Dramatic Arts Assignments, Fall/Winter Semester, 2015-2016

Dramatic Arts Assignments
Fall/Winter Semester, 2015-2016

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 25th, 2016: 1. Do Now:
  • Share your TOP TEN LIST of everything you learned in this class since September. Refer to the four plays we studied: As You Like It, Hamlet, Othello and Romeo and Juliet.

    2. Discuss/Share: What activities/texts did you enjoy the most and why? If we had more time together, what would you like to study and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively reflect on our lessons learned and knowledge acquired this semester? GOOD LUCK ON YOUR REGENTS EXAMS! IT WAS A GREAT PLEASURE BEING YOUR TEACHER!
    Friday, January 22nd, 2016: Work Period:
  • Make a TOP TEN LIST of everything you learned in this class since September. Refer to the four plays we studied: As You Like It, Hamlet, Othello and Romeo and Juliet.
  • Make up owed homework.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively reflect on our lessons learned and knowledge acquired this semester? Make up owed HW. ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN OR E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY 3pm TODAY, FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd!
    Thursday, January 21st, 2016: 1. Do Now: What patterns did you see in Shakespeare's plays: Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Hamlet and As You Like It?

    Show HW:: Film Evaluation: Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you evaluate the film, As You Like It. Write the strengths and weaknesses of the director Kenneth Branagh's interpretation of Shakespeare's play. Use the film analysis sheet for your evidence. Refer to set design, costumes, actors' choices, props, music, sound and color.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over your Do Now answers. Volunteers share with the class. Volunteers share excerpts from their film evaluation homework.

    3. Reflections: Why are Shakespeare's plays widely read in high schools all over the world? Why are Shakespeare's plays so universal (popular in any location and any time period) for the past 400+ years? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively analyze the modern film version of the play, As You Like It and the significance of Shakespeare's plays as universal texts? Make up owed HW. ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN OR E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd before 3pm).
    Wednesday, January 20th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Answer the questions from the Do Now while viewing the modern film of the play, As You Like It.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively analyze the modern film version of the play, As You Like It? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 21st:
    FILM EVALUATION: Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you evaluate the film, As You Like It. Write the strengths and weaknesses of the director Kenneth Branagh's interpretation of Shakespeare's play. Use the film analysis sheet for your evidence. Refer to set design, costumes, actors' choices, props, music, sound and color.

    Make up owed HW. ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN OR E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd before 3pm).

    Tuesday, January 19th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Answer the questions from the Do Now while viewing the modern film of the play, As You Like It.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively analyze the modern film version of the play, As You Like It? Make up owed HW. ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN OR E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd before 3pm).
    Friday, January 15th, 2016: 1. Do Now: NOTEBOOK EXAM #2

    2. Work Period: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    Answer the questions above while viewing the modern film of the play, As You Like It.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively analyze the modern film version of the play, As You Like It? Make up owed HW.
    Thursday, January 14th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Answer the questions while viewing the modern film of the play, As You Like It.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively analyze the modern film version of the play, As You Like It? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 15th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK EXAM (value=50% of the 3rd marking period): You need to have all notes since November 9th (scroll down). You may use your notes for the exam. You will need a #2 pencil (it will be a multiple-choice question exam). MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ALL THE NOTES AND HANDOUTS BELOW. Review the following: epilogue for Romeo and Juliet, handout on the list of characters in Othello, predictive questions and answers for Othello, film viewing questions and answers for Othello, epilogue for Othello, handout for the list of characters in Hamlet, predictive questions and answers for Hamlet, predictive scene for Hamlet, components of the grading rubric for scene performances, famous the interpretation of "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy from Hamlet, film questions and answers for Hamlet, epilogue for Hamlet, interpretation of the famous "All the World's a Stage" speech from As You Like It, predictive scene based on the list of characters in As You Like It, and Act 4, Scene 1 excerpt from As You Like It.
  • Wednesday, January 13th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Compose a multiple-choice question (with four answer choices) for the Open Notebook Exam. Choose from one of these: epilogue for Romeo and Juliet, handout on the list of characters in Othello, predictive questions and answers for Othello, film viewing questions and answers for Othello, epilogue for Othello, handout for the list of characters in Hamlet, predictive questions and answers for Hamlet, predictive scene for Hamlet, components of the grading rubric for scene performances, famous the interpretation of "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy from Hamlet, film questions and answers for Hamlet, epilogue for Hamlet, interpretation of the famous "All the World's a Stage" speech from As You Like It, predictive scene based on the list of characters in As You Like It, and Act 4, Scene 1 excerpt from As You Like It.

    2. Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    3. Work Period: Answer the questions while viewing the modern film of the play, As You Like It.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively analyze the modern film version of the play, As You Like It? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 15th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK EXAM (value=50% of the 3rd marking period): You need to have all notes since November 9th (scroll down). You may use your notes for the exam. You will need a #2 pencil (it will be a multiple-choice question exam). MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ALL THE NOTES AND HANDOUTS BELOW. Review the following: epilogue for Romeo and Juliet, handout on the list of characters in Othello, predictive questions and answers for Othello, film viewing questions and answers for Othello, epilogue for Othello, handout for the list of characters in Hamlet, predictive questions and answers for Hamlet, predictive scene for Hamlet, components of the grading rubric for scene performances, famous the interpretation of "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy from Hamlet, film questions and answers for Hamlet, epilogue for Hamlet, interpretation of the famous "All the World's a Stage" speech from As You Like It, predictive scene based on the list of characters in As You Like It, and Act 4, Scene 1 excerpt from As You Like It.
  • Tuesday, January 12th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Gallery Walk of predictive scenes for As You Like It based on the As You Like It Character List. On the different colored post-it notes, write the following: strengths and qualities needing improvement. Refer to the following checklist:
    1.) Were there stage directions?
    2.) Did the stage directions include characters' actions and physical interactions?
    3.) Did the stage directions include costumes, props and set design?
    4.) Did the epilogue connect to the end of Romeo and Juliet?
    5.) Was there evidence of Shakespearean language?

    2. Discuss/Share/Present: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share their impressions from the Do Now with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the Excerpt from Act 4, Scene 1 of As You Like It. Interpret the excerpt from the scene in your own words. What do you predict will happen in As You Like It after this excerpt? Volunteers will act out the excerpted scene.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  • How can we effectively interpret a scene (an excerpt from Act 4, Scene 1) in As You Like It? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 15th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK EXAM (value=50% of the 3rd marking period): You need to have all notes since November 9th (scroll down). You may use your notes for the exam. You will need a #2 pencil (it will be a multiple-choice question exam). MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ALL THE NOTES AND HANDOUTS BELOW. Review the following: epilogue for Romeo and Juliet, handout on the list of characters in Othello, predictive questions and answers for Othello, film viewing questions and answers for Othello, epilogue for Othello, handout for the list of characters in Hamlet, predictive questions and answers for Hamlet, predictive scene for Hamlet, components of the grading rubric for scene performances, famous the interpretation of "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy from Hamlet, film questions and answers for Hamlet, epilogue for Hamlet, interpretation of the famous "All the World's a Stage" speech from As You Like It, predictive scene based on the list of characters in As You Like It, and Act 4, Scene 1 excerpt from As You Like It.
  • Monday, January 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read your neighbor's predictive scene for As You Like It based on the As You Like It Character List. What are your impressions? How would you compare/contrast your predictive scene with your neighbor's predictive scene?

    SHOW HW: Show your predictive scene for As You Like It.

    2. Discuss/Share/Present: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share their impressions from the Do Now with the class. Volunteers present their predictive scenes.

    3. Reflections: What do you predict will happen in As You Like It? What are your first impressions of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we effectively predict a scene in As You Like It? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 15th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK EXAM (value=50% of the 3rd marking period): You need to have all notes since November 9th (scroll down). You may use your notes for the exam. You will need a #2 pencil (it will be a multiple-choice question exam). MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ALL THE NOTES AND HANDOUTS BELOW. Review the following: epilogue for Romeo and Juliet, handout on the list of characters in Othello, predictive questions and answers for Othello, film viewing questions and answers for Othello, epilogue for Othello, handout for the list of characters in Hamlet, predictive questions and answers for Hamlet, predictive scene for Hamlet, components of the grading rubric for scene performances, famous the interpretation of "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy from Hamlet, film questions and answers for Hamlet, epilogue for Hamlet, interpretation of the famous "All the World's a Stage" speech from As You Like It, predictive scene based on the list of characters in As You Like It, and Act 4, Scene 1 excerpt from As You Like It.
  • Friday, January 8th, 2016: Work Period: Create a predictive scene for As You Like It based on the As You Like It Character List. Follow the format of the epilogue.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we effectively predict a scene in As You Like It? DUE THIS MONDAY, JANUARY 11th:
  • Turn in the predictive scene for As You Like It based on the As You Like It Character List. Follow the format of the epilogue.
  • Thursday, January 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read the As You Like It Character List.

    2. Read-Aloud: Read aloud and discuss the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Create a predictive scene for As You Like It based on the As You Like It Character List. Follow the format of the epilogue.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we effectively predict a scene in As You Like It? Make up any owed HW.
    Wednesday, January 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What can you understand about the famous speech "All the World's a Stage" from As You Like It?

    2. Read-Aloud: Read aloud and share students' interpretations from the Do Now.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss/Interpret the famous speech "All the World's a Stage" from As You Like It. Take notes. Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we effectively understand and interpret the famous monologue "All the World's a Stage" from As You Like It? Make up any owed HW.
    Tuesday, January 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What can you predict about the play As You Like It--Shakespeare's comedy?

    SHOW HW: EPILOGUE for HAMLET

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the Do Now answer with your neighbor and with the whole class.

    3. Work Period: Interpret the famous speech "All the World's a Stage" from As You Like It.

    4. Discuss/Review the work famous speech "All the World's a Stage" from As You Like It. Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we effectively understand a famous monologue from As You Like It? Make up any owed HW.
    Monday, January 4th, 2016: Work Period: EPILOGUE FOR HAMLET: Create an epilogue (with stage directions) that is the scene after HAMLET has ended. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language. You should include some of the major characters: Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Laertes, and Horatio. Common Core Standards:
  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we effectively compose the epilogue for Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:
    EPILOGUE FOR HAMLET: Create an epilogue (with stage directions) that is the scene after HAMLET has ended. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language. You should include some of the major characters: Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Laertes, and Horatio.
    Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: 1-8-1 Freeze activity: Have 1st person go on stage and act based on HAMLET. Then, someone raises their hand and goes on stage and changes the scene and the 1st person reacts to the new scene. They keep going until 8 people are onstage. Then, each person leaves slowly, going back to their scene until the stage is back to 1 person. REPEAT with new people. Other freeze activities include the following: ROMEO AND JULIET, OTHELLO and their own choice (RELATIONSHIPS?).

    2. Work Period: Status Game: Each student will be given a number, which assigns them a status in a Shakespearean society. When we go around the circle, each student will introduce himself/herself and say, "Hello, my name is..." As they step forward, they will use their body and voice to communicate their status (not their words). At the end of the game, students will determine what each person's status is and why. Why is this activity important? How can it translate to acting onstage?

    3. Reflections: What can you predict will happen after the play, Hamlet? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we effectively engage in drama games? DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th (after the break!):
    EPILOGUE FOR HAMLET: Create an epilogue (with stage directions) that is the scene after HAMLET has ended. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language. You should include some of the major characters: Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Laertes, and Horatio.
    Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Film viewing of Hamlet.

    4. Reflections: What can you predict will happen next in the film? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we analyze the film version of Hamlet? DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th (after the break!):
    EPILOGUE FOR HAMLET: Create an epilogue (with stage directions) that is the scene after HAMLET has ended. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language. You should include some of the major characters: Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Laertes, and Horatio.
    Monday, December 21st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Film viewing of Hamlet.

    4. Reflections: What can you predict will happen next in the film? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we analyze the film version of Hamlet? N/A
    Friday, December 18th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Film viewing of Hamlet.

    4. Reflections: What can you predict will happen next in the film? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we analyze the film version of Hamlet? N/A
    Thursday, December 17th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Film viewing of Hamlet.

    4. Reflections: What can you predict will happen next in the film? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we analyze the film version of Hamlet? N/A
    Wednesday, December 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Review the film analysis questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Film viewing of Hamlet.

    4. Reflections: What can you predict will happen next in the film? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we analyze the film version of Hamlet? N/A
    Tuesday, December 15th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Introduce the film review questions: Answer the following questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Work Period: Film viewing of Hamlet.

    4. Reflections: What can you predict will happen next in the film? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How can we analyze the film version of Hamlet? N/A
    Monday, December 14th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read Hamlet's famous soliloquy: "To Be or Not to Be" (Act III, Scene I). Why do you believe this soliloquy is so famous?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the do now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Interpret each line of Hamlet's famous soliloquy: "To Be or Not to Be" (Act III, Scene I). Take notes.

    4. Reflections: What can you predict Hamlet's soliloquy affecting the rest of the play's plot? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we effectively interpret the famous soliloquy "To Be or Not to Be" from Hamlet? N/A
    Friday, December 11th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read Hamlet's famous soliloquy: "To Be or Not to Be" (Act III, Scene I). What do you understand about its meaning? How does this soliloquy connect to events and characters that you are already familiar with in the play?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the do now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Interpret each line of Hamlet's famous soliloquy: "To Be or Not to Be" (Act III, Scene I). Take notes.

    4. Reflections: Why do you believe this soliloquy is so famous? Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we effectively interpret the famous soliloquy "To Be or Not to Be" from Hamlet? N/A
    Thursday, December 10th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Presentation of Hamlet scenes for students with last names beginning with N-Z. Students will show that they incorporated acting techniques while presenting their scenes in small groups or monologues. Acting Techniques that will be presented include the following: movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Students will be graded on the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scene.

    2. Reflections: What went well today in your practice? If we had more time to practice, what would you improve?

    3. Presentation Practice: Students who are presenting tomorrow will continue their practice. Common Core Standards:

  • Sl.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively present predictive scenes in Hamlet? N/A
    Wednesday, December 9th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Presentation of Hamlet scenes for students with last names beginning with A-M. (Tomorrow, Thursday (12/10), students with last names beginning with N-W will present their scenes). Students will show that they incorporated acting techniques while presenting their scenes in small groups or monologues. Acting Techniques that will be presented include the following: movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Students will be graded on the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scene.

    2. Reflections: What went well today in your practice? If we had more time to practice, what would you improve?

    3. Presentation Practice: Students who are presenting tomorrow will continue their practice. Common Core Standards:

  • Sl.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively present predictive scenes in Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW THURSDAY (12/10):
  • PRESENTATION OF HAMLET PREDICTIVE SCENES: Present your Hamlet scene (written by you or a classmate): Students with last names beginning with N-W). Students will be graded on incorporating acting techniques while reading aloud their scenes in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Here's the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scene. This presentation will be 25% of the 3rd marking period grade.
  • Tuesday, December 8th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Prepare for your presentation of your Hamlet scene THIS week (assigned dates are the following: TOMORROW, Wednesday (12/9)-Students with last names beginning with A-M, Thursday (12/10)-Students with last names beginning with N-W). Students will work on incorporating acting techniques while reading aloud their scenes in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction.

    2. Reflections: What went well today in your practice? What do you need to work on for tomorrow's presentation? Common Core Standards:

  • Sl.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively present predictive scenes in Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY (12/9) AND THURSDAY (12/10):
  • PRESENTATION OF HAMLET PREDICTIVE SCENES: Present your Hamlet scene (written by you or a classmate): Wednesday (12/9)-Students with last names beginning with A-M, Thursday (12/10)-Students with last names beginning with N-W). Students will be graded on incorporating acting techniques while reading aloud their scenes in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Here's the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scene. This presentation will be 25% of the 3rd marking period grade.
  • Monday, December 7th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Review Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scene.

    2. Work Period: Prepare for your presentation of your Hamlet scene THIS week (assigned dates are the following: Wednesday (12/9)-Students with last names beginning with A-M, Thursday (12/10)-Students with last names beginning with N-W). Students will work on incorporating acting techniques while reading aloud their scenes in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction.

    Show HW: Show owed HW.

    3. Reflections: What went well today in your practice? What do you need to work on the rest of this week? Common Core Standards:

  • Sl.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively present predictive scenes in Hamlet? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY (12/9) AND THURSDAY (12/10):
  • PRESENTATION OF HAMLET PREDICTIVE SCENES: Present your Hamlet scene (written by you or a classmate) next week (assigned dates are the following: Wednesday (12/9)-Students with last names beginning with A-M, Thursday (12/10)-Students with last names beginning with N-W). Students will be graded on incorporating acting techniques while reading aloud their scenes in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Here's the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scene. This presentation will be 25% of the 3rd marking period grade.
  • Friday, December 4th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Introduce Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scene.

    2. Work Period: Prepare for your presentation of your Hamlet scene next week (assigned dates are the following: Wednesday (12/9)-Students with last names beginning with A-M, Thursday (12/10)-Students with last names beginning with N-W). Students will work on incorporating acting techniques while reading aloud their scenes in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction.

    Show HW: Show your predictive scene from Hamlet.

    3. Reflections: What went well today in your practice? What do you need to work on next week? Common Core Standards:

  • Sl.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively present predictive scenes in Hamlet? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY (12/9) AND THURSDAY (12/10):
  • PRESENTATION OF HAMLET PREDICTIVE SCENES: Present your Hamlet scene (written by you or a classmate) next week (assigned dates are the following: Wednesday (12/9)-Students with last names beginning with A-M, Thursday (12/10)-Students with last names beginning with N-W). Students will be graded on incorporating acting techniques while reading aloud their scenes in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Here's the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scene. This presentation will be 25% of the 3rd marking period grade.
  • Thursday, December 3rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Introduce HW.

    2. Work Period: Begin HW: Create a one-page predictive scene from Hamlet, based on the List of Hamlet Characters. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language. Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively predict scenes in Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
    Create a one-page predictive scene from Hamlet, based on the List of Hamlet Characters. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or one typed page-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language. You must create your scene based on the list of characters above. You will present this scene next week for a grade! You may present with classmates.
    Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: What were challenging predictive questions? What were easy predictive questions?

    Show HW: Predictive Questions for Hamlet.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Discuss the Do Now questions with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Discuss the predictive questions, which are based on the List of Hamlet Characters:
    1.) What is the relationship between Hamlet and Claudius?
    2.) Who provokes Hamlet's downfall?
    3.) Is more than one story being told? If so, explain.
    4.) What conflicts will exist and between whom?
    5.) What is the relationship between Hamlet and Gertrude? Compare/Contrast these two women.
    6.) Where does the play take place?
    7.) Which characters (choose among Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Horatio and Ophelia) are static? Define static.
    8.) Compare and contrast the female characters: Gertrude and Ophelia.
    9.) Predict what will happen to Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Horatio and Ophelia at the resolution (very end) of the play.
    10.) What is one theme (author's message) in this play?
    11.) What literary techniques do you predict will be used in this play? How do you believe these techniques will be used? Suggestions: foreshadowing, symbolism, and imagery,.
    12.) Do the situations and characters seem believable? Explain.

    4. Work Period: Begin HW: Create a one-page predictive scene from Hamlet, based on the List of Hamlet Characters. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language. Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively predict scenes in Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
    Create a one-page predictive scene from Hamlet, based on the List of Hamlet Characters. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or one typed page-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language. You must create your scene based on the list of characters above. You will present this scene next week for a grade! You may present with classmates.
    Tuesday, December 1st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read the List of Hamlet Characters. What can you predict about the events of the plot in Hamlet?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Based on the List of Hamlet Characters, answer the following predictive questions:
    1.) What is the relationship between Hamlet and Claudius?
    2.) Who provokes Hamlet's downfall?
    3.) Is more than one story being told? If so, explain.
    4.) What conflicts will exist and between whom?
    5.) What is the relationship between Hamlet and Gertrude? Compare/Contrast these two women.
    6.) Where does the play take place?
    7.) Which characters (choose among Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Horatio and Ophelia) are static? Define static.
    8.) Compare and contrast the female characters: Gertrude and Ophelia.
    9.) Predict what will happen to Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Horatio and Ophelia at the resolution (very end) of the play.
    10.) What is one theme (author's message) in this play?
    11.) What literary techniques do you predict will be used in this play? How do you believe these techniques will be used? Suggestions: foreshadowing, symbolism, and imagery,.
    12.) Do the situations and characters seem believable? Explain. Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively predict the synopsis and literary techniques in Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
    Finish the classwork: Based on the List of Hamlet Characters, answer the following predictive questions:
    1.) What is the relationship between Hamlet and Claudius?
    2.) Who provokes Hamlet's downfall?
    3.) Is more than one story being told? If so, explain.
    4.) What conflicts will exist and between whom?
    5.) What is the relationship between Hamlet and Gertrude? Compare/Contrast these two women.
    6.) Where does the play take place?
    7.) Which characters (choose among Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Horatio and Ophelia) are static? Define static.
    8.) Compare and contrast the female characters: Gertrude and Ophelia.
    9.) Predict what will happen to Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Horatio and Ophelia at the resolution (very end) of the play.
    10.) What is one theme (author's message) in this play?
    11.) What literary techniques do you predict will be used in this play? How do you believe these techniques will be used? Suggestions: foreshadowing, symbolism, and imagery,.
    12.) Do the situations and characters seem believable? Explain.
    Monday, November 30th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Research the play, Hamlet. Why is this play one of the most famous plays throughout history and time?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the List of Hamlet Characters. What can you predict about the events of the plot in Hamlet?

    4. Discuss/Share: Share your work period answers.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively predict the synopsis of Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments).
    Wednesday, November 25th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Compare/Contrast your epilogue for Othello with a neighbor's epilogue. What are the comparisons (similarities) and contrasts (differences)?

    Show HW: Show the epilogues for Othello.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Gallery Walk: Walk around the classroom, reading at least three students' epilogues. Using post-it notes, write comments on their strengths and areas needing improvement. Refer to the following checklist:
    1.) How did the writer grab your attention at the beginning of the prologue?
    2.) What was evidence of the following stage directions: characters' actions and physical interactions?
    3.) What was evidence of the following stage directions: costumes, props and set design?
    4.) How did the epilogue connect to the end of Othello?
    5.) What was the evidence of Shakespearean language?

    4. Discuss/Share: Reflect on your impressions. What are your classmates' strengths? What are your classmates' challenges (or areas needing improvement)?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively evaluate our classmates' epilogues for Othello? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments).
    Tuesday, November 24th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Work on writing the EPILOGUE FOR OTHELLO: Create an epilogue (with stage directions) that is the scene after Othello has ended. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language.

    2. Reflections: How is the writing process going thus far? What do you need to improve and how are you successful in your writing?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively compose an epilogue for Othello? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25th:
  • EPILOGUE FOR OTHELLO: Create an epilogue (with stage directions) that is the scene after Othello has ended. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). EXTRA CREDIT: WRITE TWO PAGES! EARN A FREE HOMEWORK! Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language (thou=you, thee=you, thy=your, art=are).
  • Monday, November 23rd, 2015: 1. Work Period: Film Viewing of Othello. Answer the following questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Reflections: Which dramatic arts choices are most prominent in the film? What can you predict will occur after Othello?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively analyze dramatic arts choices in Othello? DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25th:
  • EPILOGUE FOR OTHELLO: Create an epilogue (with stage directions) that is the scene after Othello has ended. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language.
  • Friday, November 20th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Film Viewing of Othello. Answer the following questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Reflections: Which dramatic arts choices are most prominent in the film thus far? What can you predict will occur in Othello on Monday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively analyze dramatic arts choices in Othello? N/A
    Thursday, November 19th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Film Viewing of Othello. Answer the following questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Reflections: Which dramatic arts choices are most prominent in the film thus far? What can you predict will occur in Othello tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively analyze dramatic arts choices in Othello? N/A
    Wednesday, November 18th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Film Viewing of Othello. Answer the following questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Reflections: Which dramatic arts choices are most prominent in the film thus far? What can you predict will occur in Othello tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively analyze dramatic arts choices in Othello? N/A
    Tuesday, November 17th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Film Viewing of Othello. Answer the following questions:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Show yesterday's classwork/homework (predictive questions about Othello).

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively analyze dramatic arts choices in Othello? N/A
    Monday, November 16th, 2015: Work Period: Based on the List of Characters in Othello, answer the following predictive questions:
    1.) What happens in the play?
    2.) Does the story go straight ahead in time or are there flashbacks?
    3.) Is more than one story being told?
    4.) What conflicts can you find?
    5.) What is the climax or turning point of the play?
    6.) Where and when does the play take place?
    7.) Does the story shift from one setting to another?
    8.) Is the setting important to the story?
    9.) Is time a vital factor in the story?
    10.) Does the play have a theme or underlying idea? If so, what is it?
    11.) Does the author use such devices as foreshadowing and symbols?
    12.) Do the situations and characters seem believable?
    13.) Does the author depend upon coincidence or are the events developed logically and inevitably?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively predict elements of the plot and literary techniques in Othello? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:
  • Finish today's classwork: Based on the List of Characters in Othello, answer the following predictive questions:
    1.) What happens in the play?
    2.) Does the story go straight ahead in time or are there flashbacks?
    3.) Is more than one story being told?
    4.) What conflicts can you find?
    5.) What is the climax or turning point of the play?
    6.) Where and when does the play take place?
    7.) Does the story shift from one setting to another?
    8.) Is the setting important to the story?
    9.) Is time a vital factor in the story?
    10.) Does the play have a theme or underlying idea? If so, what is it?
    11.) Does the author use such devices as foreshadowing and symbols?
    12.) Do the situations and characters seem believable?
    13.) Does the author depend upon coincidence or are the events developed logically and inevitably?
  • Friday, November 13th, 2015: 1. Do Now: EXTRA CREDIT PRESENTATIONS of the epilogue for Romeo and Juliet.

    2. Work Period: Based on the List of Characters in Othello, answer the following predictive questions:
    1.) What happens in the play?
    2.) Does the story go straight ahead in time or are there flashbacks?
    3.) Is more than one story being told?
    4.) What conflicts can you find?
    5.) What is the climax or turning point of the play?
    6.) Where and when does the play take place?
    7.) Does the story shift from one setting to another?
    8.) Is the setting important to the story?
    9.) Is time a vital factor in the story?
    10.) Does the play have a theme or underlying idea? If so, what is it?
    11.) Does the author use such devices as foreshadowing and symbols?
    12.) Do the situations and characters seem believable?
    13.) Does the author depend upon coincidence or are the events developed logically and inevitably?

    3. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the work period with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively predict elements of the plot and literary techniques in Othello? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • Finish today's classwork: Based on the List of Characters in Othello, answer the following predictive questions:
    1.) What happens in the play?
    2.) Does the story go straight ahead in time or are there flashbacks?
    3.) Is more than one story being told?
    4.) What conflicts can you find?
    5.) What is the climax or turning point of the play?
    6.) Where and when does the play take place?
    7.) Does the story shift from one setting to another?
    8.) Is the setting important to the story?
    9.) Is time a vital factor in the story?
    10.) Does the play have a theme or underlying idea? If so, what is it?
    11.) Does the author use such devices as foreshadowing and symbols?
    12.) Do the situations and characters seem believable?
    13.) Does the author depend upon coincidence or are the events developed logically and inevitably?
  • Thursday, November 12th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Compare/Contrast your epilogue for Romeo and Juliet with a neighbor's epilogue. What are the comparisons (similarities) and contrasts (differences)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Gallery Walk: Walk around the classroom, reading at least three students' epilogues. Using post-it notes, write comments on their strengths and areas needing improvement. Refer to the following checklist:
    1.) Were there stage directions?
    2.) Did the stage directions include characters' actions and physical interactions?
    3.) Did the stage directions include costumes, props and set design?
    4.) Did the epilogue connect to the end of Romeo and Juliet?
    5.) Was there evidence of Shakespearean language?

    4. Discuss/Share: Reflect on your impressions. What are your classmates' strengths? What are your classmates' challenges/areas needing improvement?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively write and evaluate a scene with stage directions as an epilogue for Romeo and Juliet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
  • For extra credit (up to 5 extra points on your final grade), present your Romeo and Juliet epilogues to the class.
  • Tuesday, November 10th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Describe the process of composing an epilogue for Romeo and Juliet. What were your strengths? What were your challenges?

    Show HW: Show your epilogue for Romeo and Juliet.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period for Presentation of Epilogues: With your neighbors, work on presenting your epilogues. Act out your stage directions.

    4. Discuss/Share: Reflect on your presentation practice. What are your strengths? What are the challenges?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively present a scene with stage directions as an epilogue for Romeo and Juliet? DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
  • For extra credit (up to 5 extra points on your final grade), present your Romeo and Juliet epilogues to the class.
  • Monday, November 9th, 2015: 1. Work Period: Finish creating a scene (with stage directions) that's post-Romeo and Juliet. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page. Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share excerpts from your post-Romeo and Juliet scene.

    3. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's film viewing. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively write a scene with stage directions as an epilogue for Romeo and Juliet? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:
  • POST-ROMEO AND JULIET SCENE: Create a scene (with stage directions) that's post-Romeo and Juliet. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page (or typed-12 point font, with a heading that includes your name, the teacher's name, the date, Dramatic Arts, Period 4). Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language.
  • Friday, November 6th, 2015: 1. Do Now: OPEN NOTEBOOK EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period)

    2. Work Period: Create a scene (with stage directions) that's post-Romeo and Juliet. Your scene should connect to the film/play. Your scene should be one, handwritten page. Your stage directions should include costumes, set design, props, physical interactions, and sound effects. You should add Shakespearean language.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share excerpts from your post-Romeo and Juliet scene.

    4. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's film viewing. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively take an exam on our note-taking skills? NO HOMEWORK!
    Thursday, November 5th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Film Viewing of Romeo and Juliet:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    2. Discuss/Share: Review the Film Viewing Questions and Answers. Take notes.

    3. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's film viewing. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively review the film of Romeo and Juliet? DATE CHANGE: DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK TEST (use your class notes)--25% of the 2nd marking period. You should have all notes (including handouts, like the film review questions) since October 1st!!
  • Wednesday, November 4th, 2015: Film Viewing of Romeo and Juliet:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's film viewing. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Wednesday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How do we effectively review the film of Romeo and Juliet? DATE CHANGE: DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK TEST (use your class notes)--25% of the 2nd marking period. You should have all notes (including handouts, like the film review questions) since October 1st!!
  • Monday, November 2nd, 2015: Film Viewing of Romeo and Juliet:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's film viewing. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Wednesday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.0-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively review the film of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS COMING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK TEST (use your class notes)--25% of the 2nd marking period. You should have all notes (including handouts, like the film review questions) since October 1st!!
  • Friday, October 30th, 2015: Film Viewing of Romeo and Juliet:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's film viewing. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Monday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.0-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively review the film of Romeo and Juliet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK TEST (use your class notes)--25% of the 2nd marking period. You should have all notes (including handouts, like the film review questions) since October 1st!!
  • Thursday, October 29th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Finish filling out the grading sheet on Romeo's monologue from the film version of Romeo and Juliet.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your answers with the class. Take notes.

    3.Film Viewing of an Excerpt from Romeo and Juliet:
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of music in the movie. Does the music enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? How would you have used music in this movie?
    6. Analyze the use of sound other than music in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds, other than music, would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    7. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?

    4. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's film viewing. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.0-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively review the film of Romeo and Juliet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
  • OPEN NOTEBOOK TEST (use your class notes)--25% of the 2nd marking period. You should have all notes since October 1st!!
  • Wednesday, October 28th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Re-Read Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2.

    2.Film Viewing of an Excerpt from Romeo and Juliet:

  • Use the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene to grade the actor's performance. Write in the comments to evaluate the actor's strengths.
  • Students will write in stage directions, using the Sample Play with Stage Directions.

    3. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's performances. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.0-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively analyze acting techniques and write in stage directions for Romeo's monologue from Act 2, Scene 2? N/A
    Tuesday, October 27th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Performance reminders. Refer to the Grading Rubric and Sample Play with stage directions to guide you.

    2.Presentations of Act I, Scene 3:

  • Students will bring stage directions to life (use the Sample Play with Stage Directions as a guide).
  • Students will reveal their acting techniques while reading aloud Act I, Scene 3 to the whole class. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Use the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene to guide your performance.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's performances. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.0-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively present our performances of Act I, Scene 3 of Othello? N/A
    Monday, October 26th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Performance reminders. Refer to the Grading Rubric and Sample Play with stage directions to guide you.

    2.Presentations of Act I, Scene 3:

  • Students will bring stage directions to life (use the Sample Play with Stage Directions as a guide).
  • Students will reveal their acting techniques while reading aloud Act I, Scene 3 to the whole class. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Use the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene to guide your performance.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's performances. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.0-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How do we effectively present our performances of Act I, Scene 3 of Othello?

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY (10/27): REMAINING PRESENTATIONS (depending on the day you've signed up). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period. Each student will be graded on the following rubric: Grading Sheet for Othello Scene.

    Friday, October 23rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are your costumes and props for your performance of Act I, Scene 3 of Othello? Refer to the Grading Rubric and Sample Play with stage directions to guide you.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your acting group. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Practice Presentation Work Period of Act I, Scene 3:

  • Students will add stage directions (use the Sample Play with Stage Directions as a guide.
  • Students will work on improving acting techniques while reading aloud Act I, Scene 3 in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Use the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene to guide your practice.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we effectively prepare our performances of Act I, Scene 3 of Othello?

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY (10/26) AND TUESDAY (10/27): PRESENTATION OF ACT I, SCENE 3 WILL BE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th AND TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27th (depending on the day you've signed up). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period. Each student will be graded on the following rubric: Grading Sheet for Othello Scene.

    Thursday, October 22nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are your strengths and areas needing improvement in your performance of Act I, Scene 3 of Othello? Refer to the Grading Rubric and Sample Play with stage directions to guide you.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your acting group. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Practice Presentation Work Period of Act I, Scene 3:

  • Students will add stage directions (use the Sample Play with Stage Directions as a guide.
  • Students will work on improving acting techniques while reading aloud Act I, Scene 3 in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Use the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene to guide your practice.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we effectively prepare our performances of Act I, Scene 3 of Othello?

    DUE NEXT MONDAY (10/26) AND TUESDAY (10/27): PRESENTATION OF ACT I, SCENE 3 WILL BE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th AND TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27th (depending on the day you've signed up). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period. Each student will be graded on the following rubric: Grading Sheet for Othello Scene.

    Wednesday, October 21st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Add more stage directions in Act I, Scene 3 of Othello, using your Sample Play with Stage Directions as a guide. Stage directions include the following: non-verbal sounds, actions, set design, props, and characters' entrances and exits.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your acting group. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Practice Presentation Work Period of Act I, Scene 3:

  • Students will add stage directions (use the Sample Play with Stage Directions as a guide.
  • Students will work on improving acting techniques while reading aloud Act I, Scene 3 in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Use the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene to guide your practice.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we effectively add stage directions in Act I, Scene 3 of Othello? No Homework!

    LOOKING AHEAD: PRESENTATION OF ACT I, SCENE 3 WILL BE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th AND TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27th (depending on the day you've signed up). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period. Each student will be graded on the following rubric: Grading Sheet for Othello Scene.

    Tuesday, October 20th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Highlight the stage directions in pages 10-13 in this Sample Play with Stage Directions.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Practice Presentation Work Period of Act I, Scene 3:

  • Students will add stage directions (use the Sample Play with Stage Directions as a guide.
  • Students will work on improving acting techniques while reading aloud Act I, Scene 3 in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Use the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene to guide your practice.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we effectively add stage directions in Act I, Scene 3 of Othello? No Homework!

    LOOKING AHEAD: PRESENTATION OF ACT I, SCENE 3 WILL BE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th AND TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27th. This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period. Each student will be graded on the following rubric: Grading Sheet for Othello Scene.

    Monday, October 19th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are your strengths and areas needing improvement in acting technqiues? Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Introduce the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene.

    4. Practice Presentation of Act I, Scene 3: Students will work on improving acting techniques while reading aloud Act I, Scene 3 in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction. Use the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene to guide your practice.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we develop our strengths in performance of Act I, Scene 3 of Othello? No Homework!

    LOOKING AHEAD: PRESENTATION OF ACT I, SCENE 3 WILL BE THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 26th!

    Friday, October 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are your favorites of the following: TV show, movie, video game, and genre of literature?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class. The Do Now will help students narrow their focus for the director's vision of Act I, Scene 3. Director's vision ideas include the following: puppet show, robots, fantasy fiction/superheroes and villains, etc.

    3. Work Period: Introduce the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene.

    4. Practice Presentation of Act I, Scene 3: Students will work on improving acting techniques while reading aloud Act I, Scene 3 in their small groups. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we interpret the relationship between Brabantio and Desdemona in Act I, Scene 3 of Othello? No Homework!

    LOOKING AHEAD: PRESENTATION OF ACT I, SCENE 3 WILL BE THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 26th!

    Thursday, October 15th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Why do people ask for their parents' blessings before getting married?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the scene from Act I, Scene 3 between Brabantio and Desdemona.

    4. Volunteer Presentation of Act I, Scene 3: Volunteer students present Act I, Scene 3. They will work on improving acting techniques while student audience evaluates them. Acting Techniques will include movement, emotion, eye contact, energy, projection, levels and physical interaction.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we interpret the relationship between Brabantio and Desdemona in Act I, Scene 3 of Othello? No Homework!
    Tuesday, October 13th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Was Romeo's monologue (from Act 2, Scene 2) realistic for 2015?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:
    A.) Do you believe in love at first sight? Why or why not?
    B.) What do you think the difference is between love and lust? Where does “love at first sight” usually fit into this question?
    C.) Would you defy your parents to marry someone you love? Why or why not?
    D.) Can people fall in love in less than a day? Explain your answer.
    E.) Describe your ideal mate. What qualities would you be looking for when choosing a partner?

    4. Discuss/Share: Share your Work Period answers.

    5. Acting Exercises: In any relationship, there has to be team work. We're going to create a sound machine in small teams of 6 people. In each circle of 6, students will make a sound, one at a time, and then create a human sound machine.

    6. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we reflect on the interpretation of Romeo's monologue? No Homework!
    Friday, October 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: How would you grade your project presentation? Explain your reasoning (based on the rubric.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Project Presentations: Students will present their monologues and comic strips.

    4. Work Period: Classwork presented to be graded.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we present our oral/visual presentation of Romeo's monologue? No Homework!
    Thursday, October 8th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's Good Food/Bad Food Activity. Underline good words and circle bad words in Romeo's monologue.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Tableau: With a partner, create a tableau for your two assigned lines. Review line interpretations. Be ready to present to the class.

    4. Work Period: Work on tomorrow's HW project presentation.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we prepare for our oral/visual presentation of Romeo's monologue? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
  • CHOOSE ONE (50% of your 1st marking period grade):
    1.) Oral Presentation of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric. You should be memorized (or nearly memorized) when you present to the class.
    2.) Comic Strip of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric (see corrections made in class). You MUST create a minimum of 12 illustrations (scenes). You MUST write the lines from the monologue (make them captions) under each illustration. For example, you can write lines 1 and 2 under the first illustration. You may also add your own modern language as captions. On the grading rubric, landscape and props are the detailed imagery that you demonstrate the words' meanings.

  • ALL NOTES TAKEN IN CLASS (since Wednesday, September 30th): We will have five days of notes (each day will be worth 10% of class participation for the 1st marking period)--9/30, 10/1, 10/2, 10/7 and 10/8. The notes include the Do Nows and Aims, the K/W/L, the interpretation of Romeo's monologue, and the notes taken last week and this week.
  • Wednesday, October 7th, 2015: 1. Do Now: How's your composition/practice of the oral presentation or comic strip of Romeo's monologue?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Review Homework requirements.

    4. Acting Activity: Introduce Good Food/Bad Food Activity. What's your favorite food? What's your worst food? Circle good food (good) words and bad food (bad) words in Romeo's monologue.

    5. Group Practice: In small groups, work on your homework presentation.

    6. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we prepare for our oral/visual presentation of Romeo's monologue? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
  • CHOOSE ONE (50% of your 1st marking period grade):
    1.) Oral Presentation of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric. You should be memorized (or nearly memorized) when you present to the class.
    2.) Comic Strip of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric (see corrections made in class). You MUST create a minimum of 12 illustrations (scenes). You MUST write the lines from the monologue (make them captions) under each illustration. For example, you can write lines 1 and 2 under the first illustration. You may also add your own modern language as captions. On the grading rubric, landscape and props are the detailed imagery that you demonstrate the words' meanings.

  • ALL NOTES TAKEN IN CLASS (since Wednesday, September 30th): We will have five days of notes (each day will be worth 10% of class participation for the 1st marking period)--9/30, 10/1, 10/2, 10/7 and 10/8. The notes include the Do Nows and Aims, the K/W/L, the interpretation of Romeo's monologue, and the notes taken next week.
  • Monday (10/5)-Tuesday (10/6), 2015: Work Period: Work on the HOMEWORK--
  • CHOOSE ONE (50% of your 1st marking period grade):
    1.) Oral Presentation of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric. You should be memorized (or nearly memorized) when you present to the class.
    2.) Comic Strip of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric (see corrections made in class). You MUST create a minimum of 12 illustrations (scenes). You MUST write the lines from the monologue (make them captions) under each illustration. For example, you can write lines 1 and 2 under the first illustration. You may also add your own modern language as captions. On the grading rubric, landscape and props are the detailed imagery that you demonstrate the words' meanings.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we interpret Shakespeare's language in Romeo's monologue? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
  • CHOOSE ONE (50% of your 1st marking period grade):
    1.) Oral Presentation of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric. You should be memorized (or nearly memorized) when you present to the class.
    2.) Comic Strip of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric (see corrections made in class). You MUST create a minimum of 12 illustrations (scenes). You MUST write the lines from the monologue (make them captions) under each illustration. For example, you can write lines 1 and 2 under the first illustration. You may also add your own modern language as captions. On the grading rubric, landscape and props are the detailed imagery that you demonstrate the words' meanings.

  • ALL NOTES TAKEN IN CLASS (since Wednesday, September 30th): We will have five days of notes (each day will be worth 10% of class participation for the 1st marking period)--9/30, 10/1, 10/2, 10/7 and 10/8. The notes include the Do Nows and Aims, the K/W/L, the interpretation of Romeo's monologue, and the notes taken next week.
  • Friday, October 2nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. How can you tell this is written by Shakespeare? Refer to your notes on Shakespeare's background.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Interpret each line (in your own, modern-day words) of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet.

    4. Discuss/Share: Share your interpretations in the work period.

    5. Acting Activity: Introduce Good Food/Bad Food Activity. What's your favorite food? What's your worst food? Circle good food (good) words and bad food (bad) words in Romeo's monologue.

    6. Introduce HW.

    7. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • How do we interpret Shakespeare's language in Romeo's monologue? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
  • CHOOSE ONE (50% of your 1st marking period grade):
    1.) Oral Presentation of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric. You should be memorized (or nearly memorized) when you present to the class.
    2.) Comic Strip of Romeo's famous monologue from Act 2, Scene 2 in Romeo and Juliet. You will be graded by this Grading Rubric (see corrections made in class). You MUST create a minimum of 12 illustrations (scenes). You MUST write the lines from the monologue (make them captions) under each illustration. For example, you can write lines 1 and 2 under the first illustration. You may also add your own modern language as captions. On the grading rubric, landscape and props are the detailed imagery that you demonstrate the words' meanings.

  • ALL NOTES TAKEN IN CLASS (since Wednesday, September 30th): We will have five days of notes (each day will be worth 10% of class participation for the 1st marking period)--9/30, 10/1, 10/2, 10/7 and 10/8. The notes include the Do Nows and Aims, the K/W/L, the interpretation of Romeo's monologue, and the notes taken next week.
  • Thursday, October 1st, 2015: 1. Do Now: If your friend asks you about William Shakespeare, how would you describe him? Be concise (brief) in one sentence.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Finish introducing Shakespeare's background and Note-taking.

    4. Acting Activity: Introduce Tableaus (frozen image/picture). Students get in a whole-class circle. Then, pair up with a partner. Pairs create a tableau of WAR. Their tableaus must be physically touching. Then, levels are introduced (high, middle and low). Tableaus of war are created again, but this time with levels incorporated.

    5. Reflections: Thumbs up/sideways/down evaluation of today's activity. What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how an author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • How do we prepare to understand the requirements for Dramatic Arts? N/A
    Wednesday, September 30th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What do you know about William Shakespeare? Identify three facts.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Create a K/W/L chart and add what you've learned in the "L" column. Write three questions in the "W" column (What do you want to know?).

    4. Discuss/Share: Share your K/W/L chart with the class.

    5. Introduce Shakespeare's background. Student pairs will introduce facts from this handout and explain why these facts make Shakespeare a unique and famous playwright.

    5. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how an author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • How do we prepare to understand the requirements for Dramatic Arts? N/A