AP English Assignments, September 2009-June 2010

AP English Assignments
September 2009-June 2010

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 14th, 2010: Work Period: Papers returned, grades distributed, and yearbooks signed! How can we effectively finish our last high school English class? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

I enjoyed teaching all of you. See you at graduation!

Friday, June 11th, 2010: Work Period: Make up any HW owed for my class and other classes, if necessary. Q & A regarding college plans. N/A PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

Have a wonderful and safe time at prom this evening!

Wednesday, June 9th, 2010: SENIOR BARBECUE N/A PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

Turn in any owed HW by Friday!

Tuesday, June 8th, 2010: Graduation Speech Presentations (finished today) How can we effectively present a graduation speech in terms of content and delivery? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

Turn in any owed HW by Friday!

Monday, June 7th, 2010: Graduation Speech Presentations How can we effectively present a graduation speech in terms of content and delivery? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY (all remaining speeches will be presented, in the order that they were assigned; IF YOU ARE NOT PRESENT WHEN YOUR NAME IS CALLED TO PRESENT, YOU WILL GET A ZERO. IF YOU'RE NOT SURE OF THE PROCEDURE, ASK MS. CONN. BE READY.):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Friday, June 4th, 2010: Graduation Speech Presentations How can we effectively present a graduation speech in terms of content and delivery? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

DUE MONDAY AND TUESDAY (all remaining speeches will be presented, in the order that they were assigned; IF YOU ARE NOT PRESENT WHEN YOUR NAME IS CALLED TO PRESENT ON MONDAY OR TUESDAY, YOU WILL GET A ZERO. IF YOU'RE NOT SURE OF THE PROCEDURE, ASK MS. CONN. BE READY.):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010: Graduation Speech Presentations How can we effectively present a graduation speech in terms of content and delivery? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

DUE THIS WEEK (assigned date given in class):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010: Graduation Speech Presentations How can we effectively present a graduation speech in terms of content and delivery? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

DUE THIS WEEK (assigned date given in class):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Tuesday, June 1st, 2010: 1 Do Now: Graduation Speech Requirements reviewed.

2. Graduation Speech Presentations

How can we effectively present a graduation speech in terms of content and delivery? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS.

DUE THIS WEEK (assigned date given in class):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Friday, May 28th, 2010: 1 Do Now: Turn in your final paper.

2. Work Period: Write one paragraph of your speech. Practice speech delivery.

How can we prepare for the final paper? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS ON TUESDAY.

PAPER WAS TURNED IN TODAY. NO LATE PAPERS WILL BE ACCEPTED (50% of your grade).

DUE THIS COMING WEEK OF TUESDAY, JUNE 1ST (assigned date given in class):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Thursday, May 27th, 2010: 1 Work Period: Gather resources for your final paper. Freewrite. Review requirements

2. Reflections and Steps for Success: What are the remaining steps needed to be successful? What do you need to do in order to be successful on the final paper? How will you make progress in the final paper?

How can we prepare for the final paper? PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS TOMORROW, WITH YOUR PAPER AND GRADING RUBRIC.


DUE TOMORROW FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER. NO LATE PAPERS WILL BE ACCEPTED (50% of your grade). YOU MUST USE THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

DUE THE WEEK OF TUESDAY, JUNE 1ST (assigned date given in class):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Introduce the Writing in College Resource: University of Chicago.

2. Work Period: Gather resources for your final paper. Freewrite. If time allows work on the following--
2020=Creative Writing: Imagine it's 2020 and you're about to go to your 10-year high school reunion. Write a fictional story about yourself in 2020. Describe your life, the people around you, the state of our country and the world, and your community. Include the effects of your childhood/adolescent events and choices. Show (use the five senses--sight, sound, smell, taste, touch); do not tell. Include both direct quotations (where a person's exact words are used and those words are set off with quotation marks: Jack said, "The match won't start on time if it rains.") and indirect quotations (give the meaning of what a person said, but not necessarily his or her exact words: Jack said that the game would start late if it rains tonight.). Write a minimum of one full, handwritten page. You could potentially use an excerpt from this piece for your graduation speech.

3. Reflections and Steps for Success: What are the remaining steps needed to be successful? What do you need to do in order to be successful on the final paper? How will you make progress in the final paper?

How can we prepare for the final paper?
DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER (50% of your grade) on THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

DUE THE WEEK OF TUESDAY, JUNE 1ST (assigned date given in class):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Tuesday, May 25th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Introduce the Graduation Speech and see a sample valedictorian speech (see details in the HW section). Review the components of the Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

2. Work Period: Write one paragraph (intro., body paragraph, or conclusion) of the graduation speech. Read aloud to a neighbor, paying attention to the grading rubric requirements.

3. Reflections and Steps for Success: How is the speech writing and presentation practice going thus far? What are the steps needed to be successful? What do you need to do in order to be successful on the final paper? How will you make progress in the final paper?

How can we prepare for the speech?
DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER (50% of your grade) on THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

DUE THE WEEK OF TUESDAY, JUNE 1ST (assigned date given in class):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Monday, May 24th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Review the Final Paper requirements.

2. Work Period: Freewrite for the Final Paper. Pose questions and anticipate answers.

How can we prepare for our final assignments--the paper and the speech?
DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER (50% of your grade) on THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

DUE THE WEEK OF TUESDAY, JUNE 1ST (assigned date to be given):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Friday, May 21st, 2010: 1.Do Now: The class divides into two halves--In Favor of Legalization of Marijuana and Opposed to Legalization of Marijuana. Freewrite on your assigned position.

2. Read/Analyze: Class will read this article: CNN.

3. Debate begins.

How can we debate controversial topics in the news?
DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER (50% of your grade) on THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

DUE THE WEEK OF TUESDAY, JUNE 1ST (assigned date to be given):
Graduation Speech (Value=20% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech

Thursday, May 20th, 2010: 1.Do Now: The class divides into two halves--In Favor of Oil Dependence and Opposed to Oil Dependence. Freewrite on your assigned position.

2. Read/Analyze: Class will read this article: "Fallout from the Gulf Oil Spill" from The New York Times.

3. Debate begins.

How can we debate controversial topics in the news?
DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER (50% of your grade) on THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.
Wednesday, May 19th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Finish yesterday's debate. Student volunteers who will cross-examine with challenging questions to the opposition. Each side will have the opportunity to answer. Final statements.

2. Discuss/Analyze: The second debate begins. Class will read this article: "The Battle Over Taxing Soda" from The New York Times. Class will divide into two sides: Opposed to the Soda Tax and In Favor of the Soda Tax.

How can we debate controversial topics in the news?
DUE FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER (50% of your grade) on THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.
Tuesday, May 18th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Divide half of the class into the following: In Favor of Immigration Law Reform and Opposed to Immigration Law Reform. Freewrite about a page of arguments for your assigned position.

2. Read the following news article and take notes that are appropriate for your position: New York Times Article on the Arizona Immigration Law

3. Discussion/Analysis: Student volunteers share their platform position, using hard evidence from the New York Times article to support their position. Then, there will be time for rebuttal (student volunteers will argue against the opposition, with appropriate evidence). Finally, there will be student volunteers who will cross-examine with challenging questions to the opposition. Each side will have the opportunity to answer.

How can we debate a controversial topic in the news?
DUE FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER (50% of your grade) on THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.
Monday, May 17th, 2010: Final Paper Instructions How can we prepare for our final paper?
DUE FRIDAY, MAY 28th: FINAL PAPER (50% of your grade) on THIS FOCUS=Viktor Frankl, the author of Man's Search for Meaning, was a psychiatrist who survived the Holocaust and documented in his writing that human beings cannot choose the course of their lives, but instead can choose how they deal with their experiences, both the joys and sufferings. Frankl argued that people's primary drives are to find purpose and meaning in their lives. With a focus on Frankl's theory, identify and analyze three works of literature studied this academic year that reveal characters who encounter personal sufferings and, consequently, survive because of the discovery and pursuit of what they find personally meaningful. You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's focus). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper focus) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.
Friday, May 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Write your Senior Will. Begin it with the following: "I, ___________, being of ______________mind, and ______________body, bequeath...

2. Yoga. Tip of the Day: If you act it, you will feel it. Sing in the morning!

How can we relax, reflect and revitalize? Final Paper (50% of your grade) due May 28th. It will be 3-5 pp. It will focus on the course theme of identity and self-exploration. You will choose three novels/plays in which this theme is revealed. MORE INFO TO COME!

Graduation Speech (20% of your grade)--due June 2nd/3rd/4th (depending on your assigned day). MORE INFO. TO COME!

Thursday, May 13th, 2010: FILM VIEWING OF THE HURT LOCKER How can we effectively analyze the best movie of the year and prepare for our debate on current events/hot topics? Final Paper (50% of your grade) due May 28th. It will be 3-5 pp. It will focus on the course theme of identity and self-exploration. You will choose three novels/plays in which this theme is revealed. MORE INFO. TO COME!

Graduation Speech (20% of your grade)--due June 2nd/3rd/4th (depending on your assigned day). MORE INFO. TO COME!

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Multi-cultural Feast!

2. FILM VIEWING OF THE HURT LOCKER

How can we effectively analyze the best movie of the year and prepare for our debate on current events/hot topics? Final Paper (50% of your grade) due May 28th. It will be 3-5 pp. It will focus on the course theme of identity and self-exploration. You will choose three novels/plays in which this theme is revealed. MORE INFO. TO COME!

Graduation Speech (20% of your grade)--due June 2nd/3rd/4th (depending on your assigned day). MORE INFO. TO COME!

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010: FILM VIEWING OF THE HURT LOCKER How can we effectively analyze the best movie of the year and prepare for our debate on current events/hot topics? Prepare your multicultural meal/dessert--bring in TOMORROW! Bring enough for 5-7 people. Napkins would be appreciated.

Final Paper (50% of your grade) due May 28th. It will be 3-5 pp. It will focus on the course theme of identity and self-exploration. You will choose three novels/plays in which this theme is revealed. MORE INFO. TO COME!

Graduation Speech (20% of your grade)--due June 2nd/3rd/4th (depending on your assigned day). MORE INFO. TO COME!

Monday, May 10th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Two remaining AP English Study Guide Presentations (given by Roxanne and Keyanna). They will explain how they used their study guides on the AP English Literature Exam.

2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and share the votes and final decision regarding the remaining month of class. First, this week we will watch The Hurt Locker and have a multicultural feast, then we will engage in current event debates, following that, we will review the final paper requirements, and finally we will discuss the graduation speech requirements and present the speeches! We will also have yoga Fridays!

How can we reflect and plan out the rest of the AP English course? Prepare your multicultural meal/dessert--bring in on Wednesday!

Final Paper (50% of your grade) due May 28th. It will be 3-5 pp. It will focus on the course theme of identity and self-exploration. You will choose three novels/plays in which this theme is revealed.

Friday, May 7th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Reflect on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM. Did it meet your expectations? What were your strengths? What was challenging?

2. Yoga!

3. What would you like to do in this class for the rest of the year? Films? Philosophical discussion? More yoga?

How can we relax and revitalize after the exam? None :)

Final Paper (50% of your grade) due May 28th. It will be 3-5 pp. It will focus on the course theme of identity and self-exploration. You will choose three novels/plays in which this theme is revealed.

Thursday, May 6th, 2010: AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM How can we be asssessed on the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? None :)
Wednesday, May 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: AP Exam Reminders for TOMORROW (see HW section)

2. Discuss/Share: What are the skills we should know and apply for tomorrow's AP exam? How can we tackle the difficult questions and texts on the exam? Why are we prepared for this exam? This discussion will capitalize on the positives in terms of preparation and knowledge.

3. End of Semester Reminders: 70% of your grade for the 3rd marking period is yet to be completed--final paper due Friday, May 28th (50%) and graduation speech (20%) due the week of June 7th.

4. Final Q & A for the AP English Literature Exam--any remaining questions and concerns? Ask them now.

How can we prepare for the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS TOMORROW THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM! BEST OF LUCK!!


  • What should I do the night and morning before the exam? Eat a hearty, nutritious dinner tonight (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Relax tonight. Watch a movie or play a game. Then, find a quiet spot and go throug your notebook, review sheets, exam notes, study guides and details of the full-length novels/plays that you might write about in the free-response essay. Sleep well! Get up VERY early, enough time to get to school. Wear comfortable clothing and extra layers (a sweater/long-sleeve shirt in case the room temperature changes). Come to Room 232 for breakfast (bagels and cream cheese, bananas, muffins, and/or juice) and moral support at 7-7:30am. Turn OFF all electronic devices. Go to the music room --ROOM 207 for the exam (EXAM STARTS AT 8AM, promptly!). Do not stress. Remind yourself that you have prepared thoroughly and that this test is a great challenge and opportunity you have been given, due to your hard work throughout high school. Be confident and proud of yourself, and you will succeed. It's your time to shine!
  • What should I bring to the exam? Student ID, Several pencils with erasers, several black pens (black ink is easier to read than other colors), a watch, something to drink (water is best), a quiet snack (like lifesavers or mints), and tissues
  • How come we haven't figured out what score range we fall into (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5)? The total score ranges each year, as it is based on a variety of items including: AP distribution over the past three years, comparability studies, frequency distributions of scores on each section and the essays, and average scores on each exam section and essays. Though, to be a candidate for a 3 or higher, you need to get at least 1/2 of the multiple-choice questions correct. Keep that mind! Also, your essays must be strong, addressing the question thoroughly, with sophisticated language and thoughtful insight.

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #1 (the poem):

  • Kacper and Chelsea
  • Benjamin and Jonpierre
  • Shaileen and DongMi
  • Oak and Sim

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #2 (the prose passage):

  • Carolina and Michelle
  • Laura and Jackie
  • Moin and Daniel
  • Michael and Damian
  • Keyanna and Marco

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #3 (free-response essay):

  • Pooja and Johnathan
  • Dalianny and Anthony

    Check out your classmates' study guides for the Multiple Choice Question section:

  • Daribel and Zoe
  • Grace and Krystal
  • Cody and Breeonna
  • Daniela, Shalin and Roxanne

    Check out important resources for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's AP English Literature Exam Section of PREVIOUS EXAMS
  • Additional Strategies Compiled By Previous Classes
  • AP English Literature Website with GREAT Resource Links
  • READ A NOVEL/PLAY from this list of GREAT AP Titles

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

  • Tuesday, May 4th, 2010: 1. Do Now: AP Exam answer sheet completion

    2. Review multiple-choice question types and definitions of literary terms, including euphemism, litotes, apostrophe, etc.

    How can we prepare for the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #1 (the poem):
  • Kacper and Chelsea
  • Benjamin and Jonpierre
  • Shaileen and DongMi
  • Oak and Sim

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #2 (the prose passage):

  • Carolina and Michelle
  • Laura and Jackie
  • Moin and Daniel
  • Michael and Damian
  • Keyanna and Marco

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #3 (free-response essay):

  • Pooja and Johnathan
  • Dalianny and Anthony

    Check out your classmates' study guides for the Multiple Choice Question section:

  • Daribel and Zoe
  • Grace and Krystal
  • Cody and Breeonna
  • Daniela, Shalin and Roxanne

    Check out important resources for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's AP English Literature Exam Section of PREVIOUS EXAMS
  • Additional Strategies Compiled By Previous Classes
  • AP English Literature Website with GREAT Resource Links
  • READ A NOVEL/PLAY from this list of GREAT AP Titles

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

  • Monday, May 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Study Guide Presentations for the multiple-choice question section and any students who didn't present from previous days.

    2. AP Exam answer sheet completion.

    How can we prepare for the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #1 (the poem):
  • Kacper and Chelsea
  • Benjamin and Jonpierre
  • Shaileen and DongMi
  • Oak and Sim

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #2 (the prose passage):

  • Carolina and Michelle
  • Laura and Jackie
  • Moin and Daniel
  • Michael and Damian

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #3 (free-response essay):

  • Pooja and Johnathan
  • Dalianny and Anthony

    Check out your classmates' study guides for the Multiple Choice Question section:

  • Daribel and Zoe
  • Grace and Krystal
  • Cody and Breeonna
  • Daniela, Shalin and Roxanne

    Check out important resources for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's AP English Literature Exam Section of PREVIOUS EXAMS
  • Additional Strategies Compiled By Previous Classes
  • AP English Literature Website with GREAT Resource Links
  • READ A NOVEL/PLAY from this list of GREAT AP Titles

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

  • Friday, April 30th, 2010: Do Now: Study Guide Presentations for the multiple-choice question section and any students who didn't present from previous days. How can we prepare for the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #1 (the poem):
  • Kacper and Chelsea
  • Benjamin and Jonpierre
  • Shaileen and DongMi
  • Oak and Sim

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #2 (the prose passage):

  • Carolina and Michelle
  • Laura and Jackie
  • Moin and Daniel
  • Michael and Damian

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #3 (free-response essay):

  • Pooja and Johnathan
  • Dalianny and Anthony

    Check out your classmates' study guides for the Multiple Choice Question section:

  • Daribel and Zoe
  • Grace and Krystal
  • Cody and Breeonna
  • Daniela, Shalin and Roxanne

    Check out important resources for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's AP English Literature Exam Section of PREVIOUS EXAMS
  • Additional Strategies Compiled By Previous Classes
  • AP English Literature Website with GREAT Resource Links
  • READ A NOVEL/PLAY from this list of GREAT AP Titles

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

  • Thursday, April 29th, 2010: Do Now: Study Guide Presentations for essay questions #2 (the prose passage) and #3 (free-response). How can we prepare for the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #1 (the poem):
  • Kacper and Chelsea
  • Benjamin and Jonpierre
  • Shaileen and DongMi
  • Oak and Sim

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #2 (the prose passage):

  • Carolina and Michelle
  • Laura and Jackie
  • Moin and Daniel

    Check out your classmates' study guides for Essay Question #3 (free-response essay):

  • Pooja and Johnathan
  • Dalianny and Anthony

    Check out important resources for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's AP English Literature Exam Section of PREVIOUS EXAMS
  • Additional Strategies Compiled By Previous Classes
  • AP English Literature Website with GREAT Resource Links
  • READ A NOVEL/PLAY from this list of GREAT AP Titles

    DUE TOMORROW (FRIDAY) (see your assigned day below):

  • Create a two-page study guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your study guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your study guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the entire 15% of your 3rd marking period HW grade (yes, this is your ONLY HW assignment for the 3rd marking period! Don't worry; you will have two other assignments--a paper and a speech, but they will count as part of the papers/exams/presentations section of your grade, which makes up a total of 50%).
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section; any remaining presentations will present TOMORROW; #12-15 will present the multiple-choice question section will present TOMORROW, Friday, April 30th:
    1. Benjamin Arnemann and Jonpierre Coakland
    2. Oak Aung and Harsimran Janjua
    3. Shaileen Berlas and DongMi Won
    4. Chelsea Castro and Kacper Wegiel
    5. Carolina Diaz and Chwen Lien
    6. Laura Diaz and Jacqueline Sanchez
    7. Marco Espejo and Keyanna Millinger
    8. Daniel Garcia and Moin Uddin
    9. Pooja Kar and Johnathan Malinowski
    10. Dalianny Nunez and Anthony Saravia
    11. Michael Peterson and Damian Silva
    12. Krystal Quero and Grace Zuniga
    13. Zoe Randolph and Daribel Taveras
    14. Breeonna Reed and Cody Walthall
    15. Daniela Sanchez, Roxanne Lebron and Shalin Shah (3-page study guide)


  • You do not need to print out your study guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

  • Wednesday, April 28th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Study Guide Presentations for essay question #1 (the poem!).

    2. Work Period: Work with your partner to prepare for tomorrow's and Friday's presentations.

    How can we prepare for the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? DUE TOMORROW (THURSDAY) OR FRIDAY (see your assigned day below):
  • Create a two-page study guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your study guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your study guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the entire 15% of your 3rd marking period HW grade (yes, this is your ONLY HW assignment for the 3rd marking period! Don't worry; you will have two other assignments--a paper and a speech, but they will count as part of the papers/exams/presentations section of your grade, which makes up a total of 50%).
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section; #5-8 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on Thursday, April 29th; #9-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on Thursday, April 29th and #12-15 will present the multiple-choice question section on Friday, April 30th) :
    1. Benjamin Arnemann and Jonpierre Coakland
    2. Oak Aung and Harsimran Janjua
    3. Shaileen Berlas and DongMi Won
    4. Chelsea Castro and Kacper Wegiel
    5. Carolina Diaz and Chwen Lien
    6. Laura Diaz and Jacqueline Sanchez
    7. Marco Espejo and Keyanna Millinger
    8. Daniel Garcia and Moin Uddin
    9. Pooja Kar and Johnathan Malinowski
    10. Dalianny Nunez and Anthony Saravia
    11. Michael Peterson and Damian Silva
    12. Krystal Quero and Grace Zuniga
    13. Zoe Randolph and Daribel Taveras
    14. Breeonna Reed and Cody Walthall
    15. Daniela Sanchez, Roxanne Lebron and Shalin Shah (3-page study guide)


  • You do not need to print out your study guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

  • Tuesday, April 27th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Listen to HW requirements.

    2. Work Period: Work with your partner.

    3. Paper returns and essay reminders.

    How can we prepare for the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? DUE TOMORROW (WEDNESDAY), THURSDAY OR FRIDAY (see your assigned day below):
  • Create a two-page study guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your study guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your study guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the entire 15% of your 3rd marking period HW grade (yes, this is your ONLY HW assignment for the 3rd marking period! Don't worry; you will have two other assignments--a paper and a speech, but they will count as part of the papers/exams/presentations section of your grade, which makes up a total of 50%).
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section (#1-4 will present essay question #1 (the poem!) on Wednesday, April 28th; #5-8 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on Thursday, April 29th; #9-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on Thursday, April 29th and #12-15 will present the multiple-choice question section on Friday, April 30th) :
    1. Benjamin Arnemann and Jonpierre Coakland
    2. Oak Aung and Harsimran Janjua
    3. Shaileen Berlas and DongMi Won
    4. Chelsea Castro and Kacper Wegiel
    5. Carolina Diaz and Chwen Lien
    6. Laura Diaz and Jacqueline Sanchez
    7. Marco Espejo and Keyanna Millinger
    8. Daniel Garcia and Moin Uddin
    9. Pooja Kar and Johnathan Malinowski
    10. Dalianny Nunez and Anthony Saravia
    11. Michael Peterson and Damian Silva
    12. Krystal Quero and Grace Zuniga
    13. Zoe Randolph and Daribel Taveras
    14. Breeonna Reed and Cody Walthall
    15. Daniela Sanchez, Roxanne Lebron and Shalin Shah (3-page study guide)


  • You do not need to print out your study guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

  • Monday, April 26th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Listen to HW requirements.

    2. Work Period: Work with your partner.

    How can we prepare for the AP English Literature Exam, using our own knowledge? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY OR FRIDAY (see your assigned day below):
  • Create a two-page study guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your study guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your study guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the entire 15% of your 3rd marking period HW grade (yes, this is your ONLY HW assignment for the 3rd marking period! Don't worry; you will have two other assignments--a paper and a speech, but they will count as part of the papers/exams/presentations section of your grade, which makes up a total of 50%).
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section (#1-4 will present essay question #1 (the poem!) on Wednesday, April 28th; #5-8 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on Thursday, April 29th; #9-11 will present essay question #3 (free response) on Thursday, April 29th and #12-15 will present the multiple-choice question section on Friday, April 30th) :
    1. Benjamin Arnemann and Jonpierre Coakland
    2. Oak Aung and Harsimran Janjua
    3. Shaileen Berlas and DongMi Won
    4. Chelsea Castro and Kacper Wegiel
    5. Carolina Diaz and Chwen Lien
    6. Laura Diaz and Jacqueline Sanchez
    7. Marco Espejo and Keyanna Millinger
    8. Daniel Garcia and Moin Uddin
    9. Pooja Kar and Johnathan Malinowski
    10. Dalianny Nunez and Anthony Saravia
    11. Michael Peterson and Damian Silva
    12. Krystal Quero and Grace Zuniga
    13. Zoe Randolph and Daribel Taveras
    14. Breeonna Reed and Cody Walthall
    15. Daniela Sanchez, Roxanne Lebron and Shalin Shah (3-page study guide)


  • You do not need to print out your study guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

  • Friday, April 23rd, 2010--Happy Birthday Shakespeare!: 1. Do Now: Reading of Sonnet 18 and eating of cookies and juice to commemorate Shakespeare's birthday!

    2. Career Workshop in the Library

    How can we prepare for life after high school? Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

    Thursday, April 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read over the AP English Literature Exam Review Needs (compiled from your index cards of questions and concerns for the AP Exam). Take notes on strategies and answers (make educated guesses, if necessary) for each of your classmates' needs.

    2. Work Period: Use your notes in your file folders to add to your notes.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your findings.

    How can AP students review their knowledge of the components and strategies for success on the AP English Literature Exam? TOMORROW IS THE LAST DAY OF 2ND MARKING PERIOD! TURN IN ANY OWED HW.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

    Wednesday, April 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Examine your AP Exam Freewrite (students had to write two full pages on their memory of the components of the AP exam, including the strategies involved). Look through your accessible AP materials and add at least one more full page on strategies and components of the AP exam.

    2. Work Period: Write an index card filled with questions and concerns that you have for the AP exam, which include things that you'd like to address in these last two weeks before the exam. Create a chart paper of class strengths and weaknesses.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss those strengths and weaknesses and questions and concerns.

    How can AP students review their knowledge of the components and strategies for success on the AP English Literature Exam? Continue to review your AP materials!

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 6TH AT 8AM!

    Tuesday, April 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's interactive role play!

    2. Volunteer "Who Am I?" Student volunteers will take a character card and will act out their character with another volunteer or with just the audience. They will have two minutes only. Audience members will guess at the end of the two minutes.

    3. AP Exam Freewrite (students will write two full pages on the components of the AP exam, including the strategies involved).

    How can AP students review their knowledge of characters through interactive role play? Continue to review your AP materials!
    Monday, April 19th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Listen to interactive role play instructions. Students will get into groups of four. Each student will stand up by his/her seat and have a group member tape a character's name on his/her back. They are NOT to say a word during this process (no one can reveal the character's name to your group mate). Then groups will be called up to the front of the room/stage to do an impromptu skit in which members will talk to each other and interact with each other, treating their group members as the characters from the plays/novels we've read this year. Each group will have four minutes on stage to interact. At the end of the four minutes, the group members will reveal who they think they are. If all group members guessed correctly, then they will be presented with a prize tomorrow.

    2. Interactive Role Play! Four groups will act today.

    3. Study Guide Returns and Review

  • Attention to Requirements
  • Credit to Sources/Plagiarism
  • How can AP students review their knowledge of characters through interactive role play? Continue to review your AP materials!
    Friday, April 16th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing the following questions, as referring to The Importance of Being Earnest: What are the social conventions (customs) of this Victorian era(1890's), as seen in the play? How are social conventions important to this society? Why did Wilde choose to focus his play on these social conventions? Examine other satires of the 18th century (A Modest Proposal) and of the 20th century (Orwellian literature, Fahrenheit 451). This may include or add the following:
  • Gwendolen's pursuit of Jack/Ernest--following her ideal man based on a name only! (p. 19)
  • Jack's pursuit of getting christened as Ernest; the religious influence of the time period in London, England (p. 20)
  • smoking (p. 22)
  • a man's income, investments and his acquisitions (p. 22)
  • a man's political beliefs/values (p. 23)
  • a man's position in society (p. 24)
  • the marital approval of parents/relatives (p. 25)
  • the importance of improving oneself (p. 33)
  • men do not cheat and women do not find married men attractive (p. 40)
  • girls are not educated (p. 53)
  • women who think for themselves (p. 56)
  • a single woman who has no prospect for engagement (p. 70)
  • possession of income/assets makes one more attractive (p. 80)
  • the coming of age of a woman is required in order to be married (p. 81)

    2. Discuss/Share: What are the social conventions of our modern day era? How are they important to our modern day society? What are the satires (comical attacks that are ironic and sarcastic) made on our modern day social conventions (Saturday Night Live, Borat, Stephen Colbert, The Simpsons, The Onion, South Park, etc.)? Why are these satires made?

  • How can AP students examine the importance of social conventions in The Importance of Being Earnest and modern-day society? Continue to review your AP materials!
    Thursday, April 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the novels that are appropriate for the commonly used topics for the free-response essay question:
  • a character opposed to or alienated from society
  • a character investigates a mystery
  • an ending with spiritual reassessment or moral reconciliation
  • suspenseful mental or psychological events
  • a significant social event
  • a character faces a dilemma created by competing forces
  • a character harboring an important secret
  • the effect of a minor or absent character on the protagonist
  • a victim of prejudice
  • a character overcoming odds to succeed
  • a rebel at odds with society

    *Provide a book title that could be used for each topic.

    2. Work Period: Examine the following questions, as referring to The Importance of Being Earnest: What are the social conventions (customs) of this Victorian era(1890's), as seen in the play? How are social conventions important to this Victorian society? 3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the class' findings regarding the question in #2, which may include or add the following:

  • Gwendolen's pursuit of Jack/Ernest--following her ideal man based on a name only! (p. 19)
  • Jack's pursuit of getting christened as Ernest; the religious influence of the time period in London, England (p. 20)
  • smoking (p. 22)
  • a man's income, investments and his acquisitions (p. 22)
  • a man's political beliefs/values (p. 23)
  • a man's position in society (p. 24)
  • the marital approval of parents/relatives (p. 25)
  • the importance of improving oneself (p. 33)
  • men do not cheat and women do not find married men attractive (p. 40)
  • girls are not educated (p. 53)
  • women who think for themselves (p. 56)
  • a single woman who has no prospect for engagement (p. 70)
  • possession of income/assets makes one more attractive (p. 80)
  • the coming of age of a woman is required in order to be married (p. 81)

  • How can AP students examine the importance of social conventions in The Importance of Being Earnest? Continue to review your AP materials!
    Wednesday, April 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Quiz on The Importance of Being Earnest. Grade it!

    2.Discuss/Share: Review novels that are appropriate for the commonly used topics for the free-response essay question:

  • a character opposed to or alienated from society
  • a character investigates a mystery
  • an ending with spiritual reassessment or moral reconciliation
  • suspenseful mental or psychological events
  • a significant social event
  • a character faces a dilemma created by competing forces
  • a character harboring an important secret
  • the effect of a minor or absent character on the protagonist
  • a victim of prejudice
  • a character overcoming odds to succeed
  • a rebel at odds with society

    *Provide a book title that could be used for each topic.

  • How can AP students be assessed on their knowledge and study of The Importance of Being Earnest? Continue to review your AP materials!
    Tuesday, April 13th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce Peer Review--Grade your classmate's essays and use the following criteria:
  • relevant and specific references to the text
  • develops a valid thesis
  • insightful analysis of the work of literature
  • appropriate and sophisticated language used
  • strong control of language

    2. Work Period: Use the AP essay grading rubric to grade your classmate's essays. Write a 1/2 page commentary for each essay, addressing how they address or do not address the rubric.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the grading process.

    4. Introduce the commonly used topics for the free-response essay question:

  • a character opposed to or alienated from society
  • a character investigates a mystery
  • an ending with spiritual reassessment or moral reconciliation
  • suspenseful mental or psychological events
  • a significant social event
  • a character faces a dilemma created by competing forces
  • a character harboring an important secret
  • the effect of a minor or absent character on the protagonist
  • a victim of prejudice
  • a character overcoming odds to succeed
  • a rebel at odds with society

    *Provide a book title that could be used for each topic.

  • How can AP students more effectively understand the components of a successful essay? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14TH:
  • Read the play, The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde.
  • Writing assignment: Study Guide! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! There will be a reading quiz on this play!
  • Monday, April 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review multiple-choice questions and answers in the practice exam. Examine question types (i.e. the purpose of literary techniques such as allusion and imagery, tone/mood, characterization, inference).

    2. Peer Review: Grade your classmate's essay based on the following criteria:

  • relevant and specific references to the text
  • develops a valid thesis
  • insightful analysis of the work of literature
  • appropriate and sophisticated language used
  • strong control of language
  • How can AP students acquire strategies in answering multiple-choice questions? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14TH:
  • Read the play, The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde.
  • Writing assignment: Study Guide! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! There will be a reading quiz on this play!
  • Friday, April 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review multiple-choice questions and answers in the practice exam.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Examine question types (i.e. the purpose of literary techniques such as allusion and imagery, tone/mood, characterization, inference).

    How can AP students assess their knowledge of literary terms and multiple-choice questions? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14TH:
  • Read the play, The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde.
  • Writing assignment: Study Guide! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! There will be a reading quiz on this play!
  • Thursday, April 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Grade the Quiz on the Glossary of Terms

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Begin to review answers to the multiple-choice questions on the first passage on the Practice Exam.

    How can AP students assess their knowledge of literary terms and multiple-choice questions? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14TH:
  • Read the play, The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde.
  • Writing assignment: Study Guide! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! There will be a reading quiz on this play!
  • Wednesday, April 7th, 2010--Welcome Back!: 1. Do Now: Quiz on the Glossary of Terms (10% of the 2nd marking period).

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Begin to review answers to the multiple-choice questions on the Practice Exam. Calculate answers correct, incorrect and skipped.

    3. Turn in Practice Exam packet (star the essay to be graded and star the multiple-choice questions if you'd like it graded; the other essays will be peer reviewed)

    How can AP students assess their knowledge of literary terms and multiple-choice questions? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14TH:
  • Read the play, The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde.
  • Writing assignment: Study Guide! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! There will be a reading quiz on this play!
  • Friday, March 26th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish review of the Glossary of Terms.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss the independent reading novels and the study guide writing process. Examine the following:

  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation

    3. HW Reminders

  • How can AP students use the analysis of the independent novels to guide them in preparation for the AP exam? DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7TH (THE DAY WE RETURN FROM SPRING BREAK):
  • Quiz on the Glossary of Terms (they are accessible in the back of the practice exam packet and in 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature, Second Edition). This will be worth 10% of 2nd marking period. Suggestion: Make flashcards--they are very helpful and you're studying while you make them!
  • The COMPLETED PRACTICE TEST A (this is a 3-hour exam! Time yourself accordingly). You MUST complete the entire thing to earn credit (including the three essays, of course). We will be working with the entire packet in class, including peer review of the essays. You also will have the option for the following: You can be GRADED ON ONE ESSAY OF YOUR CHOICE (50% of your 2nd marking period grade) OR GRADED ON ONE ESSAY OF YOUR CHOICE AND THE MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTION SECTION (a total of 50% of your 2nd marking period grade).
  • Thursday, March 25th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish the Diagnostic Practice Exam (the final 30 minutes)

    2. Discuss/Share: Review the answers for the Diagnostic Practice Exam. Add up the total number correct and the total number incorrect (do not count blank answers). Everyone's goal should be to get more than half of the answers correct. Students should skip questions, if necessary, instead of getting answers incorrect.

    3. Review the Glossary of Terms!

    How can AP students apply our multiple-choice question strategies to today's diagnostic practice exam? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide (15% of your 2nd marking period grade; compose your study guides in organized, outline forms) for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Wednesday, March 24th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Listen to the practice exam instructions.

    2. Work Period: Diagnostic Practice Exam

    How can AP students apply our multiple-choice question strategies to today's diagnostic practice exam? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish Classwork Assignment: Create a minimum of FIVE AP-style multiple-choice questions and five answer choices, using your life as the text. Use p. 39 to guide you in the key words and phrases that you should use to create challenging questions. Look through the diagnostic exam to find models for challenging questions and answers.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide (15% of your 2nd marking period grade; compose your study guides in organized outline forms) for each novel.

  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Work on Understanding Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement and do the exercises that follow. Work on Understanding Dependent and Independent Clauses and do the exercises that follow.

    2. Work Period: Create a minimum of FIVE AP-style multiple-choice questions and five answer choices, using your life as the text. Use p. 39 to guide you in the key words and phrases that you should use to create challenging questions. Look through the diagnostic exam to find models for challenging questions and answers.

    3. Exchange your questions with a classmate who knows you well and who could know the answers about YOU! :)

    How can AP students benefit from review of clauses (dependent and independent), antecedents and question composition? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide (15% of your 2nd marking period grade; compose your study guides in organized outline forms) for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Monday, March 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the answers and strategies for the Diagnostic Exam multiple-choice questions.

    2. Work Period: Create a minimum of FIVE AP-style multiple-choice questions and five answer choices, using your life as the text. Use p. 39 to guide you in the key words and phrases that you should use to create challenging questions. Look through the diagnostic exam to find models for challenging questions and answers.

    3. Exchange your questions with a classmate who knows you well and who could know the answers about YOU! :)

    How can AP students benefit from question composition? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide (15% of your 2nd marking period grade; compose your study guides in organized outline forms) for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Friday, March 19th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Create a minimum of FIVE AP-style multiple-choice questions and five answer choices, using your life as the text. Use p. 39 to guide you in the key words and phrases that you should use to create challenging questions. Look through the diagnostic exam to find models for challenging questions and answers.

    2. Work Period: Exchange your questions with a classmate who knows you well and who could know the answers about YOU! :)

    How can AP students benefit from question composition? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide (in an organized outline form) for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Thursday, March 18th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the answers, process of elimination and question types for the AP multiple-choice question diagnostic exam. How can AP students benefit from multiple-choice question analysis? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Wednesday, March 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Prepare two intelligent, thought-provoking questions for our guest (on the index card).

    2. Listen and Learn from our Career Day Guest Speaker!

    How can AP students benefit from Career Day? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Tuesday, March 16th, 2010: Diagnostic EXAM (Multiple-Choice Questions ONLY)-50 minutes How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through analysis of multiple-choice questions? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Monday, March 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Analyze the poem and the first 10 questions and answers of the diagnostic exam.

    2. Work Period: Identify question types for each question in the first 10 questions and answers of the diagnostic exam.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through analysis of multiple-choice question strategies? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Friday, March 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish the multiple-choice question strategy packet. Finish reviewing strategies for success on the multiple-choice questions of the AP English Literature Exam, focusing on a poetry selection.

    2. Work Period: Compose a sample factual, technical, analytical and inferential question for the sample poem.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss and share the sample questions.

    4. If time allows, begin the poem and the first 10 questions of the diagnostic exam.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through analysis of multiple-choice question strategies? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Thursday, March 11th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue with the study and analysis of the multiple-choice question strategy packet. Continue reviewing strategies for success on the multiple-choice questions of the AP English Literature Exam, focusing on a poetry selection.

    2. Work Period: Compose a sample factual, technical, analytical and inferential question for the sample poem.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss and share the sample questions.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through analysis of multiple-choice question strategies? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Wednesday, March 10th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue analyzing the multiple-choice question strategy packet. Review strategies for success on the multiple-choice questions of the AP English Literature Exam, which include understanding and composing questions.

    2. Work Period: Compose sample factual, technical, analytical and inferential questions for a sample prose selection.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through analysis of multiple-choice question strategies? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, and imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, and objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, and origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, and figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Tuesday, March 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce multiple-choice question strategy packet. Begin reviewing strategies for success on the multiple-choice questions of the AP English Literature Exam.

    2. Introduce the independent reading HW. Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.

  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through analysis of multiple-choice question strategies? DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 26th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel.
  • For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology
  • For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality
  • For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war
  • For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
  • Monday, March 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish analyzing "The Naked and the Nude" poem by Robert Graves. In our analysis, focus on the TP-CASTT. Analyze the poem, annotating and understanding the title's significance, paraphrasing, connotation, attitude, shifts and theme. Address the AP essay question in the analysis.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Review the essay question #2 grades and rubric (the essays completed with partners). Return those essays and the dialectical journals, explaining the evaluation process and strategies for success.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through their assessment of poetry, along with the TP-CASTT mnemonic device, and short fiction selections? NO HW. RELAX AND REVIEW OLD AP MATERIALS! :)
    Friday, March 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce TP-CASTT for poetry analysis and analyze "The Naked and the Nude" poem by Robert Graves using this mnemonic device. Read aloud twice.

    2. Work Period: Analyze the poem, annotating and understanding the title's significance, paraphrasing, connotation, attitude, shifts and theme.

    3. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss as a class.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through their assessment of the novellas, The Awakening and The Metamorphosis and TP-CASTT? QUIZ IS CANCELLED FOR TOMORROW. NO HW TOMORROW OR THE WEEKEND. RELAX AND REVIEW OLD AP MATERIALS! :)
    Thursday, March 4th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Final Discussion on the novellas, The Awakening and The Metamorphosis. What was most compelling? What literary devices contributed most to the meanings of the works as a whole? What are the novellas saying about the human experience, motivation or condition? What ideas do the authors want you, the readers, to take away with?

    2. Introduce TP-CASTT for poetry analysis and analyze "The Naked and the Nude" poem by Robert Graves using this mnemonic device.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through their assessment of the novellas, The Awakening and The Metamorphosis and TP-CASTT? QUIZ IS CANCELLED FOR TOMORROW. NO HW TOMORROW OR THE WEEKEND. RELAX AND REVIEW OLD AP MATERIALS! :)
    Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Quiz on the novellas, The Awakening and The Metamorphosis.

    2. Grade the quizzes.

    3. Grade distribution.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP exam through their assessment of the novellas, The Awakening and The Metamorphosis? Due Friday, March 5th:
  • Quiz on the AP 9-point rubric
  • Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Brainstorming and study guide outline preparation with a partner.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Discuss the themes of alienation, societal expectations, and self-determination. Discuss the evidence of literary terms--point of view, imagery, diction, and tone.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP essay questions through analysis and evidence of themes and literary terms? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, March 3rd:
  • Read The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and The Awakening by Kate Chopin.
  • Study Guide for both novellas (5% of this marking period): Create a study guide in outline form. Your study guide should be no longer than two pages typed. In your study guide, you should include an analytical focus (point of view, imagery, diction and tone) and a thematic focus (alienation, societal expectations and self-determination), and be sure to address how these elements impact the characters' experiences and purposes in each of the novellas.
  • Quiz on both novellas (10% of this marking period)
  • Monday, March 1st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the HW assignment details (due on Wed.)

    2. Work Period: Reflect on the components of the AP 9-point rubric in an ungraded quiz. Check your answers.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the answers to the AP 9-point rubric.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP essay questions through question and rubric analysis? Due THIS Wednesday, March 3rd:
  • Read The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and The Awakening by Kate Chopin.
  • Study Guide for both novellas (5% of this marking period): Create a study guide in outline form. Your study guide should be no longer than two pages typed. In your study guide, you should include an analytical focus (point of view, imagery, diction and tone) and a thematic focus (alienation, societal expectations and self-determination), and be sure to address how these elements impact the characters' experiences and purposes in each of the novellas.
  • Quiz on both novellas (10% of this marking period)
  • Friday, February 26th, 2010:

    Standard 3: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation; Standard 4: Language for Social Interaction

    SNOW DAY N/A Due NEXT Wednesday, March 3rd:
  • Read The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and The Awakening by Kate Chopin.
  • Study Guide for both novellas (5% of this marking period): Create a study guide in outline form. Your study guide should be no longer than two pages typed. In your study guide, you should include an analytical focus (point of view, imagery, diction and tone) and a thematic focus (alienation, societal expectations and self-determination), and be sure to address how these elements impact the characters' experiences and purposes in each of the novellas.
  • Quiz on both novellas (10% of this marking period)
  • Thursday, February 25th, 2010:

    Standard 3: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation; Standard 4: Language for Social Interaction

    1. Do Now: Review subsidiary questions, the process of composition and the value of composing them for the AP essay questions.

    2. Work Period: With your partner, compose at least three subsidiary questions for each of the sample essay question #2 handouts given in previous days.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share subsidiary question samples with the whole class.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on the components of the AP 9-point rubric in an ungraded quiz. Check your answers.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP essay questions through question and rubric analysis? Due NEXT Wednesday, March 3rd:
  • Read The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and The Awakening by Kate Chopin.
  • Study Guide for both novellas (5% of this marking period): Create a study guide in outline form. Your study guide should be no longer than two pages typed. In your study guide, you should include an analytical focus (point of view, imagery, diction and tone) and a thematic focus (alienation, societal expectations and self-determination), and be sure to address how these elements impact the characters' experiences and purposes in each of the novellas.
  • Quiz on both novellas (10% of this marking period)
  • Wednesday, February 24th, 2010:

    Standard 3: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation; Standard 4: Language for Social Interaction

    1. Do Now: Arrange into groups of four based on your essay question. Create a Venn Diagram in which you will compare and contrast your essay (with your partner) to your classmate's essay (with his/her partner).

    2. Work Period: Read your classmates' essays and identify similarities and differences in which you will add your findings to the Venn Diagram. Use the AP 9-point rubric to analyze similarities and differences. Pay close attention to the ideas and content (relevant details from the short fiction text), organization, word choice, sentence fluency, voice, conventions, insight, support and introduction/conclusion. Turn in your essays at the end of class.

    3. Reflections: What was valuable in comparing/contrasting your essay with your classmates? What insight can you learn and apply to your future essay #2 writing? If time allows, an ungraded quiz on the 9/10 components of the AP essay grading rubric. Check your answers.

    How can students prepare for success on the AP essay question #2 through essay writing and rubric analysis? Due NEXT Wednesday, March 3rd:
  • Read The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and The Awakening by Kate Chopin.
  • Study Guide for both novellas (5% of this marking period): Create a study guide in outline form. Your study guide should be no longer than two pages typed. In your study guide, you should include an analytical focus (point of view, imagery, diction and tone) and a thematic focus (alienation, societal expectations and self-determination), and be sure to address how these elements impact the characters' experiences and purposes in each of the novellas.
  • Quiz on both novellas (10% of this marking period)
  • Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Partner Writing: Continue to work on one of the short fiction excerpts to write an essay with your partner. Follow the AP 9-point rubric. Make sure the planning and writing of your essay were completed together.

    2. Reflections: How is the partner-writing process proceeding so far? What are your final steps?

    How can students prepare for success on the AP essay question #2 through annotations and essay writing? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24TH:
  • Finish the partner essay question #2. Follow the AP 9-point rubric. Make sure the planning and writing of your essay were completed together. Tomorrow, be ready to peer review and answer questions regarding the writing process.
  • Monday, February 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Reflections on the HW--what was valuable in working on the annotations for each short fiction excerpt from AP essay question #2? What was challenging?

    2. Partner Writing: Choose one of the short fiction excerpts to write an essay with your partner. Follow the AP 9-point rubric. Begin planning your essay together. Show your HW annotations.

    3. Reflections: How is the pre-writing process proceeding so far?

    How can students prepare for success on the AP essay question #2 through annotations and preparing to write? Make up any HW owed, if necessary.
    Friday, February 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Arrange into assigned groups. Each group chooses students to have the assigned roles--Discussion Director (This group leader is in charge of formulating questions to discuss that had profound impact on him/her and, perhaps, classmates. The director will also help to lead the discussion and maintain on-topic, AP-appropriate discussion), Connector (This student will work on making textual connections between The Kite Runner and other texts, preferably texts studied this semester), Evaluator (This student will evaluate the group's discussion strengths and areas needing improvement. This student will write an evaluation, about one long paragraph, 6-8 sentences, commenting on the process.), and Investigator (This student will investigate real evidence from the novel to support the discussion questions). Everyone will participate in discussion and everyone will take notes as the discussion proceeds. Group Discussion instructions will be provided.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Groups will begin discussions, led by the Discussion Director, and may choose at least two questions in which a discussion will ensue. Those questions may stem from the essential questions we've been discussing (see below) or they may create new questions:

  • Identify two characters who have unatoned sins. Explain their unatoned sins and discuss how they find ways to be good again.
  • Identify two characters who pursue their own definitions of success. Explain their pursuit of success and discuss how/if they are able to achieve it.
  • Explain how the past contributes to the meaning of this work as a whole.
  • Explain how Amir can be depicted as a sympathetic character.
  • Describe the relationship between Amir and Baba and how it develops throughout the novel.

    3. Reflections: Reflect on the discussions' successes and areas needing improvement. Were there any epiphanies? What was most enjoyable in discussing and analyzing The Kite Runner?

  • How can students prepare for success on the AP essay question #3 by analyzing The Kite Runner in a small-group discussion format? Due Monday, February 22nd (after vacation):
  • Short fiction selections (taken from AP essay questions provided in class): requirements include close readings and annotations, attending to the essay question for each selection.
  • Thursday, February 11th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Discuss the following essential questions addressing The Kite Runner:
  • Identify two characters who have unatoned sins. Explain their unatoned sins and discuss how they find ways to be good again.
  • Identify two characters who pursue their own definitions of success. Explain their pursuit of success and discuss how/if they are able to achieve it.
  • Explain how the past contributes to the meaning of this work as a whole.
  • Explain how Amir can be depicted as a sympathetic character.
  • Describe the relationship between Amir and Baba and how it develops throughout the novel.

    2. Work Period: Work on the short fiction selection HW (if time allows).

  • How can students prepare for success on the AP essay question #2? Due Monday, February 22nd (after vacation):
  • Short fiction selections (taken from AP essay questions provided in class): requirements include close readings and annotations, attending to the essay question for each selection.
  • Wednesday, February 10th, 2010: SNOW DAY! How can students prepare for success on the AP essay question #2? Due Monday, February 22nd (after vacation):
  • Short fiction selections (taken from AP essay questions provided in class): requirements include close readings and annotations, attending to the essay question for each selection.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, February 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Teacher-Student Conferences (continued).

    2. Work Period: Continue to work on the short fiction excerpts (taken from the AP Essay Question #2 samples).

    How can students prepare for success on the AP essay question #2? Due Monday, February 22nd (after vacation):
  • Short fiction selections (taken from AP essay questions provided in class): requirements include close readings and annotations, attending to the essay question for each selection.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Monday, February 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Turn in your self-evaluation conference form. Teacher-Student Conferences.

    2. Work Period: Work on close readings and annotations of the 2009 and 2008 essay question #2 short fiction excerpts.

    How can students prepare for success on AP essay question #2? Due Monday, February 22nd:
  • Short fiction selections (taken from AP essay questions provided in class): requirements include close readings and annotations, attending to the essay question for each selection.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, February 5th, 2010: Discussion/Reflections: What are the challenges in staying in the AP English course until the end? What are the impediments to students here at ITHS that prevent them from staying in the AP English course for the second semester? Why is this course beneficial for college and life, in general? How can students prepare for success in the AP English course and college? Due Monday, February 8th:
  • Self-Evaluation Conference Form

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, February 4th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish examining the process of developing subsidiary questions. Finish creating 5 subsidiary questions for each of your short answer questions from the quiz. Turn in any remaining forms (the student profile survey, the contact information form and the student goal/action plan form), along with the graded papers from last semester. Enter these forms in your folders.

    2. Discuss/Share: Reflect on the composition and answering of the subsidiary questions. How do these steps help your writing process? Examine the following short answer (essential questions):

  • Identify two characters who have unatoned sins. Explain their unatoned sins and discuss how they find ways to be good again.
  • Identify two characters who pursue their own definitions of success. Explain their pursuit of success and discuss how/if they are able to achieve it.
  • Explain how the past contributes to the meaning of this work as a whole.
  • Explain how Amir can be depicted as a sympathetic character.
  • Describe the relationship between Amir and Baba and how it develops throughout the novel.
  • How can students prepare for success on the AP essay questions? Due TOMORROW, Friday, February 5th:
  • Create an AP-style multiple-choice question test (with a partner!) for The Kite Runner. Provide 45 questions with five answer choices. Create an answer key. Make these questions just as complex as the AP exam questions. Use the packet and the final exam as guides. Use the post-its you've composed while reading to guide you in creating this test.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the multiple-choice question answers for The Kite Runner Quiz.

    2. Work Period: Examine the process of developing subsidiary questions. Create 5 subsidiary questions for each of your short answer questions from the quiz. Turn in the two forms (the contact information forms and the student goal/action plan form), along with the graded papers. Enter these forms in your folders.

    3. Reflections: Reflect on the composition and answering of the subsidiary questions. How do these steps help your writing process?

    How can students prepare for success on the AP essay questions? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, February 4th:
  • Student Profile Survey (handout received in class)!

    Due THIS Friday, February 5th:

  • Create an AP-style multiple-choice question test (with a partner!) for The Kite Runner. Provide 45 questions with five answer choices. Create an answer key. Make these questions just as complex as the AP exam questions. Use the packet and the final exam as guides. Use the post-its you've composed while reading to guide you in creating this test.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: The Kite Runner Quiz

    2. Work Period: Show your notes on The Kite Runner and turn in your analysis of the AP multiple-choice question packet. Work on the contact information form and student goal/action plan.

    How can students prepare for the semester ahead? Due TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3rd:
  • Contact information form signed and student goal/action plan completed. Also, bring in all graded papers from the fall semester.

    Due THIS Friday, February 5th:

  • Create an AP-style multiple-choice question test (with a partner!) for The Kite Runner. Provide 45 questions with five answer choices. Create an answer key. Make these questions just as complex as the AP exam questions. Use the packet and the final exam as guides. Use the post-its you've composed while reading to guide you in creating this test.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Monday, January 25th, 2010: Work Period: Work on Regents Week HW. Grade disbursements. How can students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by analyzing/reflecting on their own work? Due TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2ND (1st day of 2nd semester):
  • Write an explanation (one paragraph--minimum of 2-3 sentences) for each correct answer in the AP English multiple-choice question packet.
  • Read The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Take notes on post-its throughout the novel, identifying literary elements/devices and their significance. Use the multiple-choice questions (and the question types you've identified) to help you determine what kinds of literary elements/devices to identify in your reading. Reading Quiz will be given! Also, expect intense discussion to ensue!

    Due Friday, February 5th:

  • Create an AP-style multiple-choice question test (with a partner!) for The Kite Runner. Provide 45 questions with five answer choices. Create an answer key. Make these questions just as complex as the AP exam questions. Use the packet and the final exam as guides. Use the post-its you've composed while reading to guide you in creating this test.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, January 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Analyze As You Like It essays in comparison/contrast to AP exam essays scored. Grade/Evaluate your own essays.

    2. Work Period: Finish circling all unknown words in the questions and the readings and identifying the question types.

    3. HW introduced, books obtained and book receipts filled out.

    How can students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by analyzing/reflecting on their own work? Due TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2ND (1st day of 2nd semester):
  • Write an explanation (one paragraph--minimum of 2-3 sentences) for each correct answer in the AP English multiple-choice question packet.
  • Read The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Take notes on post-its throughout the novel, identifying literary elements/devices and their significance. Use the multiple-choice questions (and the question types you've identified) to help you determine what kinds of literary elements/devices to identify in your reading. Reading Quiz will be given! Also, expect intense discussion to ensue!

    Due Friday, February 5th:

  • Create an AP-style multiple-choice question test (with a partner!) for The Kite Runner. Provide 45 questions with five answer choices. Create an answer key. Make these questions just as complex as the AP exam questions. Use the packet and the final exam as guides. Use the post-its you've composed while reading to guide you in creating this test.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, January 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Show your HW--multiple-choice question packet. Conference with teacher regarding current grade and any owed HW (tomorrow's the last day of the semester!). Identify question types (refer to literary devices). Circle all unknown words in the questions and the readings.

    2. Review the answers for the AP multiple-choice questions packet.

    How can students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by analyzing/reflecting on their own work? Scholarships:
  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, January 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish review of Final Exam questions and answers How can students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by analyzing/reflecting on their own work? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, January 21st:
  • AP English Literature Multiple-Choice questions packet

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, January 19th, 2010: Discuss/Share: Review Final Exam questions and answers How can students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by analyzing/reflecting on their own work? Due THIS Thursday, January 21st:
  • AP English Literature Multiple-Choice questions packet

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, January 15th, 2010: FINAL EXAM How can students be assessed on a final exam? Enjoy a weekend of NO homework or studying!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, January 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: FInish poetry analysis and review of the questions and answers

    2. Final Exam Q & A

    How can students prepare for the final exam by effectively analyzing the poetry in the Perrine's textbook? PREPARE FOR FINAL EXAM AND EDIT/UPDATE YOUR DIALECTICAL JOURNAL!

    End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: Turn in TOMORROW, Friday, January 15th (at the beginning of the final exam).
  • Final Semester Exam: TOMORROW, Friday, January 15th, 2010. Use this Final Exam Review Sheet and review all works of literature studied since Day One.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, January 13th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Poetry Q & A

    2. Finish poetry analysis and review of the questions and answers.

    How can students prepare for the final exam by effectively analyzing the poetry in the Perrine's textbook? Bring textbook tomorrow.

    PREPARE FOR FINAL EXAM AND EDIT/UPDATE YOUR DIALECTICAL JOURNAL!

    End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: Turn in THIS Friday, January 15th (at the beginning of the final exam).
  • Final Semester Exam: THIS Friday, January 15th, 2010. Use this Final Exam Review Sheet and review all works of literature studied since Day One.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, January 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Poetry Q & A

    2. Poetry analysis and review of the questions and answers.

    How can students prepare for the final exam by effectively analyzing the poetry in the Perrine's textbook? Bring textbook tomorrow.

    PREPARE FOR FINAL EXAM AND EDIT/UPDATE YOUR DIALECTICAL JOURNAL!

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: Turn in THIS Friday, January 15th (at the beginning of the final exam).
  • Final Semester Exam: THIS Friday, January 15th, 2010. Use this Final Exam Review Sheet and review all works of literature studied since Day One.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Monday, January 11th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review and Q & A on Final Exam Review Sheet. How can students prepare for the final exam? Bring textbook tomorrow.

    PREPARE FOR FINAL EXAM AND EDIT/UPDATE YOUR DIALECTICAL JOURNAL!

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: Turn in on Friday, January 15th (at the beginning of the final exam).
  • Final Semester Exam: NEXT Friday, January 15th, 2010. Use this Final Exam Review Sheet and review all works of literature studied since Day One.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, January 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Poetry Reading (see HW poems)--multiple times. Observe the tone, rhythm, meaning, various interpretations and recitations. Examine the poet's purpose in writing the poem (think about what the poet is trying to achieve and what he/she hopes the readers will understand).

    2. Work Period: Sign up for Journal Conference (next week). Introduce Final Exam Review Sheet.

    How can students engage in poetic interpretations and analysis that are typical of AP exam/college? PREPARE FOR FINAL EXAM AND EDIT/UPDATE YOUR DIALECTICAL JOURNAL!

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: NEXT Week of January 11-15 (student-teacher conferences will be arranged in which entries will be graded based on student and teacher choices)
  • Final Semester Exam: NEXT Friday, January 15th, 2010. Use this Final Exam Review Sheet and review all works of literature studied since Day One.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, January 7th, 2010: Discuss/Share/Analysis: Poetry Reading (see HW poems)--multiple times. Observe the tone, rhythm, meaning, various interpretations and recitations. Examine the poet's purpose in writing the poem (think about what the poet is trying to achieve and what he/she hopes the readers will understand). How can students engage in poetic interpretations and analysis that are typical of AP exam/college? Due TOMORROW, Friday, January 8th:
  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: NEXT Week of January 11-15 (student-teacher conferences will be arranged in which entries will be graded based on student and teacher choices)
  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 15th, 2010 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied since Day One should be reviewed)

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, January 6th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish the grading/peer review analysis of the Reading Quiz on A Modest Proposal and A Doll's House.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share student reflections on both texts.

    3. Begin poetry analysis (see HW pages).

    How can students reflect on both A Modest Proposal and A Doll's House? Due THIS Friday, January 8th:
  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: NEXT Week of January 11-15 (student-teacher conferences will be arranged in which entries will be graded based on student and teacher choices)
  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 15th, 2010 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied since Day One should be reviewed)

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, January 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Grading/Peer Review Analysis of the Reading Quiz on A Modest Proposal and A Doll's House. When finished with the grading of the quiz, Awards Presentation for Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Performance.

    2. If time allows, share your reflections on both texts.

    How can students reflect on both A Modest Proposal and A Doll's House? Due THIS Friday, January 8th:
  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: NEXT Week of January 11-15 (student-teacher conferences will be arranged in which entries will be graded based on student and teacher choices)
  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 15th, 2010 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied since Day One should be reviewed)

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Monday, January 4th, 2010: Welcome back and welcome to a new decade!

    1. Do Now: Reading Quiz on A Modest Proposal and A Doll's House. When finished with the quiz, vote (you will receive voting sheets!) for Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Performance.

    2. If time allows, share your reflections on both texts.

    How can students apply their reading/analysis of both A Modest Proposal and A Doll's House in a mini-assessment? Due THIS Friday, January 8th:
  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) TBA

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: NEXT Week of January 11-15 (student-teacher conferences will be arranged in which entries will be graded based on student and teacher choices)
  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 15th, 2010 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied since Day One should be reviewed)

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009: 1. PERFORMANCES OF SCENES FROM AS YOU LIKE IT.

    2. Reflections on Scene Performances

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? Have a wonderful holiday and restful vacation!

    VACATION HW--DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 4TH, 2010:

  • Read A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift. Be prepared for a reading quiz.
  • Read A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. You can read the play from this link or from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow (pp. 1141-1142).
  • Be ready for a reading quiz on Swift's satirical work and Ibsen's play. Also, be able to connect both works to the course theme of identity and self-exploration.

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: Week of January 11-15 (student-teacher conferences will be arranged in which entries will be graded based on student and teacher choices)
  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 15th, 2010 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied since Day One should be reviewed)

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009: PERFORMANCES OF SCENES FROM AS YOU LIKE IT. How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23rd (all remaining scenes!):
  • Performance Presentation: You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques), Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother--Jaques De Boys). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    VACATION HW--DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 4TH, 2010:

  • Practice AP Exam (to be provided in class)
  • Read A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift. Create five different AP-style multiple-choice questions (see the AP Exam as a guide) and corresponding answer choices. Create an answer sheet.
  • Read A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. You can read the play from this link or from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer the questions that follow (pp. 1141-1142).
  • Be ready for a reading quiz on Swift's satirical work and Ibsen's play. Also, be able to connect both works to the course theme of identity and self-exploration.

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: Week of January 11-15 (student-teacher conferences will be arranged in which entries will be graded based on student and teacher choices)
  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 15th, 2010 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied since Day One should be reviewed)

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Monday, December 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercise!

    2. Work Period: Scene Work! Work on final preparations: rehearsal of staging and animated/emotional acting!

    3. HW reminders: Be ready for tomorrow's performance in Room 217. Look at scholarship opportunities in the HW section. Preview vacation HW.

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE TOMORROW TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22ND/WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23rd:
  • Performance Presentation: You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques), Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother--Jaques De Boys). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    VACATION HW--DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 4TH, 2010:

  • Practice AP Exam (to be provided in class)
  • Read A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift. Create five different AP-style multiple-choice questions (see the AP Exam as a guide) and corresponding answer choices. Create an answer sheet.
  • Read A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen. You can read the play from this link or from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer the questions that follow (pp. 1141-1142).
  • Be ready for a reading quiz on Swift's satirical work and Ibsen's play. Also, be able to connect both works to the course theme of identity and self-exploration.

    Looking Ahead for the End of the Semester Requirements:

  • Completed Dialectical Journal Due Date: Week of January 11-15 (student-teacher conferences will be arranged in which entries will be graded based on student and teacher choices)
  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 15th, 2010 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied since Day One should be reviewed)

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, December 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Scene Work! Work on editing, staging, costuming, props, and animated/emotional acting!

    2. Reflections: How's your progress? Next steps?

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE THIS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22ND/WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23rd:
  • Performance Presentation: You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques), Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother--Jaques De Boys). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, December 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce the scenes for As You Like It performances and review the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes.

    2. Work Period: Arrange in your groups and begin to read aloud your scenes, determine director, roles, and director's vision/interpretation.

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22ND/WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23rd:
  • Performance Presentation: You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene III (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene VII (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam), Act III Scene II (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques), Act IV Scene I (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene III (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes II, III and IV (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother--Jaques De Boys). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.
  • Wednesday, December 16th, 2009: AS YOU LIKE IT ESSAY EXAM

    *Show your Dialectical Journal entries (5 homework assignments!).

    How will students be assessed on As You Like It in the AP-style essay exam? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22ND/WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23RD:
  • Performance Presentation (Value of a quiz grade!): You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned--chosen randomly in class) scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    Vacation HW:

  • TBA
  • Tuesday, December 15th, 2009: Discussion/Analysis/Mini-Lecture: Finish analyzing/discussing our five main points of discussion--
  • Who and what decide a person's status in society? "He keeps me rustically at home" (Orlando, I, I). "The old Duke is banished by his younger brother, the new Duke..." (Charles, I, I). "Thou art thy father's daughter; there's enough..." (Duke Frederick, I, III).
  • How do people define their own personal happiness? "And this our life exempt from public haunt...good in everything. I would not change it" (Duke Senior, II, I). "Let me be your servant...let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man" (Adam, II, III). "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and entrances..." (Jaques, II, VII).
  • What are the characteristics of a man/woman in love? Vocal about their love, irrational behavior, worshipping, blind to their beloved's faults/flaws, neglectful of their own needs; "Every eye which in this forest looks shall see thy virtue witnessed every where" (Orlando, III, II). ..."A man in love in which cage of rushes I am sure you are not a prisoner" (Rosalind/Ganymede, III, II).
  • How can men and women become better people? Tell the truth/Keep their promises: "an you be so tardy, come no more in my sight: I had as lief be wooed of a snail" (Rosalind/Ganymede, IV, I). "My conversion so sweetly tastes, being the thing I am" (Oliver, IV, III).
  • How can we achieve our personal happiness? Win the love of our beloved, marry, realize our identities, attain inner peace. "Tomorrow is the joyful day, Audrey; tomorrow will we be married" (Touchstone, V, III). "To you I give myself, for I am yours" (Rosalind, V, IV).
  • How will students prepare to study/analyze As You Like It? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16th:
  • Read As You Like It. Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Note-taking would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student.
  • EXAM on As You Like It in essay form (like the previous plays).
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It (2-4 entries per act).
  • Monday, December 14th, 2009: 1. Do Now: College Lecture/Discussion by Guest Speaker, Mr. Vasquez

    2. Discussion/Analysis/Mini-Lecture: Continue analyzing/discussing our five main points of discussion--

  • Who and what decide a person's status in society? "He keeps me rustically at home" (Orlando, I, I). "The old Duke is banished by his younger brother, the new Duke..." (Charles, I, I). "Thou art thy father's daughter; there's enough..." (Duke Frederick, I, III).
  • How do people define their own personal happiness? "And this our life exempt from public haunt...good in everything. I would not change it" (Duke Senior, II, I). "Let me be your servant...let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man" (Adam, II, III). "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and entrances..." (Jaques, II, VII).
  • What are the characteristics of a man/woman in love? Vocal about their love, irrational behavior, worshipping, blind to their beloved's faults/flaws, neglectful of their own needs; "Every eye which in this forest looks shall see thy virtue witnessed every where" (Orlando, III, II). ..."A man in love in which cage of rushes I am sure you are not a prisoner" (Rosalind/Ganymede, III, II).
  • How can men and women become better people? Tell the truth/Keep their promises: "an you be so tardy, come no more in my sight: I had as lief be wooed of a snail" (Rosalind/Ganymede, IV, I). "My conversion so sweetly tastes, being the thing I am" (Oliver, IV, III).
  • How can we achieve our personal happiness? Win the love of our beloved, marry, realize our identities, attain inner peace. "Tomorrow is the joyful day, Audrey; tomorrow will we be married" (Touchstone, V, III). "To you I give myself, for I am yours" (Rosalind, V, IV).
  • How will students prepare to study/analyze As You Like It? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16th:
  • Read As You Like It. Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Note-taking would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student.
  • EXAM on As You Like It in essay form (like the previous plays).
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It (2-4 entries per act).
  • Friday, December 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce five main points of discussion--
  • Who and what decide a person's status in society? "He keeps me rustically at home" (Orlando, I, I). "The old Duke is banished by his younger brother, the new Duke..." (Charles, I, I). "Thou art thy father's daughter; there's enough..." (Duke Frederick, I, III).
  • How do people define their own personal happiness? "And this our life exempt from public haunt...good in everything. I would not change it" (Duke Senior, II, I). "Let me be your servant...let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man" (Adam, II, III). "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and entrances..." (Jaques, II, VII).
  • What are the characteristics of a man/woman in love? Vocal about their love, irrational behavior, worshipping, blind to their beloved's faults/flaws, neglectful of their own needs; "Every eye which in this forest looks shall see thy virtue witnessed every where" (Orlando, III, II). ..."A man in love in which cage of rushes I am sure you are not a prisoner" (Rosalind/Ganymede, III, II).
  • How can men and women become better people? Tell the truth/Keep their promises: "an you be so tardy, come no more in my sight: I had as lief be wooed of a snail" (Rosalind/Ganymede, IV, I). "My conversion so sweetly tastes, being the thing I am" (Oliver, IV, III).
  • How can we achieve our personal happiness? Win the love of our beloved, marry, realize our identities, attain inner peace. "Tomorrow is the joyful day, Audrey; tomorrow will we be married" (Touchstone, V, III). "To you I give myself, for I am yours" (Rosalind, V, IV).

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the main discussion points outlined in the Do Now.

  • How will students prepare to study/analyze As You Like It? DUE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16th:
  • Read As You Like It. Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Note-taking would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student.
  • EXAM on As You Like It in essay form (like the previous plays).
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It (2-4 entries per act).
  • Thursday, December 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Reflections on performances of Henry IV Part I.

    2. Award Presentations

    3. Return Henry IV Part I plays and receive receipts. Receive As You Like It plays.

    4. Discuss/Share: Expectations and Restrictions on Gender during Shakespeare's Times and Modern Times. There are descriptions about the nature of women throughout the play, As You Like It, spoken by both female and male characters suggesting there is an essential difference between the two genders. Do you believe there is an essential difference between men and women? What is the nature of this difference? Why do some expectations regarding men and women emerge? When did the idea emerge that women couldn't work as hard as men? How much work did women do during Shakespeare's times? During modern America? How does class affect the stereotypes about men and women? What do these notions tell us about how social class and concepts of gender are intertwined?

    How will students prepare to study/analyze As You Like It? DUE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16th:
  • Read As You Like It. Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Note-taking would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student.
  • EXAM on As You Like It in essay form (like the previous plays).
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It (2-4 entries per act).
  • Wednesday, December 9th, 2009: 1. PERFORMANCES!

    2. Vote! Categories: Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director, Best Performance.

    3. Return plays!

    How will students engage in closer analysis/performance/interpretation of scenes from Henry IV Part I, using the Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10th:
  • IF NECESSARY, return your Henry IV Part I plays.
  • Make up any owed HW.
  • Tuesday, December 8th, 2009: PERFORMANCES! How will students engage in closer analysis/performance/interpretation of scenes from Henry IV Part I, using the Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9th:
  • IF NECESSARY (if you haven't performed yet, prepare!) work on your Henry IV Part I performances: 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines. Use the Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes to help prepare you and your fellow performers.
  • Return your Henry IV Part I plays.
  • Monday, December 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises--a tongue twister to help with diction(She thrusts her fists against the post, and still insists she sees the ghost) and tableaus (frozen statues of your characters).

    2. Work Period: Practice your scenes to prepare for the Henry IV Part I performances. Details found here: Scene Groups are: 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A horror movie version of a scene between Hal and King Henry. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    How will students engage in closer analysis of scenes from Henry IV Part I? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Acting groups will organize according to these Scene Groups: 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines. Use the Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes to help prepare you and your fellow performers.
  • Friday, December 4th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises--tarzan yells, tongue twisters to help with diction(Betty bought a batch of bitter butter, six sharp sharks, good blood, bad blood, red leather, yellow leather), and line practice to show image and feeling behind the words (how can your voice reflect that feeling when you speak the words? Increase volume and decrease volume in the lines)--"An if the devil come and roar for them (the prisoners), I will not send them" (Hotspur, I, III); "And G-d forbit a shallow scratch should drive the Prince of Wales from such a field as this" (Prince, V, IV).

    2. Work Period: Practice your scenes to prepare for the Henry IV Part I performances. Details found here: Scene Groups are: 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A horror movie version of a scene between Hal and King Henry. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    How will students engage in closer analysis of scenes from Henry IV Part I? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Acting groups will organize according to these Scene Groups: 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines. Use the Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes to help prepare you and your fellow performers.
  • Thursday, December 3rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Arrange into new, self-selected (with classmates you haven't worked with before) groups of four. Review the Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes.

    2. Review instructions. Introduce Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Scene Groups are: 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    3. Reading/Analysis/Performance Prep: Read your scene, determine character roles, director's vision, and application of grading sheet.

    How will students effectively analyze thematic patterns, connections and Shakespearean techniques in Henry IV Part I? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Acting groups will organize according to these Scene Groups: 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines. Use the Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes to help prepare you and your fellow performers.
  • Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review of Henry IV Part I--
  • Act I=Contrast of restricted court vs. liberating tavern (what's the purpose of creating contrasts?); reputation, honor and good name (who decides these labels--good/bad reputation, honor/dishonor, bad name/good name? "O that it could be proved that some night-tripping fairy had exchanged in cradle clothes our children where they lay, and called mine Percy, his Plantagenet!" (I, I); Falstaff said before he knew Hal he knew nothing, but now that he knows him, his wickedness/corruption has increased (I, II), redemption--cleanse the soul and put your mind at ease (Prince Hal, King Henry, Falstaff), timing (why is timing so important? Refer to Worcester's talk about "when time is ripe...our powers at once, as i will fashion it, shall happily meet..." and Hal's plan for reformation--"redeeming time when men think least I will" (I, II).
  • Act II=Deception (is it ever OK to keep secrets or tell lies to those you love? Why do rich people steal?) Hotspur to his wife, Lady Percy, and Hal to Falstaff, in the robbery), Prince's assimilation at the Tavern
  • Act III=Victory plans (Don't count your chickens before they're hatched); payback (who owes me what?! Falstaff constantly owes money)
  • Act IV=Desire for Revenge (Hotspur's anger fuels his revenge against King Henry; How do people act when they're vengeful?); Omens (What signs should not be avoided?)
  • Act V=Honor--is it worth having? (Refer to Falstaff); Leadership--are two leaders possible? (Refer to Prince and Hotspur); Peace vs. Battle (King vs. Rebellion)

    3. Return your Henry IV Part I plays.

    4. Introduce Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Acting groups will organize according to the first letter of your first name. Scene Groups are--Students' first names that begin with the letter "K"--1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), Students' first names that begin with the letter "J"-- 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), Students' first names that begin with "M, N or O"--3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), Students' first names that begin with "R"--4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "S or T"--5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "G or H"--6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and Students' first names that begin with "A, B, C or D"--7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Use this Grading Rubric for Henry IV Part I Scenes.

  • How will students effectively analyze thematic patterns, connections and Shakespearean techniques in Henry IV Part I?
  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Tuesday, December 1st, 2009: Henry IV Part I Essay Exam

    *Turn in your Dialectical Journal entries.

    How will students effectively be assessed on their knowledge and study of Henry IV Part I? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
  • Return your Henry IV Part I plays.
  • Monday, November 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions--
  • How do various characters help other characters develop their strengths and become better people? King Henry helps Prince Hal, Falstaff helps Prince Hal, Prince Hal helps Falstaff, Hotspur helps Prince Hal
  • What are some thematic patterns that appear in both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I? Father/son bond, desire for power and honor, problematic marriage, rebellion/revenge, greed, rich vs. poor/class struggle, family betrayal, ambition, poor communication between men and women, father/son conflict, good vs. evil, revenge, trust, deception/lies, denial of love, delayed choices, withdrawal from society, disappointment.
  • What are some important literary devices present in Henry IV Part I and why are they significant to the entire play's development?

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Discuss the Do Now questions.

    3. Analysis of Hamlet essay exam and preparation for the Henry IV Part I essay exam

  • How will students effectively analyze thematic patterns, challenges and Shakespearean techniques in Henry IV Part I? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1ST:
  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Henry IV Part I ESSAY EXAM
  • Wednesday, November 25th, 2009: Work Period:
  • Independent reading of Henry IV Part I!
  • Work on your Dialectical Journal (identify quotes: remember you're looking for 2-4 from each act).
  • Discuss with your table mates. Discussion question suggestions: What are the most challenging sections of Henry IV Part I? How can we help each other understand these challenging sections? What are some thematic patterns that appear in both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I? How are Shakespeare's techniques apparent in Henry IV Part I? What are some important literary devices present in Henry IV Part I and why are they significant to the entire play's development? What connections can we make between texts (Henry IV Part I, Hamlet, Oedipus Rex and Sophie's World)?

    *Be ready to share your discussion output on the Monday after Thanksgiving.

  • How will students effectively analyze thematic patterns, challenges and Shakespearean techniques in Henry IV Part I? Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1ST--note the date change (after Thanksgiving):

  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Henry IV Part I ESSAY EXAM
  • Tuesday, November 24th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Divide up into groups and discuss and create solutions to the problems and prepare to report the solutions to the class:
    a.) Iran refuses to halt its nuclear weapon development program and defies the United States, claiming that it has the right to develop whatever programs it wishes. As President of the U.S., how would you deal with this stance?
    b.) You are the parent of a rebellious teenager who consistently embarrasses you with his/her behavior and choice of friends. What methods would you use to convince/persuade them to change their behavior?
    c.) You are a prominent religious leader, and you are concerned about the fact that traditional moral codes no longer see to be embraced by a majority of the culture. What would you do? Modify the traditional codes to fit more exactly the spirit of the times? Or stand firm behind traditional morality?
    d.) You are a prominent politician who is seeking re-election and you have told your constituents that, if elected, you will not raise taxes, even though you secretly know that takes must be raised in order to compensate for the coming year's budget deficit. Do you continue to lie to your constituents in hopes of getting elected and being able to make positive changes in your district, or do you come clean on your deception and hope that the people appreciate your honesty and elect you anyway?

    2. Work Period: Find textual evidence (direct quotes) in Henry IV Part I that supports your group's solution.

    3. Discuss/Share your group's solution to the problem. Share your evidence that supports your solution.

    How will students understand the themes, problems and solutions in Henry IV Part I? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1ST--note the date change (after Thanksgiving):
  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Henry IV Part I ESSAY EXAM
  • Monday, November 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #11 Quiz (the last vocabulary quiz!)

    2. Finish story/analysis sharing of your predictions for Henry IV Part I.

    3. Paper returns and review.

    *Grade distributions today.

    How will students show their expanded lexicon? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1ST--note the date change (after Thanksgiving):
  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Henry IV Part I ESSAY EXAM
  • Friday, November 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: "Love for ITHS" Sonnet sharing.

    2. Finish story/analysis sharing on your predictions for Henry IV Part I.

    2. Vocabulary Jeopardy (for extra credit!)

    How will students show their expanded lexicon? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
  • Last vocabulary quiz! List #11 Quiz!

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th (after Thanksgiving):

  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Henry IV Part I ESSAY EXAM
  • Thursday, November 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Jeopardy preparation (categories: Shout-Outs for Shakespeare, How I Love Thee, ITHS, Shape Up!, Love is a Battlefield, C-O-L-L-E-G-E).

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your creative story or anticipatory critical analysis of Henry IV Part I. Compare and contrast your writing with your classmates.

    How will students effectively prepare to study Henry IV Part I? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).
  • Extra Credit Vocabulary Game (you must know all lists!)!

    DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:

  • Last vocabulary quiz! List #11 Quiz!

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th (after Thanksgiving):

  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Henry IV Part I ESSAY EXAM
  • Wednesday, November 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #11 introduced.

    2. Work Period: Write a creative story or anticipatory critical analysis of Henry IV Part I. Use the notes taken in class and compose a 1-2 page story/analysis of the historical play by William Shakespeare. Refer to the entire plot of the story, from beginning to end. Use your Shakespearean knowledge and style, as well as your experience as a sophisticated reader.

    How will students effectively prepare to study Henry IV Part I? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).
  • Extra Credit Vocabulary Game (you must know all lists!)!

    DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:

  • Last vocabulary quiz! List #11 Quiz!

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th (after Thanksgiving):

  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Henry IV Part I ESSAY EXAM
  • Tuesday, November 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish Mini-Lecture on the history and basic plot of Henry IV Part I.

    2. Identify similar themes in both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I. What does Shakespeare teach his readers/audience about the human experience from Henry IV Part I? Refer to specific evidence in the play. Examine the conflicting themes of rebellion vs. responsibility and inferiority vs. superiority.

    3. Introduce the "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    How will students effectively prepare to study Henry IV Part I? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Monday, November 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocab. Quiz #10

    2. Awards Presentation Awards for Best Performance, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Director.

    3. Book Distribution of Henry IV Part I.

    4. Mini-Lecture on Henry IV Part I and identify similar themes in both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I. What does Shakespeare teach his readers/audience about the human experience from Henry IV Part I? Refer to specific evidence in the play. Examine the conflicting themes of rebellion vs. responsibility and inferiority vs. superiority.

    How will students effectively prepare to study Henry IV Part I? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:
  • Read and analyze Henry IV Part I. Add to your Dialectical Journal. THIS IS WORTH 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (2-4 entries per act).
  • Friday, November 13th, 2009: 1. Remaining Scene Performances from Hamlet! Groups will be graded on the following: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    2. Voting! Vote for Best Performance, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Director.

    3. Reflections: Why were these scene performances valuable? What did you learn from this experience?

    How will students effectively present their interpretive performances of scenes from Hamlet and understand key elements that went into the production of this famous play? THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16TH: List #10 QUIZ!
    Thursday, November 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review List #10.

    2. Scene Performances from Hamlet! Groups will be graded on the following: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    How will students effectively present their interpretive performances of scenes from Hamlet and understand key elements that went into the production of this famous play? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
  • REMAINING SCENES (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16TH: List #10 QUIZ!

  • Tuesday, November 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Scene Work Reminders--include emotional acting, spatial relationships/levels; incorporate tableaus (images/statues); think about props, costumes, lighting, sound/sound effects, director's vision (what's your interpretation? A soap opera, a musical, a modern-day gang duel, a cartoon, etc.).

    2. Scene Work: Work on one of your chosen scenes in your group. Read your scene aloud. Work on editing (each scene must be 5 minutes), a director's theme/vision, the assigning of character roles, staging different levels and creating images/statues, and emotional acting. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    Meet with Ms. Conn to review your Dialectical Journal HW (if you haven't already done so).

    How will students work on their interpretive performances of scenes from Hamlet and understand key elements that went into the production of this famous play? DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16TH: List #10 QUIZ!

  • Monday, November 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: List #9 Quiz

    2. Acting Exercises: Acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet--statues will include characters as animals in Hamlet, the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Acting stretches=chewing bubble gum (with whole body) and shake-out of arms and legs, rub-down (hands, arms, legs, massage shoulders), sound passing (with a body movement), animal voices/movements (e.g. cat, lion, pig, horse). Tableaus of character relationships (e.g. Hamlet and Gertrude, Hamlet and Claudius, Ophelia and Hamlet, Gertrude and Claudius, Hamlet and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet and Horatio, etc.).

    3. Scene Work: Work on one of your chosen scenes in your group. Read your scene aloud. Work on editing (each scene must be 5 minutes), a director's theme/vision, the assigning of character roles, staging different levels and creating images/statues, and emotional acting. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    Meet with Ms. Conn to review your Dialectical Journal HW (if you haven't already done so).

    How will students begin their interpretive performances of scenes from Hamlet and understand key elements that went into the production of this famous play? DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Friday, November 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Work Period Requirements Reviewed

    2. Scene Work: Work on one of your chosen scenes in your group. Read your scene aloud. Work on editing (each scene must be 5 minutes), a director's theme/vision, the assigning of character roles, staging different levels and creating images/statues, and emotional acting. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    Show your Dialectical Journal HW!

    How will students begin their interpretive performances of scenes from Hamlet and understand key elements that went into the production of this famous play? List #9 QUIZ ON MONDAY.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Thursday, November 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review List #9.

    2. Scene Work Mini-Lecture: An explanation of the Hamlet scene groups. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    3. Acting Exercises: Begin tableaus--Statues (acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet). Statues will include archetypes in literature (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, valiant knight) and characters as animals in Hamlet. Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Archetype portrayals (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight).

    4. Work Period: Scene Groups will get together and determine director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices.

    How will students begin their interpretive performances of scenes from Hamlet and understand key elements that went into the production of this famous play? DUE TOMORROW (FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6th):
  • Dialectical Journal entries for Hamlet: 2-4 entries per act. Make sure to choose meaningful quotes/passages from each act that address the course focus on identity, self-exploration and Shakespearean style/technique. This will be worth FIVE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    List #9 QUIZ ON MONDAY.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Wednesday, November 4th, 2009: HAMLET EXAM (AP-STYLE) How will students be assessed on their reading/analysis of the Shakespearean play, Hamlet and understand the characters' internal struggles that lead to external actions? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:
  • Dialectical Journal entries for Hamlet: 2-4 entries per act. Make sure to choose meaningful quotes/passages from each act that address the course focus on identity, self-exploration and Shakespearean style/technique. This will be worth FIVE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    List #9 QUIZ ON MONDAY.

  • Monday, November 2nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: List #8 Quiz. Show any owed HW, including the packet annotations.

    2. Work Period: In your table groups, find at least three direct quotes that support the "To Be or Not To Be" philosophy that pervades the play. This philosophy can apply to multiple characters, not just Hamlet. Think about the characters questioning their own existence, their roles in the play, their inner turmoil, and the effects of Shakespeare's life and times. Show your owed HW--specifically the annotations.

    3. Mini-Lecture: Note-taking on the following--

  • "I do not set my life at a pin's fee" (I, IV, 65)--Hamlet
  • "Ay, that incestuous that adulterate beast, with witchraft of his wit, with traitorous gifts--O wicked wit and gifts, that have the power so to seduce!" (I, V, 42-45)--Ghost
  • "The time is out of joint. O cursed spite, that ever I was born to set it right!" (I, V, 188-189)--Hamlet
  • "The play's the thing wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King" (II, II, 530-531)--Hamlet
  • "To Be or Not To Be? That is the question--whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles and, by opposing, end them" (III, I, 55-59)--Hamlet
  • "Get thee to a nunnery" (III, I, 120)--Hamlet
  • "It shall be so. Madness in great ones must not unwatched go" (III, I, 187-188)--Claudius
  • "Oh, from this time forth, my thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth! (IV, IV, 63)--Hamlet
  • "Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet Prince, and flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!" (V, II, 335-336)--Horatio

    *Examine characterization and other literary devices (including metaphor, alliteration, imagery, symbolism) in connection with the the characters' internal struggles and external actions.

  • How will students prepare for an assessment on their reading/analysis of the Shakespearean play, Hamlet and understand the characters' internal struggles that lead to external actions? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:
  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Be ready to discuss and analyze in terms of the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify and understand the significance of the figurative language (literary devices), Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences.
  • IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:

  • Dialectical Journal entries for Hamlet: 2-4 entries per act. Make sure to choose meaningful quotes/passages from each act that address the course focus on identity, self-exploration and Shakespearean style/technique. This will be worth FIVE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.
  • Friday, October 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion of the Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet," "Shakespeare and His England," and "Words, Words, Words." Add to your annotations. Use the "Shakespeare's Life, Times, and Works" Notes to guide your note-taking.

    2. Work Period: In your table groups, find at least three direct quotes that support the "To Be or Not To Be" philosophy that pervades the play. This philosophy can apply to multiple characters, not just Hamlet. Think about the characters questioning their own existence, their roles in the play, their inner turmoil, and the effects of Shakespeare's life and times. Show your owed HW--specifically the annotations.

    How will students prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play, Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:
  • Quiz on List #8

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:

  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Be ready to discuss and analyze in terms of the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences.
  • IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:

  • Dialectical Journal entries for Hamlet: 2-4 entries per act. Make sure to choose meaningful quotes/passages from each act that address the course focus on identity, self-exploration and Shakespearean style/technique. This will be worth FIVE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.
  • Thursday, October 29th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Discuss the Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet," "Shakespeare and His England," and "Words, Words, Words." Add to your annotations. Use the "Shakespeare's Life, Times, and Works" Notes to guide your note-taking.

    2. Show your owed HW. Introduce List #8.

    How will students prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play, Hamlet? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:
  • Quiz on List #8

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:

  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Be ready to discuss and analyze in terms of the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences.
  • IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:

  • Dialectical Journal entries for Hamlet: 2-4 entries per act. Make sure to choose meaningful quotes/passages from each act that address the course focus on identity, self-exploration and Shakespearean style/technique. This will be worth FIVE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.
  • Wednesday, October 28th, 2009: 1. Do Now: What was the most difficult idea or topic in the HW readings? How did you handle the challenging text? How did you conquer your frustrations? Why do you believe the packet will be helpful in better understanding Hamlet and other Shakespeare's works? Show annotations.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet," "Shakespeare and His England," and "Words, Words, Words." Add to your annotations. Use the "Shakespeare's Life, Times, and Works" Notes to guide your note-taking.

    How will students prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play, Hamlet? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:
  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Be ready to discuss and analyze in terms of the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences.
  • IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:

  • Dialectical Journal entries for Hamlet: 2-4 entries per act. Make sure to choose meaningful quotes/passages from each act that address the course focus on identity, self-exploration and Shakespearean style/technique. This will be worth FIVE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.
  • Tuesday, October 27th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce Iambic Pentameter, Shakespearean style/technique and personal influences by analyzing "Sonnet 18" and "Sonnet 130". Examine all 154 Sonnets.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: How will the sonnet analysis help me understand Hamlet? What are some literary devices that he uses in his sonnets that he will use in his plays?

    3. Discussion (continued): Answer the following questions--What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop?

    How will students prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play, Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet," "Shakespeare and His England," and "Words, Words, Words." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:

  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Be ready to discuss and analyze in terms of the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences.
  • IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:

  • Dialectical Journal entries for Hamlet: 2-4 entries per act. Make sure to choose meaningful quotes/passages from each act that address the course focus on identity, self-exploration and Shakespearean style/technique. This will be worth FIVE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.
  • Monday, October 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary #7 Quiz

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Introduce Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

    3. Answer the following questions--Why is the phrase "To be or not to be?" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop?

    How will students prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play, Hamlet? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?
  • Friday, October 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Reflective Analysis of Sophie's World Critical Analysis Paper. Identify strengths and epiphanies found in your own paper. Peer review and find strengths and epiphanies found in a peer's paper. Turn in your paper, attached chart and book (you will receive your book receipt)!

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Final discussion on Sophie's World. Why was the study of this novel insightful for you at this time in your life? Share personal life lessons.

    3. Review List #7.

    How will students effectively understand the history of philosophy and the author's purpose in writing Sophie's World? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • List #7 quiz.
  • Thursday, October 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue working on the Sophie's World History of Philosophy Chart.

    2. Review paper requirements.

    How will students effectively understand the history of philosophy and the author's purpose in writing Sophie's World? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Critical Analysis Paper for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation. If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.
  • Bring in the completed Sophie's World History of Philosophy Chart.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th:

  • List #7 quiz.
  • Wednesday, October 21st, 2009: Work Period: Continue working on the Sophie's World History of Philosophy Chart. How will students effectively understand the history of philosophy through a graphic organizer? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Critical Analysis Paper for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation. If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th:

  • List #7 quiz.
  • Tuesday, October 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: In order to maintain our philosophical juices flowing, we need to discuss the following: �Sophie reads that we are like �microscopic insects existing deep down in the rabbit�s fur� (14) and that we �crawl deep into the rabbit�s fur, (to) snuggle down comfortably, and stay there for the rest of (our) lives� (17-18). In your mind, how do you see this is true? How can we fight against this from happening?

    2. Introduce the Sophie's World History of Philosophy Chart.

    3. Work Period: Begin to work on the Sophie's World History of Philosophy Chart.

    How will students effectively delve into their personal philosophical journey? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:
  • You MUST finish Sophie's World.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:

  • Critical Analysis Paper for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation. If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.
  • Monday, October 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: List #6 quiz. Show Dialectical Journal entries (HW).

    2. Review of the Critical Analysis Paper grading rubric for Sophie's World. Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    3. Work Period: In order to maintain our philosophical juices flowing, we need to think about the following: �Sophie reads that we are like �microscopic insects existing deep down in the rabbit�s fur� (14) and that we �crawl deep into the rabbit�s fur, (to) snuggle down comfortably, and stay there for the rest of (our) lives� (17-18). In your mind, how do you see this is true? How can we fight against this from happening?

    How will students effectively delve into their personal philosophical journey? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:
  • You MUST finish Sophie's World.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:

  • Critical Analysis Paper for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation. If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.
  • Friday, October 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review List #6 for Monday's quiz.

    2. Introduce the Critical Analysis Paper for Sophie's World. Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation. If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86).

    3. Discussion/Analysis: Continue to analyze the following big questions that the philosophers in Sophie's World attempt to answer. We will personally and textually discuss these questions. Here they are, as presented in Sophie's World:

  • Is sickness the punishment of the gods (or G-d, in our modern times)? (47)
  • What forces govern the course of history? (47)
  • How ought we to live? (13, 130)
  • What is the relationship between the body and mind? (235)
  • Where do we get our ideas from? Can we really rely on what our senses tell us? (263)

    4. Of these big questions philosophers attempt to answer, which are most controversial or difficult and why? Be sure to fully explain why.

  • How will students effectively delve into their personal philosophical journey? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • List #6 Quiz.
  • Continue to read Sophie's World.
  • Compose two more entries (you will have a total of FOUR entries) in your Dialectical Journal for Sophie's World. Make sure to follow the suggestions/edits acquired in the teacher-student writing workshop/conference for the 1st entry.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:

  • You MUST finish Sophie's World.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:

  • Critical Analysis Paper for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation. If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.
  • Thursday, October 15th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue to analyze the following big questions that the philosophers in Sophie's World attempt to answer. We will personally and textually discuss these questions. Here they are, as presented in Sophie's World:
  • Who are you? (2)
  • Is there life after death? (4, 13)
  • Where does the world come from? (5)
  • Could anything have always existed? (7)
  • How was the world created? (13)
  • Do you believe in fate? (47)
  • Is sickness the punishment of the gods (or G-d, in our modern times)? (47)
  • What forces govern the course of history? (47)
  • How ought we to live? (13, 130)
  • What is the relationship between the body and mind? (235)
  • Where do we get our ideas from? Can we really rely on what our senses tell us? (263)

    2. Of these big questions philosophers attempt to answer, which are most controversial or difficult and why? Be sure to fully explain why.

  • How will students effectively delve into their personal philosophical journey? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • List #6 Quiz.
  • Continue to read Sophie's World.
  • Compose two more entries (you will have a total of FOUR entries) in your Dialectical Journal for Sophie's World. Make sure to follow the suggestions/edits acquired in the teacher-student writing workshop/conference for the 1st entry.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:

  • You MUST finish Sophie's World.

    Critical Analysis Paper TBA.

  • Wednesday, October 14th, 2009: NO CLASS DUE TO THE PSAT. How will students effectively delve into their personal philosophical journey?
  • Continue to read Sophie's World.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:

  • Finish Sophie's World. Critical Analysis Paper TBA.
  • Tuesday, October 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz #5

    2. Discuss the following big questions that the philosophers in Sophie's World attempt to answer. We will personally answer (write your own interpretations and meaningful answers; no minimum is required) these questions. Here they are, as presented in Sophie's World (this list is incomplete):

  • Who are you? (2)
  • Is there life after death? (4, 13)
  • Where does the world come from? (5)

    3. Distribute and review the college essays.

  • How will students effectively delve into their personal philosophical journey?
  • Continue to read Sophie's World.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:

  • Finish Sophie's World. Critical Analysis Paper TBA.
  • Friday, October 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue to analyze the following big questions that the philosophers in Sophie's World attempt to answer. We will personally answer (write your own interpretations and meaningful answers; no minimum is required) these questions. Here they are, as presented in Sophie's World (this list is incomplete):
  • Who are you? (2)
  • Is there life after death? (4, 13)
  • Where does the world come from? (5)
  • Could anything have always existed? (7)
  • How was the world created? (13)
  • Do you believe in fate? (47)
  • Is sickness the punishment of the gods? (47)
  • What forces govern the course of history? (47)
  • How ought we to live? (13, 130)
  • What is the relationship between the body and mind? (235)
  • Where do we get our ideas from? Can we really rely on what our senses tell us? (263)

    Of these big questions philosophers attempt to answer, which are most controversial or difficult and why? Be sure to fully explain why.

    2. Teacher-Student Writing Workshop/Conference on the 1st entry in the Dialectical Journal.

    3. Review List #5 for the upcoming quiz.

  • How will students effectively begin their understanding of the dialectical journal and their journey into the world of philosophy? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:
  • List #5 Quiz.
  • Continue to read Sophie's World.
  • Compose a 2nd entry in your Dialectical Journal for Sophie's World. Make sure to follow the suggestions/edits acquired in the teacher-student writing workshop/conference for the 1st entry.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:

  • Finish Sophie's World. Critical Analysis Paper TBA.
  • Thursday, October 8th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Sophie's World book receipt/book number issuing.

    2. Introduce Dialectical Journal.

    3. Introduce big questions that the philosophers in Sophie's World attempt to answer. We will personally answer these questions. Here they are, as presented in Sophie's World (this list is incomplete):

  • Who are you? (2)
  • Is there life after death? (4, 13)
  • Where does the world come from? (5)
  • Could anything have always existed? (7)
  • How was the world created? (13)
  • Do you believe in fate? (47)
  • Is sickness the punishment of the gods? (47)
  • What forces govern the course of history? (47)
  • How ought we to live? (13, 130)
  • What is the relationship between the body and mind? (235)
  • Where do we get our ideas from? Can we really rely on what our senses tell us? (263)
  • How will students effectively begin their understanding of the dialectical journal and their journey into the world of philosophy? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
  • Turn in 1st entry for the Dialectical Journal for either Oedipus Rex or Sophie's World.

    DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • List #5 Quiz.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:

  • Finish Sophie's World. Critical Analysis Paper TBA.
  • Wednesday, October 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Fishbowl discussion on Oedipus Rex continued based on the following questions:
    1. Who am I? Identity Exploration vs. Self-Discovery
    2. Is Oedipus weak or strong? Understanding Oedipus' Character.
    3. Sight vs. Blindness. What is Sophocles' purpose in creating this contrast? Why is it significant?
    4. Growth and Development. How has Oedipus developed as a character?
    5. What is Sophocles saying about MAN in Oedipus Rex?
    6. What's the purpose of the title, Oedipus Rex?

    2. Sophie's World and book receipt distribution.

    How will students enhance their discussion skills and higher level thinking/analysis of Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Bring in your copy of Sophie's World with a completed book receipt. Begin reading the novel (the # of pages are up to you). Just be ready to have a brief understanding of the novel's opening.

    DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • List #5 Quiz.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21st:

  • Finish Sophie's World. Critical Analysis Paper TBA.
  • Tuesday, October 6th, 2009: Fishbowl discussion on Oedipus Rex continued based on the following questions:
    1. Who am I? Identity Exploration vs. Self-Discovery
    2. Is Oedipus weak or strong? Understanding Oedipus' Character.
    3. Sight vs. Blindness. What is Sophocles' purpose in creating this contrast? Why is it significant?
    4. Growth and Development. How has Oedipus developed as a character?
    5. What is Sophocles saying about MAN in Oedipus Rex?
    6. What's the purpose of the title, Oedipus Rex?
    How will students enhance their discussion skills and higher level thinking/analysis of Oedipus Rex? MAKE UP HW:
  • Finish discussion preparation of Oedipus Rex, if applicable.
  • If necessary, make up the following work: Read the poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" on p. 742 in your textbook. Answer the questions that follow. Since we have limited in-class time, we will now have an online discussion forum at www.nicenet.org. Please join HERE. Use the class key: 0278492A58. Then, you will enter a username (please use your first and last name, like this: johnsmith or john_smith1234). You can add numbers, but make sure you have your first and last name in some form. Also, you will make a password that's easy to remember. Finally, you will add a response to one of the discussion questions posted for the poem.
  • Monday, October 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #4 Quiz

    2. Reading of "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time". Nicenet.org HW reminder.

    How will students enhance their discussion skills and higher level thinking/analysis of poetry and new vocabulary? MAKE UP HW:
  • Finish discussion preparation of Oedipus Rex, if applicable.
  • If necessary, make up the following work: Read the poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" on p. 742 in your textbook. Answer the questions that follow. Since we have limited in-class time, we will now have an online discussion forum at www.nicenet.org. Please join HERE. Use the class key: 0278492A58. Then, you will enter a username (please use your first and last name, like this: johnsmith or john_smith1234). You can add numbers, but make sure you have your first and last name in some form. Also, you will make a password that's easy to remember. Finally, you will add a response to one of the discussion questions posted for the poem.
  • Friday, October 2nd, 2009: Work Period: Take care of work owed. Study for Monday's quiz. Work on discussion preparation, if necessary. Read the poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" on p. 742 in your textbook. Answer the questions that follow. Be prepared to discuss the questions online (see HW) and explain Ms. Conn's purpose in assigning it to you. How will students understand the significance of "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time"? MAKE UP HW:
  • Finish discussion preparation of Oedipus Rex, if applicable.
  • If necessary, make up the work that was due today. Read the poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" on p. 742 in your textbook. Answer the questions that follow. Since we have limited in-class time, we will now have an online discussion forum at www.nicenet.org. Please join HERE. Use the class key: 0278492A58. Then, you will enter a username (please use your first and last name, like this: johnsmith or john_smith1234). You can add numbers, but make sure you have your first and last name in some form. Also, you will make a password that's easy to remember. Finally, you will add a response to one of the discussion questions posted for the poem.

    Quiz on THIS Monday, October 5th--Vocabulary List #4.

  • Thursday, October 1st, 2009: Work Period: Work on discussion preparation, if necessary. Read the poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" on p. 742 in your textbook. Answer the questions that follow. Be prepared to discuss the questions and explain Ms. Conn's purpose in assigning it to you. How will students understand the significance of "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time"? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish discussion preparation of Oedipus Rex, if applicable.
  • Finish today's classwork: Read the poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" on p. 742 in your textbook. Answer the questions that follow. Since we have limited in-class time, we will now have an online discussion forum at www.nicenet.org. Please join HERE. Use the class key: 0278492A58. Then, you will enter a username (please use your first and last name, like this: johnsmith or john_smith1234). You can add numbers, but make sure you have your first and last name in some form. Also, you will make a password that's easy to remember. Finally, you will add a response to one of the discussion questions posted for the poem.

    Quiz on Monday, October 5th--Vocabulary List #4.

  • Wednesday, September 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Turn in signed contract. Grade the Literary Terms Test.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Group discussion/fishbowl on Oedipus Rex. Analysis will include topics/themes revealed in the Perrine textbook questions.

    How will students effectively analyze the themes in Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish discussion preparation of Oedipus Rex, if applies.
  • Tuesday, September 29th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #3 Quiz. Turn in Story #3.

    2. Resume return/analysis. Contracts introduced.

    3. Discuss/Analyze: Continue discussion on Oedipus Rex. Analysis will include topics/themes revealed in the Perrine textbook questions. Discussion topics are the following (each table group can choose a discussion topic):
    1. Who am I? Identity Exploration vs. Self-Discovery
    2. Is Oedipus weak or strong? Understanding Oedipus' Character.
    3. Sight vs. Blindness. What is Sophocles' purpose in creating this contrast? Why is it significant?
    4. Growth and Development. How has Oedipus developed as a character?
    5. What is Sophocles saying about MAN in Oedipus Rex?
    6. What's the purpose of the title, Oedipus Rex?

    *Give out student expectations/contract for this AP course. This will include the below 80 rule, which may result in removal from the class.

    How will students expand their lexicon and analyze the themes in Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Prepare your group discussion for tomorrow (see classwork for details). Remember, you should prepare for a 10 minute discussion. Have textual references ready to share and discuss with the class.
  • Bring in signed student expectations/contract for this AP course.
  • Bring in your Perrine textbook tomorrow. Be ready to discuss and share your annotations/markings.
  • Friday, September 25th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Literary Terms Test

    2. Review List #3 for Tuesday's quiz.

    How will students be assessed on literary terms in context? DUE THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:
  • Quiz on List #3.
  • Vocabulary Story for List #3. Write a creative, original story (typed with appropriate heading, including name, date, course name, my name and original title) using all of list #3 vocabulary words (underlined). Topic suggestions: Oedipus Rex, My Future, A Day in My Life, or a topic of your choice. This is an individual effort.
  • Bring in your Perrine textbook. Be ready to discuss and share your annotations/markings.
  • Thursday, September 24th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue to analyze the AP Free-Response Essay (taken from the 2009 exam) and your score based on the rubric. What went right? What went wrong? What do you need to do? Analyze sample essays. Make portfolio folders and create goals.

    2. Class Discussion on Oedipus Rex. Examine the following quotes in terms of Oedipus' character flaws and the question of which carries more influence--free will or fate:

  • "You saved us from the Sphinx, that flinty singer, and the tribute we paid to her so long; yet you were never better informed than we, nor could we teach you: a god's touch, it seems, enabled you to help us" (Priest, Prologue, 38-42).
  • "Search reveals things that escape an inattentive man" (Kreon, Prologue, 114-115).
  • "There is no one here who will not curse you soon, as you curse me" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 357-358).
  • "You weave your own doom" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 365).
  • "But I say that you, with both your eyes, are blind: you can not see the wretchedness of your life..." (Teiresias, Scene 1, 399-400).
  • "You can not judge unless you know the facts" (Kreon, Scene 2, 516).
  • "Judgments too quickly formed are dangerous" (Choragos, Scene 2, 584).
  • "The greatest griefs are those we cause ourselves" (Second Messenger, Ode 4, 1184).
  • "I have been preserved for some unthinkable fate" (Oedipus, Exodus, 1404-1405).
  • "Think no longer that you are in command here, but rather think how, when you were, you served your own destruction" (Kreon, Exodus, 1465-1466).
  • How will students understand the requirements, rubric and exemplary AP essay writing and engage in discussion/analysis of Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Literary Terms Test. Know the following terms: Literary Terms Quiz and the literary terms on this Oedipus Rex link/handout. Know the definitions and be able to identify the terms in literature.

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:

  • Quiz on List #3.
  • Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Class Discussion on Oedipus Rex. Examine the following quotes in terms of Oedipus' character flaws and the question of which carries more influence--free will or fate:
  • "You saved us from the Sphinx, that flinty singer, and the tribute we paid to her so long; yet you were never better informed than we, nor could we teach you: a god's touch, it seems, enabled you to help us" (Priest, Prologue, 38-42).
  • "Search reveals things that escape an inattentive man" (Kreon, Prologue, 114-115).
  • "There is no one here who will not curse you soon, as you curse me" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 357-358).
  • "You weave your own doom" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 365).
  • "But I say that you, with both your eyes, are blind: you can not see the wretchedness of your life..." (Teiresias, Scene 1, 399-400).
  • "You can not judge unless you know the facts" (Kreon, Scene 2, 516).
  • "Judgments too quickly formed are dangerous" (Choragos, Scene 2, 584).
  • "The greatest griefs are those we cause ourselves" (Second Messenger, Ode 4, 1184).
  • "I have been preserved for some unthinkable fate" (Oedipus, Exodus, 1404-1405).
  • "Think no longer that you are in command here, but rather think how, when you were, you served your own destruction" (Kreon, Exodus, 1465-1466).

    2. Analyze the AP Free-Response Essay (taken from the 2009 exam) and your score based on the rubric. What went right? What went wrong? What do you need to do? Analyze sample essays.

  • How will students understand the requirements, rubric and exemplary AP essay writing and engage in discussion/analysis of Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:
  • Bring in the Perrine textbook and be prepared to discuss/analyze Oedipus Rex. Look over today's quotes and discussion topic and be prepared to share additional textual references and insight tomorrow.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Literary Terms Test. Know the following terms: Literary Terms Quiz and the literary terms on this Oedipus Rex link/handout. Know the definitions and be able to identify the terms in literature.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:

  • Quiz on List #3.
  • Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Oedipus Rex Reading Quiz (pop!). Use the text to include textual evidence. Turn in your Oedipus questions and show your markings.

    How will students be assessed on their reading/analysis of Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd and THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:
  • Bring in the Perrine textbook and be prepared to discuss/analyze Oedipus Rex.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Literary Terms Test. Know the following terms: Literary Terms Quiz and the literary terms on this Oedipus Rex link/handout. Know the definitions and be able to identify the terms in literature.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:

  • Quiz on List #3.
  • Monday, September 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocab. List #2 Quiz

    2. Work Period: Finish the Vocabulary Story Writing on Life at ITHS. Work on the discipline code paperwork.

    3. Discuss/Share: Vocabulary Story Sharing.

    4. If time allows, AP essay review.

    How will students expand their lexicon? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:
  • Read Oedipus Rex in the Perrine textbook--pp. 1209-1260. Mark the text (without marking the actual textbook) as guided to do so in "How to Mark a Book". Focus your reading and marking according to the syllabus guidelines (see the introductory weeks under Oedipus Rex). Answer the questions on pp. 1261-1262.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:

  • Finish and turn in the discipline code paperwork.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Literary Terms Test. Know the following terms: Literary Terms Quiz and the literary terms on this Oedipus Rex link/handout. Know the definitions and be able to identify the terms in literature.
  • Friday, September 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the answers to the Literary Terms Quiz. Turn in your book receipts.

    2. Vocabulary List #2 preparatory review.

    3. Vocabulary Story Writing on Life at ITHS.

    How will students prepare to expand their lexicon? QUIZ #2 THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all 11 lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex in the Perrine textbook--pp. 1209-1260. Mark the text (without marking the actual textbook) as guided to do so in "How to Mark a Book". Focus your reading and marking according to the syllabus guidelines (see the introductory weeks under Oedipus Rex). Answer the questions on pp. 1261-1262.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Literary Terms Test. Know the following terms: Literary Terms Quiz and the literary terms on this Oedipus Rex link/handout. Know the definitions and be able to identify the terms in literature.
  • Thursday, September 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the literary terms on this Oedipus Rex link/handout. Get your book receipt and turn in tomorrow.

    2. Finish reading the "How to Mark a Book" article.

    3. Literary Terms Quiz (ungraded; this is merely to find out what you know and what you need to know)

    How will students prepare to read Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Bring in the completed book receipt.

    QUIZ #2 NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all 11 lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex in the Perrine textbook--pp. 1209-1260. Mark the text (without marking the actual textbook) as guided to do so in "How to Mark a Book". Focus your reading and marking according to the syllabus guidelines (see the introductory weeks under Oedipus Rex). Answer the questions on pp. 1261-1262.
  • Wednesday, September 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Turn in your resume. In groups of 2-3, begin to define the literary terms on this Oedipus Rex link/handout. Get your Perrine textbooks today/fill out book sign-up list.

    2. Read "How to Mark a Book".

    How will students prepare to read Oedipus Rex? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish defining the literary terms (in-class handout and also found HERE) and bring in to class.

    QUIZ #2 NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all 11 lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex in the Perrine textbook--pp. 1209-1260. Mark the text (without marking the actual textbook) as guided to do so in "How to Mark a Book". Focus your reading and marking according to the syllabus guidelines (see the introductory weeks under Oedipus Rex). Answer the questions on pp. 1261-1262.
  • Tuesday, September 15th, 2009: Work Period: For 40 minutes, read "A White Heron" by Sarah Orne Jewett and write the essay based on the following AP-style question: Write an essay showing how the author dramatizes the young heroine�s adventure. Consider such literary elements as diction, imagery, narrative pace, and point of view. How will students understand an AP-style free-response question? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:
  • Academic Resume (first draft is due--it MUST be typed). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.
  • Read "How To Mark a Book" and put his ideas into practice.

    QUIZ #2 NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all 11 lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Monday, September 14th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #1 Quiz. Turn in your College Essay.

    2. Analysis of Sample Resumes--Students individually and collectively analyze the sample resumes. Guiding questions to answer while analyzing: What are the components of an academic resume? What are the strengths of each resume? What are the weaknesses? What qualities, in terms of formatting, writing style, and word usage, are worth including in your own resume?

    How will students prepare to compose their resumes? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Read An Essay About Essays (answering the "So what?" question). Be ready to apply this information in a practice AP essay tomorrow.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:

  • Academic Resume (first draft is due--it MUST be typed). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    QUIZ #2 NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all 11 lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Friday, September 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read "Three Questions" by Leo Tolstoy (1885). Why is this story a parable? How does this story set the tone for the course? For the time in your life? For a lifelong lesson?

    2. Read Sample College Essays. What are some strengths in these essays? What tips can you use from these essays? Take notes.

    3. HW reminders, including vocabulary knowledge found invocabulary list #1

    How will students prepare to write the college essay? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

    QUIZ #1 THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all 11 lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Thursday, September 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Begin reading the following: "Writing the Essay: Sound Advice from an Expert", taking notes and underlining key points. How do you identify the key points? AP English Syllabus check.

    2. Discuss/Review the Do Now.

    3. HW reminders, including vocabulary knowledge found invocabulary list #1

    How will students prepare to write the college essay? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • E-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Introduce yourself. What should I know about you? Put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."
  • Have your parent/guardian e-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Your parent/guardian can just say a brief hello and explain how he/she is related (father, mother, guardian, aunt, uncle, etc.). Please have him/her put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

    QUIZ #1 on MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all 11 lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Wednesday, September 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and fill out the index card, answering the following in complete sentences (when appropriate):
  • your full name (in parentheses, write your first name, which you want to be called in class)
  • Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
  • What did you read this summer? Provide titles of books, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • Identify FIVE colleges you will apply to. Star (*) your #1 choice.
  • What career do you plan to pursue and why?
  • What knowledge do you hope to acquire in this AP English course?
  • What can you contribute to this AP English course?
  • What are you looking forward to this school year?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share responses.

    3. AP English Syllabus introduced.

    4. HW introduced.

  • How will students introduce themselves, with reference to recent literary practice and personal and academic goals? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Print out and read the AP English Syllabus. Bring it to class tomorrow.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:

  • E-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Introduce yourself. What should I know about you? Put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."
  • Have your parent/guardian e-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Your parent/guardian can just say a brief hello and explain how he/she is related (father, mother, guardian, aunt, uncle, etc.). Please have him/her put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

    QUIZ #1 on MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all 11 lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).