Runner:
  • The journey as a major force in a work.
  • Transformation (literal and figurative).
  • How a minor character is used to develop a major character.
  • How time is a major factor.
  • Parent/child or sibling relationships and their significance.
  • The analysis of a villain with regard to the meaning of the work.

    Use sample essay scoring rubrics to examine if student presentations (in self-assessment) have the writing preparation and understanding of the text to write an effective essay on one of the essay question prompts.

    2. Introduce HW. Return The Kite Runner copies.

  • How can students effectively prepare for the prose passage essay and free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 1st/THURSDAY, MAY 2ND/FRIDAY, MAY 3rd:
    50% of 3rd marking period:
  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1 (POEM), essay #2 (PROSE PASSAGE) or essay #3 (FREE-RESPONSE)). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams, practice material given in class and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a PROJECT grade, about 50% of your 3rd marking period!
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section; #1-4 will present the multiple-choice question section on WEDNESDAY, May 1st; #5-7 will present essay question #1 (the poem(s)) on Thursday, MAY 2nd; #8-9 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd; #10-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on FRIDAY, MAY 3rd:
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.
    9.
    10.
    11.

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    Here's the list of all works read this year to guide you:

    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013 (Shakespeare's birthday!): 1. Do Now: In small discussion groups, present your notes and share specific, direct quotes (one quote per person) that show how the following free-response essay question prompts are relevant to The Kite Runner:
  • The journey as a major force in a work.
  • Transformation (literal and figurative).
  • How a minor character is used to develop a major character.
  • How time is a major factor.
  • Parent/child or sibling relationships and their significance.
  • The analysis of a villain with regard to the meaning of the work.

    2. Review The Kite Runner Quiz answers.

    3. Share your favorite things about William Shakespeare! Have cookies and juice in his honor!

  • How can students effectively prepare for the prose passage essay and free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? Please be ready to present your discussion material (from class) and return The Kite Runner tomorrow!

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Monday, April 22nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: For the prose passage essay on "The Dead" by James Joyce, examine teacher's notes and sample, exemplary body paragraphs.

    2. Look at a sample, exemplary prose passage essay in its entirety.

    3. Compose a chart of your strengths and areas needing improvement in prose passage essay writing.

    4. In small discussion groups, discuss, take notes (fill one page as a group) and identify specific, direct quotes (one quote per person) that show how the following free-response essay question prompts are relevant to The Kite Runner:

  • The journey as a major force in a work.
  • Transformation (literal and figurative).
  • How a minor character is used to develop a major character.
  • How time is a major factor.
  • Parent/child or sibling relationships and their significance.
  • The analysis of a villain with regard to the meaning of the work.
  • How can students effectively prepare for the prose passage essay and free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, APRIL 23rd (Shakespeare's Birthday!):
  • Finish today's classwork: In small discussion groups (3-4 people), discuss, take notes (fill one page as a group) and identify specific, direct quotes (one quote per person) that show how the following free-response essay question prompts are relevant to The Kite Runner:
  • The journey as a major force in a work.
  • Transformation (literal and figurative).
  • How a minor character is used to develop a major character.
  • How time is a major factor.
  • Parent/child or sibling relationships and their significance.
  • The analysis of a villain with regard to the meaning of the work.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Friday, April 19th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Kite Runner QUIZ (10 minutes)

    2. Work Period: For the prose passage essay on "The Dead" by James Joyce: Take 17 minutes to write three body paragraphs and one brief conclusion (1-2 sentences are acceptable).

    3. Look at sample, exemplary body paragraphs.

    4. Look at a sample, exemplary prose passage essay in its entirety.

    How can students effectively prepare for the prose passage essay on the AP English Literature Exam? FOR THOSE STUDENTS WHO USED SPARK NOTES FOR THE STUDY GUIDE (OR ANOTHER OUTSIDE RESOURCE), PLEASE REWRITE THE STUDY GUIDE (E-MAIL MS. CONN BY TOMORROW, SATURDAY, BY 8am) AND FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES:
    ANALYTICAL FOCUS: Flashback, Foreshadowing and Point of View
    THEMATIC FOCUS: The Influence of Guilt, Desire for Acceptance vs. Societal Expectations, and Self-Exploration

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Thursday, April 18th, 2013: 1. Do Now: For the prose passage essay on "The Dead" by James Joyce: Examine/Analyze exemplary annotations, underlining and preparations to write (underlining, circling and/or bracketing relevant words; outlining, etc.). Discuss how to categorize/organize and make sense of your annotations.

    2. Take 3 minutes to write your introduction.

    3. Look at sample, exemplary introductions.

    4. Take 17 minutes to write three body paragraphs and one brief conclusion (1-2 sentences or acceptable).

    5. Look at sample, exemplary body paragraphs.

    6. Look at a sample, exemplary prose passage essay in its entirety.

    How can students effectively prepare for the prose passage essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, APRIL 19th:
  • Read The Kite Runner.
  • Create your own study guide, following the analytical focus and thematic focus that we've been following (do not use outside resources; use your brain; take notes as you read!). PLEASE E-MAIL ME THE STUDY GUIDE: hconn@schools.nyc.gov (no later than 2pm tomorrow!).
  • Quiz on The Kite Runner. Details of what to study will include the following: characterization of Amir, Hassan, Baba, Rahim Khan, Ali, Sohrab, Soraya, Assef; the influence of sin, guilt and prejudice throughout the novel as a whole; relationships between the characters previously mentioned; major events in the plot (exposition, rising action, climax, and resolution), the influence/evidence of flashback, foreshadowing and point of view.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Wednesday, April 17th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • Discuss/Review and Take Notes on the rest of the Prose Essay Questions:
    1.) What is an AP Literature prose passage?
    2.) What is the purpose in writing an essay about a prose piece?
    3.) What are types of prose passage questions?
    4.) How should I time the essay?
    5.) How should I go about reading and analyzing the prose essay question prompt?
    6.) How should I go about reading and annotating the prose passage?
    7.) What should I write in the introduction paragraph?
    8.) What should I include in the body paragraphs of the prose passage essay?

    2. For the prose passage essay on "The Dead" by James Joyce: Begin the 1-3 minutes of reading and working the prompt and 15 minutes of reading, annotating and preparing to write (underlining, circling and/or bracketing relevant words; outlining, etc.).

  • How can students effectively prepare for the prose passage essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, APRIL 19th:
  • Read The Kite Runner.
  • Create your own study guide, following the analytical focus and thematic focus that we've been following (do not use outside resources; use your brain; take notes as you read!).
  • Quiz on The Kite Runner. Details of what to study will include the following: characterization of Amir, Hassan, Baba, Rahim Khan, Ali, Sohrab, Soraya, Assef; the influence of sin, guilt and prejudice throughout the novel as a whole; relationships between the characters previously mentioned; major events in the plot (exposition, rising action, climax, and resolution;, the influence/evidence of flashback, foreshadowing and point of view.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Tuesday, April 16th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • Discuss/Review the exemplary annotations of "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds (scroll down). How are your annotations similar and different? Make an old-fashioned Venn Diagram!
  • Discuss/Review the exemplary poetry essay on "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds (scroll down). How is your essay similar and different? Make an old-fashioned Venn Diagram!

    2. Review details to study in The Kite Runner: characterization of Amir, Hassan, Baba, Rahim Khan, Ali, Sohrab, Soraya, Assef, the influence of sin, guilt and prejudice throughout the novel as a whole, relationships between the characters previously mentioned, major events in the plot (exposition, rising action, climax, and resolution), and the influence/evidence of flashback, foreshadowing and point of view.

    3. Prose Essay Questions:
    1.) What is an AP Literature prose passage?
    2.) What is the purpose in writing an essay about a prose piece?
    3.) What are types of prose passage questions?
    4.) How should I time the essay?
    5.) How should I go about reading and analyzing the prose essay question prompt?
    6.) How should I go about reading and annotating the prose passage?
    7.) What should I write in the introduction paragraph?
    8.) What should I include in the body paragraphs of the prose passage essay?

  • How can students effectively prepare for the poetry essay and the prose passage essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, APRIL 19th:
  • Read The Kite Runner.
  • Create your own study guide, following the analytical focus and thematic focus that we've been following (do not use outside resources; use your brain; take notes as you read!).
  • Quiz on The Kite Runner. Details of what to study will include the following: characterization of Amir, Hassan, Baba, Rahim Khan, Ali, Sohrab, Soraya, Assef; the influence of sin, guilt and prejudice throughout the novel as a whole; relationships between the characters previously mentioned; major events in the plot (exposition, rising action, climax, and resolution;, the influence/evidence of flashback, foreshadowing and point of view.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Monday, April 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • Analyze the exemplary annotations of "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds (scroll down). How are your annotations similar and different? Make an old-fashioned Venn Diagram!
  • Analyze the exemplary poetry essay on "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds (scroll down). How is your essay similar and different? Make an old-fashioned Venn Diagram!
  • Show HW: annotations and essay. Also, show evidence of working the essay question prompt.

    2. Discuss Do Now/HW.

  • How can students effectively prepare for the poetry essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, APRIL 19th:
  • Read The Kite Runner.
  • Create your own study guide, following the analytical focus and thematic focus that we've been following (do not use outside resources; use your brain; take notes as you read!).
  • Quiz on The Kite Runner. Details of what to study will include the following: TBA

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Friday, April 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Check out The Kite Runner. Answer the following questions in class today
    1.) What is the purpose of the poetry essay?
    2.) What kinds of questions are asked for the poetry essay?
    3.) How should I plan to spend my time writing the poetry essay?
    4.) How should I go about reading the prompt?
    5.) What should I include in the opening paragraph?
    6.) What should I include in the body of the poetry essay?
    How can students effectively prepare for the poetry essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 15th:
  • Read "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds (scroll down). Essay Question: In "On the Subway," Sharon Olds brings two worlds into close proximity. Identify the contrasts that develop both portraits in the poem and discuss the insights the narrator comes to as a result of the experience. Refer to such literary techniques as tone, poetic devices, imagery and organization. Suggested time: 40 minutes. Annotate the poem with a purpose (the essay question). Hand-write only. Show evidence of working the essay question prompt.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, APRIL 19th:

  • Read The Kite Runner.
  • Create your own study guide, following the analytical focus and thematic focus that we've been following (do not use outside resources; use your brain; take notes as you read!).
  • Quiz on The Kite Runner. Details of what to study will include the following: TBA

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Thursday, April 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review the contents of The Awakening, based on the study guide.
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman

    2. Read/Share content of your AP-style Essay on The Awakening. Read excerpts from the introduction, body paragraphs and conclusion.

    3. Return The Awakening.

  • How can students effectively prepare for the free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Wednesday, April 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Discuss and take notes on the rest of the answers to the following questions (2-3 sentences per answer):
    1.) What is a free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam?
    2.) What is the purpose of the free-response essay?
    3.) What makes this essay "free"?
    4.) If this is total freedom of expression, how can I ever get less than a perfect score (9 is a perfect score on the essay)?
    5.) What are the pitfalls of the free-response essay?
    6.) What kinds of works may I refer to in this essay?
    7.) Must I use the lists of works provided at the bottom of the prompt?
    8.) Must I use works read this year?
    9.) How do I prepare for the free-response essay?
    10.)What criteria do the AP readers use to rate a free-response essay?
    11.) What happens if I use a work that the reader doesn't know?
    12.) How should I plan and time the free-response essay?
    13.) What should be addressed in the opening paragraph?
    14.) What should I include in the body of the free-response essay?

    2. Examine an exemplary AP-style Essay on The Awakening. Discuss, compare and contrast to your essay.

    3. Review the answers to The Awakening Quiz.

    How can students effectively prepare for the free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? Return The Awakening tomorrow.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Tuesday, April 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Discuss and take notes on the answers to the following questions (2-3 sentences per answer):
    1.) What is a free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam?
    2.) What is the purpose of the free-response essay?
    3.) What makes this essay "free"?
    4.) If this is total freedom of expression, how can I ever get less than a perfect score (9 is a perfect score on the essay)?
    5.) What are the pitfalls of the free-response essay?
    6.) What kinds of works may I refer to in this essay?
    7.) Must I use the lists of works provided at the bottom of the prompt?
    8.) Must I use works read this year?
    9.) How do I prepare for the free-response essay?
    10.)What criteria do the AP readers use to rate a free-response essay?
    11.) What happens if I use a work that the reader doesn't know?
    12.) How should I plan and time the free-response essay?
    13.) What should be addressed in the opening paragraph?
    14.) What should I include in the body of the free-response essay?

    2. Examine an exemplary AP-style Essay on The Awakening. Discuss, compare and contrast to your essay (show your essay).

    How can students effectively prepare for the free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Monday, April 8th, 2013 (Holocaust Remembrance Day): 1. Do Now: Short Multiple-Choice Question Quiz and AP-style Essay on The Awakening

    2. HW Reminders

    3. Holocaust Remembrance Day reminder

    How can students effectively prepare for the free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, APRIL 9th:
  • Finish today's in-class free-response essay on The Awakening.

    DUE THIS AFTERNOON (no later than 5pm, unless you have a legitimate excuse; otherwise, it will be late/half credit):
    E-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) Friday's classwork:
    Answer the following questions (2-3 sentences per question; you may do your own research, discuss with classmates, and use prior knowledge):
    1.) What is a free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam?
    2.) What is the purpose of the free-response essay?
    3.) What makes this essay "free"?
    4.) If this is total freedom of expression, how can I ever get less than a perfect score (9 is a perfect score on the essay)?
    5.) What are the pitfalls of the free-response essay?
    6.) What kinds of works may I refer to in this essay?
    7.) Must I use the lists of works provided at the bottom of the prompt?
    8.) Must I use works read this year?
    9.) How do I prepare for the free-response essay?
    10.)What criteria do the AP readers use to rate a free-response essay?
    11.) What happens if I use a work that the reader doesn't know?
    12.) How should I plan and time the free-response essay?
    13.) What should be addressed in the opening paragraph?
    14.) What should I include in the body of the free-response essay?

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Friday, April 5th, 2013: Work Period: Answer the following questions (2-3 sentences per question; you may do your own research, discuss with classmates, and use prior knowledge):
    1.) What is a free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam?
    2.) What is the purpose of the free-response essay?
    3.) What makes this essay "free"?
    4.) If this is total freedom of expression, how can I ever get less than a perfect score (9 is a perfect score on the essay)?
    5.) What are the pitfalls of the free-response essay?
    6.) What kinds of works may I refer to in this essay?
    7.) Must I use the lists of works provided at the bottom of the prompt?
    8.) Must I use works read this year?
    9.) How do I prepare for the free-response essay?
    10.)What criteria do the AP readers use to rate a free-response essay?
    11.) What happens if I use a work that the reader doesn't know?
    12.) How should I plan and time the free-response essay?
    13.) What should be addressed in the opening paragraph?
    14.) What should I include in the body of the free-response essay?
    How can students effectively prepare for the free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 8th:
  • QUIZ on The Awakening (refer to the study guide for your preparation)
  • Work Period questions (see today's classwork; bring in hard copy; do not e-mail)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Thursday, April 4th, 2013: Work Period: Answer the following questions (2-3 sentences per question; you may do your own research, discuss with classmates, and use prior knowledge):
    1.) What is a free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam?
    2.) What is the purpose of the free-response essay?
    3.) What makes this essay "free"?
    4.) If this is total freedom of expression, how can I ever get less than a perfect score (9 is a perfect score on the essay)?
    5.) What are the pitfalls of the free-response essay?
    6.) What kinds of works may I refer to in this essay?
    7.) Must I use the lists of works provided at the bottom of the prompt?
    8.) Must I use works read this year?
    9.) How do I prepare for the free-response essay?
    10.)What criteria do the AP readers use to rate a free-response essay?
    11.) What happens if I use a work that the reader doesn't know?
    12.) How should I plan and time the free-response essay?
    13.) What should be addressed in the opening paragraph?
    14.) What should I include in the body of the free-response essay?
    How can students effectively prepare for the free-response essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE TODAY, THURSDAY, APRIL 4th:
  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class).
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose for each throughout the entirety of the novella (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Expect a quiz on the novella on Monday.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 8th:

  • QUIZ on The Awakening (see above for what to expect on the quiz).
  • Work Period questions (see today's classwork)

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    Show the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now (HW).

    3. Based on the HW due tomorrow on the novella, The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class). What is most compelling? What literary devices contributed most to the meaning of the literary work as a whole? What is the novella saying about the human experience, motivation or condition? What ideas does the author want you, the readers, to take away with? Refer to the following HW due tomorrow:

  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose for each throughout the entirety of the novella (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • How can students effectively analyze similarities between time periods, genres, themes, and authors in comparing the works of literature studied this year in AP English? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, APRIL 4th:
  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class).
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose for each throughout the entirety of the novella (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Expect a quiz on the novella.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Friday, March 22nd, 2013: Work Period:
    Work on any of the following HW assignments:
  • Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class).
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose for each throughout the entirety of the novella (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • How can students effectively analyze similarities between time periods, genres, themes, and authors in comparing the works of literature studied this year in AP English? DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3rd:
    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Identify a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    DUE THURSDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class).
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose for each throughout the entirety of the novella (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Expect a quiz on the novella.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Thursday, March 21st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review the answers to the quiz on The Metamorphosis

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Share how the themes of alienation, societal expectations and self-determination were revealed in The Metamorphosis. Share your analysis of point of view, imagery, diction, and tone (explain why each of these literary terms are important to the novella as a whole--think in terms of author's purpose).

    3. Distribution of The Awakening by Kate Chopin. Learn about the HW.

    How can students effectively analyze similarities between time periods, genres, themes, and authors in comparing the works of literature studied this year in AP English? DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3rd:
    Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Begin to determine a minimum of 5 similarities between authors' lives, a minimum of 5 similarities between themes from the literary works, a minimum of 5 similarities between genres of the literary works and a minimum of 5 similarities between each of the following time periods in literature: 1600's, 1700's 1800's, 1900's, and 2000's.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    DUE THURSDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class).
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose for each throughout the entirety of the novella (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Expect a quiz on the novella.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Wednesday, March 20th, 2013: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on The Metamorphosis

    2. Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Begin to determine similarities between their lives, themes, genres and time periods in literature.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    3. What were some surprises/epiphanies discovered in the analysis of time periods, genres, authors, and themes in the literature that we've studied this year, thus far? Discuss and share. Focus on The Metamorphosis.

    4. Share how the themes of alienation, societal expectations and self-determination were revealed in The Metamorphosis. Share your analysis of point of view, imagery, diction, and tone (explain why each of these literary terms are important to the novella as a whole--think in terms of author's purpose).

    5. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively analyze similarities between time periods, genres, themes, and authors in comparing the works of literature studied this year in AP English? PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Tuesday, March 19th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish the list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Begin to determine similarities between their lives, themes, genres and time periods in literature.
    1.) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (429 B.C.E.)
    2.) Hamlet by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    3.) Othello by Shakespeare (c. 1603)
    4.) As You Like It by Shakespeare (c. 1600)
    5.) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (1879)
    6. Poetry Selections: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Victorian poet (1809-1892) (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts, (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts, (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn, (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake, English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts, (pp. 779-781).
    7.) A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (1729)
    8.) Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder (1991; study of philosophers from 320 B.C.E.-1800's C.E.)
    9.) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)
    10.) Independent Reading Selection: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891) OR 1984 by George Orwell (1949)
    11.) Independent Reading Selection: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962) OR All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)
    12.) The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915)
    13.) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
    14.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)

    2. Brainstorm/Discuss the meanings of alienation, societal expectations and self-determination, which will help you with the study guide for The Metamorphosis.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively display sophisticated discussion techniques when analyzing AP English Literature? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20th:
    Read Kafka's novella, The Metamorphosis (text will be provided in class or you can read it online HERE). Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following (from the syllabus):
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: alienation, societal expectations and self-determination
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Metamorphosis, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Be prepared to have a quiz (10% of your 2nd term grade) on the novella. You should expect to answer the questions on the following: Gregor's characterization (especially pre-transformation and post-transformation), the characterization of Gregor's sister and parents, the author's tone, shift(s) in the novel, and Kafka's life influences on his novella.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page
  • Use this College Board Resource for the AP English Literature Exam (OLD exams)
  • Monday, March 18th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Discuss Franz Kafka's life.

    2. Discuss the AP Grading Rubric categories in which you identified as your weaknesses and strengths.

    3. Make a list of all of the authors/poets read this year, thus far. Begin to determine similarities between their lives and themes in literature.

    4. If time allows, brainstorm/Discuss the meanings of alienation, societal expectations and self-determination, which will help you with the study guide for The Metamorphosis.

    How can students effectively display sophisticated discussion techniques when analyzing AP English Literature? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20th:
    Read Kafka's novella, The Metamorphosis (text will be provided in class or you can read it online HERE). Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following (from the syllabus):
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: alienation, societal expectations and self-determination
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Metamorphosis, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Be prepared to have a quiz (10% of your 2nd term grade) on the novella. You should expect to answer the questions on the following: Gregor's characterization (especially pre-transformation and post-transformation), the characterization of Gregor's sister and parents, the author's tone, shift(s) in the novel, and Kafka's life influences on his novella.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

  • Thursday, March 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review HW. Check out Kafka's The Metamorphosis. Return any owed books. Begin reading Franz Kafka's life and the novella.

    2. Show HW: edits of Sophie's World PAPER (see their e-mails) and the original paper, along with the AP Grading Rubric categories in which you identified as your weaknesses and strengths.

    3. Work Period: Work on reading and taking notes for The Metamorphosis Study Guide. Brainstorm the meanings of alienation, societal expectations and self-determination.

    4. If time allows, discuss the meanings of alienation, societal expectations and self-determination.

    How can students effectively display sophisticated discussion techniques when analyzing AP English Literature? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20th:
    Read Kafka's novella, The Metamorphosis (text will be provided in class or you can read it online HERE). Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following (from the syllabus):
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: alienation, societal expectations and self-determination
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Metamorphosis, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Be prepared to have a quiz (10% of your 2nd term grade) on the novella. You should expect to answer the questions on the following: Gregor's characterization (especially pre-transformation and post-transformation), the characterization of Gregor's sister and parents, the author's tone, shift(s) in the novel, and Kafka's life influences on his novella.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

  • Wednesday, March 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now: The remaining book group will discuss based on the independent novels, and finish sharing with the class.
    Book Discussion Questions:
    1.) Did you feel that the book fulfilled your expectations? Were you satisfied or disappointed with the book as a whole? Explain.
    2.) How did the books compare to other books by the author or other books in the same genre or time period?
    3.) What are some of the book’s themes? How important were they?
    4.) How are the book’s images symbolically significant in the book as a whole? Do the images help to develop the plot or help to define the characters?
    5.) How did the author’s tone and point of view influence the book as a whole?
    6.) What were some captivating characters, events or other details that you will remember in the future?

    Each group will spend about 6 minutes discussing/sharing each question.

    2. Introduce HW. Check out Kafka's The Metamorphosis. Return any owed books. Begin reading Franz Kafka's life and the novella.

    3. Show HW: edits of Sophie's World PAPER (see their e-mails) and the original paper, along with the AP Grading Rubric categories in which you identified as your weaknesses and strengths.

    How can students effectively display sophisticated discussion techniques when analyzing AP English Literature? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20th:
    Read Kafka's novella, The Metamorphosis (text will be provided in class). Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following (from the syllabus):
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: alienation, societal expectations and self-determination
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Metamorphosis, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Be prepared to have a quiz (10% of your 2nd term grade) on the novella. You should expect to answer the questions on the following: Gregor's characterization (especially pre-transformation and post-transformation), the characterization of Gregor's sister and parents, the author's tone, shift(s) in the novel, and Kafka's life influences on his novella.

    PLEASE CONTINUE TO INDEPENDENTLY PREPARE FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM.

    FOR AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY, USE THIS HELPFUL AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

  • Tuesday, March 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Get into book groups based on your independent novels, and finish sharing with the class.
    Book Discussion Questions:
    1.) Did you feel that the book fulfilled your expectations? Were you satisfied or disappointed with the book as a whole? Explain.
    2.) How did the books compare to other books by the author or other books in the same genre or time period?
    3.) What are some of the book’s themes? How important were they?
    4.) How are the book’s images symbolically significant in the book as a whole? Do the images help to develop the plot or help to define the characters?
    5.) How did the author’s tone and point of view influence the book as a whole?
    6.) What were some captivating characters, events or other details that you will remember in the future?

    Each group will spend about 6 minutes discussing/sharing each question.

    2. Show HW: edits of Sophie's World PAPER and the original paper, along with the AP Grading Rubric categories in which you identified as your weaknesses and strengths.

    3. Book returns.

    4. If time allows, introduce Franz Kafka's life.

    How can students effectively display sophisticated discussion techniques when analyzing AP English Literature? PLEASE E-MAIL REVISIONS OF THE SOPHIE'S WORLD PAPER TO MS. CONN THIS AFTERNOON/EVENING.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20th:
    Read Kafka's novella, The Metamorphosis (text will be provided in class). Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following (from the syllabus):

  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: alienation, societal expectations and self-determination
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Metamorphosis, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Be prepared to have a quiz (10% of your 2nd term grade) on the novella. You should expect to answer the questions on the following: Gregor's characterization (especially pre-transformation and post-transformation), the characterization of Gregor's sister and parents, the author's tone, shift(s) in the novel, and Kafka's life influences on his novella.

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    Stay tuned for more HW details to come!

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Monday, March 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Get into book groups based on your independent novels, and share with the class.
    Book Discussion Questions:
    1.) Did you feel that the book fulfilled your expectations? Were you satisfied or disappointed with the book as a whole? Explain.
    2.) How did the books compare to other books by the author or other books in the same genre or time period?
    3.) What are some of the book’s themes? How important were they?
    4.) How are the book’s images symbolically significant in the book as a whole? Do the images help to develop the plot or help to define the characters?
    5.) How did the author’s tone and point of view influence the book as a whole?
    6.) What were some captivating characters, events or other details that you will remember in the future?

    Each group will spend about 6 minutes discussing/sharing each question.

    Paper returns on Sophie's World. 2. HW introduced and book returns.

    How can students effectively display sophisticated discussion techniques when analyzing AP English Literature? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 12TH:
  • Edit your Sophie's World papers. Bring in the original and edited version tomorrow. You may show the edited version in an electronic format.
  • Go through the AP Grading Rubric and identify which categories you lost points.

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    Stay tuned for more HW details to come!

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Friday, March 8th, 2013: Work Period: Get into book groups based on your independent novels.
    Book Discussion Questions:
    1.) Did you feel that the book fulfilled your expectations? Were you satisfied or disappointed with the book as a whole? Explain.
    2.) How did the books compare to other books by the author or other books in the same genre or time period?
    3.) What are some of the book’s themes? How important were they?
    4.) How are the book’s images symbolically significant in the book as a whole? Do the images help to develop the plot or help to define the characters?
    5.) How did the author’s tone and point of view influence the book as a whole?
    6.) What were some captivating characters, events or other details that you will remember in the future?

    Be ready to share on Monday. Each group will spend about 6 minutes discussing/sharing each question.

    How can students effectively display sophisticated discussion techniques when analyzing AP English Literature? DUE THIS MONDAY, MARCH 11TH:
  • Be ready to share book discussion questions--1 minute per question for each group.
  • Return books.

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    Stay tuned for more HW details to come!

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Thursday, March 7th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Continue review of the answers to the sample questions from the multiple-choice questions on the AP English Literature Exam.

    2. Take notes on the Do Now. Discuss/Analyze as needed.

    3. Work Period: Get into book groups based on your independent novels.
    Book Discussion Questions:
    1.) Did you feel that the book fulfilled your expectations? Were you satisfied or disappointed with the book as a whole? Explain.
    2.) How did the books compare to other books by the author or other books in the same genre or time period?
    3.) What are some of the book’s themes? How important were they?
    4.) How are the book’s images symbolically significant in the book as a whole? Do the images help to develop the plot or help to define the characters?
    5.) How did the author’s tone and point of view influence the book as a whole?
    6.) What were some captivating characters, events or other details that you will remember in the future?

    How can students effectively understand the multiple-choice questions in the AP English Literature Exam?

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    Stay tuned for more HW details to come!

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Wednesday, March 6th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Continue review of the answers to the sample questions from the multiple-choice questions on the AP English Literature Exam.

    2. Take notes on the Do Now. Discuss/Analyze as needed.

    How can students effectively understand the multiple-choice questions in the AP English Literature Exam?

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    PLEASE NOTE THE DATE CHANGE: DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 7th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Tuesday, March 5th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Continue review of the answers to the sample questions from the multiple-choice questions on the AP English Literature Exam.

    2. Take notes on the Do Now. Discuss/Analyze as needed.

    How can students effectively understand the multiple-choice questions in the AP English Literature Exam?

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    PLEASE NOTE THE DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 7th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Monday, March 4th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Review the answers to the sample questions from the multiple-choice questions on the AP English Literature Exam.

    2. Take notes on the Do Now. Discuss/Analyze as needed.

    How can students effectively understand the multiple-choice questions in the AP English Literature Exam?

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    PLEASE NOTE THE DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 7th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Friday, March 1st, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Finish identifying the question types in each of the questions in the Sample Questions for the AP English Literature and Composition Exam. Use the Do Now to guide you. When you're finished, read your independent novels.

    Show HW: the correct answers (1-3 sentences supporting each answer). This is the value of a quiz.

    2. Review the answers to the sample questions from the multiple-choice questions on the AP English Literature Exam.

    How can students effectively understand the multiple-choice question types in the AP English Literature Exam?

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    PLEASE NOTE THE DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT THURSDAY, MARCH 7th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Thursday, February 28th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Discuss/Review the question types in the Multiple-Choice Question Stems. You may highlight or write in the margins the types of questions.

    2. Work Period: Work on identifying the question types in each of the questions in the Sample Questions for the AP English Literature and Composition Exam. Use the Do Now to guide you.

    How can students effectively understand the multiple-choice question types in the AP English Literature Exam? NEW DUE DATE=TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 1st:
  • Using the correct answers (below), write 1-3 sentences for each answer, explaining why the answer is correct (you may need to refer to the passage and specific lines). THIS IS THE VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE FOR THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD (10% of your grade). Here are the correct answers:
    1.) E, 2.) B, 3.) A, 4.) D, 5.) E, 6.) C 7.) B, 8.) B, 9.) A, 10.) D, 11.) E, 12.) D, 13.) E, 14.) C, 15.) E, 16.) D, 17.) B, 18.) C, 19.) A, 20.) B, 21.) E, 22.) D, 23.) E, 24.) C, 25.) D, 26.) C, 27.) A, 28.) A, 29.) B, 30.) A, 31.) B, 32.) E, 33.) C, 34.) B, 35.) A, 36.) C, 37.) D, 38.) C, 39.) E, 40.) A, 41.) B, 42.) D, 43.) E, 44.) B, 45.) C, 46.) A

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Wednesday, February 27th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Identify question types in the Multiple-Choice Question Stems. You may highlight or write in the margins the types of questions.

    2. Work Period: Work on identifying the question types in each of the questions in the Sample Questions for the AP English Literature and Composition Exam.

    How can students effectively understand the multiple-choice question types in the AP English Literature Exam? NEW DUE DATE=FRIDAY, MARCH 1st:
  • Using the correct answers (below), write 1-3 sentences for each answer, explaining why the answer is correct (you may need to refer to the passage and specific lines). THIS IS THE VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE FOR THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD (10% of your grade). Here are the correct answers:
    1.) E, 2.) B, 3.) A, 4.) D, 5.) E, 6.) C 7.) B, 8.) B, 9.) A, 10.) D, 11.) E, 12.) D, 13.) E, 14.) C, 15.) E, 16.) D, 17.) B, 18.) C, 19.) A, 20.) B, 21.) E, 22.) D, 23.) E, 24.) C, 25.) D, 26.) C, 27.) A, 28.) A, 29.) B, 30.) A, 31.) B, 32.) E, 33.) C, 34.) B, 35.) A, 36.) C, 37.) D, 38.) C, 39.) E, 40.) A, 41.) B, 42.) D, 43.) E, 44.) B, 45.) C, 46.) A

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Tuesday, February 26th, 2013: 1. DO NOW:
  • Review the answers to The Importance of Being Earnest quiz.
  • Discuss the discrepancies in the HW and adjust the HW, if necessary.

    2. Work Period:

  • Work on adjusting the HW.
  • Read your independent novel and take notes as you read, preparing for the study guide.
  • How can students effectively practice the multiple-choice questions section of the AP English Literature Exam? NEW DUE DATE=FRIDAY, MARCH 1st:
  • Using the correct answers (below), write 1-3 sentences for each answer, explaining why the answer is correct (you may need to refer to the passage and specific lines). THIS IS THE VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE FOR THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD (10% of your grade). Here are the correct answers:
    1.) E, 2.) B, 3.) A, 4.) D, 5.) E, 6.) C 7.) B, 8.) B, 9.) A, 10.) D, 11.) E, 12.) D, 13.) E, 14.) C, 15.) E, 16.) D, 17.) B, 18.) C, 19.) A, 20.) B, 21.) E, 22.) D, 23.) E, 24.) C, 25.) D, 26.) C, 27.) A, 28.) A, 29.) B, 30.) A, 31.) B, 32.) E, 33.) C, 34.) B, 35.) A, 36.) C, 37.) D, 38.) C, 39.) E, 40.) A, 41.) B, 42.) D, 43.) E, 44.) B, 45.) C, 46.) A

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Monday, February 25th, 2013: Work Period:
  • Work on the HW due tomorrow.
  • Read your independent novel and take notes as you read, preparing for the study guide.
  • How can students effectively practice the multiple-choice questions section of the AP English Literature Exam? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26th:
  • Using the correct answers (below), write 1-3 sentences for each answer, explaining why the answer is correct (you may need to refer to the passage and specific lines). THIS IS THE VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE FOR THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD (10% of your grade). Here are the correct answers:
    1.) D, 2.) E, 3.) C, 4.) B, 5.) A, 6.) B, 7.) A, 8.) A, 9.) D, 10.) E, 11.) B, 12.) E, 13.) D, 14.) D, 15.) E, 16.) C, 17.) B, 18.) C, 19.) A, 20.) A, 21.) A, 22.) D, 23.) A, 24.) D, 25.) C, 26.) B, 27.) E, 28.) E, 29.) B, 30.) E, 31.) B, 32.) C, 33.) B, 34.) D, 35.) A, 36.) E, 37.) B, 38.) E, 39.) B, 40.) C, 41.) A, 42.) A, 43.) B, 44.) C, 45.) A, 46.) B

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Friday, February 22nd, 2013: Work Period: Finish the multiple-choice questions from the AP multiple-choice questions packet. How can students effectively practice the multiple-choice questions section of the AP English Literature Exam? DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26th:
  • Using the correct answers (below), write 1-3 sentences for each answer, explaining why the answer is correct (you may need to refer to the passage and specific lines). THIS IS THE VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE FOR THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD (10% of your grade). Here are the correct answers:
    1.) D, 2.) E, 3.) C, 4.) B, 5.) A, 6.) B, 7.) A, 8.) A, 9.) D, 10.) E, 11.) B, 12.) E, 13.) D, 14.) D, 15.) E, 16.) C, 17.) B, 18.) C, 19.) A, 20.) A, 21.) A, 22.) D, 23.) A, 24.) D, 25.) C, 26.) B, 27.) E, 28.) E, 29.) B, 30.) E, 31.) B, 32.) C, 33.) B, 34.) D, 35.) A, 36.) E, 37.) B, 38.) E, 39.) B, 40.) C, 41.) A, 42.) A, 43.) B, 44.) C, 45.) A, 46.) B

    CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Thursday, February 21st, 2013: 1. Do Now: In your table groups, finish sharing the different essay question prompts (prose essay question, poetry essay question, and open-ended essay question), taken from the AP English Teacher's Resource Page. What do these essay prompts have in common? Analyze similarities between essay prompts over the years. How do we attack these essays?

    2. Review the timing breakdown for the poetry and prose essays.

    3. If time allows, begin the first passage & multiple-choice questions from the AP multiple-choice questions packet.

    How can students effectively understand the components of the AP essays? CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Wednesday, February 20th, 2013: 1. Do Now: In small groups, look at this AP English Teacher's Resource Page What do these essay prompts have in common? Analyze similarities between essay prompts over the years. How do we attack these essays?

    2. Be ready to share your Do Now with the rest of the class. Take notes.

    3. Review the timing breakdown for the poetry and prose essays.

    How can students effectively understand the components of the AP essays? CHECK OUT THIS AP English Teacher's Resource Page!

    DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Friday, February 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now: With your table mates, write a summary of the play, "The Importance of Being Earnest." The summary must contain exactly fifty words, not one more nor one less. THIS IS THE LENGTH OF PLOT SUMMARY ALLOWED ON EACH OF THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE ESSAYS (no more, though less is encouraged).

    2. Be ready to share your Do Now.

    3. Discussion/Analysis of "The Importance of Being Earnest" in terms of Wilde's satire on three major topics: A.) romantic conventions, B.) social obligations and C.) Victorian Era etiquette. The subtopics are the following: 1.) marriage, 2.) public appearances, 3.) deception, 4.) parental approval/consent, 5.) income and assets, 6.) family background, 7.) knowledge and information, 8.) banter/conversation, 9.) courtship, 10.) gender roles, 11.) fashion, 12.) food, and 13.) social engagements/parties

    How can students effectively be assessed on Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes, romantic conventions (standards/expectations), courtship, and social obligations? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Thursday, February 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Tape your multiple-choice questions on chart paper in the order of the question #s. Reflections: what were the challenges and benefits of composing AP-style multiple-choice questions for "The Importance of Being Earnest"?

    2. Write which independent novels you will be reading. Check out any books that you will read.

    3. Reflections on the Study Guide

    4. Discussion/Analysis of "The Importance of Being Earnest" in terms of Wilde's satire on romantic conventions, social obligations and Victorian Era etiquette.

    5. "Sonnet 18"

    How can students effectively be assessed on Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes, romantic conventions (standards/expectations), courtship, and social obligations? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

    Wednesday, February 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest." Turn in the Study Guide.

    2. Work Period: Using sample AP English Literature multiple-choice questions, students will compose their own multiple-choice questions for "The Importance of Being Earnest." Each student will compose three or four questions that have five answer choices for each question. Make sure to use similar, sophisticated vocabulary and literary language. Each student will identify which question # corresponds with each of their questions.

    3. Reflections on the Study Guide

    4. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively be assessed on Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes, romantic conventions (standards/expectations), courtship, and social obligations? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14th:
  • Finish today's classwork: Using sample AP English Literature multiple-choice questions, students will compose their own multiple-choice questions for "The Importance of Being Earnest." Each student will compose three or four questions that have five answer choices for each question. Make sure to use similar, sophisticated vocabulary and literary language. Each student will identify which question # corresponds with each of their questions.

  • Decide which two novels you will read below (check out any books you'd like in class tomorrow).

    DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 8th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For The Picture of Dorian Gray (class copy available) (Wilde)=Analytical Focus: imagery, tone, and foreshadowing and Thematic Focus: societal expectations, morality, art for art's sake, and deception; For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality; For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war; For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (class copy available) (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation.

    WE WILL BE ENGAGING IN AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM STUDY (expect homework!) DURING THE WEEKS THAT YOU WILL BE READING YOUR CHOSEN NOVELS.

  • Tuesday, February 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Groups discuss, compare/contrast Victorian Era to modern times, and provide evidence from the text of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest". Each group should speak for 2-3 minutes total (with 2 pages of notes per group; about a paragraph per person). Expect question and answer period for each topic below:
  • Group #1: The confines of marriage and class structure
  • Group #2: The burdens of courtship
  • Group #3: Romantic etiquette between men and women
  • Group #4: How manners dictate people's daily lives
  • Group #5: Adherence to conventions of society
  • Group #6: Social appearances and double lives (see Jack and his country life as Jack and city life as Ernest and Algernon's invention of his invalid friend named Bunbury who he can visit to avoid social obligations)
  • Group #7: Deception and wearing masks
  • Group #8: Rebellion against conventions

    2. Reflections/HW Reminders

  • How can students effectively prepare to read Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes and personal connections to romantic conventions (standards/expectations), courtship, and social obligations? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th:
  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest (text is also provided in class).
  • Quiz (10% of 2nd marking period): study the notes/ideas presented in class and how they relate to the play.
  • Writing assignment (10% of 2nd marking period): Study Guide (TWO pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font). The Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. The Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Identify examples of each of these literary terms and themes above. Also explain the author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole).
  • Monday, February 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read the following scenarios and discuss the questions that follow:
  • You’ve said you won’t date anyone shorter than you, and here is Taylor—a whole five inches shorter. Taylor is everything else you’ve ever said you wanted. Taylor has the looks, the same interests, and a great personality. You laugh at the same things and get angry at the same things. You love to be around Taylor. You hang out at school and talk on the phone. Then, Taylor suggests that you go to the prom, but you give an excuse. You can tell that Taylor is hurt by your refusal. What kind of person are you to ignore all of Taylor’s other qualities and focus on that five-inch difference in height? Why is that five-inch difference so important? Should it be?
  • You attended a summer dance camp, had a wonderful time, and met Meredith. For the whole month, you two were inseparable. You’d never met anyone you could talk to so easily. You opened up and told Meredith about your family, about school, and about everything. You promised to write, and then you came home. Now, unexpectedly, here is Meredith at your school. Your stomach does that sinking thing. Meredith doesn’t fit in with your group of friends or with your family. Already your friends are making snide remarks about the newcomer. Your mother wants to know who is on the phone. What are you going to do?
  • There’s a party Saturday night. It’s at your best friend’s house, and he is counting on you. You promised to be there. However, Saturday afternoon you’re going into town and picking up the special equipment you ordered for your hobby, and you know you’re going to want to assemble it and see if it works right away. That means you won’t make it to the party. You’re clear on that, but you’re not so clear on how to get out of this social obligation. What do you do?

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Finish discussing last week's questions/preparation for Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest."
    A.) What are romantic conventions today?
    B.) What would be your steps to obtain a romantic relationship?
    C.) Describe modern-day courtship.
    D.) What are the burdens of courtship?
    E.) What are today's conventions regarding marriage? To clarify, how does a man or woman get married? What does he or she need to do in a romantic relationship to lead to marriage? What are the drawbacks in marriage? Think about what a satirist would ridicule about the institution of marriage.
    F.) What are the the burdens of etiquette (proper manners)?

    3. Analyze, predict and take notes on Wilde's satire of the confines of marriage, class structure, manners dictating their daily lives (even despite poor health), romantic etiquette between men and women, and double lives (see Jack and his country life as Jack and city life as Ernest and Algernon's invention of his invalid friend named Bunbury who he can visit to avoid social obligations). Also, analyze and take notes on evidence of adherence to conventions, how we all wear masks (we are all deceivers!), and rebellion against conventions.

    4. HW Reminders

  • How can students effectively prepare to read Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes and personal connections to romantic conventions (standards/expectations), courtship, and social obligations? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12th:
    Be ready to discuss, compare/contrast Victorian Era to modern times, and provide evidence from the text of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest". Each group should speak for 2-3 minutes total (with 2 pages of notes per group; about a paragraph per person). Expect question and answer period for each topic below:
  • Group #1: The confines of marriage and class structure
  • Group #2: The burdens of courtship
  • Group #3: Romantic etiquette between men and women
  • Group #4: How manners dictate people's daily lives
  • Group #5: Adherence to conventions of society
  • Group #6: Social appearances and double lives (see Jack and his country life as Jack and city life as Ernest and Algernon's invention of his invalid friend named Bunbury who he can visit to avoid social obligations)
  • Group #7: Deception and wearing masks
  • Group #8: Rebellion against conventions

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th:

  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest (text is also provided in class).
  • Quiz (10% of 2nd marking period): study the notes/ideas presented in class and how they relate to the play.
  • Writing assignment (10% of 2nd marking period): Study Guide (TWO pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font). The Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. The Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Identify examples of each of these literary terms and themes above. Also explain the author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole).
  • Friday, February 8th, 2013: Work Period: Read the following scenarios and answer the questions that follow:
  • You’ve said you won’t date anyone shorter than you, and here is Taylor—a whole five inches shorter. Taylor is everything else you’ve ever said you wanted. Taylor has the looks, the same interests, and a great personality. You laugh at the same things and get angry at the same things. You love to be around Taylor. You hang out at school and talk on the phone. Then, Taylor suggests that you go to the prom, but you give an excuse. You can tell that Taylor is hurt by your refusal. What kind of person are you to ignore all of Taylor’s other qualities and focus on that five-inch difference in height? Why is that five-inch difference so important? Should it be?
  • You attended a summer dance camp, had a wonderful time, and met Meredith. For the whole month, you two were inseparable. You’d never met anyone you could talk to so easily. You opened up and told Meredith about your family, about school, and about everything. You promised to write, came home. Now, unexpectedly, here is Meredith at your school. Your stomach does that sinking thing. Meredith doesn’t fit in with your group of friends or with your family. Already your friends are making snide remarks about the newcomer. Your mother wants to know who is on the phone. What are you going to do? Avoiding social or family responsibilities
  • There’s a party Saturday night. It’s at your best friend’s house, and he is counting on you. You promised to be there. However, Saturday afternoon you’re going into town and picking up the special equipment you ordered for your hobby, and you know you’re going to want to assemble it and see if it works right away. That means you won’t make it to the party. You’re clear on that, but you’re not so clear on how to get out of this social obligation. What do you do?
  • How can students effectively prepare to read Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes and personal connections to romantic conventions (standards/expectations), courtship, and social obligations? DUE THIS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • Be ready to discuss the scenarios and questions from class today (Friday, February 8th) and yesterday (Thursday, February 7th).

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th:

  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest (text is also provided in class).
  • Quiz (10% of 2nd marking period): study the notes/ideas presented in class and how they relate to the play.
  • Writing assignment (10% of 2nd marking period): Study Guide (TWO pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font). The Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. The Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Identify examples of each of these literary terms and themes above. Also explain the author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole).
  • Thursday, February 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    A.) What are romantic conventions today?
    B.) What would be your steps to obtain a romantic relationship?
    C.) Describe modern-day courtship.
    D.) What are the burdens of courtship?
    E.) What are today's conventions regarding marriage? To clarify, how does a man or woman get married? What does he or she need to do in a romantic relationship to lead to marriage? What are the drawbacks in marriage? Think about what a satirist would ridicule about the institution of marriage.
    F.) What are the the burdens of etiquette (proper manners)?

    2. Distribution of copies of The Importance of Being Earnest.

    3. Discuss/Share answers to the Do Now questions.

    4. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to read Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes and personal connections to romantic conventions (standards/expectations), courtship, and the institution of marriage (why is it called an institution?)? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th:
  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest (text is also provided in class).
  • Quiz (10% of 2nd marking period): study the notes/ideas presented in class and how they relate to the play.
  • Writing assignment (10% of 2nd marking period): Study Guide (TWO pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font). The Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. The Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Identify examples of each of these literary terms and themes above. Also explain the author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole).
  • Wednesday, February 6th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Discuss (interpret each in your own words) the following quotes/cliches that will be revealed in "The Importance of Being Earnest":
    1.) "Art for Art's Sake"--the motto for Aestheticists (of which Wilde associated)
    2.) People are Posers
    3.) We All Wear Masks
    4.) "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players..." (As You Like It)
    5.) We are All in the Gutter

    2. If time allows, introduce the Power Point on Oscar Wilde and the Victorian Era.

    3. Briefly discuss Victorian Era and its influences and Victorian fashion. Discuss how fashion reflects society's values (as compared/contrasted to modern-day fashions and our society's values).

    4. Distribution of copies of The Importance of Being Earnest, if time allows.

    How can students effectively prepare to read Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes, literary terms, the setting (time period, location and its influences) and the author's biography? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th:
  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest (text is also provided in class).
  • Quiz (10% of 2nd marking period): study the notes/ideas presented in class and how they relate to the play.
  • Writing assignment (10% of 2nd marking period): Study Guide (TWO pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font). The Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. The Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Identify examples of each of these literary terms and themes above. Also explain the author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole).
  • Tuesday, February 5th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Discuss Oscar Wilde's life. How will Wilde's life be revealed in his works of literature (we will be reading a play by Wilde: "The Importance of Being Earnest")? Identify at least three interests/life experiences that will likely be revealed in Wilde's work of literature. Be ready to share and take notes.

    2. Define/Share (first, your definitions, and second, dictionary definitions) manners, conventions, irony, and satire (themes and literary terms revealed in "The Importance of Being Earnest").

    3. Discuss (interpret each in your own words) the following quotes/cliches that will be revealed in "The Importance of Being Earnest":
    1.) "Art for Art's Sake"--the motto for Aestheticists (of which Wilde associated)
    2.) People are Posers
    3.) We All Wear Masks
    4.) "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players..." (As You Like It)
    5.) We are All in the Gutter

    4. Turn in extra credit and possibly earn up to 20 points!

    5. If time allows, introduce the Power Point on Oscar Wilde and the Victorian Era.

    How can students effectively prepare to read Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" by examining major themes, literary terms and the author's biography? N/A
    Monday, February 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Identify (Underline) your thesis statement (the answer to the paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose?), which should be in the introductory paragraph.

    2. Peer Review using the AP-Style Grading Rubric. Compose at least 5 post-its of areas needing improvement in your peer partner's (choose a partner that you don't normally work with) paper.

    3. Create a Class Chart of "Favorite Quotes and Philosophies from Sophie's World" and then share favorite quotes/philosophies.

    4. Return copies of Sophie's World.

    5. Introduce HW.

    How can students effectively analyze/reflect on Sophie's World? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5th:
  • Read about Oscar Wilde's life. Be able to anticipate how Wilde's life will be revealed in his works of literature (we will be reading a play by Wilde: "The Importance of Being Earnest"). Identify at least three interests/life experiences that will likely be revealed in Wilde's work of literature. Be ready to share.
  • Define (first, your definitions, and second, dictionary definitions) manners, conventions, irony, and satire (themes and literary terms revealed in "The Importance of Being Earnest").
  • Brainstorm (interpret each in your own words) the following quotes/cliches that will be revealed in "The Importance of Being Earnest" (be ready to share/discuss tomorrow):
    1.) "Art for Art's Sake"--the motto for Aestheticists (of which Wilde associated)
    2.) People are Posers
    3.) We All Wear Masks
    4.) "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players..." (As You Like It)
    5.) We are All in the Gutter

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY--DUE TOMORROW ONLY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5th, 2013:

  • Using your peer reviewer's suggestions for improvement, turn in a new and improved version of your paper (you may want to turn in a page or two; it does not have to be the entire paper) to earn up to 20 extra points on your Sophie's World paper grade!
  • Friday, February 1st, 2013: 1. Do Now: How did Sophie's World give you more clarity on your life? What was the author's purpose? How did Gaarder engage his readers? Were Sophie and Alberto engaging characters? What about the ending--were you shocked/intrigued/pleasantly surprised? How was your paper helpful to sharpen your ideas about the world around you?

    2. Discussion about philosophical ideas from Sophie's World that intrigued students.

    How can students effectively analyze/reflect on Sophie's World? Please be ready to have a final discussion on Sophie's World and be ready to return the novel in class on Monday, February 4th, 2013.
    Thursday, January 31st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish presenting answers to the following philosophical questions in small groups (be ready to share with the class):
    A.) Is it true that people are only concerned with trivialities (as Sophie says on p. 10)? Why/Why not?
    B.) How come our faculty of wonder diminishes as we get older? Why is this?
    C.) Socrates said, "One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing." Why is this so profound?
    D.) What's so great about philosophers? Why is it valuable to study philosophy (the study of thinking)?
    E.) How does philosophy affect many facets of our lives? (such as our identities, as when Marx said in the 1840s, "Tell me what you do and I'll tell you who you are." The way you think is closely connected to the job you do. Philosophy also applies to our religious and political values)

    2. Classmates will ask clarifying questions, which will help the student presenters sharpen their opinions on each of the philosophical ideas, after each presentation of the questions above. Clarifying questions will begin with one of the 5 W's and the 1 H. Students will take notes as they see fit, which will help them prepare for their paper.

    3. Why do people seek philosophy? Why do people seek religion? How are philosophy and religion connected? How did Sophie's World give you more clarity on your life? What was the author's purpose? How did Gaarder engage his readers? Were Sophie and Alberto engaging characters? What about the ending--were you shocked/intrigued/pleasantly surprised? Some intriguing philosophers that may help shape your philosophy about life:

  • Heraclitus (a Natural Philosopher from c. 540-480 B.C.)-held the belief that "the world is characterized by opposites. If we were never ill, we would not know what it was to be well" (Gaarder, 36).
  • Darwin (biologist, natural scientist, open challenger to the Biblical view of creation; 1809-1882)-held the belief that evolution was the result of natural selection and "that those that were best adapted to their surroundings would survive and perpetuate the race" (Gaarder, 409).

    4. Paper Requirements & Preparation reviewed. See the following:

  • *MLA Format requirements for your paper: Use this resource to compose the first page of your paper, including heading, title, and page number. Use this resource for the works cited page.
  • Preparation techniques: Use the table of contents and the index to identify various philosophical ideas and philosophers. For example, if you're interested in writing about FATE, look up pp. 49-50 and 53-55. If you are intrigued by the influential and classical philosophers, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, check out pp. 58-119.
  • How can students effectively engage in philosophical discussion as connected to Sophie's World? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 2013:
  • Read Sophie's World.
  • Complete the Philosophy Chart. The more you fill in, the better.
  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 1st marking period of the 2nd semester) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). You may also choose to refer to current event sources (sources provided in the news links below) to supplement your understanding of the world around you. You will need a works cited page (the works cited format will be reviewed in class). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    *MLA Format requirements for your paper: Use this resource to compose the first page of your paper, including heading, title, and page number. Use this resource for the works cited page.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES AND USE THESE SOURCES FOR YOUR SOPHIE'S WORLD PAPER (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Wednesday, January 30th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish presenting answers to the following philosophical questions in small groups (be ready to share with the class):
    A.) Who are you?
    B.) Is there life after death?
    C.) Where does the world come from?
    D.) Could anything have always existed?
    E.) How was the world created?
    F.) Do you believe in fate?
    G.) Is sickness a punishment?
    H.) What forces govern the course of history?
    I.) How should we live every day?
    J.) What is the relationship between the body and mind?
    K.) Where do we get our ideas from?
    L.) Can we really rely on what our senses tell us?

    2. Philosophical discussion continues (and note-taking commences) from the following questions (each table will be assigned a question below; be ready to share):
    A.) Is it true that people are only concerned with trivialities (as Sophie says on p. 10)? Why/Why not?
    B.) How come our faculty of wonder diminishes as we get older? Why is this?
    C.) Socrates said, "One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing." Why is this so profound?
    D.) What's so great about philosophers? Why is it valuable to study philosophy (the study of thinking)?
    E.) How does philosophy affect many facets of our lives? (such as our identities, as when Marx said in the 1840s, "Tell me what you do and I'll tell you who you are." The way you think is closely connected to the job you do. Philosophy also applies to our religious and political values)

    3. Classmates will ask clarifying questions, which will help the student presenters sharpen their opinions on each of the philosophical ideas, after each presentation of the questions above. Clarifying questions will begin with one of the 5 W's and the 1 H. Students will take notes as they see fit, which will help them prepare for their paper.

    4. Paper Requirements & Preparation reviewed. See the following:

  • *MLA Format requirements for your paper: Use this resource to compose the first page of your paper, including heading, title, and page number. Use this resource for the works cited page.
  • Preparation techniques: Use the table of contents and the index to identify various philosophical ideas and philosophers. For example, if you're interested in writing about FATE, look up pp. 49-50 and 53-55. If you are intrigued by the influential and classical philosophers, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, check out pp. 58-119.
  • How can students effectively engage in philosophical discussion as connected to Sophie's World? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 2013:
  • Read Sophie's World.
  • Complete the Philosophy Chart. The more you fill in, the better.
  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 1st marking period of the 2nd semester) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). You may also choose to refer to current event sources (sources provided in the news links below) to supplement your understanding of the world around you. You will need a works cited page (the works cited format will be reviewed in class). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    *MLA Format requirements for your paper: Use this resource to compose the first page of your paper, including heading, title, and page number. Use this resource for the works cited page.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES AND USE THESE SOURCES FOR YOUR SOPHIE'S WORLD PAPER (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Tuesday, January 29th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Answer two of the following philosophical questions in small groups (be ready to share with the class):
    A.) Who are you?
    B.) Is there life after death?
    C.) Where does the world come from?
    D.) Could anything have always existed?
    E.) How was the world created?
    F.) Do you believe in fate?
    G.) Is sickness a punishment?
    H.) What forces govern the course of history?
    I.) How should we live every day?
    J.) What is the relationship between the body and mind?
    K.) Where do we get our ideas from?
    L.) Can we really rely on what our senses tell us?

    2. Discussion Sharing of Do Now questions. Classmates will ask clarifying questions, which will help the student presenters sharpen their opinions on each of the philosophical ideas, after each presentation of the questions above. Clarifying questions will begin with one of the 5 W's and the 1 H. Students will take notes as they see fit, which will help them prepare for their paper.

    3. Small Group Discussion/Sharing: Philosophical discussion continues (and note-taking commences) from the following questions (each table will be assigned a question below; be ready to share):
    A.) Is it true that people are only concerned with trivialities (as Sophie says on p. 10)? Why/Why not?
    B.) How come our faculty of wonder diminishes as we get older? Why is this?
    C.) Socrates said, "One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing." Why is this so profound?
    D.) What's so great about philosophers? Why is it valuable to study philosophy (the study of thinking)?
    E.) How does philosophy affect many facets of our lives? (such as our identities, as when Marx said in the 1840s, "Tell me what you do and I'll tell you who you are." The way you think is closely connected to the job you do. Philosophy also applies to our religious and political values)

    4. Whole class discussion/sharing

    How can students effectively engage in philosophical discussion as connected to Sophie's World? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 2013:
  • Read Sophie's World.
  • Complete the Philosophy Chart. The more you fill in, the better.
  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 1st marking period of the 2nd semester) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). You will also need to refer to current event sources (sources provided in the news links below) to supplement your understanding of the world around you. You will need a works cited page (the works cited format will be reviewed in class). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    *MLA Format requirements for your paper: Use this resource to compose the first page of your paper, including heading, title, and page number. Use this resource for the works cited page.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES AND USE THESE SOURCES FOR YOUR SOPHIE'S WORLD PAPER (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Friday, January 18th, 2013: 1. Work Period: Work on HW--reading, philosophy chart and preparation for the paper.

    2. Answer the following philosophical questions:
    A.) Who are you?
    B.) Is there life after death?
    C.) Where does the world come from?
    D.) Could anything have always existed?
    E.) How was the world created?
    F.) Do you believe in fate?
    G.) Is sickness a punishment?
    H.) What forces govern the course of history?
    I.) How should we live every day?
    J.) What is the relationship between the body and mind?
    K.) Where do we get our ideas from?
    L.) Can we really rely on what our senses tell us?

    How can students effectively prepare to read Sophie's World and connect to the previous texts? DUE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 2013:
  • Read Sophie's World.
  • Complete the Philosophy Chart. The more you fill in, the better.
  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 1st marking period of the 2nd semester) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). You will also need to refer to current event sources (sources provided in the news links below) to supplement your understanding of the world around you. You will need a works cited page (the works cited format will be reviewed in class). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES AND USE THESE SOURCES FOR YOUR SOPHIE'S WORLD PAPER (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Thursday, January 17th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Sophie's World distribution, HW introduced, and show extra credit (last opportunity to fix your final exam score!).

    2. Answer the following philosophical questions:
    A.) Who are you?
    B.) Is there life after death?
    C.) Where does the world come from?
    D.) Could anything have always existed?
    E.) How was the world created?
    F.) Do you believe in fate?
    G.) Is sickness a punishment?
    H.) What forces govern the course of history?
    I.) How should we live every day?
    J.) What is the relationship between the body and mind?
    K.) Where do we get our ideas from?
    L.) Can we really rely on what our senses tell us?

    3. Discuss answers to the philosophical questions.

    How can students effectively prepare to read Sophie's World and connect to the previous texts? DUE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 2013:
  • Read Sophie's World.
  • Complete the Philosophy Chart. The more you fill in, the better.
  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 1st marking period of the 2nd semester) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). You will also need to refer to current event sources (sources provided in the news links below) to supplement your understanding of the world around you. You will need a works cited page (the works cited format will be reviewed in class). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES AND USE THESE SOURCES FOR YOUR SOPHIE'S WORLD PAPER (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Wednesday, January 16th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Answer the following philosophical questions:
    A.) Who are you?
    B.) Is there life after death?
    C.) Where does the world come from?
    D.) Could anything have always existed?
    E.) How was the world created?
    F.) Do you believe in fate?
    G.) Is sickness a punishment?
    H.) What forces govern the course of history?
    I.) How should we live every day?
    J.) What is the relationship between the body and mind?
    K.) Where do we get our ideas from?
    L.) Can we really rely on what our senses tell us?

    2. Discuss answers to the philosophical questions.

    How can students effectively prepare to read Sophie's World and connect to the previous texts? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th:
  • All HW owed must be turned in!
  • Extra Credit Opportunity: To earn 9 points back on your final exam, write a paragraph explanation for each question answered incorrectly (no more than 4 questions can be corrected). For each question you write a paragraph explanation, you will earn 2 points extra credit.

    DUE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 2013:

  • Read Sophie's World.
  • Complete the Philosophy Chart. The more you fill in, the better.
  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 1st marking period of the 2nd semester) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). You will also need to refer to current event sources (sources provided in the news links below) to supplement your understanding of the world around you. You will need a works cited page (the works cited format will be reviewed in class). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES AND USE THESE SOURCES FOR YOUR SOPHIE'S WORLD PAPER (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Tuesday, January 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Final Exam Distribution/Review

    2. Answer the following philosophical questions:
    A.) Who are you?
    B.) Is there life after death?
    C.) Where does the world come from?
    D.) Could anything have always existed?
    E.) How was the world created?
    F.) Do you believe in fate?
    G.) Is sickness a punishment?
    H.) What forces govern the course of history?
    I.) How should we live every day?
    J.) What is the relationship between the body and mind?
    K.) Where do we get our ideas from?
    L.) Can we really rely on what our senses tell us?

    3. If time allows, discuss answers to the philosophical questions.

    How can students effectively prepare to read Sophie's World and connect to the previous texts? DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th:
  • All HW owed must be turned in!
  • Extra Credit Opportunity: To earn 9 points back on your final exam, write a paragraph explanation for each question answered incorrectly (no more than 4 questions can be corrected). For each question you write a paragraph explanation, you will earn 2 points extra credit.

    DUE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 2013:

  • Read Sophie's World.
  • Complete the Philosophy Chart. The more you fill in, the better.
  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 1st marking period of the 2nd semester) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). You will also need to refer to current event sources (sources provided in the news links below) to supplement your understanding of the world around you. You will need a works cited page (the works cited format will be reviewed in class). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES AND USE THESE SOURCES FOR YOUR SOPHIE'S WORLD PAPER (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Monday, January 14th, 2013: FINAL EXAM How can students effectively prepare for the Final Exam? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:
  • FINAL EXAM (50% of 3rd marking period) on ALL OF THE WORKS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE'S A GUIDE: FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET. This FINAL EXAM will be multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil on Monday.

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Friday, January 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Work on the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

    2. Work on researching definitions and working in study groups on the Final Exam Review Sheet.

    How can students effectively be assessed the Final Exam? Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:
  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

  • Thursday, January 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Work on the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

    2. Work on researching definitions and working in study groups on the Final Exam Review Sheet.

    How can students effectively prepare for the Final Exam? Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:
  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • FINAL EXAM (50% of 3rd marking period) on ALL OF THE WORKS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE'S A GUIDE: FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.
  • Wednesday, January 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Discuss the following--How would you portray the speaker of "A Modest Proposal", by Jonathan Swift (1729)? Who would be his supporters and who would be his critics? How would readers respond? What is Swift's purpose in writing this essay? Does he achieve his purpose, in your opinion? Why/Why not? This is a satirical essay that was shocking and absurd. Discuss the identity of the speaker and how he is perceived by various readers (critics and supporters of his essay). Taking notes is essential in a thorough understanding of the text. Take notes on the difference between Swift and the proposer (narrator), the benefits of the proposal, the definition and evidence of satire and significance of the title.

    2. Review the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

    3. Begin researching definitions and working in study groups on the Final Exam Review Sheet.

    How can students effectively analyze "Modest Proposal" and prepare for the Final Exam? Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:
  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • FINAL EXAM (50% of 3rd marking period) on ALL OF THE WORKS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE'S A GUIDE: FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.
  • Tuesday, January 8th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing the poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).

    2. Finish introducing the poets:

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson: Victorian poet (1809-1892) who lived in England; one of the most famous Victorian poets (Victorian Era: Queen Victoria led England 1837-1901, when she died; period of great growth in culture/arts--with photography at the forefront--and population), best known lines from his poem In Memoriam--"Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all."
  • Gwendolyn Brooks: African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, IL; Poet Laureate in 1985; her characters are often drawn from poor, inner city; taught creative writing at prestigious universities like Columbia Univ.
  • Sylvia Plath: American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts; struggled with depression, committed suicide; advanced the genre of confessional poetry; wrote the semi-autobiographical novel The Bell Jar; received more fame posthumously
  • Emily Dickinson: American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts; lived a solitary/anti-social/reclusive life; most of her poems were published posthumously; many of her poems deal with death and morbid topics; died of kidney disease; best known as an innovator for her unconventional capitalization and punctuation
  • Robert Frost: American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts; very popular, honored poet during his lifetime (received multiple Pulitzer prizes in poetry); poetry often focused on rural life, particularly in New England; attended Dartmouth and Harvard though never graduated; taught at many prestigious colleges (including University of Michigan!) and received many honorary degrees; recited poetry at JFK's inauguration in 1961; died of complications of prostrate surgery
  • Walt Whitman: American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn; left formal schooling at age 11 to help with family's finances; worked as a teacher and eventually found his own newspaper and, after it became defunct, he worked at various newspapers, though poetry writing was his true love; died of pneumonia/TB; broke boundaries in poetry (labeled the father of free verse, though he didn't invent it; wrote about sexuality and prostitution; wrote prose-like); believed to be homosexual or bisexual; labored on his most famous book of poetry Leaves of Grass for 30+ years (famous poems from this book are the following: "O Captain! My Captain!" and "Song of Myself"), which exalts the American experience, including the Civil War and land of opportunity
  • William Blake: English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), part of the Romantic movement (revolt against social and political norms; characterized by strong emotion and the emergence of new ideas, exotic and unfamiliar; not limited to Europe); hostile to the Church of England; left formal schooling at age 10 and continued schooling at home, by his mother; much of his poetry reveals a protest against religion and the confines of marriage (though he was married for 45 years; his wife could not bear children for him, which sparked conjecture that he wanted another wife to bear children); he seemed to advocate "free love movement" as his poetry reveals; though he attacked the conventions of religion, he still abided by Christianity; earned more fame posthumously.

    3. If time allows, review the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

  • How can students effectively prove their study/analysis of contemporary poetry in terms of the course focus of identity and self-exploration? Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:
  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9th:

  • Read "A Modest Proposal", by Jonathan Swift (1729). This is a satirical essay that was shocking and absurd. Pay close attention to the identity of the speaker and how he is perceived by various readers (critics and supporters of his essay). Taking notes is essential in a thorough understanding of the text. Take notes on the difference between Swift and the proposer (narrator), the benefits of the proposal, the definition and evidence of satire and significance of the title.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • FINAL EXAM (50% of 3rd marking period) on ALL OF THE WORKS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE'S A GUIDE: FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.
  • Monday, January 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Continue discussing the poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).

    2. Continue introducing the poets:

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson: Victorian poet (1809-1892) who lived in England; one of the most famous Victorian poets (Victorian Era: Queen Victoria led England 1837-1901, when she died; period of great growth in culture/arts--with photography at the forefront--and population), best known lines from his poem In Memoriam--"Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all."
  • Gwendolyn Brooks: African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, IL; Poet Laureate in 1985; her characters are often drawn from poor, inner city; taught creative writing at prestigious universities like Columbia Univ.
  • Sylvia Plath: American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts; struggled with depression, committed suicide; advanced the genre of confessional poetry; wrote the semi-autobiographical novel The Bell Jar; received more fame posthumously
  • Emily Dickinson: American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts; lived a solitary/anti-social/reclusive life; most of her poems were published posthumously; many of her poems deal with death and morbid topics; died of kidney disease; best known as an innovator for her unconventional capitalization and punctuation
  • Robert Frost: American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts; very popular, honored poet during his lifetime (received multiple Pulitzer prizes in poetry); poetry often focused on rural life, particularly in New England; attended Dartmouth and Harvard though never graduated; taught at many prestigious colleges (including University of Michigan!) and received many honorary degrees; recited poetry at JFK's inauguration in 1961; died of complications of prostrate surgery
  • Walt Whitman: American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn; left formal schooling at age 11 to help with family's finances; worked as a teacher and eventually found his own newspaper and, after it became defunct, he worked at various newspapers, though poetry writing was his true love; died of pneumonia/TB; broke boundaries in poetry (labeled the father of free verse, though he didn't invent it; wrote about sexuality and prostitution; wrote prose-like); believed to be homosexual or bisexual; labored on his most famous book of poetry Leaves of Grass for 30+ years (famous poems from this book are the following: "O Captain! My Captain!" and "Song of Myself"), which exalts the American experience, including the Civil War and land of opportunity
  • William Blake: English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), part of the Romantic movement (revolt against social and political norms; characterized by strong emotion and the emergence of new ideas, exotic and unfamiliar; not limited to Europe); hostile to the Church of England; left formal schooling at age 10 and continued schooling at home, by his mother; much of his poetry reveals a protest against religion and the confines of marriage (though he was married for 45 years; his wife could not bear children for him, which sparked conjecture that he wanted another wife to bear children); he seemed to advocate "free love movement" as his poetry reveals; though he attacked the conventions of religion, he still abided by Christianity; earned more fame posthumously.

    3. Introduce the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

  • How can students effectively prove their study/analysis of contemporary poetry in terms of the course focus of identity and self-exploration? Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:
  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9th:

  • Read "A Modest Proposal", by Jonathan Swift (1729). This is a satirical essay that was shocking and absurd. Pay close attention to the identity of the speaker and how he is perceived by various readers (critics and supporters of his essay). Taking notes is essential in a thorough understanding of the text. Take notes on the difference between Swift and the proposer (narrator), the benefits of the proposal, the definition and evidence of satire and significance of the title.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • FINAL EXAM (50% of 3rd marking period) on ALL OF THE WORKS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE'S A GUIDE: FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.
  • Friday, January 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing A Doll's House questions. Awards for best costume, best actor, best actress, and best performance.

    2. Take additional notes on the Do Now and be able to explain how A Doll's House supports the course focus of identity and self-exploration.

    3. Begin discussing the poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).

    4. Introduce the poets:

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson: Victorian poet (1809-1892) who lived in England; one of the most famous Victorian poets (Victorian Era: Queen Victoria led England 1837-1901, when she died; period of great growth in culture/arts--with photography at the forefront--and population), best known lines from his poem In Memoriam--"Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all."
  • Gwendolyn Brooks: African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, IL; Poet Laureate in 1985; her characters are often drawn from poor, inner city; taught creative writing at prestigious universities like Columbia Univ.

    5. Introduce the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

  • How can students effectively prove their study/analysis of A Doll's House in terms of the course focus of identity and self-exploration? Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:
  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9th:

  • Read "A Modest Proposal", by Jonathan Swift (1729). This is a satirical essay that was shocking and absurd. Pay close attention to the identity of the speaker and how he is perceived by various readers (critics and supporters of his essay). Taking notes is essential in a thorough understanding of the text. Take notes on the difference between Swift and the proposer (narrator), the benefits of the proposal, the definition and evidence of satire and significance of the title.

    DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • FINAL EXAM (50% of 3rd marking period) on ALL OF THE WORKS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE'S A GUIDE: FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.
  • Thursday, January 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review A Doll's House questions. Voting for best costume, best actor, best actress, and best performance.

    2. Take additional notes on the Do Now and be able to explain how A Doll's House supports the course focus of identity and self-exploration.

    How can students effectively prove their study/analysis of A Doll's House in terms of the course focus of identity and self-exploration? Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:
  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9th:

  • Read "A Modest Proposal", by Jonathan Swift (1729). This is a satirical essay that was shocking and absurd. Pay close attention to the identity of the speaker and how he is perceived by various readers (critics and supporters of his essay). Taking notes is essential in a thorough understanding of the text. Take notes on the difference between Swift and the proposer (narrator), the benefits of the proposal, the definition and evidence of satire and significance of the title.
  • Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: Compose "Letter to an ITHS Freshman" to give advice on achieving success in 2013! Turn it in. (HW check of poetry questions/A Doll's House questions and turn in votes for best costume, best actor, best actress, and best performance if you did not e-mail your votes)

    2. READING QUIZ on A Doll's House

    3. Work Period: Find at least two direct quotes (if you have your textbook in class or access to the play) OR identify two facts (from memory) from A Doll's House that support the course focus of identity and self-exploration.

    How can students effectively prove their study/analysis of A Doll's House in terms of the course focus of identity and self-exploration? Be ready to discuss A Doll's House tomorrow and Friday.

    Work on college scholarships!! This is a WONDERFUL SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY:

  • Random House Creative Writing Scholarship for NYC High School Seniors only: Deadline is February 8th, 2013.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9th:

  • Read "A Modest Proposal", by Jonathan Swift (1729). This is a satirical essay that was shocking and absurd. Pay close attention to the identity of the speaker and how he is perceived by various readers (critics and supporters of his essay). Taking notes is essential in a thorough understanding of the text. Take notes on the difference between Swift and the proposer (narrator), the benefits of the proposal, the definition and evidence of satire and significance of the title.
  • Friday, December 21st, 2012: 1. Do Now: FINAL PERFORMANCE! Reminders: Turn in one grading rubric per group. Introduce your scene (a brief summary), actors/characters, and theme. Remember to incorporate levels, sound effects, physical interactions, body language, ENERGY, and vocal projection. At the end, bow!

    2. HW Reminders/HW collections (letter revisions) and voting

    How can students effectively present scenes from As You Like It, considering sound effects and stage directions, in particular? HAPPY HOLIDAYS AND HAVE A WONDERFUL VACATION!

    Please e-mail me (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your votes for the following (based on our in-class performances of As You Like It): Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume (one person only), and Best Group Performance.

    VACATION HW, DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2nd, 2013 (a total of FIVE HW ASSIGNMENTS: 50 points):

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook; textbook will be checked out before the vacation or you can read it here) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Read A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) or online and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow: pp. 1141-1142). Annotating the play will assist you, taking notes on the course themes of identity and self-exploration. It's also recommended to annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Thursday, December 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Dress Rehearsal (show an excerpt--about 1 minute per group). Teacher and classmates will offer feedback for improvement.

    2. Work Period: Final in-class practice for performance groups. Make sure to incorporate the sound effects that we worked on. Also, include stage directions that are meaningful and appropriate for your theme/director's vision. Edit, if necessary. Apply the details of the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes.

    3. Tomorrow's performance reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to present scenes from As You Like It, considering sound effects and stage directions? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st--REVISE THE LETTER, which is one of the following (use the modified block letter format):
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st: Here are the groups--

  • Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick): Jennifer, Brian, Sin Yi, and Alexandra
  • Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens): Anthony, Adrain, Dhwanish, Ghilary, Lesley, Peter, and Andre
  • Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques): Alexander, Aditya, Eboni, Karl, Brandon D. and Kevin C.
  • Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia): Gurdarshan, Adam, Saadman, Jiyoung
  • Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver): Aliaa, Tyler, Martha, and Sharon
  • Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother): Thomas, Motiur, Brandon M., Quintin, Johnny, Jazmin, Robert, Justin, and Jerome


    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of about 10%--half of your participation grade!): You and your group mates (according to sibling order--oldest sibling, middle sibling, youngest sibling or only child (paired with oldest siblings)) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes (points will be deducted if below or above this time range; points will be deducted at the discretion of the teacher). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be close to memorized and very familiar with your character's lines.

    VACATION HW, DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2nd, 2013 (a total of FIVE HW ASSIGNMENTS: 50 points):

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook; textbook will be checked out before the vacation or you can read it here) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Read A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) or online and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow: pp. 1141-1142). Annotating the play will assist you, taking notes on the course themes of identity and self-exploration. It's also recommended to annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Wednesday, December 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Exchange your letters with a neighbor and peer review/edit. When finished, turn in all letters to receive credit (you will receive your letters at the end of the period so you can revise them).

    2. Check out textbooks/HW Reminders

    3. Work Period: Arrange in your performance groups. Make sure to incorporate the sound effects that we worked on. Also, create stage directions that are meaningful and appropriate for your theme/director's vision. Edit, if necessary. Apply the details of the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes.

    How can students effectively prepare to present scenes from As You Like It, considering sound effects and stage directions? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
  • Dress Rehearsal! Bring props and costumes. Show that you've learned your lines. Show that you've created and implemented stage directions. Have a very clear theme/director's vision.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st--REVISE THE LETTER, which is one of the following (use the modified block letter format):

  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st: Here are the groups--

  • Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick): Jennifer, Brian, Sin Yi, and Alexandra
  • Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens): Anthony, Adrain, Dhwanish, Ghilary, Lesley, Peter, and Andre
  • Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques): Alexander, Aditya, Eboni, Karl, Brandon D. and Kevin C.
  • Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia): Gurdarshan, Adam, Saadman, Jiyoung
  • Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver): Aliaa, Tyler, Martha, and Sharon
  • Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother): Thomas, Motiur, Brandon M., Quintin, Johnny, Jazmin, Robert, Justin, and Jerome


    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of about 10%--half of your participation grade!): You and your group mates (according to sibling order--oldest sibling, middle sibling, youngest sibling or only child (paired with oldest siblings)) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes (points will be deducted if below or above this time range; points will be deducted at the discretion of the teacher). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be close to memorized and very familiar with your character's lines.

    VACATION HW, DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2nd, 2013 (a total of FIVE HW ASSIGNMENTS: 50 points):

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook; textbook will be checked out before the vacation or you can read it here) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and "Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Read A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) or online and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow: pp. 1141-1142). Annotating the play will assist you, taking notes on the course themes of identity and self-exploration. It's also recommended to annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Tuesday, December 18th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your performance groups. Make sure to incorporate the sound effects that we worked on yesterday. Also, create stage directions that are meaningful and appropriate for your theme/director's vision. Edit, if necessary. Apply the details of the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes.

    2. Arrange in your As You Like It scene groups (sibling order groups: oldest, middle, youngest or only siblings). Read aloud your scene. Determine director's vision/theme. Edit, if necessary. Add in stage directions. Distribute and review

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to present scenes from As You Like It, considering sound effects and stage directions? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19th--Choose one (or more) of the following (use the modified block letter format):
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20th:

  • Dress Rehearsal! Bring props and costumes. Show that you've learned your lines. Show that you've created and implemented stage directions. Have a very clear theme/director's vision.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st: Here are the groups--

  • Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick): Jennifer, Brian, Sin Yi, and Alexandra
  • Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens): Anthony, Adrain, Dhwanish, Ghilary, Lesley, Peter, and Andre
  • Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques): Alexander, Aditya, Eboni, Karl, Brandon D. and Kevin C.
  • Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia): Gurdarshan, Adam, Saadman, Jiyoung
  • Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver): Aliaa, Tyler, Martha, and Sharon
  • Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother): Thomas, Motiur, Brandon M., Quintin, Johnny, Jazmin, Robert, Justin, and Jerome


    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of about 10%--half of your participation grade!): You and your group mates (according to sibling order--oldest sibling, middle sibling, youngest sibling or only child (paired with oldest siblings)) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes (points will be deducted if below or above this time range; points will be deducted at the discretion of the teacher). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be close to memorized and very familiar with your character's lines.

    VACATION HW, DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2nd, 2013:

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook; textbook will be checked out before the vacation) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Read A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow (pp. 1141-1142). Annotating the play will assist you, taking notes on the course themes of identity and self-exploration. It's also recommended to annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Monday, December 17th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises--create a sound machine (each character/actor must have an appropriate sound) in your groups. Present it to the class. In your groups, create a group tableau where every character/actor is physically interacting with each other. Add in the sound effects.

    Turn in HW: character summaries and scene summaries.

    2. Arrange in your As You Like It scene groups (sibling order groups: oldest, middle, youngest or only siblings). Read aloud your scene. Determine director's vision/theme. Edit, if necessary. Add in stage directions. Distribute and review Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to present scenes from As You Like It, considering sound effects and stage directions? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st: Here are the groups--
  • Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick): Jennifer, Brian, Sin Yi, and Alexandra
  • Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens): Anthony, Adrain, Dhwanish, Ghilary, Lesley, Peter, and Andre
  • Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques): Alexander, Aditya, Eboni, Karl, Brandon D. and Kevin C.
  • Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia): Gurdarshan, Adam, Saadman, Jiyoung
  • Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver): Aliaa, Tyler, Martha, and Sharon
  • Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother): Thomas, Motiur, Brandon M., Quintin, Johnny, Jazmin, Robert, Justin, and Jerome


    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of about 10%--half of your participation grade!): You and your group mates (according to sibling order--oldest sibling, middle sibling, youngest sibling or only child (paired with oldest siblings)) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes (points will be deducted if below or above this time range; points will be deducted at the discretion of the teacher). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be close to memorized and very familiar with your character's lines.

    VACATION HW, DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2nd, 2013:

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook; textbook will be checked out before the vacation) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Read A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow (pp. 1141-1142). Annotating the play will assist you, taking notes on the course themes of identity and self-exploration. It's also recommended to annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Friday, December 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #11.

    2. Finish group sharing of each act of As You Like It. You will be presenting with a focus on the HW/essay question and the main events that occur in each act. Choose 6 main points (about 2-3 sentences per point) to discuss and present--about 2-3 minutes per group. Each student should present one point.

    3. Work Period: Arrange in sibling order groups (oldest, middle, youngest or only siblings). Choose your As You Like It scene according to sibling order. Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Read aloud your scene. Assign roles. Determine director's vision/theme. Add in stage directions. Distribute and review Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. 4. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively present main points for each act of As You Like It in terms of the essay question on the significance of home in a character's life and revealed throughout the play as a whole? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER, 17th:
  • Each As You Like It group should have a one-page summary of your scene.
  • Each student/character should have a minimum of a typed, 1/2 page characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, dialogue/style of speech, and other characters' points of view).

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st: Here are the groups--

  • Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick): Jennifer, Brian, Sin Yi, and Alexandra
  • Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens): Anthony, Adrain, Dhwanish, Ghilary, Lesley, Peter, and Andre
  • Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques): Alexander, Aditya, Eboni, Karl, Brandon D. and Kevin C.
  • Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia): Gurdarshan, Adam, Saadman, Jiyoung
  • Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver): Aliaa, Tyler, Martha, and Sharon
  • Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother): Thomas, Motiur, Brandon M., Quintin, Johnny, Jazmin, Robert, Justin, and Jerome


    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of about 10%--half of your participation grade!): You and your group mates (according to sibling order--oldest sibling, middle sibling, youngest sibling or only child (paired with oldest siblings)) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes (points will be deducted if below or above this time range; points will be deducted at the discretion of the teacher). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be close to memorized and very familiar with your character's lines.

  • Thursday, December 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Arrange in sibling order groups (oldest, middle, youngest or only siblings). Choose your As You Like It scene according to sibling order. Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother)

    2. Arrange in 5 groups and prepare to present each act (each group will be assigned an act) of As You Like It. You will be presenting with a focus on the HW/essay question and the main events that occur in each act. Choose 6 main points (about 2-3 sentences per point) to discuss and present--about 2-3 minutes per group. Each student should present one point.

    3. Award Presentations

    4. Group Sharing of each act of As You Like It.

    5. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively present main points for each act of As You Like It in terms of the essay question on the significance of home in a character's life and revealed throughout the play as a whole? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • QUIZ on List #11.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of about 10%--half of your participation grade!): You and your group mates (according to sibling order--oldest sibling, middle sibling, youngest sibling or only child (paired with oldest siblings)) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes (points will be deducted if below or above this time range; points will be deducted at the discretion of the teacher). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be close to memorized and very familiar with your character's lines.

  • Wednesday, December 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Exam Instructions.

    2. ESSAY EXAM on As You Like It.

    Show HW: For each Act, answer the following questions (at least 1/2 page typed, double-spaced for each Act; value of 5 HW assignments!):
    1.) Identify and describe a character that experiences a rift and becomes cut off from “home,” whether that home is the character’s birthplace, family, homeland, or other special place.
    2.) Analyze how this character’s experience with exile is both alienating and enriching.
    3.) Explain how this character's experience illuminates the meaning of the play as a whole (after reading the play completely, you'll have to go back through each act to address this question).

    3. Voting/Reflections on yesterday's performances

    How can students effectively interpret the Shakespearean play, As You Like It in terms of the essay question on the significance of home in a character's life and revealed throughout the play as a whole? Make up any HW, if necessary.
    Tuesday, December 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Performance Reminders (introduce your scene, theme and actors/roles, and don't forget to bow at the end!) and Preparation.

    2. FINAL PERFORMANCES! Remember to address the following:

  • strong vocal projection, echoing and articulation
  • active gesturing/body expression
  • actors facing away from each other and showing animated expressions (remember your tableaus!)
  • incorporating the audience and empowering the audience members with knowledge, participation and engagement
  • actors physically touching/interacting with each other (PG, of course!)
  • different levels
  • music/lighting/sound effects
  • application of Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance

    3. Voting/Reflections

    4. HW Reminders

  • How can students effectively interpret the Shakespearean play, Othello, and perform their chosen scenes, keeping in mind the events and characters that contribute to the tragedy? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
    Read As You Like It (some copies of the plays are available in class or the play can be read at this link). For each Act, answer the following questions (at least 1/2 page typed, double-spaced for each Act; value of 5 HW assignments!):
    1.) Identify and describe a character that experiences a rift and becomes cut off from “home,” whether that home is the character’s birthplace, family, homeland, or other special place.
    2.) Analyze how this character’s experience with exile is both alienating and enriching.
    3.) Explain how this character's experience illuminates the meaning of the play as a whole (after reading the play completely, you'll have to go back through each act to address this question).

    ***There will be an in-class ESSAY EXAM (25% of your 3rd term grade) given on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (it will address the three major points above).

    Monday, December 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now:
    Practice your scene in your group. Act out your director's vision/theme. Practice on your feet. Incorporate the following (from your previous scene performances of Hamlet and recent acting exercises):
  • strong vocal projection, echoing and articulation
  • active gesturing/body expression
  • actors facing away from each other and showing animated expressions (remember your tableaus!)
  • incorporating the audience and empowering the audience members with knowledge, participation and engagement
  • actors physically touching/interacting with each other (PG, of course!)
  • different levels
  • music/lighting/sound effects
  • application of Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance

    2. Dress Rehearsal! What are your strengths? What do you need to work on for the final, graded performance tomorrow? Teacher and classmates' feedback is offered.

    3. Work Period: Final in-class practice and application of feedback from dress rehearsal.

  • How can students effectively interpret the Shakespearean play, Othello, and perform their chosen scenes, keeping in mind the events and characters that contribute to the tragedy? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
    PERFORM YOUR SCENE FROM OTHELLO (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should learn their lines with minimal assistance, stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
    Read As You Like It (some copies of the plays are available in class or the play can be read at this link). For each Act, answer the following questions (at least 1/2 page typed, double-spaced for each Act; value of 5 HW assignments!):
    1.) Identify and describe a character that experiences a rift and becomes cut off from “home,” whether that home is the character’s birthplace, family, homeland, or other special place.
    2.) Analyze how this character’s experience with exile is both alienating and enriching.
    3.) Explain how this character's experience illuminates the meaning of the play as a whole (after reading the play completely, you'll have to go back through each act to address this question).

    ***There will be an in-class ESSAY EXAM (25% of your 3rd term grade) given on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (it will address the three major points above).

    Friday, December 7th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #10.

    *Distribution of List #11.

    2. Work Period:
    Practice your scene in your group. Continue editing your Othello scenes. Act out your director's vision/theme. Practice on your feet. Incorporate the following (from your previous scene performances of Hamlet and today's acting exercises):

  • strong vocal projection, echoing and articulation
  • active gesturing/body expression
  • actors facing away from each other and showing animated expressions (remember your tableaus!)
  • incorporating the audience and empowering the audience members with knowledge, participation and engagement
  • actors physically touching/interacting with each other (PG, of course!)
  • different levels
  • music/lighting/sound effects
  • application of Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance
  • How can students effectively interpret the Shakespearean play, Othello, and perform their chosen scenes, keeping in mind the events and characters that contribute to the tragedy? E-mail Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov if you want pictures from the performances of Hamlet.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:
    Dress Rehearsal of an excerpt from your scene. As a class, we will offer helpful hints for improvement!

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
    PERFORM YOUR SCENE FROM OTHELLO (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should learn their lines with minimal assistance, stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
    Read As You Like It (some copies of the plays are available in class or the play can be read at this link). For each Act, answer the following questions (at least 1/2 page typed, double-spaced for each Act; value of 5 HW assignments!):
    1.) Identify and describe a character that experiences a rift and becomes cut off from “home,” whether that home is the character’s birthplace, family, homeland, or other special place.
    2.) Analyze how this character’s experience with exile is both alienating and enriching.
    3.) Explain how this character's experience illuminates the meaning of the play as a whole (after reading the play completely, you'll have to go back through each act to address this question).

    ***There will be an in-class ESSAY EXAM (25% of your 3rd term grade) given on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (it will address the three major points above).

    Thursday, December 6th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Acting/Vocal Exercises--
  • "Farewell the tranquil mind!" (Othello, 3.3.399).
  • "It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul" (Othello, 5.2.1).
  • Tableau practice: Iago and Othello in Act III, Othello and Desdemona in Act V (actors facing away with different levels and touching an arm/leg/shoulder).

    2. Work Period:
    Read aloud your scene in your group. Continue editing your Othello scenes. Act out your director's vision/theme. Practice on your feet. Incorporate the following (from your previous scene performances of Hamlet and today's acting exercises):

  • strong vocal projection, echoing and articulation
  • active gesturing/body expression
  • actors facing away from each other
  • incorporating the audience and empowering the audience members with knowledge, participation and engagement
  • actors physically touching/interacting with each other (PG, of course!)
  • different levels
  • music/lighting/sound effects
  • application of Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance
  • How can students effectively interpret the Shakespearean play, Othello, and perform their chosen scenes, keeping in mind the events and characters that contribute to the tragedy? E-mail Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov if you want pictures from the performances of Hamlet.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:

  • Quiz on List #10.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
    PERFORM YOUR SCENE FROM OTHELLO (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should learn their lines with minimal assistance, stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
    Read As You Like It (some copies of the plays are available in class or the play can be read at this link). For each Act, answer the following questions (at least 1/2 page typed, double-spaced for each Act; value of 5 HW assignments!):
    1.) Identify and describe a character that experiences a rift and becomes cut off from “home,” whether that home is the character’s birthplace, family, homeland, or other special place.
    2.) Analyze how this character’s experience with exile is both alienating and enriching.
    3.) Explain how this character's experience illuminates the meaning of the play as a whole (after reading the play completely, you'll have to go back through each act to address this question).

    There will be an in-class ESSAY EXAM (25% of your 3rd term grade) given on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (it will address the three major points above).

  • Wednesday, December 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss Acts II, III, IV and V of Othello, focusing on the HW questions:
    1.) What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy?
    2.) How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy?
    3.) How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge?
    4.) How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play?
    5.) How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    2. Work Period: Organize into your groups for Othello performances. Here are the scene groups: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Continue reading aloud your scene and work on the editing process. Also, consider what your director's vision will be. Introduce Grading Sheet for Othello Scenes.

    How can students effectively analyze Shakespearean play, Othello, in terms of its tragic elements? E-mail Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov if you want pictures from the performances of Hamlet.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:

  • Quiz on List #10.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
    PERFORM YOUR SCENE FROM OTHELLO (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should learn their lines with minimal assistance, stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
    Read As You Like It (some copies of the plays are available in class or the play can be read at this link). For each Act, answer the following questions (at least 1/2 page typed, double-spaced for each Act; value of 5 HW assignments!):
    1.) Identify and describe a character that experiences a rift and becomes cut off from “home,” whether that home is the character’s birthplace, family, homeland, or other special place.
    2.) Analyze how this character’s experience with exile is both alienating and enriching.
    3.) Explain how this character's experience illuminates the meaning of the play as a whole (after reading the play completely, you'll have to go back through each act to address this question).

    There will be an in-class ESSAY EXAM (25% of your 3rd term grade) given on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (it will address the three major points above).

  • Tuesday, December 4th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Review List #10.

    2. Work Period: Organize into your groups for Othello performances. Here are the scene groups: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Begin reading aloud your scene and begin the editing process. Also, consider what your director's vision will be. Show HW: scene group summary and characterization of your chosen role.

    3. Discuss Acts I, II and III of Othello, focusing on the HW questions:
    1.) What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy?
    2.) How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy?
    3.) How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge?
    4.) How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play?
    5.) How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    How can students effectively analyze Shakespearean play, Othello, in terms of its tragic elements? E-mail Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov if you want pictures from the performances of Hamlet.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:

  • Quiz on List #10.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
    PERFORM YOUR SCENE FROM OTHELLO (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should learn their lines with minimal assistance, stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
    Read As You Like It (some copies of the plays are available in class or the play can be read at this link). For each Act, answer the following questions (at least 1/2 page typed, double-spaced for each Act; value of 5 HW assignments!):
    1.) Identify and describe a character that experiences a rift and becomes cut off from “home,” whether that home is the character’s birthplace, family, homeland, or other special place.
    2.) Analyze how this character’s experience with exile is both alienating and enriching.
    3.) Explain how this character's experience illuminates the meaning of the play as a whole (after reading the play completely, you'll have to go back through each act to address this question).

    There will be an in-class ESSAY EXAM (25% of your 3rd term grade) given on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (it will address the three major points above).

  • Monday, December 3rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Review answers to the HAMLET EXAM and the OTHELLO EXAM.

    2. Reward Presentations of Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Overall Performance.

    3. Introduce List #10.

    4. Return copies of Hamlet.

    5. Choose groups for Othello performances! Here are the scene groups: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters).

    How can students effectively compare two Shakespearean plays, Hamlet and Othello? E-mail Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov if you want pictures from the performances of Hamlet.

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4th:

  • Each Othello group should have a one-page summary of your scene. Each student/character should have a minimum of a typed, 1/2 page characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, dialogue/style of speech, and other characters' points of view).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:

  • Quiz on List #10.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
    PERFORM YOUR SCENE FROM OTHELLO (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should learn their lines with minimal assistance, stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
    Read As You Like It (some copies of the plays are available in class or the play can be read at this link). For each Act, answer the following questions (at least 1/2 page typed, double-spaced for each Act; value of 5 HW assignments!):
    1.) Identify and describe a character that experiences a rift and becomes cut off from “home,” whether that home is the character’s birthplace, family, homeland, or other special place.
    2.) Analyze how this character’s experience with exile is both alienating and enriching.
    3.) Explain how this character's experience illuminates the meaning of the play as a whole (after reading the play completely, you'll have to go back through each act to address this question).

    There will be an in-class ESSAY EXAM (25% of your 3rd term grade) given on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (it will address the three major points above).

  • Friday, November 30th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #9.

    2. Introduce List #10.

    Turn in Hamlet books and any owed HW.

    3. Review answers to the HAMLET EXAM. Receive OTHELLO EXAM scores.

    4. Reward Presentations of Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Overall Performance.

    How can students effectively be assessed on vocabulary study and Shakespearean plays? Work on college applications and scholarship applications, if necessary. Read for pleasure and challenge! Finally, be prepared to discuss Othello on Monday, focusing on the HW questions.
    Thursday, November 29th, 2012: 1. Do Now: OTHELLO EXAM. Show HW notes for Othello.

    2. Review answers to the HAMLET EXAM.

    3. Reward Presentations of Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Overall Performance.

    How can students effectively prove study/analysis of Othello on today's exam? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:
  • Quiz on List #9.
  • All owed HW (last day of the 2nd marking period!).
  • Wednesday, November 28th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Performance Reminders (One person will introduce the scene and interpretation/director's vision briefly. Everyone will bow at the end. Make sure to give in your grading sheet. Remember, we will vote on Best Performance, Best Actor, and Best Actress.)

    2. FINAL PERFORMANCE OF HAMLET SCENES--ACT V, SCENE II! Reveal the director's vision and introduce your scene. Make sure to give in your grading sheet. Don't forget to bow at the end of the performance.

    3. Voting on Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Overall Performance.

    4. Reflections on our performances: What went well? What do we need to work on for next time? What did you enjoy? What was challenging?

    5. Write at least two multiple-choice questions (5 answers: A, B, C, D, and E) for tomorrow's Othello exam. Focus on questions that have to do with the HW questions (see below) and basic plot/characterization questions. You may use the Hamlet Exam questions to guide you. For each question chosen, you will earn two extra credit points! Here are the HW questions to guide you as well:
    1. What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy?
    2. How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy?
    3. How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge?
    4. How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play?
    5. How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    How can students effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet and prepare for tomorrow's exam on Othello? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:
  • Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). For each Act, answer the questions below. You should write ONE-TWO (about 400-500 words) typed pages per act (your answers may be in "note" form or "paragraph" form). Here are the questions for each Act:
    1. What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy?
    2. How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy?
    3. How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge?
    4. How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play?
    5. How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    ***EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on OTHELLO. It will be a multiple-choice question test that will assess your knowledge of the details of the play in terms of the questions above. Also, be ready to discuss these questions in class.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Quiz on List #9.
  • All owed HW (last day of the 2nd marking period!).
  • Tuesday, November 27th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Performance Reminders (One person will introduce the scene and interpretation/director's vision briefly. Everyone will bow at the end. Make sure to give in your grading sheet. Remember, we will vote on Best Performance, Best Actor, and Best Actress.)

    2. PERFORMANCES OF HAMLET SCENES! Reveal the director's vision and introduce your scene. Make sure to give in your grading sheet. Don't forget to bow at the end of the performance.

    How can students effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? FINAL PERFORMANCE(S) WILL BE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th: YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE OF TWO QUIZ GRADES!) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). For each Act, answer the questions below. You should write ONE-TWO (about 400-500 words) typed pages per act (your answers may be in "note" form or "paragraph" form). Here are the questions for each Act: 1. What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy? 2. How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy? 3. How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? 4. How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play? 5. How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    ***EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on OTHELLO. It will be a multiple-choice question test that will assess your knowledge of the details of the play in terms of the questions above. Also, be ready to discuss these questions in class.

  • Monday, November 26th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #9.

    2. Scene Group Work Period: Scene Groups will get together, make sure editing is complete and efficient, and sharpen director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Make arrangements for final group practices on your own time. Be ready for performances TOMORROW, Tuesday, and Wednesday.

    Turn in edits of "Why Study Shakespeare" Papers.

    How can students effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? FINAL PERFORMANCE DATE WILL BE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th: YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE OF TWO QUIZ GRADES!) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). For each Act, answer the questions below. You should write ONE-TWO (about 400-500 words) typed pages per act (your answers may be in "note" form or "paragraph" form). Here are the questions for each Act: 1. What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy? 2. How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy? 3. How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? 4. How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play? 5. How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    ***EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on OTHELLO. It will be a multiple-choice question test that will assess your knowledge of the details of the play in terms of the questions above. Also, be ready to discuss these questions in class.

  • Wednesday, November 21st, 2012: Scene Group Work Period: Scene Groups will get together, work on editing and sharpen director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Make arrangements for group practice on your own time. Be ready for performances next Tuesday and Wednesday. How can students effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

    FINAL PERFORMANCE DATE WILL BE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th: YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE OF TWO QUIZ GRADES!) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27th:

  • Rewrite "Why Study Shakespeare" papers (see edits).

    DUE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). For each Act, answer the questions below. You should write ONE-TWO (about 400-500 words) typed pages per act (your answers may be in "note" form or "paragraph" form). Here are the questions for each Act: 1. What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy? 2. How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy? 3. How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? 4. How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play? 5. How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    ***EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on OTHELLO. It will be a multiple-choice question test that will assess your knowledge of the details of the play in terms of the questions above. Also, be ready to discuss these questions in class.

  • Tuesday, November 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing Hamlet Notes on Act 5.

    2. Dress Rehearsal: Show excerpts from your scenes (1-2 minutes). Audience/Classmates and teacher will offer suggestions for improvement and successful choices.

    3. Scene Group Work: Scene Groups will get together, work on editing and sharpen director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Make arrangements for group practice on your own time. Be ready for performances next Tuesday and Wednesday.

    How can students effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? FINAL PERFORMANCE DATE WILL BE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th: YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE OF TWO QUIZ GRADES!) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27th:

  • Rewrite "Why Study Shakespeare" papers (see edits).

    DUE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). For each Act, answer the questions below. You should write ONE-TWO (about 400-500 words) typed pages per act (your answers may be in "note" form or "paragraph" form). Here are the following questions: 1. What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy? 2. How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy? 3. How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? 4. How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play? 5. How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    ***EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on OTHELLO. It will be a multiple-choice question test that will assess your knowledge of the details of the play in terms of the questions above. Also, be ready to discuss these questions in class.

  • Monday, November 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce HW.

    2. Acting Technique Reminders: Incorporate different levels, physical interactions (remember the tableau), and various levels of intensity in vocal projection, gesturing and body language (remember the Good vs. Evil exercise).

    3. Scene Group Work: Scene Groups will get together, work on editing and determine director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Make arrangements for group practice on your own time. Be ready for a dress rehearsal tomorrow!

    How can students effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • DRESS REHEARSAL. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines nearly memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    FINAL PERFORMANCE DATE WILL BE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th: YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE OF TWO QUIZ GRADES!) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27th:

  • Rewrite "Why Study Shakespeare" papers (see edits).

    DUE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). For each Act, answer the questions below. You should write ONE-TWO (about 400-500 words) typed pages per act (your answers may be in "note" form or "paragraph" form). Here are the following questions: 1. What events in the play, Othello, contribute to its depiction as a tragedy? 2. How do the characters' (both major and minor) characterizations (actions, personality traits, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view) contribute to the tragedy? 3. How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? 4. How does 'beauty' (goodness) die throughout the play? 5. How does the malevolence in the play contradict with the acts of benevolence?

    ***EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on OTHELLO. It will be a multiple-choice question test that will assess your knowledge of the details of the play in terms of the questions above. Also, be ready to discuss these questions in class.

  • Friday, November 16th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #8.

    2. Independent Work Period: Work on editing and determining director's vision, costume choices, and character portrayal.

    3. Acting Exercise: Divide up 1/2 of scene groups into "I like you" and "I hate you". One one side (Side A) is the lovers and the other side is the haters (Side B).
    Side A says these lines: I like you, I adore you, I worship you (in increasing intensity, from Level 3, Level 6 to Level 10).
    Side B says their lines: I hate you, I despise you, I loathe you (also in increasing intensity). Then, they will use body language to evoke (call forth) the emotions without using the words.

    4. Scene Group Work: Scene Groups will get together and work on editing and determine director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Make arrangements for group practice on your own time!

    How can students effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • DRESS REHEARSAL. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines nearly memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. FINAL PERFORMANCE DATE WILL BE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th: YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Thursday, November 15th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises=
  • Tableau partners to mark the character relationships in Hamlet (i.e. Hamlet and Gertrude, Hamlet and Claudius, Ophelia and Hamlet, Gertrude and Claudius, Hamlet and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet and Horatio, etc.).
  • Change into tableaus of three or more persons as characters in the play. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.
  • Change into characters as animals in Hamlet.
  • Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery.
  • Tongue Twisters/Articulation work.

    2. Introduce Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    3. Work Period: Scene Groups will get together and begin editing and determine director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Make arrangements for group practice on your own time!

    Show HW: one-page scene group summaries and 1/2 page characterization of your chosen character.

    4. Review tomorrow's quiz words: List #8

  • How can students effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • QUIZ on List #8.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:

  • DRESS REHEARSAL. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines nearly memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. FINAL PERFORMANCE DATE WILL BE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26th/TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27th: YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Wednesday, November 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: MIDTERM EXAM ON HAMLET (25% of the 2nd marking period grade)

    2. Work Period: Work on HW--scene summary and character portrayals.

    3. Acting Exercises: Tableaus to mark the character relationships in Hamlet (i.e. Hamlet and Gertrude, Hamlet and Claudius, Ophelia and Hamlet, Gertrude and Claudius, Hamlet and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet and Horatio, etc.). Include tableaus of three or more persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Characters as animals in Hamlet. Tongue Twisters/Articulation work.

    How can students effectively prove their knowledge and course study of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15th:
  • Each group should have one page summary of your scene. Each character should have a minimum of a 1/2 page characterization (personality traits, appearance, type of speech/dialogue. actions, thoughts/feelings and other characters' points of view)

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:

  • QUIZ on List #8.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:

  • DRESS REHEARSAL. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines nearly memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. FINAL PERFORMANCE DATE WILL BE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26th/TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27th: YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Tuesday, November 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss and finish taking notes on Act IV and Act V.

    2. Midterm Reminders

    3. Choose scene groups.

    4. HW introduced.

    How can students effectively analyze Acts IV and V of Hamlet? NOTE THE NEW EXAM DETAILS: DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTION EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period)=(MIDTERM EQUIVALENT). Study all in-class notes: Hamlet Notes on Acts I, II and III and Act IV and Act V.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15th:

  • Each group should have one page summary of your scene. Each character should have at least a 1/2 page characterization.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:

  • QUIZ on List #8.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:

  • DRESS REHEARSAL. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines nearly memorized. Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. FINAL PERFORMANCE DATE WILL BE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26th/TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27th: YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Friday, November 9th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #7.

    2. Introduce List #8.

    3. Discuss and finish taking notes on the analysis of Hamlet Notes on Acts I, II and III and introduce Act IV Notes.

    4. Midterm Strategies/Details

    How can students effectively analyze Acts II, III and IV of Hamlet as well as vocabulary skills? NOTE THE NEW EXAM DATE AND DETAILS: NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTION EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period)=(MIDTERM EQUIVALENT). Study all in-class notes!!

    Thursday, November 8th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss and finish taking notes on the analysis of Hamlet Notes on Acts I, II and III.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now notes.

    How can students effectively analyze Acts I, II and III of Hamlet? QUIZ on List #7 TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th

    THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period)=TBD (TO BE DETERMINED)

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (SAT style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period.

    Wednesday, November 7th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss and take notes on the analysis of Hamlet Notes on Acts I, II and III.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now notes.

    3. Share HW: all notes on Acts I-V (all HW notes on Hamlet will be accepted on time today only).

    How can students effectively analyze Acts I, II and III of Hamlet? QUIZ on List #7 THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th

    THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period)=TBD (TO BE DETERMINED)

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (SAT style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period.

    Monday, November 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Brainstorming: briefly write 5 blessings that you are grateful for after Hurricane Sandy.

    *Show HW notes on Acts I, II and III of Hamlet.

    2. Creative Thinking: Imagine William Shakespeare and 4 characters (e.g. Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, and Ophelia) from Hamlet were living today. What would be each of their reactions to Hurricane Sandy?

    3. Begin analysis of Hamlet Notes. Discuss, if time allows.

    How can students effectively analyze Acts I, II and III of Hamlet? DUE Wednesday, November, 7th:
  • Read ALL of Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in ALL NOTES ON ALL ACTS (a minimum of 5 pages of notes; at least one page for each act). See details below.

    **Read with a purpose: take A MINIMUM OF ONE PAGE OF NOTES FOR EACH ACT OF HAMLET (a total of FIVE ACTS=FIVE HW assignments), focusing on the following:

  • course themes of identity and self-exploration
  • figurative language (literary devices and their significance)
  • Shakespearean structure
  • Shakespeare's personal life influences
  • Shakespeare's time period influences

    Be sure to EXPLAIN WHY THE THEMES, LANGUAGE CHOICES, STRUCTURE, SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE INFLUENCES AND SHAKESPEARE'S TIME PERIOD INFLUENCES impact the characters and events of each act. Remember, do not provide plot summary. Instead, examine WHY Shakespeare made certain choices and how his background influences those choices.

    ***TBA=THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period).

    ****QUIZ on List #7=FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th

  • Monday, October 29th-Friday, November 2nd (Hurricane Sandy days), 2012: N/A due to Hurricane Sandy How can students effectively prepare to read Hamlet? DUE Monday, November, 5th, THE DAY WE RETURN FROM HURRICANE SANDY CLEAN-UP:
  • Read Acts I, I, and III in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in three pages of notes (one page for each act). See details below.

    **Read with a purpose: take ONE PAGE OF NOTES FOR EACH ACT OF HAMLET (a total of FIVE ACTS=FIVE HW assignments), focusing on the following:

  • course themes of identity and self-exploration
  • figurative language (literary devices and their significance)
  • Shakespearean structure
  • Shakespeare's personal life influences
  • Shakespeare's time period influences

    Be sure to EXPLAIN WHY THE THEMES, LANGUAGE CHOICES, STRUCTURE, SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE INFLUENCES AND SHAKESPEARE'S TIME PERIOD INFLUENCES impact the characters and events of each act. Remember, do not provide plot summary. Instead, examine WHY Shakespeare made certain choices and how his background influences those choices.

    TBA:

  • Read Acts IV and V in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in the remaining two pages of notes (one page for each act). See above for note-taking requirements.

    ***TBA THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period).

    ****QUIZ on List #7=TBA

  • Friday, October 26th, 2012: No class due to parent-teacher conferences. How can students effectively prepare to read Hamlet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Read Acts I, I, and III in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in three pages of notes (one page for each act). See details below.

    **Read with a purpose: take ONE PAGE OF NOTES FOR EACH ACT OF HAMLET (a total of FIVE ACTS=FIVE HW assignments), focusing on the following:

  • course themes of identity and self-exploration
  • figurative language (literary devices and their significance)
  • Shakespearean structure
  • Shakespeare's personal life influences
  • Shakespeare's time period influences

    Be sure to EXPLAIN WHY THE THEMES, LANGUAGE CHOICES, STRUCTURE, SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE INFLUENCES AND SHAKESPEARE'S TIME PERIOD INFLUENCES impact the characters and events of each act. Remember, do not provide plot summary. Instead, examine WHY Shakespeare made certain choices and how his background influences those choices.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:

  • Read Acts IV and V in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in the remaining two pages of notes (one page for each act). See above for note-taking requirements.

    ***NEXT THURSDAY (NOVEMBER 1st) THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period).

  • Thursday, October 25th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss Shakespeare's language, style and life based on the following links and important points:
  • version of the introduction from Macbeth.
  • Shakespeare's Life.
  • Language: subject-verb flip-flop, word omission, puns, metaphors, position changes of words to fit rhythm and emphasis, implied stage actions/directions
  • Life: Grammar School (Latin, grammar, Bible, Roman history, Greek mythology), father-alderman/politician, early marriage years are unknown (1582-1592), gained prominence in London as a playwright, actor and acting company investor (King's Men) in 1590's, wrote poems when theaters closed because of the plague, 1610-1613--retired and returned to Stratford-upon-Avon (his childhood home), lived in two worlds (city vs. rural life in England)

    2. Finish discussing your own thoughts/definitions/revelations of identity, self-exploration, examples of figurative language, Shakespearean structure and Shakespearean personal life and time period influences.

    3. HW Reminders

  • How can students effectively prepare to read Hamlet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Read Acts I, I, and III in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in three pages of notes (one page for each act). See details below.

    **Read with a purpose: take ONE PAGE OF NOTES FOR EACH ACT OF HAMLET (a total of FIVE ACTS=FIVE HW assignments), focusing on the course themes of identity and self-exploration, figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:

  • Read Acts IV and V in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in the remaining two pages of notes (one page for each act).

    ***NEXT THURSDAY (NOVEMBER 1st) THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period).

  • Wednesday, October 24th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing your own thoughts/definitions/revelations of identity, self-exploration, examples of figurative language, Shakespearean structure and Shakespearean personal life and time period influences.

    2. Reading of Shakespeare's background/literary style in the in-class copy of Hamlet. Here's a version of the introduction from Macbeth.

    How can students effectively prepare to read Hamlet? DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Read Acts I, I, and III in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in three pages of notes (one page for each act). See details below.

    **Read with a purpose: take ONE PAGE OF NOTES FOR EACH ACT OF HAMLET (a total of FIVE ACTS=FIVE HW assignments), focusing on the course themes of identity and self-exploration, figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:

  • Read Acts IV and V in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in the remaining two pages of notes (one page for each act).

    ***NEXT THURSDAY (NOVEMBER 1st) THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period).

  • Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Hamlet distribution

    2. Introduce HW.

    3. Brainstorm notes on your own thoughts/definitions/revelations of identity, self-exploration, examples of figurative language, Shakespearean structure and Shakespearean personal life and time period influences.

    4. Share brainstorming.

    How can students effectively prepare to read Hamlet? DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Read Acts I, I, and III in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in three pages of notes (one page for each act). See details below.

    **Read with a purpose: take ONE PAGE OF NOTES FOR EACH ACT OF HAMLET (a total of FIVE ACTS=FIVE HW assignments), focusing on the course themes of identity and self-exploration, figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:

  • Read Acts IV and V in Hamlet (read online here or from text provided in class) and turn in the remaining two pages of notes (one page for each act).

    ***NEXT THURSDAY (NOVEMBER 1st) THERE WILL BE AN IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON ALL OF HAMLET (25% of 2nd marking period).

  • Monday, October 22nd, 2012: 1. Do Now: HW Returns/Review

    2. Finish discussing/analyzing the famous soliloquy from Hamlet: "To Be or Not to Be". Discuss the notion of questioning one's own existence, Hamlet's role in the play, his inner turmoil, predictions regarding plot and character portrayals, and evidence of Shakespeare's life and times as revealed in this soliloquy. Take notes.

    3. Discuss the content of the college essays.

    4. Extra Credit HW Collections

    How can students effectively analyze the "to be or not to be" soliloquy? HW TBA
    Friday, October 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #6

    2. Introduce List #7.

    3. Finish discussing/analyzing the famous soliloquy from Hamlet: "To Be or Not to Be". Discuss the notion of questioning one's own existence, Hamlet's role in the play, his inner turmoil, predictions regarding plot and character portrayals, and evidence of Shakespeare's life and times as revealed in this soliloquy. Take notes.

    4. Discuss the content of the college essays.

    5. Extra Credit HW Reminder

    How can students effectively acquire new vocabulary knowledge and analyze the "to be or not to be" soliloquy? EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd (earn up to 50 points on your quiz grades for the 2nd marking period!):
  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors INFO.
  • Creative Writing Competition Application.
  • Thursday, October 18th, 2012: 1. Do Now: "Love for ITHS" Sonnet sharing.

    2. Introduce the famous soliloquy from Hamlet: "To Be or Not to Be". Discuss the notion of questioning one's own existence, Hamlet's role in the play, his inner turmoil, predictions regarding plot and character portrayals, and evidence of Shakespeare's life and times as revealed in this soliloquy. Take notes.

    3. Review/Return college essays.

    How can students effectively acquire new knowledge on Shakespeare's life, times and poetic style as seen in the "to be or not to be" soliloquy? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards forList #6
  • QUIZ on List #6.

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd (earn up to 50 points on your quiz grades for the 2nd marking period!):

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors INFO.
  • Creative Writing Competition Application.
  • Tuesday, October 16th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce Shakespearean Sonnets (take notes on important facts) and "Sonnet 18". Analyze "Sonnet 18" for poetic devices and evidence of Shakespeare's life and times. Examine the influences of Shakespeare's life and times on his poetry writing. Take notes and discuss.

    2. Introduce HW and begin HW, if time allows.

    How can students effectively acquire new knowledge on Shakespeare's life, times and poetic style? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17th--by midnight:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, and at least two poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed (and e-mailed to Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov by Wednesday, no later than midnight)and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd (earn up to 50 points on your quiz grades for the 2nd marking period!):

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors INFO.
  • Creative Writing Competition Application.
  • Monday, October 15th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Share favorite excerpt/fun fact from your "Why Study Shakespeare" papers.

    2. Introduce Shakespeare's Life, Times, and Literary Background.

    3. Turn in HW: "Why Study Shakespeare" partner essay.

    How can students effectively acquire new knowledge on Shakespeare's life, times and poetic style? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17th--by midnight:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, and at least two poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed (and e-mailed to Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov by Wednesday, no later than midnight)and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #6
  • QUIZ on List #6.

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd (earn up to 50 points on your quiz grades for the 2nd marking period!):

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors INFO.
  • Creative Writing Competition Application.
  • Friday, October 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #5.

    2. Introduce List #6. Show HW: vocabulary flashcards for list #5.

    3. Discuss/Share thoughts on your independent choice novel and on Oedipus Rex. We will discuss answers to the following questions: In what ways do the events in the book reveal evidence of the author's world view? What specific themes did the author emphasize throughout the novel? What do you think he or she is trying to get across to the reader? Explain a character’s relationship with his/her home and share how this relationship is either alienating or enriching. Share how this relationship with his/her home is significant to the story as a whole.

    How can students effectively prove knowledge of vocabulary, their study of Oedipus Rex and their independently chosen novel? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 15th:
  • With a partner, write 2 typed pages (or 2-3 pages handwritten) on the following topic: Why Study Shakespeare. You MUST use outside sources, AND include a Works Cited. See this Works Cited Resource at Purdue OWL. Include plentiful reasons why Shakespeare's works, life and times are relevant today in 2012. Use at least 25 words from our Vocabulary Word Lists.

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd (earn up to 50 points on your quiz grades for the 2nd marking period!):

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors INFO.
  • Creative Writing Competition Application.
  • Thursday, October 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing/discussing the exam answers and HW (students will share citations and explanations for each exam answer) for the exam on Oedipus Rex.

    2. Discuss/Share thoughts on your independent choice novel. We will discuss answers to the following questions: In what ways do the events in the book reveal evidence of the author's world view? What specific themes did the author emphasize throughout the novel? What do you think he or she is trying to get across to the reader? Explain a character’s relationship with his/her home and share how this relationship is either alienating or enriching. Share how this relationship with his/her home is significant to the story as a whole.

    How can students effectively prove their AP-style study of Oedipus Rex and other literary works in general? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #5
  • QUIZ on List #5.

    *Continue to read your own novels. An agile mind is a mind ready for college!

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd (earn up to 50 points on your quiz grades for the 2nd marking period!):

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors INFO.
  • Creative Writing Competition Application.
  • Wednesday, October 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Go over the exam answers and HW (students will share citations and explanations for each exam answer) for the exam on Oedipus Rex.

    2. Discuss/Share thoughts on your independent choice novel. Here are some questions to answer: In what ways do the events in the book reveal evidence of the author's world view? What specific themes did the author emphasize throughout the novel? What do you think he or she is trying to get across to the reader? Explain a character’s relationship with his/her home and share how this relationship is either alienating or enriching. Share how this relationship with his/her home is significant to the story as a whole.

    How can students effectively prove their AP-style study of Oedipus Rex and other literary works in general? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #5
  • QUIZ on List #5.

    *Continue to read your own novels. An agile mind is a mind ready for college!

  • Tuesday, October 9th, 2012: Work Period:
    1.) Make an AP-style essay question (see the AP essay question that you were given on the first day) for Oedipus Rex. Turn it in!
    2.) When finished, work on tomorrow's HW and prepare for Friday's vocabulary quiz.
    3.) Read your chosen novel.
    How can students effectively prove their AP-style study of Oedipus Rex and vocabulary skill building? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:
  • Oedipus Rex Test Citations: For each question on the Oedipus Rex test, do the following: cite the text. This is an example of proper citation for this play: "There is no one here who will not curse you soon, as you curse me" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 357-358). Be ready to share your citations and discuss/analyze in class. Make sure you are ready to explain your citation choices. At least a sentence or two explanation will suffice.

    *Continue to read your own novels. An agile mind is a mind ready for college!

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:

  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #5
  • QUIZ on List #5.
  • Friday, October 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #4

    *Show HW: vocabulary flashcards. Turn in first draft and final draft of resume.

    2. HW introduced: Oedipus Rex Test returned and HW explained.

    3. Introduce List #5.

    How can students effectively prove their study of Oedipus Rex and vocabulary skill building? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:
  • Oedipus Rex Test Citations: For each question on the Oedipus Rex test, do the following: cite the text. This is an example of proper citation for this play: "There is no one here who will not curse you soon, as you curse me" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 357-358). Be ready to share your citations and discuss/analyze in class.

    *Continue to read your own novels. An agile mind is a mind ready for college!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:

  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #5
  • QUIZ on List #5.
  • Thursday, October 4th, 2012: 1. Do Now: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION: FINALLY, remaining students will present. It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    2. Discuss answers to the Oedipus Rex questions.

    3. HW Reminders and review of List #4.

    How can students effectively prove their knowledge, applying themes and important analytical terms in Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #4
  • QUIZ on List #4.
  • FINAL DRAFT of your resume (see the first draft of your resume with my edits/suggestions for improvement). Staple the first draft of the resume to the back of the final draft.
  • Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: EXAM on Oedipus Rex

    *Show HW: answers to the Oedipus Rex questions.

    2. CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION: Remaining students will present. It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    3. HW Reminders and, if time allows, review List #4.

    How can students effectively prove their knowledge, applying themes and important analytical terms in Oedipus Rex? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #4
  • QUIZ on List #4.
  • FINAL DRAFT of your resume (see the first draft of your resume with my edits/suggestions for improvement). Staple the first draft of the resume to the back of the final draft.
  • Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012: 1. Do Now: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION: Remaining students will present. It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    2. HW Reminders and, if time allows, review List #4.

    How can students effectively present their career research, attending to verbal and written expression? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:
  • Read Oedipus Rex (packet)--both the introductory pages and the play itself. Annotate (take notes as you read) on the following (find evidence in the play): Analytical terms=irony, classical tragedy, Greek drama; Thematic terms=self-knowledge, pride, and arrogance.
  • Answer the questions at the end of the packet (HW grade).
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice question test) on the reading: To study for the exam, use the questions at the end of the packet, evidence of the terms above, definitions of the following terms (and how they appear in the play): tragedy, comedy, tragic hero (and what classifies one as a tragic hero), hamartia, catharsis, melodrama, farce, Oedipus (what's the name mean?), oracle, strophe, antistrophe, and sphinx, and evidence of free-will, fate, and people being responsible for their own actions.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:

  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #4
  • QUIZ on List #4.
  • Monday, October 1st, 2012: Work Period:
  • Prepare for Wednesday's HW: reading, annotating and answering questions on Oedipus Rex. Exam (25% of your 1st marking period grade) on the play as well. Working/Study Preparation in groups is acceptable.
  • How can students effectively understand Oedipus Rex in analytical and thematic terms?
  • CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION (details discussed in class): ALL REMAINING STUDENTS WILL PRESENT TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2nd):It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC--you can download it now. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex (packet)--both the introductory pages and the play itself. Annotate (take notes as you read) on the following (find evidence in the play): Analytical terms=irony, classical tragedy, Greek drama; Thematic terms=self-knowledge, pride, and arrogance.
  • Answer the questions at the end of the packet (HW grade).
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice question test) on the reading: To study for the exam, use the questions at the end of the packet, evidence of the terms above, definitions of the following terms (and how they appear in the play): tragedy, comedy, tragic hero (and what classifies one as a tragic hero), hamartia, catharsis, melodrama, farce, Oedipus (what's the name mean?), oracle, strophe, antistrophe, and sphinx, and evidence of free-will, fate, and people being responsible for their own actions.
  • Friday, September 28th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #3. Show HW: vocabulary flashcards.

    Introduce List #4.

    2. CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION: Remaining students will present. It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively present their career research, attending to verbal and written expression?
  • CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION (details discussed in class): ALL REMAINING STUDENTS WILL PRESENT ON TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2nd):It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC--you can download it now. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex (packet)--both the introductory pages and the play itself. Annotate (take notes as you read) on the following (find evidence in the play): Analytical terms=irony, classical tragedy, Greek drama; Thematic terms=self-knowledge, pride, and arrogance.
  • Answer the questions at the end of the packet (HW grade).
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice question test) on the reading: To study for the exam, use the questions at the end of the packet, evidence of the terms above, definitions of the following terms (and how they appear in the play): tragedy, comedy, tragic hero (and what classifies one as a tragic hero), hamartia, catharsis, melodrama, farce, Oedipus (what's the name mean?), oracle, strophe, antistrophe, and sphinx, and evidence of free-will, fate, and people being responsible for their own actions.
  • Thursday, September 27th, 2012: 1. Do Now: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION: Students with last names beginning with D-O (and remaining students from Tuesday). It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    2. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively present their career research, attending to verbal and written expression? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:
  • CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION (details discussed in class): FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th (any remaining students who didn't present yet AND ALL REMAINING STUDENTS WILL PRESENT ON TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2nd):It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #3. Put the word and part of speech on the front of the flashcard and the definition and an original sentence (not the sentences provided in the list above) on the back of the flashcard. Electronic flashcards are acceptable and encouraged (for example: download the flashcard app onto your smart phone!).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex (packet)--both the introductory pages and the play itself. Annotate (take notes as you read) on the following (find evidence in the play): Analytical terms=irony, classical tragedy, Greek drama; Thematic terms=self-knowledge, pride, and arrogance.
  • Answer the questions at the end of the packet (HW grade).
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice question test) on the reading: To study for the exam, use the questions at the end of the packet, evidence of the terms above, definitions of the following terms (and how they appear in the play): tragedy, comedy, tragic hero (and what classifies one as a tragic hero), hamartia, catharsis, melodrama, farce, Oedipus (what's the name mean?), oracle, strophe, antistrophe, and sphinx, and evidence of free-will, fate, and people being responsible for their own actions.
  • Tuesday, September 25th, 2012: 1. Do Now: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION: Students with last names beginning with D-J (and remaining students from yesterday). It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    2. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively present their career research, attending to verbal and written expression? DUE THIS THURSDAY AND FRIDAY:
  • CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION (details discussed in class): THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th (Last names beginning with D-O) and FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th (any remaining students who didn't present yet):It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #3. Put the word and part of speech on the front of the flashcard and the definition and an original sentence (not the sentences provided in the list above) on the back of the flashcard. Electronic flashcards are acceptable and encouraged (for example: download the flashcard app onto your smart phone!).
  • Monday, September 24th, 2012: 1. Do Now: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION: Students with last names beginning with A-C. It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

    2. Turn in Discipline Code Booklet Handouts (HW)

    How can students effectively present their career research, attending to verbal and written expression? CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION (details discussed in class): TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th (Last names beginning with D-J and remaining students from today), THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th (Last names beginning with M-P) and FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th (any remaining students who didn't present yet):It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).
    Friday, September 21st, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2 (show HW: flashcards for Vocabulary List #2).

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #3

    3. Introduce HW: discipline code booklet/handouts

    4. If time allows, continue discussion on the following (from yesterday):
    Pre-Reading Discussion Questions for Oedipus Rex:
    A.) Brainstorm word associations with light, darkness, sight and blindness. Identify at least 3 word associations for each word above.
    B.) Are fate and G-d's will synonymous or independent of each other? What is the relation between fate and G-d's will?
    C.) To what extent are people responsible for their own actions? Are there any factors that diminish human guilt? Refer to factors such as lack of intent/purpose, the influence of fate, or the influence of G-d.
    D.) What do you think determines your life--free will or fate? Explain.

    How can students effectively prepare to read Oedipus Rex, focusing on new terminology and themes of fate vs. free will? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:
  • Discipline Code Booklet Handouts

    CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION (details discussed today in class): DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th (Last names beginning with A-C), TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th (Last names beginning with D-O), THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th (Last names beginning with P-T) and FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th (any remaining students who didn't present yet):It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

  • Thursday, September 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Pre-Reading Discussion Questions for Oedipus Rex:
    A.) Brainstorm word associations with light, darkness, sight and blindness. Identify at least 3 word associations for each word above.
    B.) Are fate and G-d's will synonymous or independent of each other? What is the relation between fate and G-d's will?
    C.) To what extent are people responsible for their own actions? Are there any factors that diminish human guilt? Refer to factors such as lack of intent/purpose, the influence of fate, or the influence of G-d.
    D.) What do you think determines your life--free will or fate? Explain.

    2. Using the Perrine textbook, define the terms you need to know for Oedipus Rex:

  • tragedy
  • comedy
  • tragic hero (and what classifies one as a tragic hero)
  • hamartia
  • catharsis
  • melodrama
  • farce
  • Oedipus (what's the name mean?)
  • oracle
  • strophe
  • antistrophe
  • sphinx
  • How can students effectively prepare to read Oedipus Rex, focusing on new terminology and themes of fate vs. free will? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #2. Put the word and part of speech on the front of the flashcard and the definition and an original sentence (not the sentences provided in the list above) on the back of the flashcard. Electronic flashcards are acceptable and encouraged (for example: download the flashcard app onto your smart phone!).
  • Bring in an independent reading selection (either a novel chosen in class or one chosen at home or at the library) that is challenging and engaging. Be ready to share at a moment's notice. Show that you're flexing your AP minds on a daily basis.

    CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATION (details discussed today in class): DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th (Last names beginning with _______), TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th (Last names beginning with _______), THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th (Last names beginning with ________) and FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th (Last names beginning with ________):It's the value of 25% of the 1st marking period. Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Follow the Career Research Presentation Project Guidelines. Your presentation should be 3-4 minutes (if you go under 3 minutes or over 4 minutes, you will lose -3 points for every 10 seconds).

  • Friday, September 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Show flashcard HW.

    2. Discuss the short story, "Three Questions" (1885) by Leo Tolstoy. Why is this story a parable? How does this story set the tone for the course? For this time in your life? For a lifelong lesson? Discuss/Share.

    3. Introduce Vocabulary List #2.

    How can students recognize the AP English writing skills they need to improve through self-assessment, peer assessment and evaluation of an exemplary AP essay? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th:
  • Read "How to Mark a Book" and "Essay About Essays: Answering the 'So What?' Question in Your Reading. Be ready to discuss.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #2. Put the word and part of speech on the front of the flashcard and the definition and an original sentence (not the sentences provided in the list above) on the back of the flashcard. Electronic flashcards are acceptable and encouraged (for example: download the flashcard app onto your smart phone!).
  • Thursday, September 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Peer Assessment. Exchange your first AP English Essay with a neighbor and do a peer review. What went right, what went wrong, and what does your peer need? Use the grading rubric to guide you in your peer assessment.

    2. Discuss/Share insights in self-assessment, peer assessment, and exemplary essay.

    3. Read "Three Questions" (1885) by Leo Tolstoy. Why is this story a parable? How does this story set the tone for the course? For this time in your life? For a lifelong lesson? Discuss/Share.

    4. Vocabulary Review

    How can students recognize the AP English writing skills they need to improve through self-assessment, peer assessment and evaluation of an exemplary AP essay? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #1. Put the word and part of speech on the front of the flashcard and the definition and an original sentence (not the sentences provided in the list above) on the back of the flashcard. Electronic flashcards are acceptable and encouraged (for example: download the flashcard app onto your smart phone!).
  • Wednesday, September 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Read the AP English exemplary essay aloud. Evaluate this essay, identifying 10 exemplary qualities of this essay. Use the grading rubric to guide this evaluation.

    2. Self-Assessment: Analyze your first AP English Essay. Walk and talk through the process: what went right, what went wrong, and what do you need? Use the AP English rubric to guide this self-assessment. Identify evidence from your writing to support your analysis.

    3. Peer Review: If time allows, exchange your first AP English Essay with a neighbor and do a peer review. What went right, what went wrong, and what does your peer need?

    4. If time allows, read "Three Questions" (1885) by Leo Tolstoy. Why is this story a parable? How does this story set the tone for the course? For this time in your life? For a lifelong lesson? Discuss/Share.

    How can students recognize the AP English writing skills they need to improve through self-assessment and evaluation of an exemplary AP essay? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13th:
  • Finish today's self-assessment.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #1. Put the word and part of speech on the front of the flashcard and the definition and an original sentence (not the sentences provided in the list above) on the back of the flashcard. Electronic flashcards are acceptable and encouraged (for example: download the flashcard app onto your smart phone!).
  • Tuesday, September 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Read the AP English rubric. Identify key words in each category.

    2. Read a sample, exemplary AP English Essay. What are the top three qualities of this exemplary essay that you'd like to integrate in your own writing?

    *Turn in your resume and college essay at this time.

    2.

    3. Gratitude Writing: List 10 body parts that you are grateful for. By showing this gratitude, you are honoring the memories of the victims who lost their lives on 9/11/01.

    *Check out 9/11 Day Website and do a good deed: volunteer, make a pledge to do good for others, and more.

    How can students recognize the writing skills they need to improve through self-assessment and peer review? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #1. Put the word and part of speech on the front of the flashcard and the definition and an original sentence (not the sentences provided in the list above) on the back of the flashcard. Electronic flashcards are acceptable and encouraged (for example: download the flashcard app onto your smart phone!).
  • Monday, September 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now: See Sample College Essays. Students will share Do's and Don'ts.

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #1.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students prepare for college, with college essays and vocabulary skill building? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • Your Resume (Draft #1): Use these Sample College Resumes and Resume Information to guide you. Note: Only include your primary home address below your name, e-mail address and phone number at the top (centered) of your resume.
  • College Essay (Draft #1). Requirements: 500 word minimum (about two pages), typed, double spaced; TOPIC=YOUR CHOICE. You may choose to focus on one of these questions to discuss in your paper: How are you a unique candidate for the college of your choice? What did you do in high school that makes you unique and worthy of your dream college? (Hint: refer to your contributions to ITHS and/or your community) How do you help better your community and society at large? What are your career interests and how did you develop yourself throughout your high school years to help you for this career? Why is your background unique and what can your background/experiences contribute to your dream college? What is your most significant achievement and why is it meaningful to you? What is your most significant achievement and why is it meaningful to you?). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #1. Put the word and part of speech on the front of the flashcard and the definition and an original sentence (not the sentences provided in the list above) on the back of the flashcard. Electronic flashcards are acceptable and encouraged (for example: download the flashcard app onto your smart phone!).
  • Friday, September 7th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce AP English syllabus.

    2. Introduce HW. Students will receive resumes and college essay questions. They will share Do's and Don'ts.

    How can students better understand AP English course requirements and expectations? DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • Your Resume (Draft #1): Use these Sample College Resumes and Resume Information to guide you. Note: Only include your primary home address below your name, e-mail address and phone number at the top (centered) of your resume.
  • College Essay (Draft #1). Requirements: 500 word minimum (about two pages), typed, double spaced; TOPIC=YOUR CHOICE. You may choose to focus on one of these questions to discuss in your paper: How are you a unique candidate for the college of your choice? What did you do in high school that makes you unique and worthy of your dream college? (Hint: refer to your contributions to ITHS and/or your community) How do you help better your community and society at large? What are your career interests and how did you develop yourself throughout your high school years to help you for this career? Why is your background unique and what can your background/experiences contribute to your dream college? What is your most significant achievement and why is it meaningful to you? What is your most significant achievement and why is it meaningful to you?). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Thursday, September 6th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introductions/Greetings

    2. Work Period: Compose the AP English Free Response Essay (2007). This essay MUST be written in the 40 minutes allotted. This essay will help determine if this class is a suitable fit for students enrolled at this time.

    How can students better understand AP English writing requirements in a sample AP English exam writing piece? DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • Your Resume (Draft #1): Use these Sample College Resumes and Resume Information to guide you. Note: Only include your primary home address below your name, e-mail address and phone number at the top (centered) of your resume.
  • College Essay (Draft #1). Requirements: 500 word minimum (about two pages), typed, double spaced; TOPIC=YOUR CHOICE. You may choose to focus on one of these questions to discuss in your paper: How are you a unique candidate for the college of your choice? What did you do in high school that makes you unique and worthy of your dream college? (Hint: refer to your contributions to ITHS and/or your community) How do you help better your community and society at large? What are your career interests and how did you develop yourself throughout your high school years to help you for this career? Why is your background unique and what can your background/experiences contribute to your dream college? What is your most significant achievement and why is it meaningful to you? What is your most significant achievement and why is it meaningful to you?). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
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