Freshman Assignments, Fall/Winter Semester, 2015-2016

Freshman Assignments
Fall/Winter Semester, 2015-2016

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Friday, January 25th, 2016: 1. Do Now: View the film version of Odyssey by Homer.

2. Discuss/Share:

  • Share your evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that develop his character as a hero.

    3. Reflections: Why is this epic poem "Odyssey" (by Homer) so popular and widely taught to high school students? What were your favorite scenes in the film version? How did Odysseus develop as a character throughout the film? What will you most remember this semester? What activities/lessons/texts did you most enjoy and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we characterize the development of a hero in the film version of the epic poem, Odyssey? GOOD LUCK ON REGENTS EXAMS! IT WAS A GREAT PLEASURE BEING YOUR TEACHER!
    Friday, January 22nd, 2016: Work Period:
  • Make a TOP TEN LIST of everything you learned in this class since September. Refer to the texts, which include the following: Seedfolks, short stories and articles from the textbook and close reader, independent reading novels, and the film on the epic poem, Odyssey. You may also refer to discussion groups, writing, vocabulary, and themes of study (common ground for the 1st and 2nd marking periods, journey and heroes for the 3rd marking period).
  • Make up owed homework (you must turn in all owed work before 3pm today!).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we reflect on the semester and assess lessons learned? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN OR E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BEFORE 3pm TODAY, FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd!
    Thursday, January 21st, 2016: 1. Do Now: View the film version of Odyssey by Homer.

    2. Work Period: Fill out the Character Maps for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that develop his character as a hero.

    4. Reflections: Why is this epic poem "Odyssey" (by Homer) so popular and widely taught to high school students? What were your favorite scenes in the film version? How did Odysseus develop as a character throughout the film?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we characterize the development of a hero in the film version of the epic poem, Odyssey? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN OR E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd (before 3pm).
    Wednesday, January 20th, 2016: 1. Do Now: How can you be a hero in someone's life?

    2. Share/Discuss: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: View the film version of Odyssey by Homer. Fill out the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero.

    SHOW HW: Show your well developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the CENTRAL IDEA OF HEROISM.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we characterize a hero in the film version of the epic poem, Odyssey? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN OR E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd (before 3pm).
    Tuesday, January 19th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are your strengths and areas needing improvement in composing a well-developed paragraph CENTRAL IDEA OF HEROISM?

    2. Share/Discuss: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: View the film version of Odyssey by Homer. Fill out the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero.

    SHOW HW: Show your well developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the CENTRAL IDEA OF HEROISM.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we characterize a hero in the film version of the epic poem, Odyssey? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Friday, January 15th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Introduce the instructions for today's writing assignment on a well-developed paragraph on heroism. Using the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.), write an evidence-based well developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the CENTRAL IDEA OF HEROISM. Begin with an attention grabber on heroism, and focus on evidence that reveals Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero.

    2. Work Period: Using the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.), write an evidence-based well developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the CENTRAL IDEA OF HEROISM. Begin with an attention grabber on heroism, and focus on evidence that reveals Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we characterize a hero in the film version of the epic poem, Odyssey? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Thursday, January 14th, 2016: 1. Do Now: View the film version of Odyssey by Homer.

    2. Work Period: Fill out the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we characterize a hero in the film version of the epic poem, Odyssey? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Wednesday, January 13th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's list of the TOP TEN qualities/actions/values/strengths/beliefs of a HERO. Add one piece of evidence for each quality/action/value/strength/belief. Write this in your LA section.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now answers with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Film Viewing: View Odyssey and fill out the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we characterize a hero in our own lives and in the film version of the epic poem, Odyssey? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Tuesday, January 12th, 2016: 1. FINAL EXAM (open book and open notes)

    You should use your notes for "The Journey" (poem on p. 442), "Gettysburg Address" (p. 27), and vocabulary (see last week's class notes). Value=about 10% of your 3rd marking period grade.

    2. Work Period: List the TOP TEN qualities/actions/values/strengths/beliefs of a HERO. Write this in your LA section.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • How can we be assessed on the final exam by employing strategies for success on multiple-choice questions? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Monday, January 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are strategies for success on multiple-choice questions?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share with the class. Take notes.

    3. Work Period: Review notes for tomorrow's Final Exam.

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBD
  • How can we prepare for our final exam by reviewing strategies for success on multiple-choice questions? FINAL EXAM=TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 12th:
  • It's open-book and open-notes (vocabulary and textbook stories). Make sure your notes are in order for "The Journey" (poem), "Gettysburg Address," and vocabulary (see last week's class notes). Value=about 10% of your 3rd marking period grade

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS:
    FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.

  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Friday, January 8th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the words from the Info Tech words of the week. You may use electronic devices and your own prior knowledge. Be ready to share. HERE ARE THE WORDS (so far; more coming soon): ACCURATE, OCCUR, COMPARE, COMPARISON, FUNCTION, CONSIDER, PROCESS, IDENTIFY, ISSUE, ROLE, INTERPRET, PERSPECTIVE, RESPOND, RESPONSE, STRATEGY, ACQUIRE, SIGNIFICANT, SIGNIFICANCE, PARTICIPATE, ARGUE, ARGUMENT, MAINTAIN, CONTRAST, SUMMARY, SUMMARIZE, PREDICT, PREDICTION, ORGANIZE, ORGANIZATION, DEFINE, CLARIFY, CLARIFICATION, DESCRIBE, DESCRIPTION, CRITICAL

    NEW WORDS: RELEVANT, INFER, VALID, SOLVE, PERSUADE, GENERALIZE, SELECT, FUNDAMENTAL, REQUIRE, IMPLY, JUSTIFY, FOCUS, OPINION, STATEMENT, ANALYZE, PRIMARY, EXPLAIN, INTEGRATE, REACTION, EVIDENCE, ELIMINATE, INTRODUCE, PATTERN, INCLUDE, SEQUENCE, ELABORATE, EXPAND

    2. Discuss/Share: Share definitions with the class. Take notes.

    3. Work Period: Create decorative posters for the words of the week. Include parts of speech, definitions, original sentences, and images.

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBD
  • How can we prepare for our midterm exam by reviewing words of the week? FINAL EXAM=TUESDAY, JANUARY 12th:
  • It's open-book and open-notes (vocabulary and textbook stories). Make sure your notes are in order for "The Journey" (poem), "Oklahoma Bombing," "Gettysburg Address," and vocabulary (see today's class).

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS:
    FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.

  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Thursday, January 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish defining your assigned words from the Info Tech words of the week. You may use electronic devices and your own prior knowledge. Be ready to share. HERE ARE THE WORDS (so far; more coming soon): ACCURATE, OCCUR, COMPARE, COMPARISON, FUNCTION, CONSIDER, PROCESS, IDENTIFY, ISSUE, ROLE, INTERPRET, PERSPECTIVE, RESPOND, RESPONSE, STRATEGY, ACQUIRE, SIGNIFICANT, SIGNIFICANCE, PARTICIPATE, ARGUE, ARGUMENT, MAINTAIN, CONTRAST, SUMMARY, SUMMARIZE, PREDICT, PREDICTION, ORGANIZE, ORGANIZATION, DEFINE, CLARIFY, CLARIFICATION, DESCRIBE, DESCRIPTION, CRITICAL

    NEW WORDS: RELEVANT, INFER, VALID, SOLVE, PERSUADE, GENERALIZE, SELECT, FUNDAMENTAL, REQUIRE, IMPLY, JUSTIFY, FOCUS, OPINION, STATEMENT, ANALYZE, PRIMARY, EXPLAIN, INTEGRATE, REACTION, EVIDENCE, ELIMINATE, INTRODUCE, PATTERN, INCLUDE, SEQUENCE, ELABORATE, EXPAND

    2. Discuss/Share: Share definitions with the class. Take notes.

    3. Work Period: Create decorative posters for the words of the week. Include parts of speech, definitions, original sentences, and images.

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBD
  • How can we prepare for our midterm exam by reviewing words of the week? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS:
    FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Wednesday, January 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish answering the questions on p. 444 in the textbook for "The Journey."

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and taken notes on the answers to the questions on p. 444 in the textbook for "The Journey."

    3. Work Period: Define the words of the week. You may use electronic devices and your own prior knowledge. Be ready to share. HERE ARE THE WORDS (so far; more coming soon): ACCURATE, OCCUR, COMPARE, COMPARISON, FUNCTION, CONSIDER, PROCESS, IDENTIFY, ISSUE, ROLE, INTERPRET, PERSPECTIVE, RESPOND, RESPONSE, STRATEGY, ACQUIRE, SIGNIFICANT, SIGNIFICANCE, PARTICIPATE, ARGUE, ARGUMENT, MAINTAIN, CONTRAST, SUMMARY, SUMMARIZE, PREDICT, PREDICTION, ORGANIZE, ORGANIZATION, DEFINE, CLARIFY, CLARIFICATION, DESCRIBE, DESCRIPTION, CRITICAL

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we analyze, interpret and make inferences about the poem "The Journey" by Mary Oliver? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS:
    FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Tuesday, January 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are some common poetic techniques that poets use? Refer to "The Journey" by Mary Oliver.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Share yesterday's annotations from "The Journey" by Mary Oliver. Share three annotation marks from the annotation bookmark guide. Explain the purpose/reason for the marks you chose.

    3. Work Period: Work on questions on p. 444 in the textbook for "The Journey."

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we analyze and annotate the poem "The Journey" by Mary Oliver? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS:
    FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Monday, January 4th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What career do you plan on pursuing? What does your family want you to pursue? How are your plans and your family's plans for you similar or different?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read "The Journey" by Mary Oliver. In the margins, use three annotation marks from the annotation bookmark guide. Explain the purpose/reason for the marks you chose.

    4. Discuss/Share: Review "The Journey" by Mary Oliver and share annotations.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we analyze and annotate the poem "The Journey" by Mary Oliver? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS:
    FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Compare/Contrast your personal life with your protagonist's life. Make a Venn Diagram or a T-Chart.

    SHOW HOMEWORK: 10 post-it notes and turn in the ESSAY on the central idea of journey in your novel.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    2. GIFT OF KINDNESS: Instructions will be shared. Gallery Walk.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we compare and contrast our novel to our personal lives? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS:
    FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015: 1. Work Period: Finish the following:
  • Finish reading your novel.
  • Work on 10 post-it notes HW.
  • Work on composing your essay (see the outline given). REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE
  • Compose FIVE DOK (see handout) questions for your novel. Include the answers. Label each question with the appropriate DOK level. (You will need this for Tuesday's classwork)
  • Choose FIVE favorite quotes from the novel to support the central idea of the journey. Introduce and interpret each quote (see the sample on the board).

    2. Reflections: What did you accomplish today? What do you need to accomplish tonight for homework?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we prepare to compose the essay on central idea of journey? DATE CHANGE: DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23rd:
  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Monday, December 21st, 2015: 1. Work Period: Finish the following:
  • Finish reading your novel.
  • Work on 10 post-it notes HW.
  • Work on composing your essay (see the outline given). REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE
  • Compose FIVE DOK (see handout) questions for your novel. Include the answers. Label each question with the appropriate DOK level. (You will need this for Tuesday's classwork)
  • Choose FIVE favorite quotes from the novel to support the central idea of the journey. Introduce and interpret each quote (see the sample on the board).

    2. Reflections: What did you accomplish today? What do you need to accomplish tonight for homework?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we prepare to compose the essay on central idea of journey? DATE CHANGE: DUE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23rd:
  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above (VALUE=3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS).
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Friday, December 18th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What's the first step that you take when beginning an essay? Explain your reasoning.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Introduce the MAJOR ESSAY for the 3rd marking period. See the Outline.

    3. Work Period: Finish the following:

  • Finish reading your novel.
  • Work on 10 post-it notes HW.
  • Work on composing your essay (see the outline given). REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE
  • Compose FIVE DOK (see handout) questions for your novel. Include the answers. Label each question with the appropriate DOK level. (You will need this for Tuesday's classwork)
  • Choose FIVE favorite quotes from the novel to support the central idea of the journey. Introduce and interpret each quote (see the sample on the board).

    4. Reflections: What did you accomplish today? What do you need to accomplish this weekend?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we prepare to compose the essay on central idea of journey? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:
  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above.
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Thursday, December 17th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are your strengths and shortcomings in writing essays? How can you improve those shortcomings?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Introduce the MAJOR ESSAY for the 3rd marking period. See the Outline.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, finish the following:

  • Compose FIVE DOK (see handout) questions for your novel. Include the answers. Label each question with the appropriate DOK level.
  • Choose FIVE favorite quotes from the novel to support the central idea of the journey. Introduce and interpret each quote (see the sample on the board).

    4. Reflections: What did you accomplish today? What can you predict will happen next in your novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • What are the expectations and requirements for the essay on central idea of journey? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:
  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY (2 TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED PAGES; 5 BODY PARAGRAPHS) WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. FOLLOW the OUTLINE. 25% of the 3rd marking period. TURN IT IN ON TIME! -10 POINTS EACH DAY LATE. You can e-mail the paper (if you don't have a printer or you turn it in over winter break) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above.
  • RETURN YOUR NOVEL.
  • Wednesday, December 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: If you were in your novel's protagonist's position, what would you do?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Introduce the MAJOR ESSAY for the 3rd marking period.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, finish the following:

  • Compose FIVE DOK (see handout) questions for your novel. Include the answers. Label each question with the appropriate DOK level.
  • Choose FIVE favorite quotes from the novel to support the central idea of the journey. Introduce and interpret each quote (see the sample on the board).

    34 Reflections: What did you accomplish today? What can you predict will happen next in your novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively practice composing DOK questions and interpret quotes that support the central idea of journey in our novels? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:
  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. 25% of the 3rd marking period.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above.
  • Tuesday, December 15th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are your impressions of your novel thus far?

    2. Work Period: In your LA section, do the following:

  • Compose FIVE DOK (see handout) questions for your novel. Include the answers.
  • Choose FIVE favorite quotes from the novel to support the central idea of the journey. Introduce and interpret each quote (see the sample on the board).

    Show HW: Show the FOUR post-it notes (you should have a total of TEN post-it notes).

    3. Reflections: What did you accomplish today? What can you predict will happen next in your novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively practice composing DOK questions and interpret quotes that support the central idea of journey in our novels? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:
  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY WILL BE DUE. REQUIREMENTS ARE HERE. 25% of the 3rd marking period.
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above.
  • Monday, December 14th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Arrange in groups of 3-4 students (according to your independent novels). Determine roles for your group:

    2. Introduce the LITERARY CIRCLE ROLES:

    1.) ARTIST: Your job is to create an illustration related to the reading. It can be a sketch, cartoon, diagram, flow chart, or other depiction. You can choose to illustrate a scene, an idea, a symbol, or a character. Consider how to use color in your illustration for effect. Write a reflection that explains your graphic, symbolic connections, or connections between images and the literature. Show your illustration to the group without any explanation. Ask each group member to respond, either by making a comment or asking a question. After everyone has responded, then you may explain your illustration and answer any questions that have not been answered.

    2.) DICTION DETECTIVE: Your job is to carefully examine the diction (word choice) in the assigned section. Search for words, phrases, and passages that are especially descriptive, powerful, funny, thought-provoking, surprising, or even confusing. During the discussion, you can read the words, phrases, or passages yourself; ask someone else to read them; or have people read them silently before sharing your thoughts on it.

    3.) BRIDGE BUILDER: Your job is to build bridges between the events of the book and other people, places, or events in school, the community, or your own life. Look for connections between the text, yourself, other texts, and the world. Also, make connections between what has happened before and what might happen as the narrative continues. Look for the characters’ internal and external conflicts and the ways that these conflicts influence their actions.

    4.) DISCUSSION LEADER: Your job is to develop a list of questions (see DOK STEMS) that you think your group should discuss about the assigned section. Encourage your group to consider many ideas. Help your group explore these important ideas and share their reactions. You will be in charge of leading the day’s discussion.

    2. Work Period: In your groups, decide on 10 pages that you want to discuss and enact the roles above. Fill out the REFLECTION SHEET and TURN IT IN AT THE END OF CLASS.

    3. Reflections: What went well in this first discussion group? What were challenges and goals for next discussion meeting?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively engage in literature circles? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:
    Read your independent novel (you should be at least halfway done with your novel; for Finding Miracles: up to p. 149; for Enrique's Journey: up to p. 116; for My Everest Story, up to p. 112). Compose FOUR (that makes your total at 10 post-it notes) more post-it notes (provided in class) that answer the following questions:
  • What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
  • Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?

    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY WILL BE DUE (Details to come! 25% of the 3rd marking period).
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above.
  • Friday, December 11th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Arrange in groups of 3-4 students (according to your independent novels). Determine roles for your group:

    2. Introduce the LITERARY CIRCLE ROLES:

    1.) ARTIST: Your job is to create an illustration related to the reading. It can be a sketch, cartoon, diagram, flow chart, or other depiction. You can choose to illustrate a scene, an idea, a symbol, or a character. Consider how to use color in your illustration for effect. Write a reflection that explains your graphic, symbolic connections, or connections between images and the literature. Show your illustration to the group without any explanation. Ask each group member to respond, either by making a comment or asking a question. After everyone has responded, then you may explain your illustration and answer any questions that have not been answered.

    2.) DICTION DETECTIVE: Your job is to carefully examine the diction (word choice) in the assigned section. Search for words, phrases, and passages that are especially descriptive, powerful, funny, thought-provoking, surprising, or even confusing. During the discussion, you can read the words, phrases, or passages yourself; ask someone else to read them; or have people read them silently before sharing your thoughts on it.

    3.) BRIDGE BUILDER: Your job is to build bridges between the events of the book and other people, places, or events in school, the community, or your own life. Look for connections between the text, yourself, other texts, and the world. Also, make connections between what has happened before and what might happen as the narrative continues. Look for the characters’ internal and external conflicts and the ways that these conflicts influence their actions.

    4.) DISCUSSION LEADER: Your job is to develop a list of questions (see DOK STEMS) that you think your group should discuss about the assigned section. Encourage your group to consider many ideas. Help your group explore these important ideas and share their reactions. You will be in charge of leading the day’s discussion.

    2. Work Period: In your groups, decide on 10 pages that you want to discuss and enact the roles above. Fill out the REFLECTION SHEET and turn it in at the end of the class. SHOW HW: Two more post-it notes on literary elements and the central idea of journey.

    3. Reflections: What went well in this first discussion group? What were challenges and goals for next discussion meeting?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively engage in literature circles? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:
    Read your independent novel (you should be at least halfway done with your novel; for Finding Miracles: up to p. 149; for Enrique's Journey: up to p. 116; for My Everest Story, up to p. 112). Compose FOUR (that makes your total at 10 post-it notes) more post-it notes (provided in class) that answer the following questions:
  • What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
  • Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?

    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY WILL BE DUE (Details to come! 25% of the 3rd marking period).
  • TURN IN 10 more post-it notes (total=20) for your novel that follow the requirements above.
  • Thursday, December 10th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Create a flyer/postcard for your independent novel. How can you market your novel? What would persuade people to read this novel?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    2. Work Period:

  • Begin HW.

    SHOW HW: Two more post-it notes on literary elements and the central idea of journey.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteers share the work period answers.

    4.Reflections: What do you predict will happen next in your novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively understand literary elements that develop the journey in an independent reading novel? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
    Read 10 more pages in your independent novel (you should be at least 50 pages into your novel). Compose two more post-it notes (provided in class) that answer the following questions:
  • What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
  • Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?

    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY WILL BE DUE (Details to come! 25% of the 3rd marking period).
  • TURN IN 20 post-it notes for your novel that follow the requirements above.
  • Wednesday, December 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What was easy and what was challenging in last night's homework assignment? Explain your reasons.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    2. Work Period:

  • Begin HW.

    SHOW HW: Two post-it notes on literary elements and the central idea of journey.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteers share the work period answers.

    4.Reflections: What do you predict will happen next in your novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively understand literary elements that develop the journey in an independent reading novel? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10th:
    Read 10 more pages in your independent novel (you should be at least 40 pages into your novel). Compose two more post-its (provided in class) that answer the following questions:
  • What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
  • Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?

    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY WILL BE DUE (Details to come! 25% of the 3rd marking period).
  • Tuesday, December 8th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What literary elements are you most familiar with and why?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    2. Work Period:

  • In your LA section, define the following literary elements: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and author's tone.
  • Begin the HW.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteers share the work period answers.

    4.Reflections: What do you predict will happen next in your novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively understand literary elements that develop the journey in an independent reading novel? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9th:
    Read 10 more pages in your independent novel. Compose two post-its (provided in class) that answer the following questions:
  • What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
  • Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?

    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above.

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL. ESSAY WILL BE DUE (Details to come! 25% of the 3rd marking period).
  • Monday, December 7th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are your first impressions of your independent reading novel?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    2. Work Period: In your LS section, identify five unknown words (with page numbers) and define them.

    SHOW HW: Show the following questions in your LA section (TITLE: EXPOSITION (FIRST 20 PAGES) OF INDEPENDENT READING NOVEL) for the independent reading novel:
    1.) Where is the protagonist's journey going?
    2.) What are the motives for taking the journey?
    3.) What are the observations and experiences on the journey?
    4.) What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?
    5.) Who are the protagonist and other central character(s) introduced?
    6.) What is the setting?

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteers share the work period answers.

    4.Reflections: What do you predict will happen next in your novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively understand the exposition of a journey in an independent reading novel? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments).
    Friday, December 4th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Peer Assessment on the Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey: Did your peer do the following? Put a check for each one that they accomplished.
    1.) Write Two Pages (handwritten or typed, 12 point, times new roman font) ______
    2.) Appropriate Heading with the following: student's name, my name, Elements of Literacy, Period #, the date, the assignment--Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey, and an original title. _____
    3.) The following Questions Answered: Where is your journey going? What are the motives for taking the journey? What are the observations and experiences on the journey? What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?_____
    4.) Exposition (the introduction of the story): the protagonist and other central character(s) are introduced, the setting is provided, and the character introduces the journey. You may want to begin with a crisis/struggle that needs to be solved. The central characters reveal their desires to learn something from the journey they are about to begin. ______
    5.) Rising Action (second phase of the story): It includes a series of related events in which the protagonist is a participant. There's dramatic tension. As the journey progresses, the protagonist experiences one or more setbacks/obstacles/conflicts, which make it more difficult to complete the journey. _____
    6.) Crisis: It's the event right before the climax. For example: suppose you are writing a journey about taking a trip. You are at the airport, experiencing conflict about whether to hop on the plane or remain behind. This conflict creates a crisis, whether to begin the journey or not. _____
    7.) Climax: It's the turning point or main event of the story, which has the most tension and drama. It leads to a resolution of conflict and crisis. ________
    8.) Resolution: It's the final event of the story where unanswered questions are answered and the tension has subsided/ended. The writer shares an epiphany (a moment of revelation or insight) or lesson that he/she has learned from the journey. The story has reached its end. ______

    SHOW HW: Show Creative Writing Story.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Share favorite excerpts from your creative writing HW.

    2. Work Period: Check out independent reading novels.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the work period answers.

    4.Reflections: What makes you proud in the composition of your creative writing story? What can you predict that we will do on Monday.

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBA
  • How can we effectively compose a creative writing story and choose an appropriate independent reading novel? DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Read a minimum of 20 pages in your independent reading novel. Answer the following questions in your LA section for the independent reading novel:
    1.) Where is the protagonist's journey going?
    2.) What are the motives for taking the journey?
    3.) What are the observations and experiences on the journey?
    4.) What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?
    5.) Who are the protagonist and other central character(s) introduced?
    6.) What is the setting?
  • Friday, December 4th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Peer Assessment on the Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey: Did your peer do the following? Put a check for each one that they accomplished.
    1.) Write Two Pages (handwritten or typed, 12 point, times new roman font) ______
    2.) Appropriate Heading with the following: student's name, my name, Elements of Literacy, Period #, the date, the assignment--Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey, and an original title. _____
    3.) The following Questions Answered: Where is your journey going? What are the motives for taking the journey? What are the observations and experiences on the journey? What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?_____
    4.) Exposition (the introduction of the story): the protagonist and other central character(s) are introduced, the setting is provided, and the character introduces the journey. You may want to begin with a crisis/struggle that needs to be solved. The central characters reveal their desires to learn something from the journey they are about to begin. ______
    5.) Rising Action (second phase of the story): It includes a series of related events in which the protagonist is a participant. There's dramatic tension. As the journey progresses, the protagonist experiences one or more setbacks/obstacles/conflicts, which make it more difficult to complete the journey. _____
    6.) Crisis: It's the event right before the climax. For example: suppose you are writing a journey about taking a trip. You are at the airport, experiencing conflict about whether to hop on the plane or remain behind. This conflict creates a crisis, whether to begin the journey or not. _____
    7.) Climax: It's the turning point or main event of the story, which has the most tension and drama. It leads to a resolution of conflict and crisis. ________
    8.) Resolution: It's the final event of the story where unanswered questions are answered and the tension has subsided/ended. The writer shares an epiphany (a moment of revelation or insight) or lesson that he/she has learned from the journey. The story has reached its end. ______

    SHOW HW: Show Creative Writing Story.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Share favorite excerpts from your creative writing HW.

    2. Work Period: Check out independent reading novels.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the work period answers.

    4.Reflections: What makes you proud in the composition of your creative writing story? What can you predict that we will do on Monday.

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBA
  • How can we effectively compose a creative writing story and choose an appropriate independent reading novel? DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Read a minimum of 20 pages in your independent reading novel. Answer the following questions in your LA section for the independent reading novel:
    1.) Where is the protagonist's journey going?
    2.) What are the motives for taking the journey?
    3.) What are the observations and experiences on the journey?
    4.) What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?
    5.) Who are the protagonist and other central character(s) introduced?
    6.) What is the setting?
  • Thursday, December 3rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Introduce the HW:
    Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey: You will write two pages (handwritten or typed, 12 point, times new roman font). You must include the following in the heading: your name, my name, Elements of Literacy, Period____, the date, the assignment--Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey, and an original title. Your journey story can be personal or fictional. You MUST include the following:
  • The following Questions Must Be Answered: Where is your journey going? What are the motives for taking the journey? What are the observations and experiences on the journey? What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?
  • Exposition (the introduction of the story): the protagonist and other central character(s) are introduced, the setting is provided, and the character introduces the journey. You may want to begin with a crisis/struggle that needs to be solved. The central characters reveal their desires to learn something from the journey they are about to begin.
  • Rising Action (second phase of the story): It includes a series of related events in which the protagonist is a participant. There's dramatic tension. As the journey progresses, the protagonist experiences one or more setbacks/obstacles/conflicts, which make it more difficult to complete the journey.
  • Crisis: It's the event right before the climax. For example: suppose you are writing a journey about taking a trip. You are at the airport, experiencing conflict about whether to hop on the plane or remain behind. This conflict creates a crisis, whether to begin the journey or not.
  • Climax: It's the turning point or main event of the story, which has the most tension and drama. It leads to a resolution of conflict and crisis.
  • Resolution: It's the final event of the story where unanswered questions are answered and the tension has subsided/ended. The writer shares an epiphany (a moment of revelation or insight) or lesson that he/she has learned from the journey. The story has reached its end.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    2. Work Period: Work on the creative writing story HW.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the work period answers.

    4.Reflections: What did you accomplish today? What do you need to accomplish tonight in your creative writing story?

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBA
  • How can we effectively compose a creative writing story? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
    Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey: You will write two pages (handwritten or typed, 12 point, times new roman font). You must include the following in the heading: your name, my name, Elements of Literacy, Period____, the date, the assignment--Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey, and an original title. Your journey story can be personal or fictional. You MUST include the following:
  • The following Questions Must Be Answered: Where is your journey going? What are the motives for taking the journey? What are the observations and experiences on the journey? What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?
  • Exposition (the introduction of the story): the protagonist and other central character(s) are introduced, the setting is provided, and the character introduces the journey. You may want to begin with a crisis/struggle that needs to be solved. The central characters reveal their desires to learn something from the journey they are about to begin.
  • Rising Action (second phase of the story): It includes a series of related events in which the protagonist is a participant. There's dramatic tension. As the journey progresses, the protagonist experiences one or more setbacks/obstacles/conflicts, which make it more difficult to complete the journey.
  • Crisis: It's the event right before the climax. For example: suppose you are writing a journey about taking a trip. You are at the airport, experiencing conflict about whether to hop on the plane or remain behind. This conflict creates a crisis, whether to begin the journey or not.
  • Climax: It's the turning point or main event of the story, which has the most tension and drama. It leads to a resolution of conflict and crisis.
  • Resolution: It's the final event of the story where unanswered questions are answered and the tension has subsided/ended. The writer shares an epiphany (a moment of revelation or insight) or lesson that he/she has learned from the journey. The story has reached its end.
  • Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Interpret the following quote in your own words: "If a journey doesn't have something to teach you about yourself, then what kind of a journey is it?" Explain whether you agree or disagree with this quote.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    2. Work Period: In your LA section, answer the following questions:
    1.) What is a journey?
    2.) What kind of people go on journeys?
    3.) What is achieved on a journey?
    4.) What are motivations for a journey?
    5.) What are observations and experiences on a journey?
    6.) What are personal reflections and insights on a journey?
    7.) Compare/Contrast a spiritual journey and a physical journey.
    8.) What is an example of a literary journey from a novel?

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the work period answers.

    4.FINAL QUESTION: In your LA section, answer the following question. What would you prefer to write in a creative writing paper: your own personal journey or a fictional journey?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prepare for our independent reading unit? DUE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
    Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey: You will write two pages (handwritten or typed, 12 point, times new roman font). You must include the following in the heading: your name, my name, Elements of Literacy, Period____, the date, the assignment--Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey, and an original title. Your journey story can be personal or fictional. You MUST include the following:
  • The following Questions Must Be Answered: Where is your journey going? What are the motives for taking the journey? What are the observations and experiences on the journey? What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?
  • Exposition (the introduction of the story): the protagonist and other central character(s) are introduced, the setting is provided, and the character introduces the journey. You may want to begin with a crisis/struggle that needs to be solved. The central characters reveal their desires to learn something from the journey they are about to begin.
  • Rising Action (second phase of the story): It includes a series of related events in which the protagonist is a participant. There's dramatic tension. As the journey progresses, the protagonist experiences one or more setbacks/obstacles/conflicts, which make it more difficult to complete the journey.
  • Crisis: It's the event right before the climax. For example: suppose you are writing a journey about taking a trip. You are at the airport, experiencing conflict about whether to hop on the plane or remain behind. This conflict creates a crisis, whether to begin the journey or not.
  • Climax: It's the turning point or main event of the story, which has the most tension and drama. It leads to a resolution of conflict and crisis.
  • Resolution: It's the final event of the story where unanswered questions are answered and the tension has subsided/ended. The writer shares an epiphany (a moment of revelation or insight) or lesson that he/she has learned from the journey. The story has reached its end.
  • Tuesday, December 1st, 2015: 1. Do Now: OPEN NOTES/BOOK QUIZ on "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address" and "The Gettysburg Address"

    2. Work Period: In your LA section, answer the following questions:

  • What is your prior knowledge and experience with independent reading?
  • What are effective strategies that you've learned from previous teachers?
  • What are your opinions about independent reading?
  • Why is it valuable to delve into independent reading?

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the work period answers.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today? What can you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prepare for our independent reading unit? Make up owed HW
    Monday, November 30th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read the handout provided on rhetoric and author's purpose in "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address" (p. 19 in the Close Reader).

    2. Work Period: With a neighbor, work on filling in the handout from the Do Now.

    Show extra credit HW: crossword puzzle for 5-15 extra credit points on your midterm exam.

    3. Discuss/Share: Review the answers in the handout. Students will need these answers for the quiz tomorrow.

    4. HW Reminder: open-notebook quiz tomorrow.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand rhetoric and author's purpose? Due TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
  • Review notes since November 18th on two famous speeches: "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address" and "The Gettysburg Address." OPEN NOTEBOOK QUIZ (about 10% of the 3rd marking period) on these two speeches, our class notes, textbook/close reader questions and answers. Bring a #2 pencil.
  • Wednesday, November 25th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Review midterm questions and answers.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share and take notes on the Do Now answers.

    3. Work Period: Create a crossword puzzle with 20 of the vocabulary words (taken from the textbook and close reader) in your LS section. Here's a Sample Crossword Puzzle.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively improve our literary analysis and vocabulary skills? Make up owed homework! More TBA.

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th (day we return from Thanksgiving break):

  • FOR 5-15 EXTRA CREDIT POINTS (on your midterm exam): Create a crossword puzzle with 20 of the vocabulary words (taken from the textbook and close reader) in your LS section. Here's a Sample Crossword Puzzle. You MUST have the answers on a separate piece of paper. If you want to earn more than 5 points, you should include challenging vocabulary words and challenging clues (answers).
  • Tuesday, November 24th, 2015: 1. Do Now: How would you compare and contrast Bill Clinton's "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address" (p. 19) to "The Gettysburg Address" in the textbook (p. 27)?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share and take notes on the Do Now answers.

    3. Work Period: Finish reading "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address" on pp. 19-22 in your close reader. Finish the following: Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Share your work period findings.

    5. Reflections: Do you think Clinton's speech was effective in showing support for the American people during this tragedy? How does his use of language help advance his purpose? Explain, citing textual evidence in the speech. Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively annotate and improve vocabulary and summarizing skills in "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address"? Make up owed homework! More TBA.
    Monday, November 23rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read the biographical background of Bill Clinton in the Close Reader speech "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address" (p. 19). What can you predict Clinton's speech will address (based on the background)?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share and take notes on the Do Now answers.

    3. Work Period: Read "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address" on pp. 19-22 in your close reader. Finish the following: Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Share your work period findings.

    5. Reflections: What can you predict will happen at the end of the "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address"? Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively annotate and improve vocabulary and summarizing skills in "Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address"? Make up owed homework! More TBA.
    Friday, November 20th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Finish answering the follow-up questions for "The Gettysburg Address" on p. 30 in the textbook (write in your LA section).

    2. Discuss/Share: Share and take notes on the Do Now answers.

    3. Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively annotate and improve vocabulary and summarizing skills in "The Gettysburg Address"? Make up owed homework!
    Thursday, November 19th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Why does Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" fit into our semester theme of "finding common ground"?

    Show HW: Rewrite of the well-developed paragraph on whether citizens should make the future better.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share Do Now answers.

    3. Work Period #1:

  • Finish reading "The Gettysburg Address" on pp. 27-28 in your textbook. Finish the following: Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Share Work Period answers.

    5. Work Period #2:

  • Answer the follow-up questions for "The Gettysburg Address" on p. 28 in your LA section.

    6. Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively annotate and improve vocabulary and summarizing skills in "The Gettysburg Address"? Make up owed homework!
    Wednesday, November 18th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Finish your re-read of "Once Upon a Time" (pp. 11-16). Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share Do Now answers.

    3. Work Period:

  • Begin reading "The Gettysburg Address" on pp. 27-28 in your textbook. Begin the following: Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Share Work Period answers.

    5. Introduce HW. Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively annotate and improve vocabulary and summarizing skills in "Once Upon a Time" and "The Gettysburg Address"? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
    REWRITE WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH ON MAKING THE FUTURE BETTER TOGETHER (bring in the original with Ms. Conn's corrections and the rewrite):
    Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the following question: Should American citizens be required to make a better future together? Be sure to do the following:
  • Establish your claim regarding whether or not American citizens should be required to make a better future together.
  • Present the opposing claim and explain why it's not effective or appropriate.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better, Together" article to develop your argument.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words such as: In addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, consequently)
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English (use proper grammar: capitalization, punctuation, spelling, etc.)

    *Use proper heading: your name, my name, date, Elements of Literacy, and Period_____

  • Tuesday, November 17th, 2015: 1. Do Now: MIDTERM

    2. Work Period:

  • Re-Read "Once Upon a Time" (pp. 11-16). Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page.
  • Begin reading "The Gettysburg Address" on pp. 27-28 in your textbook. Begin the following: Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page. Common Core Standards:
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively prove our knowledge of the articles from the textbook and close reader on our midterm? N/A
    Monday, November 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What can you predict will happen next in “Once Upon a Time?”

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Finish reading "Once Upon a Time." Each student plays all the roles: annotator, vocabulary guru, summarizer, and speaker. Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page. Answer the following questions for "Once Upon a Time" in your LA section:
    1.) How does Gordimer compare herself to other white people in South Africa?
    2.) In the fairy tale, how would you characterize the husband and wife? Consider their personality traits, actions, speech, thoughts and feelings.
    3.) What's an example of irony in the story?
    4.) What's a theme in the story?
    5.) What conflicts exist in the story?

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Review answers to the Work Period section with the class.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively read and analyze "Once Upon a Time" (from the textbook) and prepare for our midterm? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period)--based on our class notes on our textbook and "Close Reader" articles.
  • Friday, November 13th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are well-known fairy tales? What are the benefits and drawbacks of fairy tales?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    2. Work Period: Read "Once Upon a Time." Each student plays all the roles: annotator, vocabulary guru, summarizer, and speaker. Identify one annotation per page (in your LA section), one vocabulary word per page (in your LS section), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences in your LA section) per page. Answer the following questions for "Once Upon a Time" in your LA section:
    1.) How does Gordimer compare herself to other white people in South Africa?
    2.) In the fairy tale, how would you characterize the husband and wife? Consider their personality traits, actions, speech, thoughts and feelings.
    3.) What's an example of irony in the story?
    4.) What's a theme in the story?
    5.) What conflicts exist in the story?

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Turn and talk over your Work Period answers with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share #3: Review the answers to the "Making the Future Better, Together" Quiz.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively read and analyze "Once Upon a Time" (from the textbook) and prepare for our midterm? NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period)--based on our class notes on our textbook and "Close Reader" articles.
  • Thursday, November 12th, 2015: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on "Making the Future Better, Together" (you may use your class notes and textbook)

    2. Work Period: In your LS (Language Skills section), define the following literary terms:

  • Theme
  • Dramatic Irony
  • Characterization
  • Ideal

    3. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over your Work Period definitions with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Review the answers to the "Quilt of a Country" Quiz.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our understanding of "Making the Future Better, Together" and prepare for our midterm? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:

  • All owed HW MUST be turned in (it's the last day of the 2nd marking period!).

    NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period)--based on our class notes on our textbook and "Close Reader" articles.
  • Tuesday, November 10th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Does Eboo Patel establish a persuasive message in "Making the Future Better, Together"? Explain using evidence.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period #1: Read the next, assigned paragraphs of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Work Period #2: FOR EXTRA CREDIT (if your question is chosen, you will earn 5 points extra on your quiz!): Compose a multiple-choice question (with four answer choices) for "Making the Future Better, Together." Use the questions at the bottom of the article to guide you.

    6. HW Reminders.

    7. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we implement (use) annotation, vocabulary, author's background, and summarizing skills to better understand "Making the Future Better, Together"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

    QUIZ THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
    There will be a QUIZ on "Making the Future Better, Together" (about 20% of the 2nd marking period grade)! The quiz will be on the class notes (which you can use). Make sure that you take great class notes as we review "Making the Future Better, Together" in class every day (when we review and take notes on the summary, vocabulary and annotations). It will consist of multiple-choice questions (some of the questions which you compose will be on the quiz). Bring a #2 pencil.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:

  • All owed HW MUST be turned in (it's the last day of the 2nd marking period!).
  • Monday, November 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: In your opinion, what's great about America? What do you believe America needs to improve to be better in the future?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the next, assigned paragraphs of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Repeat #3 and #4.

    6. Introduce HW.

    7. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we implement (use) annotation, vocabulary, author's background, and summarizing skills to better understand "Making the Future Better, Together"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

    QUIZ THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
    There will be a QUIZ on "Making the Future Better, Together" (about 20% of the 2nd marking period grade)! The quiz will be on the class notes (which you can use). Make sure that you take great class notes as we review "Making the Future Better, Together" in class every day (when we review and take notes on the summary, vocabulary and annotations).

    Friday, November 6th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What's the purpose of repetition in literature? Identify two examples of repetition in "Making the Future Better, Together" and explain the purpose of those examples.

    TURN IN HOMEWORK: WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the next, assigned paragraphs of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Repeat #3 and #4.

    6. Introduce HW.

    7. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we implement (use) annotation, vocabulary, author's background, and summarizing skills to better understand "Making the Future Better, Together"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

    NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
    There will be a QUIZ on "Making the Future Better, Together" (about 20% of the 2nd marking period grade)! The quiz will be on the class notes (which you can use). Make sure that you take great class notes as we review "Making the Future Better, Together" in class every day (when we review and take notes on the summary, vocabulary and annotations).

    Thursday, November 5th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What's Eboo Patel's claim in "Making the Future Better, Together"? What's the counterclaim?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the next, assigned paragraphs of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Repeat #3 and #4.

    6. Introduce HW.

    7. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we implement (use) annotation, vocabulary, author's background, and summarizing skills to better understand "Making the Future Better, Together"? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
    Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the following question: Should American citizens be required to make a better future together? Be sure to do the following:
  • Establish your claim regarding whether or not American citizens should be required to make a better future together.
  • Present the opposing claim and explain why it's not effective or appropriate.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better, Together" article to develop your argument.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words such as: In addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, consequently)
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English (use proper grammar: capitalization, punctuation, spelling, etc.)

    *Use proper heading: your name, my name, date, Elements of Literacy, and Period_____

  • Wednesday, November 4th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Why is it effective that Eboo Patel uses a personal story and a historical example to begin his article, "Making the Future Better, Together"?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the next, assigned paragraphs of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Repeat #3 and #4.

    6. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we implement (use) annotation, vocabulary, author's background, and summarizing skills to better understand "Making the Future Better, Together"? DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
    Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the following question: Should American citizens be required to make a better future together? Be sure to do the following:
  • Establish your claim regarding whether or not American citizens should be required to make a better future together.
  • Present the opposing claim and explain why it's not effective or appropriate.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better, Together" article to develop your argument.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words such as: In addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, consequently)
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English (use proper grammar: capitalization, punctuation, spelling, etc.)

    *Use proper heading: your name, my name, date, Elements of Literacy, and Period_____

  • Monday, November 2nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read the background of author, Eboo Patel, of "Making the Future Better, Together." What are your first impressions of the author? What predictions can you make about his article?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the first two paragraphs of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we implement (use) annotation, vocabulary, author's background, and summarizing skills to better understand "Making the Future Better, Together"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK
    Friday, October 30th, 2015: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on "Quilt of a Country"

    2. Work Period:

  • Make up owed homework.
  • Finish page 9: vocabulary classwork.

    3. Pre-Reading Activity for the next textbook article:

  • Based on the title, what can you predict about the article?
  • Share your predictions.

    4. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of "Quilt of a Country" in a written assessment? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK
    Thursday, October 29th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Examine the grades 9-10 rubric for the baseline assessment and fill in the corresponding grades for each level of the rubric.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Discuss with the class.

    3. Work Period: Using the 9-10 grading rubric provided, identify strengths and weaknesses in each level and each trait. Then, read and grade the 9th grade baseline assessments. SHOW HOMEWORK: FIVE Corrections for the Vocabulary Quiz.

    4. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we understand the grading rubric for the grade 9 baseline assessment? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th: There will be an OPEN-BOOK QUIZ on "A Quilt of a Country" (20% of the 2nd marking period grade) TOMORROW! The quiz will be on the class notes (which you can use!). Make sure that you take great class notes as we review "A Quilt of a Country" in class every day (when we review and take notes on the summary, vocabulary and annotations).
    Wednesday, October 28th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What is the author's message in "Quilt of a Country"?

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Discuss with the class.

    3. Work Period-Part 1: Read each paragraph of "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark annotations using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    SHOW HOMEWORK: FIVE Corrections for the Vocabulary Quiz.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Work Period-Part 2: Using the 11-12 grading rubric provided, identify strengths and weaknesses in each level and each trait. Then, read and grade the 11th grade baseline assessments.

    6. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we apply active reading strategies (annotating, identifying and defining vocabulary words, and summarizing) in "Quilt of a Country"? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • If you didn't turn it in correctly today, fix it for tomorrow: Choose five answers from your Vocabulary Quiz to correct/make better. For example, write a more complex sentence in the Sentence Composition section OR explain why a vocabulary word has a specific part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th: There will be an OPEN-BOOK QUIZ on "A Quilt of a Country" (20% of the 2nd marking period grade) THIS FRIDAY! The quiz will be on the class notes (which you can use!). Make sure that you take great class notes as we review "A Quilt of a Country" in class every day (when we review and take notes on the summary, vocabulary and annotations).

  • Tuesday, October 27th, 2015: 1. Do Now: The author, Anna Quindlen, states that "the citizens of the United States have come together once more because of armed conflict and enemy attack (9/11)." Can you recall another time since 2001 when American citizens have united?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Discuss with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read each paragraph of "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark annotations using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we apply active reading strategies (annotating, identifying and defining vocabulary words, and summarizing) in "Quilt of a Country"? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Choose five answers from your Vocabulary Quiz to correct/make better. For example, write a more complex sentence in the Sentence Composition section OR explain why a vocabulary word has a specific part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb).

    LOOKING AHEAD: There will be a QUIZ on "A Quilt of a Country" (20% of the 2nd marking period grade) THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th! The quiz will be on the class notes (which you can use!). Make sure that you take great class notes as we review "A Quilt of a Country" in class every day (when we review and take notes on the summary, vocabulary and annotations).

  • Monday, October 26th, 2015: 1. Do Now: The author, Anna Quindlen, states that America is filled with diverse races and ethnicities in conflict, and she questions why all of us don't just divide into new nations. Do you agree that America should divide into new nations?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Discuss with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read each paragraph of "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark annotations using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we apply active reading strategies (annotating, identifying and defining vocabulary words, and summarizing) in "Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed Homework

    LOOKING AHEAD: There will be a QUIZ on "A Quilt of a Country" (20% of the 2nd marking period grade) THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th! The quiz will be on the class notes (which you can use!). Make sure that you take great class notes as we review "A Quilt of a Country" in class every day (when we review and take notes on the summary, vocabulary and annotations).

    Friday, October 23rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Do you agree with the statement that "all men are created equal, though everyone knows that most men consider themselves better than someone" (Anna Quindlen)? Explain.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Discuss with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read each paragraph of "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark annotations using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section. Include the vocabulary in your LS section.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we apply active reading strategies (annotating, identifying and defining vocabulary words, and summarizing) in "Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed Homework
    Thursday, October 22nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's work period #2: What are active reading strategies (especially when encountering this kind of challenging text) for the first paragraph of "Quilt of a Country"? (Answer in your LA section)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Discuss with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read each paragraph of "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark annotations using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Discuss/Share: Review the Work Period answers and write notes in your LA section.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we understand how to use active reading strategies in "Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed Homework
    Wednesday, October 21st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Seedfolks Vocabulary Quiz

    2. Work Period #1 (in your LA section): Briefly explain the meaning of QUILT. What do you think the title, "QUILT OF A COUNTRY", means? What can you gather about an essay with that title that is dated September 26, 2001?

    Show owed HW.

    4. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the work period questions with a neighbor. Discuss with the class.

    5. Work Period #2: Begin reading the first paragraph of "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." What are active reading strategies (especially when encountering this kind of challenging text)? (Answer in your LA section)

    Discuss/Share: Share your answers to Work Period #2.

    6. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we understand the benefits of vocabulary skill building? Make up owed Homework
    Tuesday, October 20th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe it's valuable to compose rewrites?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer with a neighbor. Share with the whole class.

    3. Work Period:

  • With a neighbor, study the vocabulary from the epilogue of Seedfolks.

    Show HW: Vocabulary Story Rewrites and Flashcards.

    4. Vocabulary Baseball: Divide into two teams. Divide students into two teams and draw a baseball diamond on the blackboard. Each team has three outs per inning (like regular baseball) and one player from each team goes at a time. Teacher asks a question about the vocabulary. The student "at bat" has 30 seconds to answer. If he answers correctly in five seconds, the team gets a home run; within 10 seconds, it's a triple; within 15 seconds, it's a double; and just before the time limit, it's a single. If the student does not get the answer right, he's out. Draw a symbol for a base runner when a student gets a hit. When a player gets to home plate the team scores a run. The team with the most runs at the end of nine innings (or whenever time runs out) wins the game.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we understand the benefits of vocabulary skill building? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, October 21st
    Vocabulary QUIZ (about 20% of the 2nd marking period): Know the definitions, parts of speech, and sentence composition for all of the vocabulary words from the epilogue of Seedfolks: 1. Idleness (noun; p. 89), 2. Affliction (noun; p. 89), 3. Astoundingly (adverb; p. 89), 4. Serendipidity (noun; p. 89), 5. Camaraderie (noun; p. 91), 6. Psyche (noun; p. 92), 7. Lure (verb; p. 93), 8. Magnetism (noun; p. 94), 9. Reminiscence (noun; p. 94), 10. Distinctive (adjective; p. 96), 11. Monologue (noun; p. 97), 12. Aversion (noun; p. 97), 13. Proposition (noun; p. 97), 14. Vigilance (noun; p. 99), 15. Hostile (adjective; p. 100), 16. Solace (noun; p. 101), 17. Serenity (noun; p. 101), 18. Altruism (noun; p. 101), 19. Marvel (noun; p. 102), 20. Potent (adjective; p. 102).
    Monday, October 19th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe it's valuable to compose vocabulary flashcards?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer with a neighbor. Share with the whole class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Create Vocabulary Flashcards. On the front of the card, write the word, part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), and image associated with the word. On the back of the card, write the definition and an original sentence.
  • Work on the Homework (rewrite of your vocabulary story).

    4. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we understand the benefits of vocabulary skill building? Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, October 20th:
    Vocabulary Story Rewrite: Rewrite the Creative Vocabulary Story, making the corrections that Ms. Conn included. Bring in the original story and the rewrite to earn full credit.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Show your 20 vocabulary flashcards (on index cards or on the electronic app) which include the following: On the front of the card, write the word, part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), and image associated with the word. On the back of the card, write the definition and an original sentence.

    Due THIS Wednesday, October 21st
    Vocabulary QUIZ: Know the definitions, parts of speech, and sentence composition for all of the vocabulary words from the epilogue of Seedfolks: 1. Idleness (noun; p. 89), 2. Affliction (noun; p. 89), 3. Astoundingly (adverb; p. 89), 4. Serendipidity (noun; p. 89), 5. Camaraderie (noun; p. 91), 6. Psyche (noun; p. 92), 7. Lure (verb; p. 93), 8. Magnetism (noun; p. 94), 9. Reminiscence (noun; p. 94), 10. Distinctive (adjective; p. 96), 11. Monologue (noun; p. 97), 12. Aversion (noun; p. 97), 13. Proposition (noun; p. 97), 14. Vigilance (noun; p. 99), 15. Hostile (adjective; p. 100), 16. Solace (noun; p. 101), 17. Serenity (noun; p. 101), 18. Altruism (noun; p. 101), 19. Marvel (noun; p. 102), 20. Potent (adjective; p. 102).

  • Friday, October 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe it's valuable to write a creative vocabulary story?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer with a neighbor. Share with the whole class.

    3. Work Period: Create Vocabulary Flashcards. On the front of the card, write the word, part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), and image associated with the word. On the back of the card, write the definition and an original sentence.

    Show HW: Show your Creative Vocabulary Story.

    4. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we understand and apply new vocabulary in writing? Due Tuesday, October 20th:
    Vocabulary Story Rewrite: Rewrite the Creative Vocabulary Story, making the corrections that Ms. Conn included. Bring in the original story and the rewrite to earn full credit.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Show your 20 vocabulary flashcards (on index cards or on the electronic app) which include the following: On the front of the card, write the word, part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), and image associated with the word. On the back of the card, write the definition and an original sentence.

    Due Wednesday, October 21st
    Vocabulary QUIZ: Know the definitions, parts of speech, and sentence composition for all of the vocabulary words from the epilogue of Seedfolks: 1. Idleness (noun; p. 89), 2. Affliction (noun; p. 89), 3. Astoundingly (adverb; p. 89), 4. Serendipidity (noun; p. 89), 5. Camaraderie (noun; p. 91), 6. Psyche (noun; p. 92), 7. Lure (verb; p. 93), 8. Magnetism (noun; p. 94), 9. Reminiscence (noun; p. 94), 10. Distinctive (adjective; p. 96), 11. Monologue (noun; p. 97), 12. Aversion (noun; p. 97), 13. Proposition (noun; p. 97), 14. Vigilance (noun; p. 99), 15. Hostile (adjective; p. 100), 16. Solace (noun; p. 101), 17. Serenity (noun; p. 101), 18. Altruism (noun; p. 101), 19. Marvel (noun; p. 102), 20. Potent (adjective; p. 102).

  • Thursday, October 15th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Look up the definition of your assigned word from the epilogue of Seedfolks: 1. Idleness (p. 89), 2. Affliction (p. 89), 3. Astoundingly (p. 89), 4. Serendipity (p. 89), 5. Camaraderie (p. 91), 6. Psyche (p. 92), 7. Lure (p. 93), 8. Magnetism (p. 94), 9. Reminiscence (p. 94), 10. Distinctive (p. 96), 11. Monologue (p. 97), 12. Aversion (p. 97), 13. Proposition (p. 97), 14. Vigilance (p. 99), 15. Hostile (p. 100), 16. Solace (p. 101), 17. Serenity (p. 101), 18. Altruism (p. 101), 19. Marvel (p. 102), 20. Potent (p. 102)

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer with a neighbor. Share with the whole class.

    3. Work Period: Begin homework.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we understand and apply new vocabulary in writing? Due Tomorrow, Friday, October 16th
    Vocabulary Creative Story: Write a Creative Story using all of the vocabulary words from the epilogue of Seedfolks: 1. Idleness (p. 89), 2. Affliction (p. 89), 3. Astoundingly (p. 89), 4. Serendipidity (p. 89), 5. Camaraderie (p. 91), 6. Psyche (p. 92), 7. Lure (p. 93), 8. Magnetism (p. 94), 9. Reminiscence (p. 94), 10. Distinctive (p. 96), 11. Monologue (p. 97), 12. Aversion (p. 97), 13. Proposition (p. 97), 14. Vigilance (p. 99), 15. Hostile (p. 100), 16. Solace (p. 101), 17. Serenity (p. 101), 18. Altruism (p. 101), 19. Marvel (p. 102), 20. Potent (p. 102). Your Creative Story should include ALL of the words above correctly. You MUST use ALL of the words and underline them! Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the following: MY COMMUNITY, A DAY IN MY LIFE, OR MY FAVORITE HOBBY. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write NO MORE than two pages handwritten OR one page typed (this means that you can write less, though you MUST use all 20 vocabulary words correctly in your story). Here's the heading:
    Ms. Conn                                       Your Name
    Class, Period                                  Date
    Assignment: Vocabulary Story
          
                         Title
    
    
    
    
    Tuesday, October 13th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What's the purpose of the PSAT?

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer with a neighbor. Share with the whole class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2:

  • PSAT Strategies:
    1.) If you see words that you don't know, use prior knowledge, which includes looking at the roots to connect to familiar words and recalling other languages (like Spanish, French, or Greek).
    2.) Cover up the answer choices. Then, find your own answer without being distracted by the answer choices. Write it in the margin. Finally, uncover your answer choices and identify the answer that matches yours (it's usually right!).
    3.) You can and should leave some questions unanswered (this means to omit some questions; figure that you should leave 2-3 questions blank per section).
    4.) Preview questions for line numbers. Then, underline the line numbers in the reading passages (before you read!). Finally, read the passages, keeping the underlined lines in mind since there will questions on these lines.
    5.) The most common question types are inferences (which include "infer," "imply," "suggest," "assume," and "conclude") and author's purpose (WHY the author makes choices throughout the reading passages).

    4. Work Period: Practice PSAT Strategies with sample PSAT questions. Compose PSAT-style questions, using the unknown words you found in the epilogue of Seedfolks.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How can we understand and apply PSAT strategies? No Homework!

    Good luck on the PSAT (tomorrow)!

    Friday, October 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What was shocking or intriguing (interesting) in the epilogue?

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk about the Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class. Discuss yesterday's work period questions/answers for the epilogue by the author--pp. 89-102. Answer the following questions in your LA section. Cite textual evidence (include page numbers) to support your answers.

  • How did the author, Paul Fleischman, get his idea for writing the novel?
  • What's the author's purpose for writing books?
  • What's the author's family's connections to gardening and writing?
  • What does "seedfolks" mean?
  • Why did the author choose Cleveland for his setting?
  • What's the author's experience with gardening?
  • Why is contact with gardens beneficial (helpful) during difficult times (like 9/11)?

    3. Work Period: Identify at least ten unknown words (with page numbers) in the epilogue. Write these words in your LS section. Can you define them from context clues?

    SHOW HOMEWORK: REWRITE OF GOOD DEED PARAGRAPH.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review the answers to the exam on Seedfolks.

    5. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • What can we learn about the author's background and composition of Seedfolks? No Homework!
    Thursday, October 8th, 2015: 1. Do Now: EXAM on Seedfolks

    2. Work Period: Read the epilogue by the author--pp. 89-102. Answer the following questions in your LA section. Cite textual evidence (include page numbers) to support your answers.

  • How did the author, Paul Fleischman, get his idea for writing the novel?
  • What's the author's purpose for writing books?
  • What's the author's family's connections to gardening and writing?
  • What does "seedfolks" mean?
  • Why did the author choose Cleveland for his setting?
  • What's the author's experience with gardening?
  • Why is contact with gardens beneficial (helpful) during difficult times (like 9/11)?

    3. Discuss/Share: Review the work period answers.

    4. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How do we effectively prove our knowledge in the exam on Seedfolks? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
  • REWRITE GOOD DEED PARAGRAPH: rewrite your good deed paragraph (see the teacher's edits returned) about your experience doing a good deed in honor of 9/11. It MUST be a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences). Your good deed should involve a minimum of 1 hour of service to others. You MUST include the following: the description of the good deed, the reason you chose this good deed, how the good deed influenced others, how the good deed made you feel, and how the good deed will make the world a better place. You MUST bring the original good deed paragraph with your rewrite.

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments. TOMORROW IS THE LAST DAY OF THE 1st marking period (all owed work MUST be turned in tomorrow).
  • Wednesday, October 7th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Even though Seedfolks is set in Cleveland, Ohio, how is this novel related to your life/society?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Compose a minimum of three multiple-choice questions (include four challenging answer choices) based on the Seedfolks Study Guide. Refer to your class notes and plot diagrams. Use the DOK Question Stems to guide you.

    SHOW THE HOMEWORK (and any owed homework): plot diagrams for chapters 11, 12, and 13.

    4. Discuss/Share: Share challenging Work Period questions and answers. Review plot diagrams for chapters 4-7 and 11-13.

    5. HW Reminders

    6. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How do we effectively prepare for the exam on Seedfolks? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8th:
  • EXAM on Seedfolks. You will be expected to know all the plot diagrams, answers to the class questions and notes taken in class. Study guide is here. It will be a multiple-choice question test (bring a #2 pencil). It will be 50% of the 1st marking period grade.

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Monday (10/5)-Tuesday (10/6), 2015: Work Period: Work on the homework (packet/book was provided in class on Friday)-- Complete THREE plot diagrams for each chapter in Seedfolks packet: chapters 11 (Maricella), 12 (Amir) and 13 (Florence).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How do we effectively apply our knowledge of plot diagrams in chapters 11, 12 and 13? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7th, 2015:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Complete THREE plot diagrams for each chapter in Seedfolks packet: chapters 11 (Maricella), 12 (Amir) and 13 (Florence).

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8th:

  • EXAM on Seedfolks. You will be expected to know all the plot diagrams, answers to the class questions and notes taken in class. Study guide will be provided soon. It will be a multiple-choice question test (bring a #2 pencil). It will be 50% of the 1st marking period grade.

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Friday, October 2nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: What activity makes you feel vibrant (lively, energetic)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read chapter 10 (Nora) in Seedfolks. In your LA section, answer the following questions. Cite textual evidence (find sentences; use quotation marks, include page numbers).

  • Why can't Mr. Myles communicate with Nora?
  • Why did Mr. Myles dramatically change from sleepy to vibrant (lively)?
  • Why does Nora compare gardening to a soap opera?

    TURN IN THE HOMEWORK (the last page of the syllabus).

    4. Discuss/Share: Review Work Period answers.

    5. Introduce the homework.

    6. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How do we effectively practice citing textual evidence in chapter 10? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7th, 2015:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Complete THREE plot diagrams for each chapter in Seedfolks packet: chapters 11 (Maricella), 12 (Amir) and 13 (Florence).

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8th:

  • EXAM on Seedfolks. You will be expected to know all the plot diagrams, answers to the class questions and notes taken in class. Study guide will be provided soon. It will be a multiple-choice question test (bring a #2 pencil). It will be 50% of the 1st marking period grade.

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Thursday, October 1st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Have you ever owned an animal or a plant? If so, what did you learn from the experience? If not, what would you like to learn from that experience?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read chapter 9 (Curtis) in Seedfolks. In your LA section, answer the following questions. Cite textual evidence (find sentences; use quotation marks, include page numbers).

  • How has Curtis grown and developed?
  • How would you describe the relationship between Lateesha and Curtis?
  • What conclusions can you draw about Curtis' relationship with his tomatoes?

    4. Discuss/Share: Review Work Period answers.

    5. Introduce the FRESHMAN ENGLISH SYLLABUS.

    6. Reflections/Fist to Five

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How do we effectively understand citing textual evidence in chapter 9? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2nd, 2015:
  • Turn in the last page (filled in with your information, your parents' emergency contact information, and signatures by you and your parents) of the FRESHMAN ENGLISH SYLLABUS (provided in class today).

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Wednesday, September 30th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Why do people like to plant in gardens?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now answer. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read chapter 8 (Sae Young) in Seedfolks. In your LA section, answer the following questions. Cite textual evidence (find sentences; use quotation marks, include page numbers).

  • What are the two tragic events in Sae Young's life?
  • How has Sae Young's personality changed as a result of these tragic events?
  • How does the garden make Sae Young feel?

    SHOW HW: Show FOUR PLOT DIAGRAMS for chapters 4-7 (they are worth FOUR homework assignments!).

    4. Discuss/Share: Review Work Period answers. Review plot diagrams (for chapters 4-7) answers.

    5. Reflections

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How do we effectively understand citing textual evidence in chapter 5? Make up owed HW:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Monday, September 28th-Tuesday, September 29th, 2015: Work Period:
  • With a neighbor or independently, work on filling in the plot diagrams (HANDOUTS WERE GIVEN ON FRIDAY) for chapters 4-7 (packet provided last week). THESE FOUR PLOT DIAGRAMS WILL BE CHECKED ON WEDNESDAY (they are worth FOUR homework assignments!).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How do we effectively understand plot structure and all the components of a plot diagram? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th:
  • FOUR HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Complete FOUR plot diagrams for each chapter in Seedfolks packet (chapters 4-7; chapter 4 was done in class).
  • Make up owed homework.
  • Friday, September 25th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Chapters 4-7 in Seedfolks

    2. Work Period: Work on filling in the plot diagram for chapter 4 ("Gonzalo").

    Show HW: Annotation Symbols and reasoning on five pages (two symbols and reasonings per page) of chapters 4-7 packet.

    3. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk about the plot diagram from the work period. Share and take notes, as a class, on the plot diagram for chapter 4 ("Gonzalo").

    4. Introduce the class syllabus.

    5. Reflections & Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • How do we effectively understand plot structure and all the components of a plot diagram? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th:
  • FOUR HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Complete FOUR plot diagrams for each chapter in Seedfolks packet (chapters 4-7; chapter 4 was done in class).
  • Make up owed homework.
  • Tuesday, September 22nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Diagnostic Exam instructions

    2. Work Period: Finish the Diagnostic Exam

    3. Reflections/Introduce HW

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How do we effectively form arguments? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Read Seedfolks packet (chapters 4-7) and choose 5 pages in which you use two annotation symbols on each page of the packet from the Annotation Symbols Bookmark. Also, explain the reasoning behind each annotation symbol (explain in the margins). For vocabulary, define the unfamiliar word.
  • QUIZ on Seedfolks packet (chapters 4-7)--10% of the 1st marking period grade. You should know the characterization of the characters, the relationships between characters, textual evidence that supports the theme of common ground, setting, and conflicts.
  • Monday, September 21st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Diagnostic Exam instructions

    2. Work Period: Diagnostic Exam

    Turn in HW: Argumentative Essay.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How do we effectively form arguments? Make up owed HW:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Friday, September 18th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Should high school students get involved in extra-curricular activities (clubs/sports/volunteering)? Here's your sentence starter: High school students should/shouldn't get involved in extra-curricular activities because...

    2. Discussion/Sharing: At your tables, discuss the Do Now. Explain. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your HW section, write 3 reasons in favor of high school students getting involved in extra-curricular activities and write 3 reasons against high school students getting involved in extra-curricular activities. Write an outline of your HW essay, which includes two body paragraphs in favor and one body paragraph against your argument. You may want to include the notes you took from today's assembly.

    4. Discussion/Sharing: Whole-class sharing of the Work Period reasons.

    5. Work Period-Part 2: Begin Homework.

    6. Reflections (Exit Slip): What was valuable about today's lesson on high school students getting involved in extra-curricular activities?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How do we effectively form an argument and write an outline? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • Outline for your Argumentative Essay: Period 3 only-Write any kind of outline of your essay (use your prior knowledge of outlines from middle school). Period 5 only-Follow the outline format that I showed you in class.
  • Argumentative Essay: Essay question--Should high school students get involved in extra-curricular activities? Write a 5-paragraph essay on this question. This should include an introductory paragraph (minimum of 4 sentences; your answer to the essay question should be the last sentence of your intro. paragraph--it's also called the thesis statement), two body paragraphs (minimum of 8 sentences each) with evidence in favor of your opinion, and one body paragraph (8-10 sentences each) on the counterclaim, which is against your opinion (attack this counterclaim: explain why it's wrong), and a conclusion paragraph (minimum of 4 sentences). You should use evidence from the following sources: today's 9th grade assembly, your family or friends, and your own personal experience/knowledge. You may type (double-spaced, 12 point font) or handwrite. Include the words of the week in your essay (you only need to use these words once): ACCURATE and OCCUR.

    Use this heading:

    Ms. Conn                                 Your Name
    Class, Period                            Date
    Assignment: Argumentative Essay on Extra-Curricular Activities
          
                         Title
    
  • Thursday, September 17th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Have you ever helped someone and felt incredibly satisfied with your act of kindness? Describe the situation.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: At your tables, discuss the Do Now. Explain. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read chapter 3 (Wendell) in Seedfolks. In your LA section, write the title Seedfolks, Chapter 3, and the date. Then, answer the following questions: Why was Kim afraid of Wendell if he was doing an act of kindness for her plants? What can you infer (or assume) is the reason that Wendell performs this act of kindness? Find textual evidence to support your answers.

    4. Discussion/Sharing: Whole-class sharing of the Work Period questions.

    5. Rules/Responsibilities in Room 232: With table groups, students will compete against other groups by answering these questions: What are the procedures for the following--

  • Daily lesson? (agenda on the board, copy do now, aim and date every day)
  • Supplies? (bring your own pen/pencil and paper every day; you cannot borrow from the teacher)
  • Class participation? (Consider raising hands, not talking unless addressed by teacher, and not getting out of your seat unless asked/told to do so)
  • Electronics and head gear? (not shown unless told by teacher to take out for academic purposes)
  • Late Assignments? (legitimate excuse note must be provided with homework, otherwise it's 1/2 credit for informal assignments and -10 points for formal assignments with a rubric)
  • Homework? (msconn.net)
  • Heading? (name, date, teacher's name, class name, period, and assignment title)
  • Bathroom and Late Logs? (sign in at the desk by the door)
  • Lockdown drill? (hide away from the windows, turn lights off, and remain silent until the "all clear" is on the PA)
  • Teacher's values? (look around the room--Shakespeare, acting in the classroom, college, inspirational quotes, Cornell notes, discussion strategies, standards, books, and msconn.net)

    6. Reflections (Exit Slip): What prediction can you make about the rest of Seedfolks, based on the evidence from chapter 3?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we understand the significance of Wendell's act of kindness in chapter 3? Make up owed HW:
  • See previous day's assignments.
  • Wednesday, September 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Have you ever made a false assumption about someone? Describe the situation.

    Show HW:

  • Supplies for this class: A three-ring binder filled with loose-leaf paper for English (or a section in a larger binder) with the following, FOUR LABELED sections: Do Nows and Aims (DNA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), and Homework (HW).
  • Good Deed Paragraph (turn it in)

    2. Discussion/Sharing: At your tables, discuss the Do Now. What assumptions have you made about your table mates? What assumptions have you made about your teachers? Do you believe those assumptions will be true or false? Explain. Share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read chapter 2 (Ana) in Seedfolks. In your LA section, write the title Seedfolks, Chapter 2, and the date. Then, answer the following questions: What false assumption did Ana make in chapter 2? What is the symbolism of the lima beans? Find textual evidence to support your answers.

    4. Discussion/Sharing: Whole-class sharing of the Work Period questions.

    5. Reflections (Exit Slip): What prediction can you make about chapter 3 in Seedfolks, based on the evidence from chapters 1 and 2?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we identify evidence of characters' assumptions and symbolism? Make up owed HW:
  • See previous day's assignments.
  • Friday, September 11th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What does 'common ground' mean? What 'common ground' do you have between your family members (besides being in the same family)?

    2. Discussion/Sharing: At your tables, discuss the Do Now answers. Also, what 'common ground' do you have among your table mates (besides going to the same school)? Identify one quality/experience/value that you all have in common. Share as a class.

    3. Work Period: Read chapters 1 (Kim) and 2 (Ana) in Seedfolks. What 'common ground' do the characters share? What is the symbolism of the lima beans?

    4. Discussion/Sharing: Whole-class sharing of the Work Period questions.

    5. Rules/Responsibilities in Room 232: With table groups, students will compete against other groups by answering these questions: What are the procedures for the following--

  • Daily lesson? (agenda on the board, copy do now, aim and date every day)
  • Supplies? (bring your own pen/pencil and paper every day; you cannot borrow from the teacher)
  • Class participation? (Consider raising hands, not talking unless addressed by teacher, and not getting out of your seat unless asked/told to do so)
  • Electronics and head gear? (not shown unless told by teacher to take out for academic purposes)
  • Late Assignments? (legitimate excuse note must be provided with homework, otherwise it's 1/2 credit for informal assignments and -10 points for formal assignments with a rubric)
  • Homework? (msconn.net)
  • Heading? (name, date, teacher's name, class name, period, and assignment title)
  • Bathroom and Late Logs? (sign in at the desk by the door)
  • Lockdown drill? (hide away from the windows, turn lights off, and remain silent until the "all clear" is on the PA)
  • Teacher's values? (look around the room--Shakespeare, acting in the classroom, college, inspirational quotes, Cornell notes, discussion strategies, standards, books, and msconn.net)

    6. Reflections (Exit Slip): Turn in the Do Now questions and Work Period questions. Use this heading:

    Ms. Conn                                 Your Name
    Class, Period                            Date
    Assignment: Seedfolks: Chapters 1 and 2
          
                         Title
    

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we identify evidence of a theme ('common ground') and symbolism? Due Wednesday, September 16th, 2015:
  • Supplies for this class: A three-ring binder filled with loose-leaf paper for English (or a section in a larger binder) with the following, FOUR LABELED sections: Do Nows and Aims (DNA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), and Homework (HW).


  • Do a good deed (volunteering) in honor of 9/11 and write about your experience in a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences). Your good deed should involve a minimum of 1 hour of service to others. You MUST include the following: the description of the good deed, the reason you chose this good deed, how the good deed influenced others, how the good deed made you feel, and how the good deed will make the world a better place. Here are some suggestions: Use Volunteer Match to find a volunteer opportunity that matches your personal interests and location. Tutor a child in your neighborhood or family. Go grocery shopping for an elderly man/woman. Go to a homeless shelter and serve the guests a meal. No money is given for a good deed--it's volunteer only.
  • Thursday, September 10th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read excerpts from articles on 9/11 (excerpts will be provided in class) taken from the following:
  • Source 1: "On 9/11, We Prevail Through Kindness" taken from The Huffington Post
  • Source 2: "9/11 Attacks" taken from History.com

    2. Discussion/Sharing: In groups of three, discuss the answer to the following question: Should 9/11 be a national holiday? Share the evidence from the statistics provided.

    3. Work Period: On the notecard provided, answer the discussion question "Should 9/11 be a national holiday?" Using at least three pieces of evidence (you MUST include two pieces of evidence from Sources 1 and 2; you may also include personal knowledge from a family member, friend, or news source), write an argument (you MUST fill the entire notecard--front and back) regarding whether or not 9/11 should be a national holiday.

    4. Discussion/Sharing: Whole-class sharing. No opt-out (everyone must share at least one sentence from their notecard).

    5. Reflections (Exit Slip): Turn in your notecard at the end of class (the notecard constitutes today's exit slip).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How do we identify evidence to support an argument and how do we establish an argument? N/A
    Wednesday, September 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read excerpts from the statistics about Information Technology High School (excerpts will be provided in class) taken from the following:
  • 2014-2015 Quality Review Report (produced by the New York City Department of Education)
  • U.S. News and World Report Best High Schools article

    2. Discussion/Sharing: In groups of three, discuss the answer to the following question: Should Information Technology High School be considered an exemplary (outstanding) high school? Share the evidence from the statistics provided.

    3. Work Period: On the notecard provided, answer the discussion question "Should Information Technology High School be considered an exemplary (outstanding) high school?" Using at least three pieces of evidence (you MUST include two pieces of evidence from the Quality Review Report and U.S. News and World Report; you may also include personal knowledge from a family member, friend, or news source), write an argument (you MUST fill the entire notecard--front and back) regarding whether or not Info Tech High School should be considered an exemplary (outstanding) high school.

    4. Discussion/Sharing: Whole-class sharing. No opt-out (everyone must share at least one sentence from their notecard).

    5. Reflections (Exit Slip): Turn in your notecard at the end of class (the notecard constitutes today's exit slip).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How do we identify evidence to support an argument and how do we establish an argument? N/A