Ms. Conn's AP English Assignments, 2010-2011

Ms. Conn's AP English Assignments
2010-2011

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 13th, 2011: Reflections/Memories/Prep for College How will students effectively reflect on their years of high school and prepare for the college years? See you tomorrow, on the Senior Day Trip to Six Flags, and at Graduation!!!!
Friday, June 10th, 2011: SENIOR BBQ! How will students effectively celebrate their years of high school in a BBQ format? See you on Monday (our final class together!) to reflect on high school memories and learn some final words of wisdom from your AP English teacher!
Wednesday, June 8th, 2011: Film Viewing of The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri (the novel provided in class). We will engage in discussion on the following questions: How does The Namesake, the novel, compare and contrast to the film? What were the director's choices and why are they important? What messages are conveyed to the audience of the film version of the novel? How can students analyze The Namesake in a college-appropriate discussion format? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (the LAST day of the semester is THIS Friday, June 10th):
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script.
  • Tuesday, June 7th, 2011: Book Discussion: Book Club Discussion of The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri (the novel is provided in class). We will engage in discussion on the following questions: How does The Namesake fit in with our course themes of identity and self-exploration? How does The Namesake connect to our other literary works studied this year (such as Hamlet, The Awakening, The Kite Runner, and others)? What moments define the characters in The Namesake? What moments define us more accidents, achievements, mourning or celebration? How does cultural heritage influence the characters in the novel? How much does our cultural heritages define our ideas and experiences? How do the characters create and find meaning in their lives? How do we (and will we) create and find meaning in our lives? How can students analyze The Namesake in a college-appropriate discussion format? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (the LAST day of the semester is THIS Friday, June 10th):
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script.
  • Monday, June 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS (the following students will present today: Nicole, Scott, Andy, and Alfred)

    2. Book Club Discussion of The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri (the novel is provided in class). We will engage in discussion on the following questions: How does The Namesake fit in with our course themes of identity and self-exploration? How does The Namesake connect to our other literary works studied this year (such as Hamlet, The Awakening, The Kite Runner, and others)? What moments define the characters in The Namesake? What moments define us more accidents, achievements, mourning or celebration? How does cultural heritage influence the characters in the novel? How much does our cultural heritages define our ideas and experiences? How do the characters create and find meaning in their lives? How do we (and will we) create and find meaning in our lives?

    How can students effectively deliver a graduation speech and achieve success in college? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (the LAST day of the semester is THIS Friday, June 10th):
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script.
  • Friday, June 3rd, 2011: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS (the following students will present today: Kimberly, Shaila, Katherine, Shakiel, Ryan, Daniela, Brandon, Sherief, Francisco, Scott, Andy, and Alfred) How can students effectively deliver a graduation speech and achieve success in college? DUE THIS MONDAY, JUNE 6th:
  • Read The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri (the novel is provided in class). Be ready to engage in discussion on the following questions: How does The Namesake fit in with our course themes of identity and self-exploration? How does The Namesake connect to our other literary works studied this year (such as Hamlet, The Awakening, The Kite Runner, and others)? What moments define the characters in The Namesake? What moments define us more accidents, achievements, mourning or celebration? How does cultural heritage influence the characters in the novel? How much does our cultural heritages define our ideas and experiences? How do the characters create and find meaning in their lives? How do we (and will we) create and find meaning in our lives?

    MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:

  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.
  • Thursday, June 2nd, 2011: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS (the following students will present today: Sairin, Noor, Dorje, Trevon, Murtaza, Michelle, Nicole, Miguel, and, if there's time, anyone who didn't present yesterday or Tuesday) How can students effectively deliver a graduation speech and achieve success in college? DUE THIS WEEK OF TUESDAY, MAY 31ST (assigned dates here: Tuesday, May 31st-Melanie, Zara, Yovanny, Eric, Jacalyn and Scott; Wednesday, June 1st-Samuel, Areeb, Andy, Diana, Alfred, Jeffrey, Pierina, Evita and Erika; Thursday, June 2nd-Sairin, Noor, Dorje, Trevon, Murtaza, Michelle, Nicole and Miguel; Friday, June 3rd-Kimberly, Shaila, Katherine, Shakiel, Ryan, Daniela, Brandon, Sherief, and Francisco): Graduation Speech (Value=33% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech and other valedictorian speeches from 2008.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, JUNE 6th:

  • Read The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri (the novel is provided in class). Be ready to engage in discussion on the following questions: How does The Namesake fit in with our course themes of identity and self-exploration? How does The Namesake connect to our other literary works studied this year (such as Hamlet, The Awakening, The Kite Runner, and others)? What moments define the characters in The Namesake? What moments define us more accidents, achievements, mourning or celebration? How does cultural heritage influence the characters in the novel? How much does our cultural heritages define our ideas and experiences? How do the characters create and find meaning in their lives? How do we (and will we) create and find meaning in our lives?

    MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:

  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.
  • Wednesday, June 1st, 2011: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS (the following students will present today: Samuel, Areeb, Andy, Diana, Alfred, Jeffrey, Pierina, Evita, and Erika) How can students effectively deliver a graduation speech and achieve success in college? DUE THIS WEEK OF TUESDAY, MAY 31ST (assigned dates here: Tuesday, May 31st-Melanie, Zara, Yovanny, Eric, Jacalyn and Scott; Wednesday, June 1st-Samuel, Areeb, Andy, Diana, Alfred, Jeffrey, Pierina, Evita and Erika; Thursday, June 2nd-Sairin, Noor, Dorje, Trevon, Murtaza, Michelle, Nicole and Miguel; Friday, June 3rd-Kimberly, Shaila, Katherine, Shakiel, Ryan, Daniela, Brandon, Sherief, and Francisco): Graduation Speech (Value=33% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech and other valedictorian speeches from 2008.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, JUNE 6th:

  • Read The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri (the novel is provided in class). Be ready to engage in discussion on the following questions: How does The Namesake fit in with our course themes of identity and self-exploration? How does The Namesake connect to our other literary works studied this year (such as Hamlet, The Awakening, The Kite Runner, and others)? What moments define the characters in The Namesake? What moments define us more accidents, achievements, mourning or celebration? How does cultural heritage influence the characters in the novel? How much does our cultural heritages define our ideas and experiences? How do the characters create and find meaning in their lives? How do we (and will we) create and find meaning in our lives?

    MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:

  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.
  • Tuesday, May 31st, 2011: 1. Do Now: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS (the following students will present today: Melanie, Zara, Yovanny, Eric, Jacalyn and Scott)

    2. GUEST SPEAKER: ITHS Alumnus, Anthony Munoz (c/o '08), will speak about how to be successful in college.

    How can students effectively deliver a graduation speech and achieve success in college? DUE THIS WEEK OF TUESDAY, MAY 31ST (assigned dates here: Tuesday, May 31st-Melanie, Zara, Yovanny, Eric, Jacalyn and Scott; Wednesday, June 1st-Samuel, Areeb, Andy, Diana, Alfred, Jeffrey, Pierina, Evita and Erika; Thursday, June 2nd-Sairin, Noor, Dorje, Trevon, Murtaza, Michelle, Nicole and Miguel; Friday, June 3rd-Kimberly, Shaila, Katherine, Shakiel, Ryan, Daniela, Brandon, Sherief, and Francisco): Graduation Speech (Value=33% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech and other valedictorian speeches from 2008.

    MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:

  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.
  • Friday, May 27th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Work on writing at least one paragraph of your graduation speech. Use the sample graduation speech to guide you. Refer to the grading rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric for requirements..

    3. Speech delivery practice! Work in small groups of 3. Work on eye contact, gestures, volume, articulation, enthusiasm, tone, etc.

    How can students effectively prepare to write and deliver a graduation speech? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE THIS COMING WEEK OF TUESDAY, MAY 31ST (assigned dates here: Tuesday, May 31st-Melanie, Zara, Yovanny, Eric, Jacalyn and Scott; Wednesday, June 1st-Samuel, Areeb, Andy, Diana, Alfred, Jeffrey, Pierina, Evita and Erika; Thursday, June 2nd-Sairin, Noor, Dorje, Trevon, Murtaza, Michelle, Nicole and Miguel; Friday, June 3rd-Kimberly, Shaila, Katherine, Shakiel, Ryan, Daniela, Brandon, Sherief, and Francisco): Graduation Speech (Value=33% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech and other valedictorian speeches from 2008.

  • Thursday, May 26th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Presentation of performance reviews (presented by Jeffrey)

    2. Introduce a sample graduation speech. What are the major components of the speech? Those major components you will need to insert in your own original graduation speech.

    2. Introduce the grading rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

    3. Begin writing your own graduation speech, using the sample speech and rubric to guide you.

    How can students effectively prepare to write a graduation speech? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE THE WEEK OF TUESDAY, MAY 31ST (assigned dates here: Tuesday, May 31st-Melanie, Zara, Yovanny, Eric, Jacalyn and Scott; Wednesday, June 1st-Samuel, Areeb, Andy, Diana, Alfred, Jeffrey, Pierina, Evita and Erika; Thursday, June 2nd-Sairin, Noor, Dorje, Trevon, Murtaza, Michelle, Nicole and Miguel; Friday, June 3rd-Kimberly, Shaila, Katherine, Shakiel, Ryan, Daniela, Brandon, Sherief, and Francisco): Graduation Speech (Value=33% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech and other valedictorian speeches from 2008.

  • Wednesday, May 25th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Performances of original scripts finish today. Each group will be graded on the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes.

    2. Reflections

    How can students effectively perform their own script? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE THE WEEK OF TUESDAY, MAY 31ST (assigned date given in class): Graduation Speech (Value=33% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech and other valedictorian speeches from 2008.

  • Tuesday, May 24th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Performances of original scripts begin today. Each group will be graded on the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes.

    2. Reflections

    How can students effectively perform their own script? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25th (each group's assigned day was given in class):

  • "Make Your Own Play" assignment=You will have to create a 5 minute performance for every 3-4 people (you will not lose points if your scene is 4:30-5:30). You will work in groups of 3-4 people, though you may combine two groups, if so desired. Your script must be a minimum of 3-4 pages (average of 1 page per person) and have a clear introductory event, events that move the story along, and a climax (A conclusion/resolution is optional). Your script must also make three literary references to three different works of literature that we've read this year. Use the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes to guide you, as you will be graded on this sheet.

    Here are some good script-writing resources:

  • Screenwriting
  • Screenplay Format

    DUE THE WEEK OF TUESDAY, MAY 31ST (assigned date given in class): Graduation Speech (Value=33% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Use this sample to guide you: Brandon Christie's High School Valedictorian Speech and other valedictorian speeches from 2008.

  • Monday, May 23rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Final rehearsal/work on the performance of your play in your groups! You will have today for in-class rehearsal. Attend to the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes.

    2. Q & A (What are your final concerns and/or questions regarding performance?)

    How can students effectively perform their own script and prepare for performance? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MAY 24th/WEDNESDAY, MAY 25th (your group's assigned day was given in class):

  • "Make Your Own Play" assignment=You will have to create a 5 minute performance for every 3-4 people (you will not lose points if your scene is 4:30-5:30). You will work in groups of 3-4 people, though you may combine two groups, if so desired. Your script must be a minimum of 3-4 pages (average of 1 page per person) and have a clear introductory event, events that move the story along, and a climax (A conclusion/resolution is optional). Your script must also make three literary references to three different works of literature that we've read this year. Use the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes to guide you, as you will be graded on this sheet.

    Here are some good script-writing resources:

  • Screenwriting
  • Screenplay Format
  • Friday, May 20th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises (arm/leg shake-out, vocal projection (as a group, choose one line to project across the room, tableaus of one scene in your play--make sure everyone is touching each other (PG, of course))

    2. Work Period: Continue to work on performing your play in your groups! You will have today and tomorrow (Friday) for in-class rehearsal day. Attend to the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes.

    How can students effectively perform their own script and prepare for performance? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE (SEE NEW DATE) NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 24th/WEDNESDAY, MAY 25th:

  • "Make Your Own Play" assignment=You will have to create a 5 minute performance for every 3-4 people (you will not lose points if your scene is 4:30-5:30). You will work in groups of 3-4 people, though you may combine two groups, if so desired. Your script must be a minimum of 3-4 pages (average of 1 page per person) and have a clear introductory event, events that move the story along, and a climax (A conclusion/resolution is optional). Your script must also make three literary references to three different works of literature that we've read this year. Use the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes to guide you, as you will be graded on this sheet.

    Here are some good script-writing resources:

  • Screenwriting
  • Screenplay Format
  • Thursday, May 19th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises (arm/leg shake-out, vocal projection (as a group, choose one line to project across the room, tableaus of one scene in your play--make sure everyone is touching each other (PG, of course))

    2. Work Period: Work on performing your play in your groups! You will have today and tomorrow (Friday) for in-class rehearsal day. Attend to the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes.

    Turn in HW: a copy of your script!

    How can students effectively perform their own script and prepare for performance? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED:
  • Annotations on your AP Practice Exam
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE (SEE NEW DATE) NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 24th/WEDNESDAY, MAY 25th:

  • "Make Your Own Play" assignment=You will have to create a 5 minute performance for every 3-4 people (you will not lose points if your scene is 4:30-5:30). You will work in groups of 3-4 people, though you may combine two groups, if so desired. Your script must be a minimum of 3-4 pages (average of 1 page per person) and have a clear introductory event, events that move the story along, and a climax (A conclusion/resolution is optional). Your script must also make three literary references to three different works of literature that we've read this year. Use the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes to guide you, as you will be graded on this sheet.

    Here are some good script-writing resources:

  • Screenwriting
  • Screenplay Format
  • Wednesday, May 18th, 2011: Work Period: Work on writing your play in your groups! You will have today to write. Tomorrow (Thursday) and Friday will be rehearsal days/acting technique reminders. Attend to the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes. How can students effectively write their own script and prepare for performance? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 19th:
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 23rd/TUESDAY, MAY 24th:

  • "Make Your Own Play" assignment=You will have to create a 5 minute performance (you will not lose points if your scene is 4:30-5:30). You will work in groups of 3-4 people. Your script must be a minimum of 3-4 pages (average of 1 page per person) and have a clear introductory event, events that move the story along, and a climax (A conclusion/resolution is optional). Your script must also make three literary references to three different works of literature that we've read this year. Use the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes to guide you, as you will be graded on this sheet.

    Here are some good script-writing resources:

  • Screenwriting
  • Screenplay Format
  • Tuesday, May 17th, 2011: Work Period: Work on writing your play in your groups! You will have today and tomorrow to write. Thursday and Friday will be rehearsal days/acting technique reminders. Attend to the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes. How can students effectively write their own script and prepare for performance? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MAY 19th:
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 23rd/TUESDAY, MAY 24th:

  • "Make Your Own Play" assignment=You will have to create a 5 minute performance (you will not lose points if your scene is 4:30-5:30). You will work in groups of 3-4 people. Your script must be a minimum of 3-4 pages (average of 1 page per person) and have a clear introductory event, events that move the story along, and a climax (A conclusion/resolution is optional). Your script must also make three literary references to three different works of literature that we've read this year. Use the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes to guide you, as you will be graded on this sheet.

    Here are some good script-writing resources:

  • Screenwriting
  • Screenplay Format
  • Monday, May 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introduce the "Make Your Own Play" assignment, including the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes.

    2. Work Period: Work on writing your play! You will have today, tomorrow and Wednesday to write. Thursday and Friday will be rehearsal days/acting technique reminders.

    How can students effectively write their own script and prepare for performance? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MAY 19th:
  • Turn in the typed, double-spaced script to Ms. Conn. Make sure all of the group members' names are printed at the top. For a group of 3-4 people, there should be 3-4 pages for the script. If there are two groups together, you must remember that the script should have a page per person. There MUST be three literary references (this means three different works of literature) in your script. Please keep it PG-13.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 23rd/TUESDAY, MAY 24th:

  • "Make Your Own Play" assignment=You will have to create a 5 minute performance (you will not lose points if your scene is 4:30-5:30). You will work in groups of 3-4 people. Your script must be a minimum of 3-4 pages (average of 1 page per person) and have a clear introductory event, events that move the story along, and a climax (A conclusion/resolution is optional). Your script must also make three literary references to three different works of literature that we've read this year. Use the Grading Sheet for the "Make Your Own Play" Scenes to guide you, as you will be graded on this sheet.

    Here are some good script-writing resources:

  • Screenwriting
  • Screenplay Format
  • Friday, May 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish viewing and analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the film version. Are the thematic messages still oppression and manipulation, as identified in the novel? If so, how are they displayed in the film version? How can students effectively analyze the film version of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and identify the thematic messages of the director and author, Ken Kesey? None. Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!
    Thursday, May 12th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue viewing and analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the film version. Are the thematic messages still oppression and manipulation, as identified in the novel? If so, how are they displayed in the film version? How can students effectively analyze the film version of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and identify the thematic messages of the director and author, Ken Kesey? None. Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!
    Wednesday, May 11th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue viewing and analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the film version. Are the thematic messages still oppression and manipulation, as identified in the novel? If so, how are they displayed in the film version? How can students effectively analyze the film version of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and identify the thematic messages of the director and author, Ken Kesey? None. Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!
    Tuesday, May 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now: AP English t-shirt introduced (design needed/AP English memories determined).

    2. Begin viewing and analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the film version. Are the thematic messages still oppression and manipulation, as identified in the novel? If so, how are they displayed in the film version?

    How can students effectively analyze the film version of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and identify the thematic messages of the director and author, Ken Kesey? None. Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!
    Monday, May 9th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Share your Senior Will. Begin it with the following: "I, ___________, being of ______________mind, and ______________body, bequeath...

    2. Sign up for our Party Potluck--what will you bring?!

    How can students effectively reflect on their high school careers? None. Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!
    Friday, May 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Reflect on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM. Did it meet your expectations? What were your strengths? What was challenging?

    2. What would you like to do in this class for the rest of the year? Let's vote!

    3. Fun Activity: Write your Senior Will. Begin it with the following: "I, ___________, being of ______________mind, and ______________body, bequeath...

    How were students successful on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM? None. Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!
    Thursday, May 5th, 2011: AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM How will students be successful on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM? None. Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate!
    Wednesday, May 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: AP Exam strategy reminders and review

    2. Q & A

    3. Partner/Group review and final preparation

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM's Essay Questions and Multiple-Choice Questions? ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM! Best of luck to all of you!!

    What should I do in these last few days/nights before the AP English Literature Exam?
    Continue to review your AP materials (read over study guides, AP preparatory materials, quizzes/exams, old papers with Ms. Conn's recommendations)! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY so you can brush up on all the words we've acquired this year--you need to use them in your essays!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    CHECK OUT YOUR CLASSMATES' REVIEW GUIDES:

  • Andy and Sairin's Review for Essay Question #1 (poetry essay)
  • Yovanny and Scott's Review for Essay Question #1 (poetry essay)
  • Francisco and Trevon's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Diana and Samuel's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Brandon's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Pierina and Melanie's Review for Essay Question #3 (free-response)
  • Evita and Noor's Review for Essay Question #3 (free-response)
  • Erika and Shakiel's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Daniela and Zara's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Shaila and Nicole's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Dorje and Michelle's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions

    What should I do the night and morning before the exam?
    Eat a hearty, nutritious dinner tonight (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Relax. Watch a movie or play a game. Then, find a quiet spot and go throug your notebook, review sheets, exam notes, study guides and details of the full-length novels/plays that you might write about in the free-response essay. Sleep well! Get up VERY early, enough time to get to school. Wear comfortable clothing and extra layers (a sweater/long-sleeve shirt in case the room temperature changes). Come to Room 232 for breakfast (bagels and cream cheese, bananas, muffins, and/or juice) and moral support at 7-7:45am. Turn OFF all electronic devices. Go to ROOM 217 for the exam (EXAM STARTS AT 8AM, promptly!). Do not stress. Remind yourself that you have prepared thoroughly and that this test is a great challenge and opportunity you have been given, due to your hard work throughout high school. Be confident and proud of yourself, and you will succeed. It's your time to shine!

    What should I bring to the exam?
    Student ID, several pencils with erasers, several black pens (black ink is easier to read than other colors), a watch, something to drink (water is best), a quiet snack (like lifesavers or mints), and tissues.

    How come we haven't figured out what score range we fall into (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5)?
    The total score ranges each year, as it is based on a variety of items including: AP distribution over the past three years, comparability studies, frequency distributions of scores on each section and the essays, and average scores on each exam section and essays. Though, to be a candidate for a 3 or higher, you need to get at least 1/2 of the multiple-choice questions correct. You CAN AND SHOULD answer all questions (remember, the AP English Literature Exam NOW does NOT take points off for wrong answers!). Keep that mind! Also, your essays must be strong, addressing the question thoroughly, with sophisticated language and thoughtful insight.

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM! Best of luck to all of you!!

  • Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: AP Exam strategy reminders and review of the entire year's worth of literature/themes

    2. Q & A

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM's Essay Questions and Multiple-Choice Questions? ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM! Best of luck to all of you!!

    What should I do these last few days/nights before the AP English Literature Exam?
    Continue to review your AP materials (read over study guides, AP preparatory materials, quizzes/exams, old papers with Ms. Conn's recommendations)! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY so you can brush up on all the words we've acquired this year--you need to use them in your essays!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    CHECK OUT YOUR CLASSMATES' REVIEW GUIDES:

  • Andy and Sairin's Review for Essay Question #1 (poetry essay)
  • Yovanny and Scott's Review for Essay Question #1 (poetry essay)
  • Francisco and Trevon's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Diana and Samuel's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Brandon's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Pierina and Melanie's Review for Essay Question #3 (free-response)
  • Evita and Noor's Review for Essay Question #3 (free-response)
  • Erika and Shakiel's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Daniela and Zara's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Shaila and Nicole's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Dorje and Michelle's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions

    What should I do the night and morning before the exam?
    Eat a hearty, nutritious dinner tonight (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Relax. Watch a movie or play a game. Then, find a quiet spot and go throug your notebook, review sheets, exam notes, study guides and details of the full-length novels/plays that you might write about in the free-response essay. Sleep well! Get up VERY early, enough time to get to school. Wear comfortable clothing and extra layers (a sweater/long-sleeve shirt in case the room temperature changes). Come to Room 232 for breakfast (bagels and cream cheese, bananas, muffins, and/or juice) and moral support at 7-7:45am. Turn OFF all electronic devices. Go to ROOM 217 for the exam (EXAM STARTS AT 8AM, promptly!). Do not stress. Remind yourself that you have prepared thoroughly and that this test is a great challenge and opportunity you have been given, due to your hard work throughout high school. Be confident and proud of yourself, and you will succeed. It's your time to shine!

    What should I bring to the exam?
    Student ID, several pencils with erasers, several black pens (black ink is easier to read than other colors), a watch, something to drink (water is best), a quiet snack (like lifesavers or mints), and tissues.

    How come we haven't figured out what score range we fall into (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5)?
    The total score ranges each year, as it is based on a variety of items including: AP distribution over the past three years, comparability studies, frequency distributions of scores on each section and the essays, and average scores on each exam section and essays. Though, to be a candidate for a 3 or higher, you need to get at least 1/2 of the multiple-choice questions correct. You CAN AND SHOULD answer all questions (remember, the AP English Literature Exam NOW does NOT take points off for wrong answers!). Keep that mind! Also, your essays must be strong, addressing the question thoroughly, with sophisticated language and thoughtful insight.

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM! Best of luck to all of you!!

  • Monday, May 2nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the AP practice exam (see the packet of answers/sample essays). Show HW (annotations and your answers for the multiple-choice questions).

    2. AP Exam strategy reminders

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM's Essay Questions and Multiple-Choice Questions? What should I do these last few days/nights before the AP English Literature Exam?
    Continue to review your AP materials (read over study guides, AP preparatory materials, quizzes/exams, old papers with Ms. Conn's recommendations)! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY so you can brush up on all the words we've acquired this year--you need to use them in your essays!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    CHECK OUT YOUR CLASSMATES' REVIEW GUIDES:

  • Andy and Sairin's Review for Essay Question #1 (poetry essay)
  • Yovanny and Scott's Review for Essay Question #1 (poetry essay)
  • Francisco and Trevon's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Diana and Samuel's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Brandon's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Pierina and Melanie's Review for Essay Question #3 (free-response)
  • Erika and Shakiel's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Daniela and Zara's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Shaila and Nicole's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Dorje and Michelle's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions

    What should I do the night and morning before the exam?
    Eat a hearty, nutritious dinner tonight (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Relax. Watch a movie or play a game. Then, find a quiet spot and go throug your notebook, review sheets, exam notes, study guides and details of the full-length novels/plays that you might write about in the free-response essay. Sleep well! Get up VERY early, enough time to get to school. Wear comfortable clothing and extra layers (a sweater/long-sleeve shirt in case the room temperature changes). Come to Room 232 for breakfast (bagels and cream cheese, bananas, muffins, and/or juice) and moral support at 7-7:45am. Turn OFF all electronic devices. Go to ROOM 217 for the exam (EXAM STARTS AT 8AM, promptly!). Do not stress. Remind yourself that you have prepared thoroughly and that this test is a great challenge and opportunity you have been given, due to your hard work throughout high school. Be confident and proud of yourself, and you will succeed. It's your time to shine!

    What should I bring to the exam?
    Student ID, several pencils with erasers, several black pens (black ink is easier to read than other colors), a watch, something to drink (water is best), a quiet snack (like lifesavers or mints), and tissues.

    How come we haven't figured out what score range we fall into (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5)?
    The total score ranges each year, as it is based on a variety of items including: AP distribution over the past three years, comparability studies, frequency distributions of scores on each section and the essays, and average scores on each exam section and essays. Though, to be a candidate for a 3 or higher, you need to get at least 1/2 of the multiple-choice questions correct. You CAN AND SHOULD answer all questions (remember, the AP English Literature Exam NOW does NOT take points off for wrong answers!). Keep that mind! Also, your essays must be strong, addressing the question thoroughly, with sophisticated language and thoughtful insight.

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THIS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM! Best of luck to all of you!!

  • Friday, April 29th, 2011: 1. PRESENTATIONS OF ESSAY QUESTION #2 (Prose Essay), ESSAY QUESTION #3 (Free-Response Essay) and MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS:
    8. Diana and Samuel
    9. Miguel and Areeb
    11. Evita and Noor
    12. Melanie and Pierina
    14. Dorje and Michelle
    15. Shaila and Nicole
    16. Zara and Daniela

    Any owed presentations will also present today.

    2. Reflections/Analysis: As presenters present their review guides, we will analyze and discuss these questions--What was a valuable tip/strategy? What were the key points?

    3. HW introduced.

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM's Essay Questions and Multiple-Choice Questions? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 2nd:
  • Annotate (with a purpose: address the questions) the poems and prose passages in your AP practice test packet.
  • In the multiple-choice questions, cover up the answer choices and write your own answer in the margin.

    Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY so you can brush up on all the words we've acquired this year--you need to use them in your essays!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    CHECK OUT YOUR CLASSMATES' REVIEW GUIDES:

  • Andy and Sairin's Review for Essay Question #1 (poetry essay)
  • Yovanny and Scott's Review for Essay Question #1 (poetry essay)
  • Diana and Samuel's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Brandon's Review for Essay Question #2 (prose essay)
  • Pierina and Melanie's Review for Essay Question #3 (free-response)
  • Erika and Shakiel's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Daniela and Zara's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions
  • Shaila and Nicole's Review for the Multiple-Choice Questions

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM! Test reminders are coming soon!!

  • Thursday, April 28th, 2011: PRESENTATIONS OF ESSAY QUESTION #2 (Prose Essay):
    5. Jeffrey and Murtaza
    6. Brandon and Alfred
    7. Trevon and Francisco
    8. Diana and Samuel

    Any owed presentations (from yesterday) and any presenters scheduled for tomorrow may be able to present today.

    Reflections/Analysis: As presenters present their review guides, we will analyze and discuss these questions--What was a valuable tip/strategy? What were the key points?

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM's Essay Question #2? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, APRIL 29th:
    AP ENGLISH EXAM REVIEW GUIDE ASSIGNMENT--
  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a quiz grade, about 15% of your 2nd marking period!
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section; #1-4 will present essay question #1 (the poem(s)) on Wednesday, April 27th; #5-8 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on Thursday, April 28th; #9-12 will present essay question #3 (free response) and #13-16 will present the multiple-choice question section on Friday, April 29th:
    1. Ryan and Eric
    2. Sairin and Andy
    3. Sherief and Kimberly
    4. Yovanny and Scott
    5. Jeffrey and Murtaza
    6. Brandon and Alfred
    7. Trevon and Francisco
    8. Diana and Samuel
    9. Miguel and Areeb
    10. Katherine and Jacalyn
    11. Evita and Noor
    12. Melanie and Pierina
    13. Erika and Shakiel
    14. Dorje and Michelle
    15. Shaila and Nicole
    16. Zara and Daniela

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th:

  • PRACTICE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM!

  • Wednesday, April 27th, 2011: PRESENTATIONS OF ESSAY QUESTION #1 (Poetry Essay):
    1. Ryan and Eric
    2. Sairin and Andy
    3. Sherief and Kimberly
    4. Yovanny and Scott

    Reflections/Analysis: What was worthwhile? What were the key points? How will these study guides help prepare you for the AP English Literature Exam?

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM's Essay Question #1? DUE THURSDAY, APRIL 28th/FRIDAY, APRIL 29th:
    AP ENGLISH EXAM REVIEW GUIDE ASSIGNMENT--
  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a quiz grade, about 15% of your 2nd marking period!
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section; #1-4 will present essay question #1 (the poem(s)) on Wednesday, April 27th; #5-8 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on Thursday, April 28th; #9-12 will present essay question #3 (free response) and #13-16 will present the multiple-choice question section on Friday, April 29th:
    1. Ryan and Eric
    2. Sairin and Andy
    3. Sherief and Kimberly
    4. Yovanny and Scott
    5. Jeffrey and Murtaza
    6. Brandon and Alfred
    7. Trevon and Francisco
    8. Diana and Samuel
    9. Miguel and Areeb
    10. Katherine and Jacalyn
    11. Evita and Noor
    12. Melanie and Pierina
    13. Erika and Shakiel
    14. Dorje and Michelle
    15. Shaila and Nicole
    16. Zara and Daniela

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th:

  • PRACTICE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM!

  • Friday, April 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss The Importance of Being Earnest: What are the social conventions (customs) of this Victorian era(1890's), as seen in the play? How are social conventions important to this Victorian society? How is satire revealed to ridicule these conventions? Some examples include the following:
  • Gwendolen's pursuit of Jack/Ernest--following her ideal man based on a name only! (p. 19)
  • Jack's pursuit of getting christened as Ernest; the religious influence of the time period in London, England (p. 20)
  • smoking (p. 22)
  • a man's income, investments and his acquisitions (p. 22)
  • a man's political beliefs/values (p. 23)
  • a man's position in society (p. 24)
  • the marital approval of parents/relatives (p. 25)
  • the importance of improving oneself (p. 33)
  • men do not cheat and women do not find married men attractive (p. 40)
  • girls are not educated (p. 53)
  • women who think for themselves (p. 56)
  • a single woman who has no prospect for engagement (p. 70)
  • possession of income/assets makes one more attractive (p. 80)
  • the coming of age of a woman is required in order to be married (p. 81)

    2. Read scenes from the play in class! Here are some scenes that we will likely read and analyze: Act II (pp. 52-54), Act III (pp. 56-62), Act III (pp. 65-69), and Act IV (pp. 85-93).

  • How will students effectively improve their success on the AP free-response essay question? DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th/THURSDAY, APRIL 28th/FRIDAY, APRIL 29th:
    AP ENGLISH EXAM REVIEW GUIDE ASSIGNMENT--
  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a quiz grade, about 15% of your 2nd marking period!
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section; #1-4 will present essay question #1 (the poem(s)) on Wednesday, April 27th; #5-8 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on Thursday, April 28th; #9-12 will present essay question #3 (free response) and #13-16 will present the multiple-choice question section on Friday, April 29th:
    1. Ryan and Eric
    2. Sairin and Andy
    3. Sherief and Kimberly
    4. Yovanny and Scott
    5. Jeffrey and Murtaza
    6. Brandon and Alfred
    7. Trevon and Francisco
    8. Diana and Samuel
    9. Miguel and Areeb
    10. Katherine and Jacalyn
    11. Evita and Noor
    12. Melanie and Pierina
    13. Erika and Shakiel
    14. Dorje and Michelle
    15. Shaila and Nicole
    16. Zara and Daniela

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th:

  • PRACTICE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM!

  • Thursday, April 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: In small groups, students will finish sharing two free-response essay questions from the LIST OF AP ENGLISH LITERATURE FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY QUESTIONS. Students will be ready to share two books (at a minimum) studied this year that can address the essay questions they received.

    2. Discuss/Share: Introduce vacation HW.

    3. Discuss The Importance of Being Earnest: What are the social conventions (customs) of this Victorian era(1890's), as seen in the play? How are social conventions important to this Victorian society? How is satire revealed to ridicule these conventions? Some examples include the following:

  • Gwendolen's pursuit of Jack/Ernest--following her ideal man based on a name only! (p. 19)
  • Jack's pursuit of getting christened as Ernest; the religious influence of the time period in London, England (p. 20)
  • smoking (p. 22)
  • a man's income, investments and his acquisitions (p. 22)
  • a man's political beliefs/values (p. 23)
  • a man's position in society (p. 24)
  • the marital approval of parents/relatives (p. 25)
  • the importance of improving oneself (p. 33)
  • men do not cheat and women do not find married men attractive (p. 40)
  • girls are not educated (p. 53)
  • women who think for themselves (p. 56)
  • a single woman who has no prospect for engagement (p. 70)
  • possession of income/assets makes one more attractive (p. 80)
  • the coming of age of a woman is required in order to be married (p. 81)

    4. Read a scene from Act I in class!

    5. Sharing of a poem for "Poem in Your Pocket" Day--"America" (in Shakespearean sonnet form) by Claude McKay (Harlem Renaissance poet)

  • How will students effectively improve their success on the AP free-response essay question? *Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th/THURSDAY, APRIL 28th/FRIDAY, APRIL 29th:
    AP ENGLISH EXAM REVIEW GUIDE ASSIGNMENT--

  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a quiz grade, about 15% of your 2nd marking period!
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section; #1-4 will present essay question #1 (the poem(s)) on Wednesday, April 27th; #5-8 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on Thursday, April 28th; #9-12 will present essay question #3 (free response) and #13-16 will present the multiple-choice question section on Friday, April 29th:
    1. Ryan and Eric
    2. Sairin and Andy
    3. Sherief and Kimberly
    4. Yovanny and Scott
    5. Jeffrey and Murtaza
    6. Brandon and Alfred
    7. Trevon and Francisco
    8. Diana and Samuel
    9. Miguel and Areeb
    10. Katherine and Jacalyn
    11. Evita and Noor
    12. Melanie and Pierina
    13. Erika and Shakiel
    14. Dorje and Michelle
    15. Shaila and Nicole
    16. Zara and Daniela

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th:

  • PRACTICE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM!

  • Wednesday, April 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Quiz on The Importance of Being Earnest.

    2. Work Period: In small groups, students will share two free-response essay questions from the LIST OF AP ENGLISH LITERATURE FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY QUESTIONS. Students will be ready to share two books (at a minimum) studied this year that can address the essay questions they received.

    3. Discuss/Share: Introduce vacation HW (if time allows). Choose 1st, 2nd, and 3rd choices for partners.

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP free-response essay question? *Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th/THURSDAY, APRIL 28th/FRIDAY, APRIL 29th:
    AP ENGLISH EXAM REVIEW GUIDE ASSIGNMENT--

  • Create a two-page AP English Literature Exam review guide on your assigned section (multiple-choice, essay #1, essay #2 or essay #3). You must have an analytical focus (you decide which literary elements are appropriate or most important for your section; refer to old exams and do your own research) and a thematic focus (what are the main ideas/strategies of that section? Don't be specific to one exam. Instead, express what all exams are trying to communicate for your particular section).
  • Post your review guide online (in a blog or other public format for all to see).
  • Be ready to present your review guide to the class. You will have to know your material well. Don't stare at the screen (yes, we will have a projector in class so that you can effectively present) or your notes.
  • This will be the value of a quiz grade, about 15% of your 2nd marking period!
  • You will work with a partner! See your assigned partner below and assigned section; #1-4 will present essay question #1 (the poem(s)) on Wednesday, April 27th; #5-8 will present essay question #2 (the prose passage) on Thursday, April 28th; #9-12 will present essay question #3 (free response) and #13-16 will present the multiple-choice question section on Friday, April 29th:
    1. Ryan and Eric
    2. Sairin and Andy
    3. Sherief and Kimberly
    4. Daniela and Scott
    5. Jeffrey and Murtaza
    6. Brandon and Alfred
    7. Trevon and Francisco
    8. Diana and Erika
    9. Miguel and Areeb
    10. Katherine and Jacalyn
    11. Evita and Noor
    12. Melanie and Pierina
    13. Samuel and Shakiel
    14. Dorje and Michelle
    15. Shaila and Nicole
    16. Zara and Yovanny

    *You do not need to print out your review guide. You will just need to post it online. Though, make sure that, if transferred to a word document, it appears as two pages of writing, in a double-spaced format. You can add graphics in a different format than our previous study guides since it needs to be appealing to the public eye. Of course, the content is what matters! You need to gather the essential criteria, in an analytical and thematic focus, for your particular section. Continue to review your AP materials! Read for pleasure and challenge; an agile mind is a mind in good shape for the AP exam and for college! Here's a link to the VOCABULARY!

    Check out important resources to use for your review guide and preparation for the AP English Literature Exam:

  • College Board's OLD AP English Literature Exams
  • LIST (through the years) OF POETRY ESSAY #1 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF PROSE ESSAY #2 QUESTIONS
  • LIST (through the years) OF FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY #3 QUESTIONS

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th:

  • PRACTICE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM

    ***AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS THURSDAY, MAY 5TH AT 8AM!

  • Tuesday, April 12th, 2011: 1. Do Now: To prepare for the HW study guide due TOMORROW, Wednesday, we will discuss modern-day interpretations of manners, conventions, humor, irony and satire. Also, we will discuss Victorian Era (refer to our Oscar Wilde handout, given on Thursday) interpretations of manners, conventions, humor, irony and satire. Compare/Contrast these interpretations. Questions to discuss include the following: How are the differences most blatant? How are the similarities most unexpected? What can be learned from this compare/contrast?

    2. Work Period: In small groups, students will be given two free-response essay questions from the LIST OF AP ENGLISH LITERATURE FREE-RESPONSE ESSAY QUESTIONS. Students will be ready to share two books (at a minimum) studied this year that can address the essay questions they received.

    3. Discuss/Share: Students (in their small groups) will share their arguments for the two books that address the essay questions given to them. This sharing will be presented to the whole class.

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP free-response essay question? DUE TOMORROW WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13th:
  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest. Writing assignment: Your LAST Study Guide (TWO pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font)! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! Please also address author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole). There will be a reading quiz on this play!

    *Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).

  • Monday, April 11th, 2011: Work Period: Prepare for the HW study guide due this Wednesday by brainstorming modern-day interpretations of manners, conventions, humor, irony and satire. Also, brainstorm Victorian Era (refer to our Oscar Wilde handout, given on Thursday) interpretations of manners, conventions, humor, irony and satire. Compare/Contrast these interpretations. Questions to think about include the following: How are the differences most blatant? How are the similarities most unexpected? What did you learn from this compare/contrast? How will students effectively improve their success on the AP free-response essay question? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13th:
  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest. Writing assignment: Your LAST Study Guide (TWO pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font)! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! Please also address author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole). There will be a reading quiz on this play!

    *Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).

  • Friday, April 8th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Instructions on filling out the AP answer sheet and booklet.

    2. Work Period: Students will fill out the AP answer sheet and booklet.

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP free-response essay question? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13th:
  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest. Writing assignment: Your LAST Study Guide (TWO pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font)! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! Please also address author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole). There will be a reading quiz on this play!

    *Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).

  • Thursday, April 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing/analyzing the components of the exemplary prose passage essay on "The Flowers" by Alice Walker. Share contents of the outlines with the class.

    2. Introduce Oscar Wilde and the HW.

    3. Check out an article from The Onion as an example of satire. Why is this satire? What is the author's purpose in writing this article? Who is his audience? Why do people write satire?

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP prose essay question? DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13th:
  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest. Writing assignment: Your LAST Study Guide (TWO pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font)! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! Please also address author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole). There will be a reading quiz on this play!

    *Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).

  • Wednesday, April 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Examine an exemplary prose passage essay on "The Flowers" by Alice Walker. Discuss/Analyze. Return all books borrowed.

    2. Work Period: Make an outline of the essay.

    3. Discuss/Share contents of the outline.

    How will students effectively improve their success on the AP prose essay question? DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13th:
  • Read The Importance of Being Earnest. Writing assignment: Your LAST Study Guide (TWO pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, Time New Roman font)! Your Thematic Focus is on manners and conventions. Your Analytical Focus is on humor, irony, satire and syntax. Please stay focused on both! Please also address author's purpose (WHY he chose these thematic and analytical elements for his play and WHY they're important to the play as a whole). There will be a reading quiz on this play!

    *Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).

  • Tuesday, April 5th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Timing the Prose Passage Essay:
  • 1-3 minutes reading and "working the prompt." Here's the prompt for the passage below: In a well-organized essay, discuss how Alice Walker conveys the meaning of "The Flowers" and how she prepares the reader for the ending of this short story. Consider at least two elements of the writer's craft such as imagery, symbol, setting, narrative pace, diction and style.
  • 5 minutes reading and making marginal notes about the passage. Try to isolate 2 quotations that strike you. This may give you your opening and closing.
  • 10 minutes preparing to write (Choose one or two of the following methods that you feel comfortable with: underlining, bracketing, circling, making marginal notations, making charts or key words/line number outlining).
  • 20 minutes to write your essay, based on your preparation
  • 3 minutes for proofreading

    2. Work Period: Annotate and prep for the essay writing of "The Flowers" by Alice Walker in terms of the AP prose essay question.

    3. Share annotations and prose passage essay preparation.

    4. Examine previously written essays on "The Flowers." Add to your list of strengths and areas needing improvement in your writing.

  • How will students effectively improve their prose analysis by annotating in connection to the AP prose essay question? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).

    Tomorrow, return ALL books borrowed this year (independent reading novels and textbooks).

    Monday, April 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read the following--Timing the Prose Passage Essay:
  • 1-3 minutes reading and "working the prompt." Here's the prompt for the passage below: In a well-organized essay, discuss how Alice Walker conveys the meaning of "The Flowers" and how she prepares the reader for the ending of this short story. Consider at least two elements of the writer's craft such as imagery, symbol, setting, narrative pace, diction and style.
  • 5 minutes reading and making marginal notes about the passage. Try to isolate 2 quotations that strike you. This may give you your opening and closing.
  • 10 minutes preparing to write (Choose one or two of the following methods that you feel comfortable with: underlining, bracketing, circling, making marginal notations, making charts or key words/line number outlining).
  • 20 minutes to write your essay, based on your preparation
  • 3 minutes for proofreading

    2.Turn in HW study guides on your two independent novels.

    3. Share most memorable facts about your independent novels!

  • How will students effectively improve their prose analysis by annotating in connection to the AP prose essay question? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW).
    Friday, April 1st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish creating a whole-class outline of the sample exemplary poetry essay (passing AP essay) (in Roman Numeral form). We will do this to understand every detail that must go into a successful poetry essay.

    2. We will review the sample outline (created by Ms. Conn):


    I. Introduction
    A. The importance of learning (agreed in both poems)
    B. The Disagreement of the origin, purpose, direction and value of education
    II. Body Paragraphs
    A. "The Tables Turned" says to learn through experience and nature
    1. More learned in nature than from books
    2. Students can make their own conclusions
    3. Learning in nature will cultivate mind, soul and spirit
    B. "To David, About His Education" says the importance of life is learned through books
    1. Proper education
    2. More effective, yet questionable benefits
    3. Become an adult but not necessarily an educated, enlightened person
    C. Images in both poems
    1. "To David, About His Education"--ridiculous and hyperbolic
    2. "The Tables Turned"--natural images and wisdom in songs of birds
    D. Tone in both poems
    1. Wordsworth-accusatory and didactic
    2. Nemerov-all-knowing
    E. Diction in both poems
    1. Wordsworth--intellect, wisdom and truth (more complete)
    2. Nemerov--learn, remember, and find out (less profound)
    III. Conclusion
    A. Similarities: both poems advocate education
    B. Differences: the means to their ends are very different

    2. Discuss the outline presented (created by Ms. Conn).

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis, learning and applying TP-CASTT (title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title and theme) to the AP poetry essay? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Thursday, March 31st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and analyzing a sample exemplary poetry essay (passing AP essay). Examine the qualities that meet high-quality status.

    2. Create a whole-class outline of the sample exemplary poetry essay (in Roman Numeral form). We will do this to understand every detail that must go into a successful poetry essay. For example:


    I. Introduction
    A. The importance of learning (agreed in both poems)
    B. The Disagreement of the origin, purpose, direction and value of education
    II. Body Paragraphs
    A. "The Tables Turned" says to learn through experience and nature
    1. More learned in nature than from books
    2. Students can make their own conclusions
    3. Learning in nature will cultivate mind, soul and spirit
    B. "To David, About His Education" says the importance of life is learned through books
    1. Proper education
    2. More effective, yet questionable benefits
    3. Become an adult but not necessarily an educated, enlightened person
    C. Images in both poems
    1. "To David, About His Education"--ridiculous and hyperbolic
    2. "The Tables Turned"--natural images and wisdom in songs of birds
    D. Tone in both poems
    1. Wordsworth-accusatory and didactic
    2. Nemerov-all-knowing
    E. Diction in both poems
    1. Wordsworth--intellect, wisdom and truth (more complete)
    2. Nemerov--learn, remember, and find out (less profound)
    III. Conclusion
    A. Similarities: both poems advocate education
    B. Differences: the means to their ends are very different
    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis, learning and applying TP-CASTT (title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title and theme) to the AP poetry essay? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Wednesday, March 30th, 2011: 1. Work Period: Finish the peer review of yesterday's poetry essay, using the AP-style grading rubric. Write comments (in colored pencil/marker) on your peer's essay.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share exemplary excerpts from your peer's writing.

    3. Begin to read a sample exemplary poetry essay (passing AP essay). Examine the qualities that meet high-quality status.

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis, learning and applying TP-CASTT (title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title and theme) to the AP poetry essay? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Tuesday, March 29th, 2011: 1. Work Period: Using your notes on the TP-CASTT, write a 4-5-paragraph essay for "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov. The essay question is the following: In both of these poems, the poets reveal their attitudes toward education. In a well-organized essay discuss their similarities and differences. You may wish to consider style, tone, poetic devices, structure and imagery.

    2. When finished, peer review, using the AP-style grading rubric. Write comments (in colored pencil/marker) on your peer's essay.

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis, learning and applying TP-CASTT (title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title and theme)? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Monday, March 28th, 2011: Work Period: Using your notes on the TP-CASTT, write a 5-paragraph essay outline (in Roman Numeral form) for "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov.

    * If you are done early, work on your HW reading.

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis, learning and applying TP-CASTT (title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title and theme)? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Friday, March 25th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue discussion on the TP-CASTT and support for the essay question for "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov.

    2. Take notes on the Do Now.

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis, learning and applying TP-CASTT (title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title and theme)? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Thursday, March 24th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Students will individually work on the TP-CASTT for "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov.

    2. Discuss the TP-CASTT for the poems in the Do Now.

    3. If time allows, work on the AP Essay Question is the following: In both of these poems, the poets reveal their attitudes toward education. In a well-organized essay discuss their similarities and differences. You may wish to consider style, tone, poetic devices, structure and imagery.

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis, learning and applying TP-CASTT (title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title and theme)? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss and analyze a high-level AP essay for "The Naked and the Nude." Review students' essays for the poem.

    2. Review, compare and contrast the high-level AP essay with your essay on the poem.

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis, learning and applying TP-CASTT (title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title and theme)? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review TP-CASTT for successful poetry analysis. Read the poem "The Naked and the Nude" by Robert Graves, analyzing the TP-CASTT (Title, Paraphrase, Connotation, Attitude, Shifts, Title, Theme).

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss the poem and TP-CASTT, taking notes.

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Monday, March 21st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introduce TP-CASTT for successful poetry analysis. Read the poem "The Naked and the Nude" by Robert Graves.

    2. Work Period: Identify the TP-CASTT for "The Naked and the Nude" poem.

    How will students effectively improve their poetry analysis? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Thursday, March 17th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the pitfalls (copying from each other and the internet), and the requirements (author's purpose--WHY they are important to the novel as a whole) when composing the study guides and writing GREAT papers! The Awakening Study Guides are returned.

    2. Work Period: Finish writing your AP multiple-choice questions (using your life as the text). Exchange your questions with a classmate who knows you well and who could know the answers about YOU! In the meantime, students may check out the HW novels.

    3. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share AP multiple-choice questions!

    4. AP Literature/Lessons Learned Ball Game (Review!)

    How will students effectively work on successfully understanding the components of the AP multiple-choice questions? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Wednesday, March 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introduce the HW, the pitfalls (copying from each other and the internet), and the requirements (author's purpose--WHY they are important to the novel as a whole).

    2. Classwork Instructions: Returning to AP Exam practice, use the AP Exam packet(s) to analyze multiple-choice questions and write FIVE AP-style multiple choice questions (using your life as the text). Use p. 39 to guide you in the key words and phrases that you should use to create challenging questions. Look through the diagnostic exam to find models for challenging questions and answers.

    3. Work Period: Write your AP multiple-choice questions (using your life as the text). Exchange your questions with a classmate who knows you well and who could know the answers about YOU! In the meantime, students may check out the HW novels.

    4. If time allows, share with the class!

    How will students effectively work on successfully understanding the components of the AP multiple-choice questions? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. Please REMEMBER to analyze the literary terms (the analytical focus) and the themes (thematic focus) and WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO THE NOVEL AS A WHOLE (author's purpose). Please DO NOT copy from each other or the internet. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Tuesday, March 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Return The Awakening books, receive book receipts, and grade the multiple-choice questions of The Awakening quizzes. Show your HW (three freewrite pages for three quotes).

    2. Reflections on the HW.

    3. Honor "Beware the Ides of March" with the following links:

  • History of Julius Caesar
  • Famous Quotes from the play, Julius Caesar

    4. Introduce HW.

  • How will students effectively prove their analysis of themes and the essential question in The Awakening through freewrite stream of consciousness/pre-writing? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
    INDEPENDENT READING NOVELS--Choose two novels (choose the novels from our class library or your local library) from the list below to read over the next three weeks. Create a two-page study guide for each novel. For Brave New World (Huxley)=Analytical Focus: Dystopian genre, diction, tone, imagery and Thematic Focus: value of art, what it means to be human, ethics of science and technology For 1984 (Orwell)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, syntax and Thematic Focus: dissolution of language, innate vs. learned behavior, objective reality For All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, imagery, figurative language and Thematic Focus: glorifying service, horrors of war, camaraderie, origins of war For One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Kesey)=Analytical Focus: point of view, diction, tone, symbolism, figurative language and Thematic Focus: oppression and manipulation
    Monday, March 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss The Awakening--pp. 103-176 in terms of the themes (adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions and ideal representation of a woman) and the essential question (How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole?). We will discuss the following quotes/ideas:
  • Adherence to Conventions: "Their home (Lebrun home) from the outside looked like a prison, with iron bars before the door and lower windows" (p. 110). Edna's father telling Leonce to "put your foot down good and hard; the only way to manage a wife" (p. 125). "He (Leonce) was simply thinking of his financial integrity (meaning that people would think that the Pontelliers had to scale down their finances)" (p. 150).
  • Defiance of Conventions: "She was still under the spell of her infatuation (Robert)" (p. 104). "She completely abandoned her Tuesdays at home, and did not return the visits of those who had called upon her" (p. 107). "Her absolute disregard for her duties as a wife angered him" (p. 108). "And she found it good to dream and to be alone and unmolested" (p. 109). "She says a wedding is one of the most lamentable spectacles on earth. Nice thing for a woman to say to her husband!" (p. 118). Edna loves the horse races (p. 122). Edna being alone (p. 126). Edna saving money (p. 134). Edna and Alcee Arobin beginning an illicit, sexual affair (pp. 130-133; p. 150). Edna saying goodbye to her husband and getting her own home (p. 137). Edna--the aggressor with Robert (pp. 166-167). Robert's good-bye letter to Edna (p. 172). Edna-naked for the first time in her life (p. 175). Edna's suicide in the ocean (p. 176).
  • Ideal Representation of a Woman: "She (Mrs. Ratignolle) was keenly interested in everything he (Mr. Ratignolle) said" (p. 107). "Mr Pontellier had been a rather courteous husband so long as he met a certain tacit submissiveness in his wife" (p. 108). "Most women are moody and whimsical. This is some passing whim of your wife..." (p. 119, spoken by the doctor). "Think of the children, Edna...remember them" (Adele Ratignolle says to Edna on her deathbed, p. 170).
  • How will students effectively prove their knowledge of The Awakening? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 15th:
  • Bring in The Awakening by Kate Chopin so we can engage in discussion.
  • Choose three of the quotes from the classwork today or Friday and write one page freewrite for each quotes. That means THREE pages of freewriting for each quote.
  • Friday, March 11th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions (the answers can be found HERE:
  • Why was The Awakening banned in libraries right after being published in 1899 and early 1900's?
  • Why are there so many French expressions in the novella?
  • When (what year) do you think The Awakening started to be acceptable reading?
  • Was Kate Chopin involved in the women's suffrage movement?

    2. Discuss The Awakening--pp. 43-103 in terms of the themes (adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions and ideal representation of a woman) and the essential question (How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole?). We will discuss the following quotes/ideas:

  • Adherence to Conventions: "...looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property..." (p. 43).
  • Adherence to Conventions: "...Mr. Pontellier was the best husband in the world. Mrs. Pontellier was forced to admit that she knew of none better" (p. 50); Leonce's pursuit of Edna (p. 62), church-going (p. 83); the Pontelliers' wealth/material possessions the envy of the town (p. 99).
  • Adherence to Conventions: mother-woman (p. 50); women leaning on their husbands (p. 72)
  • Defiance of Conventions: "He thought it very discouraging that his wife, who was the sole object of his existence, evinced so little interest in things which concerned him, and valued so little his conversation" (p. 48); Edna talking back to her husband (p. 78); Edna speaking to her husband about Robert (p. 96); masculinity of Edna; artistic sketches (p. 54), allure of the "seductive sea" (p. 57), Edna learning to swim (p. 73), Edna enjoying solitude/independence (p. 74), Edna walking side by side with Robert (p. 76); "I would give my life for my children but I wouldn't give myself"(p. 97); Edna making the decision to leave the home when she wants to, without telling anyone (pp. 100-101); Edna flinging her wedding ring (p. 103).
  • Ideal Representation of a Woman: Adele Ratignolle (pp. 51-52); Edna caring for her sons (p. 87)
  • How will students effectively prove their knowledge of The Awakening? DUE MONDAY, MARCH 12th:
  • Bring in The Awakening by Kate Chopin so we can engage in discussion.
  • Thursday, March 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now:QUIZ on The Awakening.

    2. Turn in your study guide for the novella.

    3. If time allows, answer the following questions (the answers can be found HERE:

  • Why was The Awakening banned in libraries right after being published in 1899 and early 1900's?
  • Why are there so many French expressions in the novella?
  • When (what year) do you think The Awakening started to be acceptable reading?
  • Was Kate Chopin involved in the women's suffrage movement?
  • How will students effectively prove their knowledge of The Awakening? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 11th:
  • Bring in The Awakening by Kate Chopin so we can engage in discussion.
  • Wednesday, March 9th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Literary Circle Instructions.

    2. Literary Circles for The Awakening. In small groups of 4, students will take turns reading aloud and taking notes on the themes (adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman) and the essential question (How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole?), as you read.

    3. Reflections: How did it go? Was the literary circle effective? Why or why not?

    How will students effectively evaluate The Awakening? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 10th:
  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class). It's recommended to annotate (post-its are always a great tool) on the following themes:Adherence to Conventions, Defiance of Conventions, and Ideal Representation of a Woman. Also, answer the following question (again, post-its on specific pages will help you answer this question): How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole? Be ready for a pop quiz and class discussion.
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Tuesday, March 8th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review AP multiple-choice questions (from previously received take-home packet), examining question types.

    2. Distribute grades from 1st marking period.

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively prepare to study The Awakening and analyze the AP multiple-choice question types? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 10th:
  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class). It's recommended to annotate (post-its are always a great tool) on the following themes:Adherence to Conventions, Defiance of Conventions, and Ideal Representation of a Woman. Also, answer the following question (again, post-its on specific pages will help you answer this question): How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole? Be ready for a pop quiz and class discussion.
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Monday, March 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review AP multiple-choice questions (from previously received take-home packet), examining question types.

    2. Distribute grades from 1st marking period.

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively prepare to study The Awakening and analyze the AP multiple-choice question types? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 10th:
  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class). It's recommended to annotate (post-its are always a great tool) on the following themes:Adherence to Conventions, Defiance of Conventions, and Ideal Representation of a Woman. Also, answer the following question (again, post-its on specific pages will help you answer this question): How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole? Be ready for a pop quiz and class discussion.
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Friday, March 4th, 2011: Work Period: Work on your HW reading of The Awakening, taking notes on the themes (adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions and ideal representation of a woman) and an essential question (How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole?). How will students effectively prepare to study The Awakening? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, MARCH 10th:
  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class). It's recommended to annotate (post-its are always a great tool) on the following themes:Adherence to Conventions, Defiance of Conventions, and Ideal Representation of a Woman. Also, answer the following question (again, post-its on specific pages will help you answer this question): How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole? Be ready for a pop quiz and class discussion.
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Thursday, March 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss the following--
  • How would you define an awakening? Which characters have experienced awakenings in the works of literature studied this year?

    2. Introduce the biography of Kate Chopin, the author of The Awakening.

    3. HW reminders

  • How will students effectively prepare to study The Awakening? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, MARCH 10th:
  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class). It's recommended to annotate (post-its are always a great tool) on the following themes:Adherence to Conventions, Defiance of Conventions, and Ideal Representation of a Woman. Also, answer the following question (again, post-its on specific pages will help you answer this question): How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole? Be ready for a pop quiz and class discussion.
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss the following--
  • Define the ideal woman today.
  • What symbol would best represent the ideal woman today (in your opinion)? Why?
  • Define the ideal woman in 1899 in the U.S.
  • What symbol would best represent the ideal woman in 1899 in the U.S. (in your opinion)? Why?
  • How would you define a rebel today? How would you define a rebel in 1899?
  • How would you define an awakening? Which characters have experienced awakenings in the works of literature studied this year?

    2. Distribute and fill out book receipts for The Awakening.

  • How will students effectively prepare to study The Awakening? Make up any HW owed (see previous days for details)--TOMORROW THE GRADE BOOK CLOSES FOR THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, MARCH 10th:

  • Read The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novella provided in class). It's recommended to annotate (post-its are always a great tool) on the following themes:Adherence to Conventions, Defiance of Conventions, and Ideal Representation of a Woman. Also, answer the following question (again, post-its on specific pages will help you answer this question): How does Edna's gradual defiance of conventions affect the story as a whole? Be ready for a pop quiz and class discussion.
  • Study Guide for The Awakening: Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following:
  • Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
  • Thematic Focus: adherence to conventions, defiance of conventions, and ideal representation of a woman *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Awakening, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Tuesday, March 1st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Turn in The Metamorphosis papers and novellas. What were your successes and challenges in the composition of your papers?

    2. Work Period: Brainstorm the following--

  • Define the ideal woman today.
  • What symbol would best represent the ideal woman today (in your opinion)? Why?
  • Define the ideal woman in 1899 in the U.S.
  • What symbol would best represent the ideal woman in 1899 in the U.S. (in your opinion)? Why?
  • How would you define a rebel today? How would you define a rebel in 1899?
  • How would you define an awakening? Which characters have experienced awakenings in the works of literature studied this year?
  • How will students effectively review The Metamorphosis paper and prepare to study The Awakening? Make up any HW owed (see previous days for details).
    Monday, February 28th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the Community Service Assignment. Share challenges and rewards. Any questions regarding tomorrow's paper? Please share questions/concerns.

    2. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively prove their study of The Metamorphosis through the analysis of characters' significant changes in their lives? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 1ST: THE METAMORPHOSIS PAPER (25% of the 1st marking period) on THIS QUESTION=In The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka, how does a character deal with significant changes in his/her life and how do these changes influence the story as a whole? You should explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen character's changes in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper. Your Works Cited should look like this:
    Kafka, Franz. The Metamorphosis. 1915. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1996.
    

    You should also include a proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this AP-STYLE GRADING RUBRIC to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Friday, February 18th, 2011: 1. Work Period: Continue to find three one-sentence quotes in The Metamorphosis that support the idea that characters undergo significant changes in their lives. Write a one-page analysis for each quote (a total of three pages for the three quotes). Your free-write analysis should include the following: explain how the quote reveals character development, influence on the plot and author's purpose (why the author made certain choices in the story).

    2. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively prove their study of The Metamorphosis through the analysis of characters' significant changes in their lives? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:
    In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (10% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:
  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.

    DUE TUESDAY, MARCH 1ST: THE METAMORPHOSIS PAPER (25% of the 1st marking period) on THIS QUESTION=In The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka, how does a character deal with significant changes in his/her life and how do these changes influence the story as a whole? You should explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen character's changes in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper. Your Works Cited should look like this:

    Kafka, Franz. The Metamorphosis. 1915. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1996.
    

    You should also include a proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this AP-STYLE GRADING RUBRIC to guide you in composing a successful paper.

  • Thursday, February 17th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss and share your ideas from The Metamorphosis that characters undergo significant changes in their lives. Share your analyses for the quotes from the novella. Explain how the quotes reveal character development, influences on the plot and author's purpose (why the author made certain choices in the story).

    2. Introduce HW.

    3. Work Period: Continue to find three one-sentence quotes in The Metamorphosis that support the idea that characters undergo significant changes in their lives. Write a one-page analysis for each quote (a total of three pages for the three quotes). Your free-write analysis should include the following: explain how the quote reveals character development, influence on the plot and author's purpose (why the author made certain choices in the story).

    How will students effectively prove their study of The Metamorphosis through the analysis of characters' significant changes in their lives? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:
    In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (10% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:
  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.

    DUE MONDAY, MARCH 1ST: THE METAMORPHOSIS PAPER (25% of the 1st marking period) on THIS QUESTION=In The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka, how does a character deal with significant changes in his/her life and how do these changes influence the story as a whole? You should explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen character's changes in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this AP-STYLE GRADING RUBRIC to guide you in composing a successful paper.

  • Wednesday, February 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Share the contents of the study guides for The Metamorphosis.

    2. Discuss and share your ideas from The Metamorphosis that characters undergo significant changes in their lives. Share your analyses for the quotes from the novella. Explain how the quotes reveal character development, influences on the plot and author's purpose (why the author made certain choices in the story).

    3. Introduce HW.

    How will students effectively prove their study/analysis of The Metamorphosis? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:
    In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (10% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:
  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.
  • Tuesday, February 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Listen to the instructions on pre-writing (in the work period below).

    2. Work Period: Find three one-sentence quotes in The Metamorphosis that support the idea that characters undergo significant changes in their lives. Write a one-page analysis for each quote (a total of three pages for the three quotes). Your free-write analysis should include the following: explain how the quote reveals character development, influence on the plot and author's purpose (why the author made certain choices in the story).

    How will students effectively prove their study/analysis of The Metamorphosis? Tomorrow, be prepared to engage in discussion of The Metamorphosis.
    Monday, February 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on The Metamorphosis

    *Turn in your study guide for The Metamorphosis and then return the novella.

    2. In the spirit of Valentine's Day and Kafka's novella, discuss the following:

  • What job would you love to have and why?
  • What animal would you love to be and why?
  • What do you love about your family and why?
  • What is your most loved characteristic (personality trait) and why?
  • What would you love people to say about you?
  • What did you love about Kafka's The Metamorphosis?
  • How will students effectively prove their study/analysis of The Metamorphosis? Tomorrow, be prepared to engage in discussion of The Metamorphosis.
    Friday, February 11th, 2011: Work Period:
  • Answer the following questions written yesterday--How do you define alienation? How does alienation play a significant role in society today? How do you define societal expectations? What are societal expectations for you today (at your ages of 17/18 years old)? How do societal expectations play an important role in society? What is self-determination? How does self-determination affect other people (besides yourself)?
  • Work on the HW: read The Metamorphosis and prepare the study guide.
  • How will students effectively prepare to read The Metamorphosis? DUE THIS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14th:
  • Read Kafka's The Metamorphosis (pp. 3-42). Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following (from the syllabus):
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: alienation, societal expectations and self-determination
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Metamorphosis, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Be prepared to have a quiz (10% of your 1st term grade) on the novella. You should expect to answer the questions on the following: Gregor's characterization (especially pre-transformation and post-transformation), the characterization of Gregor's sister and parents, the author's tone, shift(s) in the novel, and Kafka's life influences on his novella.
  • Thursday, February 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss the life of Franz Kafka, the author of The Metamorphosis.

    2. Work Period: Brainstorm in your own words the following themes:

  • alienation
  • societal expectations
  • self-determination

    *Your brainstorming should include answers to these questions: How do you define alienation? How does alienation play a significant role in society today? How do you define societal expectations? What are societal expectations for you today (at your ages of 17/18 years old)? How do societal expectations play an important role in society? What is self-determination? How does self-determination affect other people (besides yourself)?

  • How will students effectively prepare to read The Metamorphosis? DUE THIS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14th:
  • Read Kafka's The Metamorphosis (pp. 3-42). Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following (from the syllabus):
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: alienation, societal expectations and self-determination
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Metamorphosis, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Be prepared to have a quiz (10% of your 1st term grade) on the novella. You should expect to answer the questions on the following: Gregor's characterization (especially pre-transformation and post-transformation), the characterization of Gregor's sister and parents, the author's tone, shift(s) in the novel, and Kafka's life influences on his novella.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Wednesday, February 9th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the multiple-choice question packets created for The Kite Runner. Which questions were written appropriately and why? Which questions were not written appropriately and why? Return The Kite Runner novels.

    2. Introduce Franz Kafka and obtain The Metamorphosis and post-its (fill out the book receipt). Listen to the HW details.

    How will students effectively understand the AP-style multiple-choice questions and prepare to read The Metamorphosis? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14th:
  • Read Kafka's The Metamorphosis (pp. 3-42). Compose a two-page (double-spaced, typed, 12 point font) study guide that addresses the following (from the syllabus):
    Analytical Focus: point of view, imagery, diction, and tone
    Thematic Focus: alienation, societal expectations and self-determination
    *For the study guide, you should write about one page for the analytical focus and about one page for the thematic focus. You should explain how each of the literary terms and themes (given above) are revealed and developed in The Metamorphosis, as well as the author's purpose (WHY the author includes them AND why they are important to the novella as a whole).
  • Be prepared to have a quiz (10% of your 1st term grade) on the novella. You should expect to answer the questions on the following: Gregor's characterization (especially pre-transformation and post-transformation), the characterization of Gregor's sister and parents, the author's tone, shift(s) in the novel, and Kafka's life influences on his novella.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Tuesday, February 8th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Write the rewrite of the AP free-response essays on The Kite Runner. Make sure to apply the teacher commentary.

    2. Turn in your AP English Literature Exam (take-home packet HW) and The Kite Runner essay rewrite and the original.

    How will students effectively rewrite the free-response AP essay on The Kite Runner? GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:
  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Monday, February 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the practice AP free-response essays on The Kite Runner and the teacher commentary. See the sample, exemplary AP essay.

    2. Review the grading rubric. Turn in the AP free-response essay tomorrow for a GRADE! Now that you've seen the requirements for a successful AP free-response essay, follow them in the composition of your essay (make sure to time yourself 40 minutes).

    How will students effectively write the free-response AP essay on The Kite Runner? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8th:
  • Complete a full AP English Literature Exam (take-home packet). YOU MUST DO THE ENTIRE PACKET--THE MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS (1 HOUR), ESSAY #1 (40 MINUTES), ESSAY #2 (40 MINUTES), AND ESSAY #3 (40 MINUTES). Essay #3 MIGHT be GRADED (25%) of your 1st term grade (You can choose tomorrow)! Tomorrow we will do the re-write of The Kite Runner essay (this might be graded--25% of the 1st marking period; you can choose, but you STILL MUST DO IT!).

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Friday, February 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Brief instructions for the practice AP essay on The Kite Runner.

    2. Work Period: Spend 40 minutes writing the practice AP essay on The Kite Runner. Write at least two full, handwritten pages. Include plentiful details. Address ALL parts of the question. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Refer to the novel as a whole. Refer to author's purpose (Why are certain things important to the entirety of the story? What does the author suggest is important and why?). Use your recall of our in-class discussion/note-taking to enhance your writing.

    How will students effectively write the free-response AP essay on The Kite Runner? DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8th:
  • Complete a full AP English Literature Exam (take-home packet)

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Thursday, February 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss The Kite Runner in terms of the thematic focus (see the syllabus). Examine class and cultural struggle, redemption and identity formation in The Kite Runner. Why does Hosseini include the class structure and struggle in the story? How does it help develop the story? How do various characters seek redemption? For what reasons do they seek redemption? How does redemption help develop the story? How is the theme of redemption significant to the story as a whole? Examine identity formation for Amir and Baba--from the start to the finish of the novel.

    2. Note-taking on discussion questions in the Do Now.

    *Tomorrow we will take an in-class practice AP essay on The Kite Runner. It will not be graded, though teacher comments will be given, in connection with the AP essay grading rubric, and returned on Monday.

    How will students effectively analyze and understand the author's purpose for the thematic focus in The Kite Runner? *Tomorrow we will take an in-class practice AP essay on The Kite Runner. It will not be graded, though teacher comments will be given, in connection with the AP essay grading rubric, and returned on Monday. Please review sophisticated vocabulary from our class vocabulary lists to enhance tomorrow's essay.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss The Kite Runner in terms of the analytical focus (see the syllabus). Focus on tone, figurative language and symbolism today. Examine the author's purpose and development in the novel (discussion questions include: Where is the evidence of a negative tone emitted in the novel? What is Hosseini's purpose in creating this negative tone? What evidence of figurative language exists? Why is it important to the plot? How does the author use symbolism to help develop the story's plot?).

    2. Work Period: Examine the following thematic focus--class and cultural struggle in The Kite Runner. Why does Hosseini include the class structure and struggle in the story? How does it help develop the story?

    How will students effectively analyze and understand the author's purpose for the analytical focus and thematic focus in The Kite Runner? Bring The Kite Runner to class every day this week. Be prepared to engage in discussion that corresponds with the syllabus (analytical focus and thematic focus).

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Tuesday, February 1st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the second semester portion of the AP Senior English Syllabus. Turn in The Kite Runner multiple-choice question packet HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: What are the challenges in staying in the AP English course until the end? Why is it beneficial to overcome these challenges? Why is this course beneficial for college and life, in general?

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss The Kite Runner in terms of the analytical focus (see the syllabus). Focus on point of view and diction today. Examine the author's purpose and development in the novel (discussion questions include: Why does Hosseini choose Amir's point of view? How does Amir's point of view develop the story? What are Hosseini's diction choices in the novel? Why are those choices important? How does diction help to develop the story?)

    How will students prepare for the second semester through review of the syllabus? Bring The Kite Runner to class every day this week. Be prepared to engage in discussion that corresponds with the syllabus (analytical focus and thematic focus).

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Monday, January 24th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue to review the multiple-choice question packet. Discuss/Analyze question types.

    2. Work Period: Work on multiple-choice question composition. Seek peer/teacher assistance and review, if requested.

    How will students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam through the analysis and composition of the multiple-choice question section of the exam? DATE CHANGE
    Due Tuesday, February 1st:
  • Read The Kite Runner. With a partner, create a multiple-choice question packet for the novel (following the question types seen in the Final Exam and the multiple-choice question packet--received in class). The packet MUST include 46 questions with five answer choices for each question. Include an answer sheet. There will also be an in-class essay on The Kite Runner (TBA), so the multiple-choice question packet will be an essential tool to prepare you for the essay composition.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Friday, January 21st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue to review the multiple-choice question packet. Discuss/Analyze question types.

    2. Turn in any owed HW.

    How will students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam through the analysis of the multiple-choice question section of the exam? Due Monday, January 31st:
  • Read The Kite Runner. With a partner, create a multiple-choice question packet for the novel (following the question types seen in the Final Exam and the multiple-choice question packet--received in class). The packet MUST include 46 questions with five answer choices for each question. Include an answer sheet. There will also be an in-class essay on The Kite Runner (TBA), so the multiple-choice question packet will be an essential tool to prepare you for the essay composition.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Thursday, January 20th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Distribution of The Kite Runner. FIll out book receipts. Listen to HW instructions.

    2. Introduce the multiple-choice question packet. Review question types.

    How will students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam through the composition of a multiple-choice question section for The Kite Runner? Make up any owed HW (Tomorrow's the LAST day of the semester!)!

    Due Monday, January 31st:

  • Read The Kite Runner. With a partner, create a multiple-choice question packet for the novel (following the question types seen in the Final Exam and the multiple-choice question packet--To Be Received). The packet MUST include 46 questions with five answer choices for each question.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Wednesday, January 19th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Return and review the Final Exam. Take notes on question types.

    2. Introduce HW.

    How will students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam through familiarization with the multiple-choice question section of the exam? Make up any owed HW! Work on college applications, if necessary.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Tuesday, January 18th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introduction of AP English Literature Exam components and strategies for success.

    2. Work Period: Take notes.

    How will students prepare for the AP English Literature Exam through familiarization of components and strategies for success? Make up any owed HW! Work on college applications, if necessary.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Friday, January 14th, 2011: FINAL EXAM How will students prove their study/knowledge of all works of literature studied this year through a final exam assessment? Make up any owed HW! Work on college applications, if necessary.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Thursday, January 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: How would you portray the speaker of "A Modest Proposal"? Who would be his supporters and who would be his critics? How would readers respond? What is Swift's purpose in writing this essay? Does he achieve his purpose, in your opinion? Why/Why not?

    2. Discuss the Do Now questions/answers. What questions did you have as you were reading this essay? Did you inquire into the answers? If so, what methods/resources did you utilize?

    3. Prepare the Final Exam Review Sheet.

    How will students understand author's purpose and the speaker's portrayal in "A Modest Proposal"?
  • Final Semester Exam: TOMORROW, Friday, January 14th, 2011!! Please bring a pencil tomorrow. Here is the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET, which covers all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Wednesday, January 12th, 2011: Work Period: Prepare the Final Exam Review Sheet. How will students understand the requirements for the final exam?
  • Final Semester Exam: THIS Friday, January 14th, 2011!! Here is the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET, which covers all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Tuesday, January 11th, 2011: NO CLASS DUE TO THE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM How will students understand author's purpose and the speaker's portrayal in "A Modest Proposal"?
  • Final Semester Exam: THIS Friday, January 14th, 2011!! Here is the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET, which covers all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Monday, January 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now: How would you portray the speaker of "A Modest Proposal"? Who would be his supporters and who would be his critics? How would readers respond? What is Swift's purpose in writing this essay? Does he achieve his purpose, in your opinion? Why/Why not? BE PREPARED TO DISCUSS THESE ANSWERS ON WEDNESDAY.

    2.Work Period: Work on the Final Exam Review Sheet.

    How will students understand author's purpose and the speaker's portrayal in "A Modest Proposal" and prepare for the final exam?
  • Final Semester Exam: THIS Friday, January 14th, 2011!! Here is the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET, which covers all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Friday, January 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion/analysis of poetry. Examine the following question: How did the poetry reading HW ["The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781)] support the course focus of identity and self-exploration and connect to previously read literary texts?

    2. Introduce the HW due MONDAY and the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

    How will students identify thematic connections between poetry, plays and the novel read thus far and learn the proper analysis of poetry? DUE THIS MONDAY, JANUARY 10th: Read "A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift (1729), the satirical essay that was shocking and absurd. Pay close attention to the identity of the speaker and how he is perceived by various readers (critics and supporters of his essay). Taking notes is essential in a thorough understanding of the text.

    Looking Ahead:

  • Final Semester Exam: NEXT Friday, January 14th, 2011!! Here is the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET, which covers all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Thursday, January 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion/analysis of poetry. Examine the following question: How did the poetry reading HW ["The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781)] support the course focus of identity and self-exploration and connect to previously read literary texts?

    2. Discuss/Share: When finished discussing the Do Now question, discuss the poetry above and the subsequent questions/answers.

    3. Share facts about the poets:

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson: Victorian poet (1809-1892) who lived in England; one of the most famous Victorian poets (Victorian Era: Queen Victoria led England 1837-1901, when she died; period of great growth in culture/arts--with photography at the forefront--and population), best known lines from his poem In Memoriam--"Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all."
  • Gwendolyn Brooks: African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, IL; Poet Laureate in 1985; her characters are often drawn from poor, inner city; taught creative writing at prestigious universities like Columbia Univ.
  • Sylvia Plath: American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts; struggled with depression, committed suicide; advanced the genre of confessional poetry; wrote the semi-autobiographical novel The Bell Jar; received more fame posthumously
  • Emily Dickinson: American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts; lived a solitary/anti-social/reclusive life; most of her poems were published posthumously; many of her poems deal with death and morbid topics; died of kidney disease; best known as an innovator for her unconventional capitalization and punctuation
  • Robert Frost: American poet (1874-1963), born in San Francisco, CA, though lived mostly in Massachusetts; very popular, honored poet during his lifetime (received multiple Pulitzer prizes in poetry); poetry often focused on rural life, particularly in New England; attended Dartmouth and Harvard though never graduated; taught at many prestigious colleges (including University of Michigan!) and received many honorary degrees; recited poetry at JFK's inauguration in 1961; died of complications of prostrate surgery
  • Walt Whitman: American poet (1819-1892), raised in Huntington, Long Island and Brooklyn; left formal schooling at age 11 to help with family's finances; worked as a teacher and eventually found his own newspaper and, after it became defunct, he worked at various newspapers, though poetry writing was his true love; died of pneumonia/TB; broke boundaries in poetry (labeled the father of free verse, though he didn't invent it; wrote about sexuality and prostitution; wrote prose-like); believed to be homosexual or bisexual; labored on his most famous book of poetry Leaves of Grass for 30+ years (famous poems from this book are the following: "O Captain! My Captain!" and "Song of Myself"), which exalts the American experience, including the Civil War and land of opportunity
  • William Blake: English poet, painter and printmaker (1757-1827), part of the Romantic movement (revolt against social and political norms; characterized by strong emotion and the emergence of new ideas, exotic and unfamiliar; not limited to Europe); hostile to the Church of England; left formal schooling at age 10 and continued schooling at home, by his mother; much of his poetry reveals a protest against religion and the confines of marriage (though he was married for 45 years; his wife could not bear children for him, which sparked conjecture that he wanted another wife to bear children); he seemed to advocate "free love movement" as his poetry reveals; though he attacked the conventions of religion, he still abided by Christianity; earned more fame posthumously
  • How will students identify thematic connections between poetry, plays and the novel read thus far and learn the proper analysis of poetry? DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 10th: Read "A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift (1729), the satirical essay that was shocking and absurd. Pay close attention to the identity of the speaker and how he is perceived by various readers (critics and supporters of his essay). Taking notes is essential in a thorough understanding of the text.

    Looking Ahead:

  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 14th, 2011!! Here is the FINAL EXAM REVIEW SHEET, which covers all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One.

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Wednesday, January 5th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue discussion/analysis of poetry. Examine the following question: How did the poetry reading HW ["The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781)] support the course focus of identity and self-exploration and connect to previously read literary texts?

    2. Discuss/Share: When finished discussing the Do Now question, discuss the poetry above and the subsequent questions/answers.

    3. Share facts about the poets:

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson: Victorian poet (1809-1892) who lived in England; one of the most famous Victorian poets (Victorian Era: Queen Victoria led England 1837-1901, when she died; period of great growth in culture/arts--with photography at the forefront--and population), best known lines from his poem In Memoriam--"Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all."
  • Gwendolyn Brooks: African-American writer (1917-2000) from Chicago, IL; Poet Laureate in 1985; her characters are often drawn from poor, inner city; taught creative writing at prestigious universities like Columbia Univ.
  • Sylvia Plath: American poet (1932-1963) from Massachusetts; struggled with depression, committed suicide; advanced the genre of confessional poetry; wrote the semi-autobiographical novel The Bell Jar
  • Emily Dickinson: American poet (1830-1886) from Amherst, Massachusetts; lived a solitary/anti-social/reclusive life; most of her poems were published posthumously; many of her poems deal with death and morbid topics; died of kidney disease; best known as an innovator for her unconventional capitalization and punctuation
  • Robert Frost:
  • Walt Whitman:
  • William Blake:
  • How will students identify thematic connections between poetry, plays and the novel read thus far and learn the proper analysis of poetry? Bring your textbook tomorrow!

    Looking Ahead:

  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 14th, 2011 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One should be reviewed)

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Tuesday, January 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss yesterday's question: How did the poetry reading HW ["The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781)] support the course focus of identity and self-exploration and connect to previously read literary texts? When finished discussing this question, discuss the "What is Poetry?" introduction on pp. 647-648, "Understanding and Evaluating Poetry" on p. 655 and "Reading the Poem" on pp. 668-669.

    2. Discuss/Share the analysis and questions/answers for the poems above.

    How will students identify thematic connections between poetry, plays and the novel read thus far? Bring your textbook tomorrow!

    Looking Ahead:

  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 14th, 2011 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One should be reviewed)

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Monday, January 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Welcome back! How did the poetry reading HW ["The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781)] support the course focus of identity and self-exploration and connect to previously read literary texts? When finished answering this question, read the "What is Poetry?" introduction on pp. 647-648, "Understanding and Evaluating Poetry" on p. 655 and "Reading the Poem" on pp. 668-669. Be ready to discuss. Show HW: poetry questions/answers and turn in "Love for ITHS" Sonnet. How will students identify thematic connections between poetry, plays and the novel read thus far? Bring your textbook tomorrow!

    Looking Ahead:

  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 14th, 2011 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One should be reviewed)

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Thursday, December 23rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue the introduction of the "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, and poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    2. Work Period: Work on composing the "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (finish over the vacation)

    3. "Gift of Kindness" Activity

    How will students prove their understanding of the structure of a sonnet through original composition? DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:
  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, and poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    Looking Ahead:

  • Final Semester Exam: Friday, January 14th, 2011 (review sheet will be provided; all works of literature studied and notes/questions/quizzes/exams given since Day One should be reviewed)
  • Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish review of the questions for A Doll's House.

    2. Review "Sonnet 18".

    3. Work Period: Introduce the "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, and poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    How will students prove their reading and understanding of A Doll's House, focusing on characterizations that influence the play as a whole? DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:
  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, and poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).
  • Tuesday, December 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish review of the questions for A Doll's House.

    2. Share identity/self-exploration quotes (from Friday's class).

    How will students prove their reading and understanding of A Doll's House, focusing on characterizations that influence the play as a whole? DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:
  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Monday, December 20th, 2010: Do Now: Review the questions for A Doll's House. Turn in the HW: two revised vocabulary stories and the original stories. How will students prove their reading and understanding of A Doll's House, keeping in mind Ibsen's groundbreaking choices in playwriting? DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:
  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Friday, December 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: READING QUIZ on A Doll's House--did you read and apply yesterday's discussion to the reading? Show your HW (questions on A Doll's House).

    2. Discuss/Share: Find at least two direct quotes from A Doll's House that support the course focus of identity and self-exploration. Be sure to introduce each quote and analyze the quote afterward.

    3. Awards Presentation

    How will students prove their reading and understanding of A Doll's House, keeping in mind the portrayal of women as 'dolls' in the play and throughout time (from Sophocles' time to present day)? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
  • Revise TWO vocabulary stories (bring in the original, teacher-edited stories, too). It's preferable to bring in the two stories that have the most errors.

    DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Thursday, December 16th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Voting for Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Performance of Othello/Congratulations on Our Unit on Shakespearean Plays!

    2. Discuss/Share: How are women portrayed as "dolls" (playthings, carried by men, manipulated by men) in the texts we've read thus far (Sophie's World, Oedipus Rex, Hamlet, As You Like It, and Othello)? How do women's portrayals as "dolls" influence the storylines? Are women still portrayed as "dolls" today? Debate ensues. How did women of today lose their "doll" portrayals? Refer to women's limitations. What does the title A Doll's House imply about women and their role in society, in the home, and in the play by Ibsen?

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students prepare to read A Doll's House, keeping in mind the portrayal of women as 'dolls' throughout time (from Sophocles' time to present day)? DUE TOMORROW FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17th:
  • Read A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. You should read the play from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow (pp. 1141-1142). Annotate the play, keeping in mind the course themes of identity and self-exploration. You should also annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Bring in the textbook and Othello (which you will return) tomorrow.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 20th:

  • Revise TWO vocabulary stories (bring in the original, teacher-edited stories, too). It's preferable to bring in the two stories that have the most errors.

    DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Wednesday, December 15th, 2010: PRESENTATIONS: PERFORMANCE PRESENTATIONS of Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III and Act V Scene II from OTHELLO (final reminders before presentations: one person will deliver a summary of scene and introduction of characters, turn in grading rubric, and bow at the end of the scene) How will students be assessed on their interpretations of scenes from Othello? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17th:
  • Read A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. You should read the play from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow (pp. 1141-1142). Annotate the play, keeping in mind the course themes of identity and self-exploration. You should also annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 20th:

  • Revise TWO vocabulary stories (bring in the original, teacher-edited stories, too). It's preferable to bring in the two stories that have the most errors.

    DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Tuesday, December 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCE PRESENTATIONS of the Winter Concert Performance Group of the last scenes of As You Like It, Act I Scene I and Act II Scene I from OTHELLO (final reminders before presentations: one person will deliver a summary of scene and introduction of characters, turn in grading rubric, and bow at the end of the scene)

    2. HW Reminders

    How will students be assessed on their interpretations of scenes from Othello? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, December 15th (Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III and Act V Scene II from Othello):
  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO(Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, A Rose Among Weeds, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • Read A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. You should read the play from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow (pp. 1141-1142). Annotate the play, keeping in mind the course themes of identity and self-exploration. You should also annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 20th:

  • Revise TWO vocabulary stories (bring in the original, teacher-edited stories, too). It's preferable to bring in the two stories that have the most errors.

    DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Monday, December 13th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #12 QUIZ (final vocabulary quiz) Turn in your final vocabulary story!

    2. HW Reminders

    3. Scene Practice Work Period: Arrange in groups to plan final rehearsals.

    How will students improve their vocabulary acquisition and writing skills? DUE TOMORROW TUESDAY, December 14th (AS YOU LIKE IT Winter Concert group, Act I Scene I and Act II Scene I)/THIS WEDNESDAY, December 15th (Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III and Act V Scene II):
  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO(Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, A Rose Among Weeds, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • Read A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. You should read the play from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow (pp. 1141-1142). Annotate the play, keeping in mind the course themes of identity and self-exploration. You should also annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 20th:

  • Revise TWO vocabulary stories (bring in the original, teacher-edited stories, too). It's preferable to bring in the two stories that have the most errors.

    DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Friday, December 10th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your Othello scene groups and practice on your feet. Continue editing, determining character roles and determining director's vision. (Turn in your permission slip for photos/work to be published on the school website)

    2. Scene Practice Work Period: This is the last day of in-class rehearsal. Practice on your feet. Incorporate the following (from all of your scene performances since we started these acting groups):

  • actors facing away from each other and empowering the audience with knowledge
  • actors physically touching/interacting with each other (PG, of course!)
  • different levels
  • audience participation
  • strong vocal projection and articulation
  • music/lighting/sound effects
  • application of Grading Sheet for Othello Scenes
  • How will students interpret their Othello scenes incorporating all the acting/creative elements we've studied this year? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, December 13th:
  • Vocabulary List #12 QUIZ--the final vocabulary quiz (Etymology: ami=friendly; fort=chance, luck; trica=perplexities/hindrances; ology=study of; don=give)
  • Vocabulary List #12 STORY (the final vocabulary story) on any topic from Othello OR ONE OF THESE CHALLENGE QUESTIONS: How is Othello relevant to any stories in the bible (old/new testament)? How are good and evil portrayed in Othello? How does Othello reveal elements of the human experience? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, December 14th (AS YOU LIKE IT Winter Concert group, Act I Scene I and Act II Scene I)/WEDNESDAY, December 15th (Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III and Act V Scene II):

  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO(Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, A Rose Among Weeds, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17:

  • Read A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. You should read the play from your Perrine's Literature textbook (pp. 1079-1141) and answer THE QUESTIONS that follow (pp. 1141-1142). Annotate the play, keeping in mind the course themes of identity and self-exploration. You should also annotate how these themes are revealed through events/characters and how they contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole.

    DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 3RD, 2011:

  • Poetry selections (taken from Perrine's textbook) and questions that follow: "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson (p. 649), "Kitchenette Building" by Gwendolyn Brooks (pp. 660-661), "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath (p. 681), "There is No Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson (pp. 686-687), "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (pp. 734-735), "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman (pp. 736-737), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (pp. 737-739), and"Out, Out--" by Robert Frost (pp. 779-781).
  • Thursday, December 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your Othello scene groups. Work on reading, editing, determining character roles and determining director's vision. (Turn in your permission slip for photos/work to be published on the school website)

    2. Scene Practice Work Period: Practice on your feet. Incorporate the following (from all of your scene performances since we started these acting groups):

  • actors facing away from each other and empowering the audience with knowledge
  • actors physically touching/interacting with each other (PG, of course!)
  • different levels
  • audience participation
  • strong vocal projection and articulation
  • music/lighting/sound effects
  • application of Grading Sheet for Othello Scenes
  • How will students interpret their Othello scenes incorporating all the acting/creative elements we've studied this year? DUE NEXT MONDAY, December 13th:
  • Vocabulary List #12 QUIZ (Etymology: ami=friendly; fort=chance, luck; trica=perplexities/hindrances; ology=study of; don=give)
  • Vocabulary List #12 STORY on any topic from Othello OR ONE OF THESE CHALLENGE QUESTIONS: How is Othello relevant to any stories in the bible (old/new testament)? How are good and evil portrayed in Othello? How does Othello reveal elements of the human experience? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, December 14th/WEDNESDAY, December 15th:

  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO(Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, A Rose Among Weeds, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.
  • Wednesday, December 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read over the permission slip and scholarship handout. Sign up for the Othello scene groups.

    2. Finish taking notes and discussing the following notes (referring to textual evidence for support)-- Act V in Othello:
    Scene I: Valiant Villains and Weary Whores Among Us
    Scene II: A Rose Among Weeds. Heaven Forgive Us.

    3. Acting Exercises: Vocal Projection of the following quotes--
    "Farewell the tranquil mind!" (Othello, 3.3.399).
    "It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul" (Othello, 5.2.1).
    Tableau practice: Iago and Othello in Act III, Othello in Desdemona in Act V (actors facing away with different levels and touching an arm/leg/shoulder)

    4. Work Period: Read aloud your scene in your group. Begin editing. Determine character roles and director's vision/theme.

    How will students analyze Othello and reveal its tragic elements in an interpretive form? DUE TOMORROW: BRING IN THE PERMISSION SLIP, SIGNED BY YOUR PARENTS!

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, December 13th:

  • Vocabulary List #12 QUIZ (Etymology: ami=friendly; fort=chance, luck; trica=perplexities/hindrances; ology=study of; don=give)
  • Vocabulary List #12 STORY on any topic from Othello OR ONE OF THESE CHALLENGE QUESTIONS: How is Othello relevant to any stories in the bible (old/new testament)? How are good and evil portrayed in Othello? How does Othello reveal elements of the human experience? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, December 14th/WEDNESDAY, December 15th:

  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO(Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, A Rose Among Weeds, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.
  • Tuesday, December 7th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing List #12

    2. Finish taking notes and discussing the following notes (referring to textual evidence for support)--
    Act I of Othello:
    Scene I: Shakespeare 'speaking' to the audience (Brabantio's warning to the parents--watch out for rebellious daughters!)
    Scenes II and III: Othello's earned status as a general and deserving role as Desdemona's husband
    Scene II: Brabantio's belief that Othello is a wizard yielding magic over his daughter
    Scene III: Othello reveals Desdemona's blossoming love
    Scene III: Desdemona, the rebellious daughter and a woman ahead of her time
    Scene III: Roderigo threatening his own life due to Desdemona's disinterest in him
    Scene III: Iago's advice to Roderigo and reasons why the love between Othello and Desdemona will not last
    Scene III: Iago's plot for revenge against Othello
    All of Act I: The Power of Time
    Act II of Othello:
    Scene I: Praise for Othello, the protagonist and namesake of this play, Omens for Othello's Death, Iago's vengeful thoughts
    Scene III: Iago, the trusted advisor
    Scene III: Cassio, an abased and debased man
    Act III of Othello:
    Scene I: The Fight for Cassio's Honor
    Scene II: Iago, The Trusted Advisor
    Scene III: Deception in Thy Nature
    Scene III: What a Tangled Web We Weave
    Scene IV: Othello, Not the Man I Married
    Act IV of Othello:
    Scene I: Iago, the Devil. Othello, the Savage.
    Scene II: Desdemona, the Cursed One. Iago, the Trusted Advisor.
    Scene III: Desdemona's Prophecy. Emilia, the Wise One.
    Act V in Othello:
    Scene I: Valiant Villains and Weary Whores Among Us
    Scene II: A Rose Among Weeds. Heaven Forgive Us.

    How will students analyze Acts III, IV and V of Othello in terms of identity and the understanding of the elements of tragedy? DUE NEXT MONDAY, December 13th:
  • Vocabulary List #12 QUIZ (Etymology: ami=friendly; fort=chance, luck; trica=perplexities/hindrances; ology=study of; don=give)
  • Vocabulary List #12 STORY on any topic from Othello OR ONE OF THESE CHALLENGE QUESTIONS: How is Othello relevant to any stories in the bible (old/new testament)? How are good and evil portrayed in Othello? How does Othello reveal elements of the human experience? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, December 14th/WEDNESDAY, December 15th:

  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO(Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performance. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I (3 male characters), Act II Scene I (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act II Scene III (4 male characters and 1 female character), Act III Scene III (2 male characters and 1 female character), Act V Scene II (5 male characters and 2 female characters). Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Heaven vs. Hell, A Rose Among Weeds, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.
  • Monday, December 6th, 2010: 1. Do Now: VOCABULARY LIST #11 QUIZ (Turn in Story #11)

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #12.

    3. HW reminders and distributions!

    How will students improve their vocabulary acquisition? DUE NEXT MONDAY, December 13th:
  • Vocabulary List #12 QUIZ (Etymology: ami=friendly; fort=chance, luck; trica=perplexities/hindrances; ology=study of; don=give)
  • Vocabulary List #12 STORY on any topic from Othello OR ONE OF THESE CHALLENGE QUESTIONS: How is Othello relevant to any stories in the bible (old/new testament)? How are good and evil portrayed in Othello? How does Othello reveal elements of the human experience? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.
  • Friday, December 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue taking notes and discussing the following notes (referring to textual evidence for support)--
    Act I of Othello:
    Scene I: Shakespeare 'speaking' to the audience (Brabantio's warning to the parents--watch out for rebellious daughters!)
    Scenes II and III: Othello's earned status as a general and deserving role as Desdemona's husband
    Scene II: Brabantio's belief that Othello is a wizard yielding magic over his daughter
    Scene III: Othello reveals Desdemona's blossoming love
    Scene III: Desdemona, the rebellious daughter and a woman ahead of her time
    Scene III: Roderigo threatening his own life due to Desdemona's disinterest in him
    Scene III: Iago's advice to Roderigo and reasons why the love between Othello and Desdemona will not last
    Scene III: Iago's plot for revenge against Othello
    All of Act I: The Power of Time
    Act II of Othello:
    Scene I: Praise for Othello, the protagonist and namesake of this play, Omens for Othello's Death, Iago's vengeful thoughts
    Scene III: Iago, the trusted advisor
    Scene III: Cassio, an abased and debased man
    Act III of Othello:
    Scene I: The Fight for Cassio's Honor
    Scene II: Iago, The Trusted Advisor
    Scene III: Deception in Thy Nature
    Scene III: What a Tangled Web We Weave
    Scene IV: Othello, Not the Man I Married
    Act IV of Othello:
    Scene I: Iago, the Devil. Othello, the Savage.
    Scene II: Desdemona, the Cursed One. Iago, the Trusted Advisor.
    Scene III: Desdemona's Prophecy. Emilia, the Wise One.
    Act V in Othello:
    Scene I: Valiant Villains and Weary Whores Among Us
    Scene II: A Rose Among Weeds. Heaven Forgive Us.
    How will students improve their vocabulary acquisition and prepare to read Othello? DUE THIS MONDAY, December 6th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 QUIZ (Etymology: gyn=woman, mis=against or hate, anthrop=human, melli=sweet or honey, ob=over, and fusc=dark)
  • Vocabulary List #11 STORY on anything from Othello or acting/performance OR on THIS CHALLENGE QUESTION: How does the famous quote by Ms. Conn's college professor, Ralph Williams, "I won't willingly let beauty die" pertain to Othello? Other Othello Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): Why is Othello significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Othello? How is prejudice revealed in Othello and why is it significant? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.
  • Thursday, December 2nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Discuss with your table mates the following question: How is the course theme of identity relevant to Othello? Refer to a variety of characters who have their identities or their perceptions of others' identities influence their life choices. (Show your textual citations (the lines), the explanations as to why those examples are important to the play AND show your list of strengths/weaknesses identified from your Sophie's World paper.)

    2. Discuss/Share: Take notes and discuss the following notes (referring to textual evidence for support)--
    Act I of Othello:
    Scene I: Shakespeare 'speaking' to the audience (Brabantio's warning to the parents--watch out for rebellious daughters!)
    Scenes II and III: Othello's earned status as a general and deserving role as Desdemona's husband
    Scene II: Brabantio's belief that Othello is a wizard yielding magic over his daughter
    Scene III: Othello reveals Desdemona's blossoming love
    Scene III: Desdemona, the rebellious daughter and a woman ahead of her time
    Scene III: Roderigo threatening his own life due to Desdemona's disinterest in him
    Scene III: Iago's advice to Roderigo and reasons why the love between Othello and Desdemona will not last
    Scene III: Iago's plot for revenge against Othello
    All of Act I: The Power of Time
    Act II of Othello:
    Scene I: Praise for Othello, the protagonist and namesake of this play, Omens for Othello's Death, Iago's vengeful thoughts
    Scene III: Iago, the trusted advisor
    Scene III: Cassio, an abased and debased man
    Act III of Othello:
    Scene I: The Fight for Cassio's Honor
    Scene II: Iago, The Trusted Advisor
    Scene III: Deception in Thy Nature
    Scene III: What a Tangled Web We Weave
    Scene IV: Othello, Not the Man I Married
    Act IV of Othello:
    Scene I: Iago, the Devil. Othello, the Savage.
    Scene II: Desdemona, the Cursed One. Iago, the Trusted Advisor.
    Scene III: Desdemona's Prophecy. Emilia, the Wise One.
    Act V in Othello:
    Scene I: Valiant Villains and Weary Whores Among Us
    Scene II: A Rose Among Weeds. Heaven Forgive Us.

    How will students improve their vocabulary acquisition and prepare to read Othello? DUE NEXT MONDAY, December 6th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 QUIZ (Etymology: gyn=woman, mis=against or hate, anthrop=human, melli=sweet or honey, ob=over, and fusc=dark)
  • Vocabulary List #11 STORY on anything from Othello or acting/performance OR on THIS CHALLENGE QUESTION: How does the famous quote by Ms. Conn's college professor, Ralph Williams, "I won't willingly let beauty die" pertain to Othello? Other Othello Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): Why is Othello significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Othello? How is prejudice revealed in Othello and why is it significant? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.
  • Wednesday, December 1st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Reading Quiz on Othello

    2. Discuss/Share: Take notes and discuss the following notes--
    Act I of Othello:
    Scene I: Shakespeare 'speaking' to the audience (Brabantio's warning to the parents--watch out for rebellious daughters!)
    Scenes II and III: Othello's earned status as a general and deserving role as Desdemona's husband
    Scene II: Brabantio's belief that Othello is a wizard yielding magic over his daughter
    Scene III: Othello reveals Desdemona's blossoming love
    Scene III: Desdemona, the rebellious daughter and a woman ahead of her time
    Scene III: Roderigo threatening his own life due to Desdemona's disinterest in him
    Scene III: Iago's advice to Roderigo and reasons why the love between Othello and Desdemona will not last
    Scene III: Iago's plot for revenge against Othello
    All of Act I: The Power of Time
    Act II of Othello:
    Scene I: Praise for Othello, the protagonist and namesake of this play, Omens for Othello's Death, Iago's vengeful thoughts
    Scene III: Iago, the trusted advisor
    Scene III: Cassio, an abased and debased man
    Act III of Othello:
    Scene I: The Fight for Cassio's Honor
    Scene II: Iago, The Trusted Advisor
    Scene III: Deception in Thy Nature
    Scene III: What a Tangled Web We Weave
    Scene IV: Othello, Not the Man I Married
    Act IV of Othello:
    Scene I: Iago, the Devil. Othello, the Savage.
    Scene II: Desdemona, the Cursed One. Iago, the Trusted Advisor.
    Scene III: Desdemona's Prophecy. Emilia, the Wise One.
    Act V in Othello:
    Scene I: Valiant Villains and Weary Whores Among Us
    Scene II: A Rose Among Weeds. Heaven Forgive Us.

    How will students improve their vocabulary acquisition and prepare to read Othello? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
  • Finish today's classwork (find the lines that support the notes and explain why the examples found are important to the play). Bring in your textual citations (the lines) tomorrow AND bring in your list of strengths/weaknesses identified from your Sophie's World paper.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, December 6th:

  • Vocabulary List #11 QUIZ (Etymology: gyn=woman, mis=against or hate, anthrop=human, melli=sweet or honey, ob=over, and fusc=dark)
  • Vocabulary List #11 STORY on anything from Othello or acting/performance OR on THIS CHALLENGE QUESTION: How does the famous quote by Ms. Conn's college professor, Ralph Williams, "I won't willingly let beauty die" pertain to Othello? Other Othello Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): Why is Othello significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Othello? How is prejudice revealed in Othello and why is it significant? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.
  • Tuesday, November 30th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish introducing Vocabulary List #11

    2. Grade Quiz #10/Review graded papers (What are strengths? What are areas needing improvement? Take notes)

    3. Discuss/Share: Prepare to read Othello--What are the elements of a tragedy? How does a character become tragic? How does Shakespeare empower the audience? How can 'beauty' be defined? How can 'beauty' die?

    How will students improve their vocabulary acquisition and prepare to read Othello? DUE TOMORROW WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
    Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). Annotate the play (use sticky notes/post-its OR take notes in your notebook/binder) with a PURPOSE. THAT PURPOSE addresses the following questions:
  • What makes Othello a tragedy?
  • How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? How does this vast amount of knowledge contribute to the tragedy?
  • How does 'beauty' die throughout the play? Challenge question: How does this demise of beauty contradict the nature of humanity?
    ***Be ready to discuss in depth AND be ready to write extensively in class-generated papers.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, December 6th:

  • Vocabulary List #11 QUIZ (Etymology: gyn=woman, mis=against or hate, anthrop=human, melli=sweet or honey, ob=over, and fusc=dark)
  • Vocabulary List #11 STORY on anything from Othello or acting/performance OR on THIS CHALLENGE QUESTION: How does the famous quote by Ms. Conn's college professor, Ralph Williams, "I won't willingly let beauty die" pertain to Othello? Other Othello Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): Why is Othello significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Othello? How is prejudice revealed in Othello and why is it significant? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.
  • Monday, November 29th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary #10 Quiz (turn in Story #10)

    2. Introduce List #11

    3. Awards presented (from As You Like It performance last Wednesday)

    How will students improve their vocabulary acquisition? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
    Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). Annotate the play (use sticky notes/post-its OR take notes in your notebook/binder) with a PURPOSE. THAT PURPOSE addresses the following questions:
  • What makes Othello a tragedy?
  • How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? How does this vast amount of knowledge contribute to the tragedy?
  • How does 'beauty' die throughout the play? Challenge question: How does this demise of beauty contradict the nature of humanity?
    ***Be ready to discuss in depth AND be ready to write extensively in class-generated papers.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, December 6th:

  • Vocabulary List #11 QUIZ (Etymology: gyn=woman, mis=against or hate, anthrop=human, melli=sweet or honey, ob=over, and fusc=dark)
  • Vocabulary List #11 STORY on anything from Othello or acting/performance OR on THIS CHALLENGE QUESTION: How does the famous quote by Ms. Conn's college professor, Ralph Williams, "I won't willingly let beauty die" pertain to Othello? Other Othello Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): Why is Othello significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Othello? How is prejudice revealed in Othello and why is it significant? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.
  • Wednesday, November 24th, 2010: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCE PRESENTATIONS OF scenes from Acts IV and V in AS YOU LIKE IT (final reminders before presentations: one person will deliver a summary of scene and introduction of characters, turn in grading rubric, and bow at the end of the scene)

    2. Voting for Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Performance and Best Costume

    How will students be assessed on their interpretations of scenes from As You Like It? PLEASE E-MAIL MS. CONN (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR VOTES FOR BEST ACTOR, BEST ACTRESS, BEST PERFORMANCE AND BEST COSTUME. Have a WONDERFUL Thanksgiving Vacation!

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • Vocabulary List #10 QUIZ (Etymology: trep=shake, tremble; pacif=make peace; unda=flow, wave; trans=cross; integr=whole)
  • Vocabulary List #10 STORY on Othello or on THIS CHALLENGE QUESTION: How does the famous quote by Ms. Conn's college professor, Ralph Williams, "I won't willingly let beauty die" pertain to the works or authors we've studied thus far? Othello Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): Why is Othello significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Othello? How is prejudice revealed in Othello and why is it significant? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
    Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). Annotate the play (use sticky notes/post-its OR take notes in your notebook/binder) with a PURPOSE. THAT PURPOSE addresses the following questions:

  • What makes Othello a tragedy?
  • How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? How does this vast amount of knowledge contribute to the tragedy?
  • How does 'beauty' die throughout the play? Challenge question: How does this demise of beauty contradict the nature of humanity?
    ***Be ready to discuss in depth AND be ready to write extensively in class-generated papers.
  • Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCE PRESENTATIONS OF ACTS I, II AND III in AS YOU LIKE IT (final reminders before presentations: one person will deliver a summary of scene and introduction of characters, turn in grading rubric, and bow at the end of the scene)

    2. Finish review of List #10.

    How will students be assessed on their interpretations of scenes from As You Like It? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 24th (Acts IV-V):

    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of a quiz grade!): You and your group mates (Groups will be assigned according to the elements--stay tuned!) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • Vocabulary List #10 QUIZ (Etymology: trep=shake, tremble; pacif=make peace; unda=flow, wave; trans=cross; integr=whole)
  • Vocabulary List #10 STORY on Othello or on THIS CHALLENGE QUESTION: How does the famous quote by Ms. Conn's college professor, Ralph Williams, "I won't willingly let beauty die" pertain to the works or authors we've studied thus far? Othello Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): Why is Othello significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Othello? How is prejudice revealed in Othello and why is it significant? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
    Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). Annotate the play (use sticky notes/post-its OR take notes in your notebook/binder) with a PURPOSE. THAT PURPOSE addresses the following questions:

  • What makes Othello a tragedy?
  • How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? How does this vast amount of knowledge contribute to the tragedy?
  • How does 'beauty' die throughout the play? Challenge question: How does this demise of beauty contradict the nature of humanity?
    ***Be ready to discuss in depth AND be ready to write extensively in class-generated papers.
  • Monday, November 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #9 QUIZ (turn in Story #9)

    2. Introduce List #10. Returns of As You Like It and distributions of Othello.

    How will students be assessed on their vocabulary acquisition? DUE TOMORROW TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd (Acts I-III)/WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 24th (Acts IV-V):

    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of a quiz grade!): You and your group mates (Groups will be assigned according to the elements--stay tuned!) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • Vocabulary List #10 QUIZ (Etymology: trep=shake, tremble; pacif=make peace; unda=flow, wave; trans=cross; integr=whole)
  • Vocabulary List #10 STORY on Othello or on THIS CHALLENGE QUESTION: How does the famous quote by Ms. Conn's college professor, Ralph Williams, "I won't willingly let beauty die" pertain to the works or authors we've studied thus far? Othello Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): Why is Othello significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Othello? How is prejudice revealed in Othello and why is it significant? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
    Read Othello (plays are distributed in class). Annotate the play (use sticky notes/post-its OR take notes in your notebook/binder) with a PURPOSE. THAT PURPOSE addresses the following questions:

  • What makes Othello a tragedy?
  • How does Shakespeare make sure that the audience is empowered with knowledge? How does this vast amount of knowledge contribute to the tragedy?
  • How does 'beauty' die throughout the play? Challenge question: How does this demise of beauty contradict the nature of humanity?
    ***Be ready to discuss in depth AND be ready to write extensively in class-generated papers.
  • Friday, November 19th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises=Volume/Projection exercise across the room (using sample lines from the play) and characters (Rosalind, Orlando, Oliver, Celia) as animals in As You Like It. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.

    2. Work Period: In your groups, practice read-alouds (standing up and physically interacting only!) of your scenes and continue the editing process. Arrange stage directions, practice animated expression, body language and energy/enthusiasm (among other details from the grading rubric). Incorporate the acting exercises and director's vision/interpretation into your practice today.

    How will students prepare their interpretations of As You Like It scenes? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:
  • Vocabulary List #9 QUIZ (Etymology: caco=bad, evil; phon=voice, sound; voc=voice; cogn=knowledge; loq=talk/speak; pre=before; cede=go)
  • Vocabulary List #9 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How does As You Like It reflect Shakespeare's life and times ? How do characters in As You Like It transform? How do you compare/contrast As You Like It to Hamlet? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd (Acts I-III)/WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 24th (Acts IV-V):

    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of a quiz grade!): You and your group mates (Groups will be assigned according to the elements--stay tuned!) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

  • Thursday, November 18th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Arrange into your As You Like It Performance Groups and listen to the instructions. Brief review of Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes.

    2. Work Period: In your groups, begin to read aloud your scenes and start the editing process. Determine director, roles, and director's vision/interpretation.

    How will students prepare their interpretations of As You Like It scenes? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:
  • Vocabulary List #9 QUIZ (Etymology: caco=bad, evil; phon=voice, sound; voc=voice; cogn=knowledge; loq=talk/speak; pre=before; cede=go)
  • Vocabulary List #9 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How does As You Like It reflect Shakespeare's life and times ? How do characters in As You Like It transform? How do you compare/contrast As You Like It to Hamlet? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd/WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 24th:

    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of a quiz grade!): You and your group mates (Groups will be assigned according to the elements--stay tuned!) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

  • Wednesday, November 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Analyze the following five main points of discussion--
    Who and what decide a person's status in society? "He keeps me rustically at home" (Orlando, I, I). "The old Duke is banished by his younger brother, the new Duke..." (Charles, I, I). "Thou art thy father's daughter; there's enough..." (Duke Frederick, I, III).
    How do people define their own personal happiness? "And this our life exempt from public haunt...good in everything. I would not change it" (Duke Senior, II, I). "Let me be your servant...let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man" (Adam, II, III). "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and entrances..." (Jaques, II, VII).
    What are the characteristics of a man/woman in love? Vocal about their love, irrational behavior, worshipping, blind to their beloved's faults/flaws, neglectful of their own needs; "Every eye which in this forest looks shall see thy virtue witnessed every where" (Orlando, III, II). ..."A man in love in which cage of rushes I am sure you are not a prisoner" (Rosalind/Ganymede, III, II).
    How can men and women become better people? Tell the truth/Keep their promises: "an you be so tardy, come no more in my sight: I had as lief be wooed of a snail" (Rosalind/Ganymede, IV, I). "My conversion so sweetly tastes, being the thing I am" (Oliver, IV, III).
    How can we achieve our personal happiness? Win the love of our beloved, marry, realize our identities, attain inner peace. "Tomorrow is the joyful day, Audrey; tomorrow will we be married" (Touchstone, V, III). "To you I give myself, for I am yours" (Rosalind, V, IV).

    2. As You Like It Performance Groups will be assigned and instructions will be given.

    How will students analyze one's search for meaning in life while being influenced by status and relationships, as seen in As You Like It? How is one's identity shaped as a result of their status and relationships? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:
  • Vocabulary List #9 QUIZ (Etymology: caco=bad, evil; phon=voice, sound; voc=voice; cogn=knowledge; loq=talk/speak; pre=before; cede=go)
  • Vocabulary List #9 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How does As You Like It reflect Shakespeare's life and times ? How do characters in As You Like It transform? How do you compare/contrast As You Like It to Hamlet? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd/WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 24th:

    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of a quiz grade!): You and your group mates (Groups will be assigned according to the elements--stay tuned!) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

  • Tuesday, November 16th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing List #9

    2. Introduce five main points of discussion--
    Who and what decide a person's status in society? "He keeps me rustically at home" (Orlando, I, I). "The old Duke is banished by his younger brother, the new Duke..." (Charles, I, I). "Thou art thy father's daughter; there's enough..." (Duke Frederick, I, III).
    How do people define their own personal happiness? "And this our life exempt from public haunt...good in everything. I would not change it" (Duke Senior, II, I). "Let me be your servant...let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man" (Adam, II, III). "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and entrances..." (Jaques, II, VII).
    What are the characteristics of a man/woman in love? Vocal about their love, irrational behavior, worshipping, blind to their beloved's faults/flaws, neglectful of their own needs; "Every eye which in this forest looks shall see thy virtue witnessed every where" (Orlando, III, II). ..."A man in love in which cage of rushes I am sure you are not a prisoner" (Rosalind/Ganymede, III, II).
    How can men and women become better people? Tell the truth/Keep their promises: "an you be so tardy, come no more in my sight: I had as lief be wooed of a snail" (Rosalind/Ganymede, IV, I). "My conversion so sweetly tastes, being the thing I am" (Oliver, IV, III).
    How can we achieve our personal happiness? Win the love of our beloved, marry, realize our identities, attain inner peace. "Tomorrow is the joyful day, Audrey; tomorrow will we be married" (Touchstone, V, III). "To you I give myself, for I am yours" (Rosalind, V, IV).

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students analyze one's search for meaning in life while being influenced by status and relationships, as seen in As You Like It? How is one's identity shaped as a result of their status and relationships? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:
  • Finish answering the discussion questions (see the classwork). Make sure to refer to As You Like It with specific evidence (use the quotes provided and additional quotes from the play) to support your answers. Be prepared to share tomorrow in discussion and written format.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:

  • Vocabulary List #9 QUIZ (Etymology: caco=bad, evil; phon=voice, sound; voc=voice; cogn=knowledge; loq=talk/speak; pre=before; cede=go)
  • Vocabulary List #9 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How does As You Like It reflect Shakespeare's life and times ? How do characters in As You Like It transform? How do you compare/contrast As You Like It to Hamlet? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd/WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 24th:

    As You Like It Performance Presentation (Value of a quiz grade!): You and your group mates (Groups will be assigned according to the elements--stay tuned!) will perform one of these scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens), Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? Examples: A soap opera love scene. A 1980's style courtship. A gangster's duel. A movie version (How about The Wizard of Oz?) of the contrast between the royalty and countryside.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

  • Monday, November 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #8 QUIZ (turn in story #8)

    2. Introduce List #9

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students be assessed on their knowledge and study of vocabulary list #8 through an assessment and a writing opportunity? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:
  • Vocabulary List #9 QUIZ (Etymology: caco=bad, evil; phon=voice, sound; voc=voice; cogn=knowledge; loq=talk/speak; pre=before; cede=go)
  • Vocabulary List #9 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How does As You Like It reflect Shakespeare's life and times ? How do characters in As You Like It transform? How do you compare/contrast As You Like It to Hamlet? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

  • Friday, November 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: AS YOU LIKE IT EXAM

    2. Distribution of Hamlet Exams and Awards for Best Costume, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Overall Performance

    How will students be assessed on their knowledge and study of As You Like It in an AP English Literature Free Response Essay Question format? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15th:
  • Vocabulary List #8 QUIZ (Etymology: ana=against, chron=time, plore=weep and cry out in expression, gress=walk or go, fidel=faith)
  • Vocabulary List #8 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How is As You Like It relevant to modern day readers/audiences? How did Shakespeare break his mold with As You Like It? How is As You Like It both typical and atypical of modern day theater? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

  • Wednesday, November 10th, 2010: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCE PRESENTATIONS of ACT III SCENE II AND ACT V SCENE II from Hamlet (reminders before presentations: one person will deliver a summary of scene and introduction of characters, turn in grading rubric, and bow at the end of the scene)

    2. Review List #8 (Etymology: ana=against, chron=time, plore=weep and cry out in expression, gress=walk or go, fidel=faith) and the AP-style free response essay question (review the multiple components of the AP free-response essay question, the time allotted, and writing expectations).

    3. Voting for Best Costume, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Overall Performance

    How will students be assessed on their interpretive performances of scenes from Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • EXAM ON AS YOU LIKE IT (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Analyze the play, keeping in mind the following questions: How are the characters' identities formed and developed with respect to their settings? How does social status change for various characters throughout the play? What influences the social status of various characters? Which characters are dynamic (changing) and why? Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given THIS Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form. Review these sample AP free-response essay questions (these were distributed and reviewed in class) to understand how the AP essay question requires multiple components to be addressed (including a discussion of the literary work as a whole):
    *2006 QUESTION 3
    *2001 QUESTION 3

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15th:

  • Vocabulary List #8 QUIZ (Etymology: ana=against, chron=time, plore=weep and cry out in expression, gress=walk or go, fidel=faith)
  • Vocabulary List #8 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How is As You Like It relevant to modern day readers/audiences? How did Shakespeare break his mold with As You Like It? How is As You Like It both typical and atypical of modern day theater? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

  • Tuesday, November 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCE PRESENTATIONS (final reminders before presentations: one person will deliver a summary of scene and introduction of characters, turn in grading rubric, and bow at the end of the scene)

    2. Introduce List #8 (Etymology: ana=against, chron=time, plore=weep and cry out in expression, gress=walk or go, fidel=faith)

    How will students be assessed on their interpretive performances and vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th (ACT III SCENE II AND ACT V SCENE II):
  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: high school musical, dancing with the stars, soap opera, vampire, video game, cartoon, Jersey Shore, The Matrix, Revenge of the Nerds, cowboy/western, puppets, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (QUIZ GRADE) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read As You Like It (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given THIS Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (don't worry--we will be reviewing this essay form in advance!).

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15th:

  • Vocabulary List #8 QUIZ (Etymology: ana=against, chron=time, plore=weep and cry out in expression, gress=walk or go, fidel=faith)
  • Vocabulary List #8 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How is As You Like It relevant to modern day readers/audiences? How did Shakespeare break his mold with As You Like It? How is As You Like It both typical and atypical of modern day theater? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

  • Monday, November 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #7 QUIZ (turn in story #7)

    2. Introduce List #8

    3. Work Period: Performance Presentation Reminders (5-minute rule, attention to grading rubric, and group mate accountability). Meet with your group mates to make final arrangements to rehearse before tomorrow's performance presentations.

    How will students be assessed on their vocabulary and writing skills? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th (ACT I, ACT II, AND ACT III SCENE I) OR THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th (ACT III SCENE II AND ACT V SCENE II):
  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: high school musical, dancing with the stars, soap opera, matrix, revenge of the nerds, cowboy/western, puppets, etc. ), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (QUIZ GRADE) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read As You Like It (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given THIS Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (don't worry--we will be reviewing this essay form in advance!).

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15th:

  • Vocabulary List #8 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #8 STORY on anything from As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How is As You Like It relevant to modern day readers/audiences? How did Shakespeare break his mold with As You Like It? How is As You Like It both typical and atypical of modern day theater? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

  • Friday, November 5th, 2010: 1. DO NOW: Acting Exercises--tongue twisters, volume/articulation practice, and tableaus (i.e. Hamlet at the beginning of the play vs. the end of the play, Hamlet and Gertrude, Hamlet and Claudius, Ophelia and Hamlet, Gertrude and Claudius, Hamlet and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet and Horatio, etc.). Characters as animals in Hamlet. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.

    2. Work Period: Scene Groups will rehearse standing up, practicing physical interactions, scene staging, body/facial expressions, and volume/articulation. Continue editing and incorporating director's vision, character roles, and character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices). Discuss props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Make arrangements for group practice on your own time!

    How will students effectively prepare for interpretive performances of their chosen scene from Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:
  • Vocabulary List #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #7 STORY on anything from Hamlet, As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. Suggested Story Questions (you may choose to address one of these questions in which you incorporate all of the vocabulary words): How is Hamlet significant in your life today or in the world today? How do women play significant roles in Hamlet OR As You Like It? Compare/Contrast Hamlet and As You Like It. Why is Hamlet such a widely acclaimed play? What is Shakespeare's role in the world today? You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred. It's always recommended to compose two pages of double-spaced, typed papers.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th (ACT I, ACT II, AND ACT III SCENE I) OR WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th (ACT III SCENE II AND ACT V SCENE II):

  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: high school musical, dancing with the stars, soap opera, matrix, revenge of the nerds, cowboy/western, puppets, etc. ), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (QUIZ GRADE) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    Looking Ahead--DUE NEXT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read As You Like It (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given on Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (don't worry--we will be reviewing this essay form in advance!).
  • Thursday, November 4th, 2010: 1. DO NOW: Acting Exercises--begin tableaus. Statues (acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet). Statues will include archetypes in literature (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, valiant knight) and characters as animals in Hamlet. Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Archetype portrayals (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight). Tongue Twisters/Articulation work.

    2. Work Period: Scene Groups will get together and begin editing and determine director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices.

    How will students effectively prepare for interpretive performances of their chosen scene from Hamlet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:
  • Vocabulary List #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #7 STORY on anything from Hamlet, As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th (ACT I, ACT II, AND ACT III SCENE I) OR NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th (ACT III SCENE II AND ACT V SCENE II):

  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    Looking Ahead--DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read As You Like It (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given on Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (don't worry--we will be reviewing this essay form in advance!).
  • Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010: 1. Lecture/Discussion/Literary Analysis: How does the "To Be or Not To Be" philosophy pervade the play, Hamlet?
  • Act I=The Ghost: King Hamlet on the surface. Is he from heaven or hell?
    Hamlet: The Black Sheep of Denmark, the mourner, the anti-Claudius, the unmanly man, Ophelia's lover, Gertrude's son, King Hamlet's son, the "committed" Prince, the Revenge-Seeker
    King Hamlet: G-d (according to Prince Hamlet)
    Ophelia: Hamlet's lover, Polonius' daughter, Laertes' sister
  • Act II=Rosencrantz and Guildenstern: Hamlet's so-called friends, Claudius' loyal spies.
    Polonius: King Claudius' trusted advisor, the ruler of his family
    Hamlet: the cynic, the director.
  • Act III=Gertrude: a concerned mother
    Hamlet: anti-lover, director, murderer?
    Ophelia: weeping woman
    Polonius: spy, victim of Hamlet
    Claudius: powerful king, Hamlet's punisher
    Audience: receivers of knowledge (particularly Claudius' guilt)
  • Act IV=Ophelia: madwoman
    Laertes: revenge-seeker
    Hamlet: prisoner
    Horatio: savior
  • Act V=Gertrude: victim of Claudius
    Claudius: victim of Hamlet and victim of himself
    Hamlet: victim of Claudius and victim of himself
    Horatio: heir to Hamlet
    Laertes: victim of Claudius and victim of himself
    Fortinbras: victor

    *The "To Be or Not to Be" philosophy can apply to multiple characters (as seen above), not just Hamlet. Think about the characters' identities (as perceived by themselves and others), the questioning of their own existence, their roles in the play, their inner turmoil, and the effects of Shakespeare's life and times. Review the outline of the play, using the following quotes, which reveal the main points:

  • "I do not set my life at a pin's fee" (I, IV, 65)--Hamlet
  • "Ay, that incestuous that adulterate beast, with witchraft of his wit, with traitorous gifts--O wicked wit and gifts, that have the power so to seduce!" (I, V, 42-45)--Ghost
  • "The time is out of joint. O cursed spite, that ever I was born to set it right!" (I, V, 188-189)--Hamlet
  • "The play's the thing wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King" (II, II, 530-531)--Hamlet
  • "To Be or Not To Be? That is the question--whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles and, by opposing, end them" (III, I, 55-59)--Hamlet
  • "Get thee to a nunnery" (III, I, 120)--Hamlet
  • "It shall be so. Madness in great ones must not unwatched go" (III, I, 187-188)--Claudius
  • "Oh, from this time forth, my thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth! (IV, IV, 63)--Hamlet
  • "Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet Prince, and flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!" (V, II, 335-336)--Horatio

    2. Introduce GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE. Discuss the criteria for the Hamlet scene performance.

    3. Acting Exercises

  • How will students effectively improve their study of Hamlet and the "to be or not to be philosophy" pervading the play? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:
  • Vocabulary List #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #7 STORY on anything from Hamlet, As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th (ACT I, ACT II, AND ACT III SCENE I) OR NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th (ACT III SCENE II AND ACT V SCENE II):

  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    Looking Ahead--DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read As You Like It (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given on Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (don't worry--we will be reviewing this essay form in advance!).
  • Monday, November 1st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #6 QUIZ (turn in story #6)

    2. Introduce List #7

    3. Arrange with your group mates which character role(s) you will play.

    How will students effectively improve their study of vocabulary/etymology and drama? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd:
  • To prepare for your performance scene from Hamlet, read over your scene in depth. Know your chosen character's role in your scene (characterization: personality traits, thoughts/feelings, actions, speech, appearance, and other characters' points of view) and complete understanding of your scene.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:

  • Vocabulary List #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #7 STORY on anything from Hamlet, As You Like It, theater or Shakespeare. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th OR NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    Looking Ahead--DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read As You Like It (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given on Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (don't worry--we will be practicing this essay form in advance!).
  • Friday, October 29th, 2010: 1. Lecture/Discussion/Literary Analysis: How does the "To Be or Not To Be" philosophy pervade the play, Hamlet?
  • Act I=The Ghost: King Hamlet on the surface. Is he from heaven or hell?
    Hamlet: The Black Sheep of Denmark, the mourner, the anti-Claudius, the unmanly man, Ophelia's lover, Gertrude's son, King Hamlet's son, the "committed" Prince, the Revenge-Seeker
    King Hamlet: G-d (according to Prince Hamlet)
    Ophelia: Hamlet's lover, Polonius' daughter, Laertes' sister
  • Act II=Rosencrantz and Guildenstern: Hamlet's so-called friends, Claudius' loyal spies.
    Polonius: King Claudius' trusted advisor, the ruler of his family
    Hamlet: the cynic, the director.
  • Act III=Gertrude: a concerned mother
    Hamlet: anti-lover, director, murderer?
    Ophelia: weeping woman
    Polonius: spy, victim of Hamlet
    Claudius: powerful king, Hamlet's punisher
    Audience: receivers of knowledge (particularly Claudius' guilt)
  • Act IV=Ophelia: madwoman
    Laertes: revenge-seeker
    Hamlet: prisoner
    Horatio: savior
  • Act V=Gertrude: victim of Claudius
    Claudius: victim of Hamlet and victim of himself
    Hamlet: victim of Claudius and victim of himself
    Horatio: heir to Hamlet
    Laertes: victim of Claudius and victim of himself
    Fortinbras: victor

    *The "To Be or Not to Be" philosophy can apply to multiple characters (as seen above), not just Hamlet. Think about the characters' identities (as perceived by themselves and others), the questioning of their own existence, their roles in the play, their inner turmoil, and the effects of Shakespeare's life and times. Review the outline of the play, using the following quotes, which reveal the main points:

  • "I do not set my life at a pin's fee" (I, IV, 65)--Hamlet
  • "Ay, that incestuous that adulterate beast, with witchraft of his wit, with traitorous gifts--O wicked wit and gifts, that have the power so to seduce!" (I, V, 42-45)--Ghost
  • "The time is out of joint. O cursed spite, that ever I was born to set it right!" (I, V, 188-189)--Hamlet
  • "The play's the thing wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King" (II, II, 530-531)--Hamlet
  • "To Be or Not To Be? That is the question--whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles and, by opposing, end them" (III, I, 55-59)--Hamlet
  • "Get thee to a nunnery" (III, I, 120)--Hamlet
  • "It shall be so. Madness in great ones must not unwatched go" (III, I, 187-188)--Claudius
  • "Oh, from this time forth, my thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth! (IV, IV, 63)--Hamlet
  • "Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet Prince, and flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!" (V, II, 335-336)--Horatio

    2. HW Reminders, including beginning preparations for their Hamlet scenes (reading and understanding their scene and their chosen character role).

  • How will students prove their knowledge and application of Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:
  • Vocabulary List #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #6 STORY on anything from Hamlet, theater or Shakespeare. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd:

  • To prepare for your performance scene from Hamlet, read over your scene in depth. Know your chosen character's role in your scene (characterization: personality traits, thoughts/feelings, actions, speech, appearance, and other characters' points of view) and complete understanding of your scene.

    DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th OR WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    Looking Ahead--DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read As You Like It (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given on Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (don't worry--we will be practicing this essay form in advance!).
  • Thursday, October 28th, 2010: 1. HAMLET EXAM

    2. When finished, prepare for Monday's Vocabulary Quiz #6 and story #6.

    How will students prove their knowledge and application of Hamlet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:
  • Vocabulary List #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #6 STORY on anything from Hamlet, theater or Shakespeare. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th OR WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    Looking Ahead--DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read As You Like It (play given in class). Analyze the play with a focus on women's and men's identities, social status and society's expectations for men and women in different settings (environments and time periods). Annotating with the purposes stated above (i.e. post-its) would be beneficial to you as a college-preparatory student. There will be an EXAM given on Friday, November 12th on As You Like It in AP English Literature essay exam form (don't worry--we will be practicing this essay form in advance!).
  • Wednesday, October 27th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish notes and elaboration of Shakespeare's Life, Times and Work. Introduce Iambic Pentameter. What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays, considering we are now familiar with his background? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop?

    2. Hamlet Discussion/Analysis

    How will students effectively understand Shakespeare's life, times and work in order to better analyze Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Read with a purpose: the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences. IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:

  • Vocabulary List #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #6 STORY on anything from Hamlet, theater or Shakespeare. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Tuesday, October 26th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish the introduction of Vocabulary List #6.

    2. Notes and elaboration of Shakespeare's Life, Times and Work. Introduce Iambic Pentameter. What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays, considering we are now familiar with his background? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop?

    How will students effectively understand Shakespeare's life, times and work in order to better analyze Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Read with a purpose: the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences. IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:

  • Vocabulary List #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #6 STORY on anything from Hamlet, theater or Shakespeare. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Monday, October 25th, 2010: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #5

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #6

    How will students effectively improve their vocabulary/language skills? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Read with a purpose: the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences. IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:

  • Vocabulary List #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #6 STORY on anything from Hamlet, theater or Shakespeare. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Friday, October 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion on the following questions. Be specific. Make references to specific sections of the book or specific passages.
  • Is it true that people are only concerned with trivialities (as Sophie says on p. 10)? Why/Why not?
  • How come our faculty of wonder diminishes as we get older? Why is this?
  • Socrates said, "One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing." Why is this so profound?
  • What's so great about philosophers? Why is it valuable to study philosophy (the study of thinking)?
  • How does philosophy affect many facets of our lives (such as our identities, as when Marx said in the 1840s, "Tell me what you do and I'll tell you who you are." The way you think is closely connected to the job you do. Philosophy also applies to our religious and political values)

    2. Turn in copies of Sophie's World. Keep your post-it notes.

  • How will students effectively share their experiences with Sophie's World? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary List #5 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #5 STORY on anything from Sophie's World OR ANYTHING WE'VE STUDIED/DISCUSSED THUS FAR. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28th:

  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Read with a purpose: the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences. IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.
  • Thursday, October 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Find evidence of philosophies in Sophie's World that will help improve your lives as scholars (use real textual support). Be ready to share.

    2. Discuss/Share: Continue discussion on the following questions. Be specific. Make references to specific sections of the book or specific passages.

  • Is it true that people are only concerned with trivialities (as Sophie says on p. 10)? Why/Why not?
  • How come our faculty of wonder diminishes as we get older? Why is this?
  • Socrates said, "One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing." Why is this so profound?
  • What's so great about philosophers? Why is it valuable to study philosophy (the study of thinking)?
  • How does philosophy affect many facets of our lives (such as our identities, as when Marx said in the 1840s, "Tell me what you do and I'll tell you who you are." The way you think is closely connected to the job you do. Philosophy also applies to our religious and political values)
  • How will students effectively share their experiences with Sophie's World? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary List #5 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #5 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28th:

  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Read with a purpose: the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences. IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.
  • Wednesday, October 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish brainstorming on your reaction to your experience with Sophie's World. What did you like, not like, feel frustrated with, in awe of, etc.? Be specific. Make references to specific sections of the book or specific passages.
  • Is it true that people are only concerned with trivialities (as Sophie says on p. 10)? Why/Why not?
  • How come our faculty of wonder diminishes as we get older? Why is this?
  • Socrates said, "One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing." Why is this so profound?
  • What's so great about philosophers? Why is it valuable to study philosophy (the study of thinking)?
  • How does philosophy affect many facets of our lives (such as our identities, as when Marx said in the 1840s, "Tell me what you do and I'll tell you who you are." The way you think is closely connected to the job you do. Philosophy also applies to our religious and political values)

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now.

  • How will students effectively share their experiences with Sophie's World? DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary List #5 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #5 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28th:

  • Read Hamlet. You can read it on this online version or you can access a copy at your local library/bookstore. There will be in-class copies available for class work only. Read with a purpose: the course focus on identity and self-exploration. Also, be able to identify figurative language (literary devices and their significance), Shakespearean structure and Shakespeare's personal life and time period influences. IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET.
  • Tuesday, October 19th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Post your career presentation rubrics and corresponding career presentation posters on the hallway walls to prepare for parent-teacher conferences.

    2. Introduce List #5.

    3. Begin to take notes on your reaction to your experience with Sophie's World. What did you like, not like, feel frustrated with, in awe of, etc.? Be specific. Make references to specific sections of the book or specific passages.

  • Is it true that people are only concerned with trivialities (as Sophie says on p. 10)? Why/Why not?
  • How come our faculty of wonder diminishes as we get older? Why is this?
  • Socrates said, "One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing." Why is this so profound?
  • What's so great about philosophers? Why is it valuable to study philosophy (the study of thinking)?
  • How does philosophy affect many facets of our lives (such as our identities, as when Marx said in the 1840s, "Tell me what you do and I'll tell you who you are." The way you think is closely connected to the job you do. Philosophy also applies to our religious and political values)
  • How will students effectively improve their vocabulary, reflect on their presentation and share their experiences with Sophie's World? DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary List #5 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #5 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Monday, October 18th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ (turn in Story #4)

    2. Fill in the "comments" section of your career presentation rubric. Why did you deserve the grade you earned? Refer to the rubric points in greater detail. Why was your presentation organized? Meaningful? Appropriate? How was it delivered?

    3. Introduce List #5.

    How will students effectively improve their vocabulary skills and reflect on their presentation? DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary List #5 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #5 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Friday, October 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATIONS! All remaining students will present today. All viewing members of the audience will take notes on a newfound fact from each of the presentations (What sparked your interest? What did you learn that you'd be interested in researching/exploring for yourself? What was especially impressive?). Be ready to share.

    2. Turn in your Sophie's World papers with the grading rubric.

    3. Fill in the "comments" section of your career presentation rubric. Why did you deserve the grade you earned? Refer to the rubric points in greater detail. Why was your presentation organized? Meaningful? Appropriate? How was it delivered?

    How will students effectively present their individual career research? How will they enhance their own self-knowledge and preparation for the college application process? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:
  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #4 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Thursday, October 14th, 2010: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATIONS! Students with last names beginning with B-C and any remaining students from Tuesday. All viewing members of the audience will take notes on a newfound fact from each of the presentations (What sparked your interest? What did you learn that you'd be interested in researching/exploring for yourself? What was especially impressive?). Be ready to share. How will students effectively present their individual career research? How will they enhance their own self-knowledge and preparation for the college application process? CAREER PRESENTATIONS: DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th (students with last names beginning with "A" and any remaining students who were not able to present today): Career Research Project/Presentation. It's the value of two quiz grades (this term it will be worth 20% of your grade). Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Your presentation should be a minimum of 2 minutes and maximum of 5 minutes.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font-Times New Roman, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #4 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Tuesday, October 12th, 2010: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATIONS! Students with last names beginning with D-H and Diana and Alfred, who were supposed to present on Friday (but we ran out of time). All viewing members of the audience will take notes on a newfound fact from each of the presentations (What sparked your interest? What did you learn that you'd be interested in researching/exploring for yourself? What was especially impressive?). Be ready to share. How will students effectively present their individual career research? How will they enhance their own self-knowledge and preparation for the college application process? CAREER PRESENTATIONS: DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14th (Last names beginning with A-C): Career Research Project/Presentation. It's the value of two quiz grades (this term it will be worth 20% of your grade). Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Your presentation should be a minimum of 2 minutes and maximum of 5 minutes.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #4 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Friday, October 8th, 2010: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATIONS! Yesterday's remaining students with last names beginning with P-Z AND students with last names beginning with H-M will present today! All viewing members of the audience will take notes on a newfound fact from each of the presentations (What sparked your interest? What did you learn that you'd be interested in researching/exploring for yourself? What was especially impressive?). Be ready to share. How will students effectively present their individual career research? How will they enhance their own self-knowledge and preparation for the college application process? CAREER PRESENTATIONS: DUE THIS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12th (Last names beginning with D-H and Diana and Alfred, who are remaining students from today, Friday), OR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14th (Last names beginning with A-C): Career Research Project/Presentation. It's the value of two quiz grades (this term it will be worth 20% of your grade). Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Your presentation should be a minimum of 2 minutes and maximum of 5 minutes.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #4 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Thursday, October 7th, 2010: CAREER RESEARCH PROJECT/PRESENTATIONS! All students with last names beginning with P-Z will present today! All viewing members of the audience will take notes on a newfound fact from each of the presentations (What sparked your interest? What did you learn that you'd be interested in researching/exploring for yourself? What was especially impressive?). Be ready to share. How will students effectively present their individual career research? How will they enhance their own self-knowledge and preparation for the college application process? CAREER PRESENTATIONS: DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8th (Last names beginning with H-M) TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12th (Last names beginning with C-G), OR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14th (Last names beginning with A-B): Career Research Project/Presentation. It's the value of two quiz grades (this term it will be worth 20% of your grade). Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Your presentation should be a minimum of 2 minutes and maximum of 5 minutes.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #4 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Wednesday, October 6th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish our Oedipus Rex discussion on the following questions (in fishbowl discussion format):
  • What is Sophocles saying about MAN in Oedipus Rex? Do you think he's right? Why/Why not?
  • What are the precepts by which Oedipus lives?
  • How would you answer "Who am I?" Would your answer be the same as your parents? As your best friend?
  • What are the precepts by which you live?

    2. Review the Sophie's World Paper requirements and rubric.

    3. Discuss/Share: Introduce big questions that the philosophers in Sophie's World attempt to answer. We will personally answer these questions. Here they are, as presented in Sophie's World (this list is incomplete):

  • Who are you?
  • Is there life after death?
  • Where does the world come from?
  • Could anything have always existed?
  • How was the world created?
  • Do you believe in fate?
  • Is sickness punishment by G-d?
  • What forces govern the course of history?
  • How ought we to live?
  • What is the relationship between the body and mind?
  • Where do we get our ideas from? Can we really rely on what our senses tell us?
  • How will students effectively prepare for the study of Sophie's World through their own self-knowledge and awareness of the world around them? CHECK OUT THIS NEW ASSIGNMENT: DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7th (Last names beginning with P-Y), THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8th (Last names beginning with H-M) TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12th (Last names beginning with C-G), OR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14th (Last names beginning with A-B): Career Research Project/Presentation. It's the value of two quiz grades (this term it will be worth 20% of your grade). Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Your presentation should be a minimum of 2 minutes and maximum of 5 minutes.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary List #4 STORY on anything from Sophie's World. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Tuesday, October 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish introducing the Career Research Project/Presentation.

    2. Grade the Vocabulary List #3 QUIZ.

    3. Introduce List #4.

    4. Distribute and review the graded college essays.

    How will students effectively prepare for the SAT and college with more vocabulary and self-knowledge? CHECK OUT THIS NEW ASSIGNMENT: DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7th (Last names beginning with P-Y), THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8th (Last names beginning with H-M) TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12th (Last names beginning with C-G), OR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14th (Last names beginning with A-B): Career Research Project/Presentation. It's the value of two quiz grades (this term it will be worth 20% of your grade). Dress up for your presentation day! Show that you take this assignment seriously, as a professional! You will be graded on this RUBRIC. Your presentation should be a minimum of 2 minutes and maximum of 5 minutes.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.
  • Monday, October 4th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #3 QUIZ (Turn in the Vocab. #3 story!)

    2. HW distributions (List #4 and the Career Research Project/Presentation.

    3. If time allows, we will finish our Oedipus Rex discussion on the following questions (in fishbowl discussion format):

  • What is Sophocles saying about MAN in Oedipus Rex? Do you think he's right? Why/Why not?
  • What are the precepts by which Oedipus lives?
  • How will students effectively prepare for the SAT and college with more vocabulary and self-knowledge? CHECK OUT THIS NEW ASSIGNMENT: DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7th (Last names beginning with P-Y), THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8th (Last names beginning with H-M) TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12th (Last names beginning with C-G), OR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14th (Last names beginning with A-B): Career Research Project/Presentation. It's the value of two quiz grades (this term it will be worth 20% of your grade). The details will be discussed in class on Monday, October 4th. Though, you can start working since it's posted now! You will be graded on this RUBRIC.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.
  • Friday, October 1st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish answering the following questions--
  • How would Oedipus answer the question--"Who am I?" at the beginning of the play? How would his answer change at the end of the play? Would his answers be the same or different as Jokasta's? Teiresias's answers? Explain.
  • How would you answer "Who am I?" Would your answer be the same as your parents? As your best friend?
  • What is Sophocles saying about MAN in Oedipus Rex? Do you think he's right? Why/Why not?
  • What are the precepts by which Oedipus lives?
  • What are the precepts by which you live?

    2. Discuss/Share: Using Oedipus Rex for textual references, discuss the Do Now questions.

  • How will students effectively improve their literary analysis skills through textual citations and purposeful questioning? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (using List #3 on Oedipus Rex (you can be creative!), My Future, or philosophy). You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    CHECK OUT THIS NEW ASSIGNMENT: DUE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7th (Last names beginning with P-Y), FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8th (Last names beginning with H-M) TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12th (Last names beginning with C-G), OR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14th (Last names beginning with A-B): Career Research Project/Presentation. It's the value of two quiz grades (this term it will be worth 20% of your grade). The details will be discussed in class on Monday, October 4th. Though, you can start working since it's posted now! You will be graded on this RUBRIC.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Thursday, September 30th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion of the following quotes by addressing these questions: How are Oedipus' character flaws revealed? Which carries more influence--free will or fate?
  • "You saved us from the Sphinx, that flinty singer, and the tribute we paid to her so long; yet you were never better informed than we, nor could we teach you: a god's touch, it seems, enabled you to help us" (Priest, Prologue, 38-42).
  • "Search reveals things that escape an inattentive man" (Kreon, Prologue, 114-115).
  • "There is no one here who will not curse you soon, as you curse me" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 357-358).
  • "You weave your own doom" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 365).
  • "But I say that you, with both your eyes, are blind: you can not see the wretchedness of your life..." (Teiresias, Scene 1, 399-400).
  • "You can not judge unless you know the facts" (Kreon, Scene 2, 516).
  • "Judgments too quickly formed are dangerous" (Choragos, Scene 2, 584).
  • "The greatest griefs are those we cause ourselves" (Second Messenger, Ode 4, 1184).
  • "I have been preserved for some unthinkable fate" (Oedipus, Exodus, 1404-1405).
  • "Think no longer that you are in command here, but rather think how, when you were, you served your own destruction" (Kreon, Exodus, 1465-1466).

    2. Work Period: Brainstorm answers to the following questions--

  • How would Oedipus answer the question--"Who am I?" at the beginning of the play? How would his answer change at the end of the play? Would his answers be the same or different as Jokasta's? Teiresias's answers? Explain.
  • How would you answer "Who am I?" Would your answer be the same as your parents? As your best friend?
  • What is Sophocles saying about MAN in Oedipus Rex? Do you think he's right? Why/Why not?
  • What are the precepts by which Oedipus lives?
  • What are the precepts by which you live?
  • How will students effectively improve their literary analysis skills through textual citations and purposeful questioning? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (using List #3 on Oedipus Rex, My Future, or philosophy). You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Wednesday, September 29th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Examine the following quotes by addressing these questions: How are Oedipus' character flaws revealed? Which carries more influence--free will or fate?
  • "You saved us from the Sphinx, that flinty singer, and the tribute we paid to her so long; yet you were never better informed than we, nor could we teach you: a god's touch, it seems, enabled you to help us" (Priest, Prologue, 38-42).
  • "Search reveals things that escape an inattentive man" (Kreon, Prologue, 114-115).
  • "There is no one here who will not curse you soon, as you curse me" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 357-358).
  • "You weave your own doom" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 365).
  • "But I say that you, with both your eyes, are blind: you can not see the wretchedness of your life..." (Teiresias, Scene 1, 399-400).
  • "You can not judge unless you know the facts" (Kreon, Scene 2, 516).
  • "Judgments too quickly formed are dangerous" (Choragos, Scene 2, 584).
  • "The greatest griefs are those we cause ourselves" (Second Messenger, Ode 4, 1184).
  • "I have been preserved for some unthinkable fate" (Oedipus, Exodus, 1404-1405).
  • "Think no longer that you are in command here, but rather think how, when you were, you served your own destruction" (Kreon, Exodus, 1465-1466).

    Turn in resumes--draft #1 and final version!

    2. Discuss/Share your analysis of the quotes. Show your textual markings.

  • How will students effectively improving their vocabulary skills and higher order thinking? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (using List #3 on Oedipus Rex, My Future, or philosophy). You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Tuesday, September 28th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #3. Turn in Discipline Code Handbook forms (HW).

    2. Grade List #2 Quiz.

    3. Work Period: Examine the following quotes by addressing these questions: How are Oedipus' character flaws revealed? Which carries more influence--free will or fate?

  • "You saved us from the Sphinx, that flinty singer, and the tribute we paid to her so long; yet you were never better informed than we, nor could we teach you: a god's touch, it seems, enabled you to help us" (Priest, Prologue, 38-42).
  • "Search reveals things that escape an inattentive man" (Kreon, Prologue, 114-115).
  • "There is no one here who will not curse you soon, as you curse me" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 357-358).
  • "You weave your own doom" (Teiresias, Scene 1, 365).
  • "But I say that you, with both your eyes, are blind: you can not see the wretchedness of your life..." (Teiresias, Scene 1, 399-400).
  • "You can not judge unless you know the facts" (Kreon, Scene 2, 516).
  • "Judgments too quickly formed are dangerous" (Choragos, Scene 2, 584).
  • "The greatest griefs are those we cause ourselves" (Second Messenger, Ode 4, 1184).
  • "I have been preserved for some unthinkable fate" (Oedipus, Exodus, 1404-1405).
  • "Think no longer that you are in command here, but rather think how, when you were, you served your own destruction" (Kreon, Exodus, 1465-1466).
  • How will students effectively improving their vocabulary skills and higher order thinking? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:
  • Revised Resume! Apply the corrections made by me, your teacher. Please turn in draft #1 and this new and improved resume.
  • Bring in your textbook!!!

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 4th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (using List #3 on Oedipus Rex, My Future, or philosophy). You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Monday, September 27th, 2010: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #2! Turn in Story #2 HW. Fill out book receipt for Sophie's World and obtain a copy of the novel!

    2. Grade List #2 Quiz.

    3. List #3 and Discipline Code Handbook and forms distribution.

    4. Review Literary Terms Quiz and Resumes.

    How will students effectively improve their vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW (TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28TH):
  • BRING IN YOUR PERRINE TEXTBOOK TOMORROW!
  • Signed Discipline Code Handbook Forms (by you and your parents).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:

  • Revised Resume! Apply the corrections made by me, your teacher. Please turn in draft #1 and this new and improved resume.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 4th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (using List #3 on Oedipus Rex, My Future, or philosophy). You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:

  • Finish the reading of Sophie's World. Mark the text with a purpose (preparing for the paper below).

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Critical Analysis Paper (25% of 2nd marking period) for Sophie's World. Paper requirements: 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your name, date, my name, course name, and original title). Paper question: Which philosophers guide your understanding of the world around you and your life's purpose? Refer to a minimum of two philosophers from before common era (B.C.E., or as stated in Sophie's World: B.C.) and two philosophers in the common era (or as stated in Sophie's World, without B.C.). You must refer to specific page numbers in proper textual citation (we will discuss in class; you can also find it HERE). If you summarize an idea or put it in direct quotes, you must still use proper textual citation. Here's an example: Plato states that real knowledge cannot exist for things in flux (Gaarder, 86). Use this AP-Style Grading Rubric to guide you. Each category can be defined as follows: 9/10=90-100%, 8=80-89%, 6/7=70-79%, 5=69% and below.

    Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Friday, September 24th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Literary Terms Quiz. When done, prepare for List #2 Quiz (on Monday!) and Story #2.

    2. Finish discussion of the Oedipus Rex questions and answers from the Perrine textbook.

    How will students effectively engage in literary analysis present in Oedipus Rex? Due THIS Monday, September 27th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (using List #2 on Oedipus Rex, My Future or Life at ITHS. You MAY work with a partner, if you choose. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Don't bring in your Perrine textbook on Monday BUT BRING IT IN ON TUESDAY!

    Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Thursday, September 23rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the Reading Quiz questions and answers.

    2. Begin discussion of the Oedipus Rex questions and answers from the Perrine textbook.

    How will students effectively engage in literary analysis and Greek history present in Oedipus Rex? Due TOMORROW, Friday, September 24th:
  • QUIZ on the literary terms found (and discussed in class) here: Literary Terms Assessment.

    Due THIS Monday, September 27th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (using List #2 on Oedipus Rex, My Future or Life at ITHS. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.

    Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Define the terms in Oedipus Rex found here: Oedipus Rex: Terms, Themes, Characters and Resources. Use the glossary in the Perrine textbook. Turn in the HW: Oedipus Rex questions.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the terms in Oedipus Rex found in the link above.

    How will students effectively evaluate the literary terms and history present in Oedipus Rex? Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due Friday, September 24th:

  • QUIZ on the literary terms found (and discussed in class) here: Literary Terms Assessment.

    Due NEXT Monday, September 27th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (using List #2 on Oedipus Rex, My Future or Life at ITHS. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Tuesday, September 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm the thematic questions in Oedipus Rex found here: Oedipus Rex: Terms, Themes, Characters and Resources.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the themes in Oedipus Rex found in the link above.

    How will students effectively evaluate the themes present in Oedipus Rex? Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due TOMORROW Wednesday, September 22nd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex in the Perrine textbook--pp. 1209-1260. Mark the text (without marking the actual textbook; how about post-its?) as guided to do so in "How to Mark a Book". Focus your reading and marking according to the syllabus guidelines (see the introductory weeks under Oedipus Rex). Answer the questions on pp. 1261-1262. Bring in your Perrine textbook.

    Due Friday, September 24th:

  • QUIZ on the literary terms found (and discussed in class) here: Literary Terms Assessment.

    Due NEXT Monday, September 27th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (using List #2 on Oedipus Rex, My Future or Life at ITHS. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Monday, September 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocab. List #1 QUIZ

    2. Introduce List #2.

    3. HW reminders

    4. If time allows, grade quizzes.

    How will students expand their lexicon? Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due THIS Wednesday, September 22nd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex in the Perrine textbook--pp. 1209-1260. Mark the text (without marking the actual textbook; how about post-its?) as guided to do so in "How to Mark a Book". Focus your reading and marking according to the syllabus guidelines (see the introductory weeks under Oedipus Rex). Answer the questions on pp. 1261-1262. Bring in your Perrine textbook.

    Due Friday, September 24th:

  • QUIZ on the literary terms found (and discussed in class) here: Literary Terms Assessment.

    Due NEXT Monday, September 27th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (using List #2 on Oedipus Rex, My Future or Life at ITHS. Be ready to share. Use all vocabulary words in a story that makes sense. Underline the vocabulary words. Typed stories are preferred.
  • Friday, September 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm your prior knowledge and literary analysis of the following terms and themes, respectively: irony, classical tragedy, Greek drama AND self-knowledge, pride, and arrogance.

    2. Discuss/Share

    3. HW reminders

    4. Vocabulary Study

    How will students prepare for the course requirements in terms of higher-level reading and literary analysis? Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due THIS Monday, September 20th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).

    Due Wednesday, September 22nd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex in the Perrine textbook--pp. 1209-1260. Mark the text (without marking the actual textbook; how about post-its?) as guided to do so in "How to Mark a Book". Focus your reading and marking according to the syllabus guidelines (see the introductory weeks under Oedipus Rex). Answer the questions on pp. 1261-1262. Bring in your Perrine textbook.

    Due NEXT Friday, September 24th:

  • QUIZ on the literary terms found (and discussed in class) here: Literary Terms Assessment.
  • Thursday, September 16th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Reading Quiz on the HW essays and your chosen novel.

    2. Book/Receipt Distribution: Receive the Perrine textbook and fill out the receipt. HW introduced.

    3. Review the answers for the Literary Terms Assessment (ungraded). What do you know and what do you need to review?

    How will students prepare for the course requirements in terms of higher-level reading and literary analysis? Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due THIS Monday, September 20th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).

    Due NEXT Wednesday, September 22nd:

  • Read Oedipus Rex in the Perrine textbook--pp. 1209-1260. Mark the text (without marking the actual textbook; how about post-its?) as guided to do so in "How to Mark a Book". Focus your reading and marking according to the syllabus guidelines (see the introductory weeks under Oedipus Rex). Answer the questions on pp. 1261-1262. Bring in your Perrine textbook.

    Due NEXT Friday, September 24th:

  • QUIZ on the literary terms found (and discussed in class) here: Literary Terms Assessment.
  • Wednesday, September 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Discuss the value of "The Three Questions" by Leo Tolstoy (1885). Why is this story a parable? How does this story set the tone for the course? For the time in your life? For a lifelong lesson?

    2. Literary Terms Assessment (ungraded). What do you know and what do you need to review? Answers will be reviewed tomorrow.

    How will students prepare for the course requirements in terms of higher-level reading and literary analysis? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, September 16th:
  • Read "How to Mark a Book" and get ready to put his ideas into practice.
  • Read an Essay about Essays: Answering the "So What?" Question in Your Reading. Be ready to apply this information throughout this year.


  • Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due NEXT Monday, September 20th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Tuesday, September 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now:
    Self-Assessment: On loose leaf paper (which will be entered in your new student folder), write your answer to each question below in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples.
    1.) Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
    2.) Describe your academic and personal strengths.
    3.) What three characteristics or traits best define you?
    4.) If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself?
    5.) What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
    6.) What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?
    7.) Share three random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #1.

    3. Begin reading "The Three Questions" by Leo Tolstoy (1885). Why is this story a parable? How does this story set the tone for the course? For the time in your life? For a lifelong lesson?

    How will students assess themselves and prepare for the course requirements? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th:
  • Finish reading the handout--"The Three Questions" by Leo Tolstoy (1885). Why is this story a parable? How does this story set the tone for the course? For the time in your life? For others? For a lifelong lesson?


  • Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share at any time. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due NEXT Monday, September 20th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).
  • Monday, September 13th, 2010: 1. Do Now: 1-2 page freewrite on the novel you chose over the long weekend. Include plot summary, characters introduced, setting, etc. Use sophisticated vocabulary. Show off the best of who you are in this impromptu writing sample.

    2. Discuss/Share: Distribution and review of AP English Syllabus. Assigned seats given. Review the challenges and successes in completing the HW--college essay and resume.

    3. HW introduced.

    How will students introduce themselves, with reference to recent literary practice and personal and academic goals?
  • Continue reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share a little about the plot summary. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due NEXT Monday, September 20th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence. Use the sample sentences as guides. Suggestion: Go ahead and study all lists, as they will be extremely useful to improve your SAT score (especially if you're taking the October or November exam).

    Remember: Heading to be used on all work turned in.

    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Wednesday, September 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and fill out the index card, answering the following in complete sentences (when appropriate):
  • your full name (in parentheses, write any nickname that you want to be called in class)
  • your e-mail address (make sure it's appropriate to be used for school)
  • your parent's/guardian's e-mail address (please identify his/her name and their relation to you)
  • Home phone #
  • Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
  • What did you read this summer? Provide titles of books, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • Identify FIVE colleges you will apply to. Star (*) your #1 choice.
  • What career do you plan to pursue and why?
  • What is your short-term goal (before graduation)?
  • What is your long-term goal (5-10 years from now)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share responses.

    3. HW introduced.

  • How will students introduce themselves, with reference to recent literary practice and personal and academic goals? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13th (If you do not complete the assignments on the designated due dates, you will likely be removed from this demanding, Advanced Placement English class):
  • Begin reading a challenging book (classic novels are preferred) and be prepared to share a little about the plot summary. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Read the AP English Syllabus. Be familiar with the content of the syllabus, as we will refer back to it regularly throughout the school year.
  • Bring in Draft #1 of your resume. Use these Sample College Resumes and Resume Information to guide you. Note: Do NOT include two addresses at the top of your resume. Only include your primary address below your name, e-mail address and phone number at the top (centered) of your resume.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum (about two pages), typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness; suggested questions to answer and discuss in your paper: How are you a unique candidate for the college of your choice? What did you do in high school that makes you unique and worthy of your dream college? Hint: refer to your contributions to ITHS and/or your community. How do you help better your community and society at large? What are your career interests and how did you develop yourself throughout your high school years to help you for this career? Why is your background unique and what can your background/experiences contribute to your dream college? What is your most significant achievement and why is it meaningful to you?). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title