Junior Assignments, Fall/Winter Semester, 2015-2016

Junior Assignments
Fall/Winter Semester, 2015-2016

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 25th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Review the strategies for success on the English Regents (common core) exam (see the homework section).

2. Work Period:

  • Distribution and Review of Roots Quiz, Final Exam and remaining owed work.
  • Study for the English Regents Exam. Review the strategies for success, read the exemplary essays for parts 2 and 3, and/or read through the sample English Regents Exam packet.

    3. Reflections: What will you most remember this semester? What were your favorite activities/lessons this semester and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by improving our reading strategies and writing skills? CHECK OUT THE MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTION ANSWERS for the sample English Regents packet

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE): TUESDAY, JANUARY 26th at 12:15pm:

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4. Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay: See the exemplary essay here.

    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for literary elements (such as characterization, conflict, setting, and symbolism) that develop the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea.
    2.) Create a formal/informal outline of 3 paragraphs (about 1-1 and a 1/2 page), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary elements that develop the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph).
    3. Write your essay of 3 paragraphs that focuses on the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Friday, January 22nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Review the strategies for success on the English Regents (common core) exam (see the homework section).

    2. Work Period:

  • Make up owed homework (turn in before the school day is over; today is the last day to turn in owed work).
  • Study for the English Regents Exam. Review the strategies for success, read the exemplary essays for parts 2 and 3, and/or read through the sample English Regents Exam packet.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by improving our reading strategies and writing skills? CHECK OUT THE MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTION ANSWERS for the sample English Regents packet

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE): TUESDAY, JANUARY 26th at 12:15pm:

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4. Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay: See the exemplary essay here.

    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for literary elements (such as characterization, conflict, setting, and symbolism) that develop the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea.
    2.) Create a formal/informal outline of 3 paragraphs (about 1-1 and a 1/2 page), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary elements that develop the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph).
    3. Write your essay of 3 paragraphs that focuses on the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Thursday, January 21st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read the Part 2 (argumentative essay) and Part 3 (central idea essay) exemplary essays. Why are these exemplary essays helpful to read? What are the strengths of the Part 3 (central idea essay)?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Share the Do Now answers for the strengths for the central idea essay. Read the exemplary essays aloud.
  • Review the strategies for success on the English Regents (common core) exam (see the homework section).

    3. Reflections: What is the most helpful strategy for the English Regents Exam? Explain your reasoning.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by improving our reading strategies and writing skills? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (THE LAST DAY TO TURN IN OR E-MAIL WORK IS TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd), BEFORE 3pm!!

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE):

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4. Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay: See the exemplary essay here.

    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for literary elements (such as characterization, conflict, setting, and symbolism) that develop the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea.
    2.) Create a formal/informal outline of 3 paragraphs (about 1-1 and a 1/2 page), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary elements that develop the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph).
    3. Write your essay of 3 paragraphs that focuses on the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Wednesday, January 20th, 2016: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Roots List

    SHOW HW: OUTLINES for Parts 2 and 3 in the English Regents packet (provided in class)

    2. Work Period: Read the sample exemplary essays for Part 2 (argumentative essay) and Part 3 (central idea essay) for the English Regents packet. What are the strengths of each essay? Write THREE STRENGTHS for each essay.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share the work period answers for the strengths for the argumentative essay and the central idea essay. Read the essays aloud.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by improving our reading strategies and writing skills? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (THE LAST DAY TO TURN IN OR E-MAIL WORK IS FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd), BEFORE 3pm!!
    Tuesday, January 19th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Using the Roots List, compose three sophisticated sentences with three different vocabulary words.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share their answers with the class.
  • Introduce the Work Period assignments.

    3. Work Period:

  • Study the Roots List for tomorrow's quiz.
  • Compose OUTLINES for Parts 2 and 3 in the English Regents packet (provided in class). Use the SAMPLE OUTLINE, your Scarlet Letter paper, and your central idea journals (from A View From the Bridge) to guide you in composing your outlines. EXTRA CREDIT (up to 20 points on your final exam!):
    1.) Compose essays for Parts 2 and 3
    2.) Annotate and underline parts of the text in parts 2 and 3

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by improving our reading strategies and writing skills? DATE CHANGE: DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20th:
    Compose OUTLINES for Parts 2 and 3 in the English Regents packet (provided in class). Use the SAMPLE OUTLINE, your Scarlet Letter paper, and your central idea journals (from A View From the Bridge) to guide you in composing your outlines. EXTRA CREDIT (up to 20 points on your final exam!):
  • Compose essays for Parts 2 and 3
  • Annotate and underline parts of the text in parts 2 and 3

    QUIZ NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20th:

  • QUIZ on Roots (about 10% of your 3rd marking period grade)

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (THE LAST DAY TO TURN IN OR E-MAIL WORK IS FRIDAY, JANUARY 22nd), BEFORE 3pm!!

  • Friday, January 15th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Scan the sample ELA Regents (Common Core) Exam. What strategies can you employ (use) on parts 2 and 3? (Think about what you can do when reading the instructions and the texts)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share their answers with the class.
  • Introduce the HW.

    3. Work Period: Begin the HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by improving our reading strategies and writing skills? DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20th:
    Compose OUTLINES for Parts 2 and 3 in the English Regents packet (provided in class). Use the SAMPLE OUTLINE, your Scarlet Letter paper, and your central idea journals (from A View From the Bridge) to guide you in composing your outlines. EXTRA CREDIT (up to 20 points on your final exam!):
  • Compose essays for Parts 2 and 3
  • Annotate and underline parts of the text in parts 2 and 3

    QUIZ NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20th:

  • QUIZ on Roots (about 10% of your 3rd marking period grade)

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

  • Thursday, January 14th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Scan a sample ELA Regents (Common Core) Exam. Which part seems to be the most difficult/challenging? How will you be successful on this difficult part?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share their answers with the class.
  • Finish reviewing the contents of Roots.

    3. Work Period: Using the sample argumentative essay outline, begin the HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging or beautiful.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by improving our vocabulary and argumentative essay outline writing? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, JANUARY 19th:
    Compose OUTLINES for Parts 2 and 3 in the English Regents packet (provided in class). Use the SAMPLE OUTLINE, your Scarlet Letter paper, and your central idea journals (from A View From the Bridge) to guide you in composing your outlines. EXTRA CREDIT (up to 20 points on your final exam!):
  • Compose essays for Parts 2 and 3
  • Annotate and underline parts of the text in parts 2 and 3

    QUIZ NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20th:

  • QUIZ on Roots (about 10% of your 3rd marking period grade)

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

  • Wednesday, January 13th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish the FINAL EXAM (20 minutes).

    EXTRA CREDIT: Do the following strategies (for 5 points each; up to 20 extra credit points!): 1.) Circle/Underline key words in the questions, 2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions), 3.) Write your own answers in the margins of each question, and 4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule).

    2. Work Period: Study the Roots.

    3. Discuss/Share: Review the contents of Roots.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging or beautiful.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by employing the multiple-choice question strategies? QUIZ NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20th:
  • QUIZ on Roots (about 10% of your 3rd marking period grade)

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

  • Tuesday, January 12th, 2016: FINAL EXAM

    EXTRA CREDIT: Do the following strategies (for 5 points each; up to 20 extra credit points!): 1.) Circle/Underline key words in the questions, 2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions), 3.) Write your own answers in the margins of each question, and 4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging or beautiful.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam by employing the multiple-choice question strategies? QUIZ NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20th:
  • QUIZ on Roots (about 10% of your 3rd marking period grade)

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

  • Monday, January 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read the Roots.

    SHOW HW: Outline for the following argumentative question: Should high school students be required to perform plays in English class? Write the outline for a 5-paragraph essay. Sample Outline.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Review the Do Now Roots.
  • Discuss and take notes on the strategies for success on the multiple-choice question section of the English Regents: Common Core.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging or beautiful.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents Exam and the SAT, focusing on vocabulary and multiple-choice question strategies? FINAL EXAM IS TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 12th:
  • Expect to see Regents-style multiple-choice questions. Review your strategies for success on the multiple-choice questions (Value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period grade). Bring a #2 pencil. EXTRA CREDIT: Do the following strategies (for 5 points each; up to 20 extra credit points!): 1.) Circle/Underline key words in the questions, 2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions), 3.) Write your own answers in the margins of each question, and 4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule).

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

  • Friday, January 8th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish writing an outline for the following argumentative question: Should high school students be required to perform plays in English class? Write the outline for a 5-paragraph essay. Sample Outline.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share the components of your outline (see Do Now).

    3. Work Period: Brainstorm (or review your notes) strategies for success on the multiple-choice question section of the English Regents: Common Core.

    4. Discuss/Share: Share your brainstorming and take notes in your Regents Strategies section of your notebook.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.6 (Speaking and Listening: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate) and RL.11-12.3 (Reading Literature: Analyze the impact of the author's choice regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama)
  • How can we review the argumentative essay format and prepare for the English Regents Exam? DUE THIS MONDAY, JANUARY 11th:
  • Finish writing an outline for the following argumentative question: Should high school students be required to perform plays in English class? Write the outline for a 5-paragraph essay. Sample Outline. Remember, you don't need to write in sentence form. You need to include three pieces of evidence (from the play, students' performances and your own performance) to support each body paragraph reason (listed as the topic sentence).

    FINAL EXAM THIS COMING TUESDAY, JANUARY 12th:

  • Expect to see Regents-style multiple-choice questions. Review your strategies for success on the multiple-choice questions.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

  • Thursday, January 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Present remaining scenes from A View From the Bridge. Presentation reminders: follow the grading rubric, introduce your scene's synopsis, character roles, and bow at the end.

    Scene Presentations: Each group will present a brief synopsis (summary) of your scene taken from A View From the Bridge. Include which classmate is playing each role. Consider your modern interpretation of the scene. Each student will be graded by the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    2. Reflection Discussion: What did each group do well in their presentation? If each group had more time, what should they work on to improve their scene presentation?

    3. Work Period: Write an outline for the following argumentative question: Should high school students be required to perform plays in English class? Write the outline for a 5-paragraph essay. Sample Outline.

    SHOW HW: Rewrites of The Scarlet Letter Essay (show the original with Ms. Conn's edits) and return your copies of A View From the Bridge.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.6 (Speaking and Listening: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate) and RL.11-12.3 (Reading Literature: Analyze the impact of the author's choice regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama)
  • How can we review the argumentative essay format and reflect on our performances? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!
    Wednesday, January 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Arrange the room and your groups to prepare to present your scene from A View From the Bridge. Presentation reminders: follow the grading rubric, introduce your scene's synopsis, character roles, and bow at the end.

    2. Scene Presentations: Each group will present a brief synopsis (summary) of your scene taken from A View From the Bridge. Include which classmate is playing each role. Consider your modern interpretation of the scene. Each student will be graded by the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    3. Reflections: What did each group do well in their presentation? If each group had more time, what should they work on to improve their scene presentation?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.6 (Speaking and Listening: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate) and RL.11-12.3 (Reading Literature: Analyze the impact of the author's choice regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama)
  • How can we effectively present an appropriate scene from A View From the Bridge? DATE CHANGE: DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7th:
  • REWRITE THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER (make Ms. Conn's corrections)--bring in the original and the rewrite. You can type or handwrite (highlight your changes). VALUE=UP TO 20 EXTRA POINTS ON YOUR ESSAY GRADE!!

    LAST CHANCE: DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7th:

  • IF YOU DIDN'T PRESENT YOUR A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE, (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period) YOU MUST PRESENT TOMORROW (-10 points without an excuse note if you were absent today). You will be graded individually and as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

  • Tuesday, January 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What's a brief synopsis (summary) of your scene taken from A View From the Bridge? Write 2-3 sentences. Include which classmate is playing each role.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor in your group. Review with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your groups of 2-4 students, read-aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Consider your modern interpretation of the scene. Apply the elements of the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge and the knowledge you acquired in the Do Now about your character's stage directions.

    4. Reflections: What do you need to practice tonight? What should you bring with you tomorrow for your performance (think of props and costumes)?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.6 (Speaking and Listening: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate) and RL.11-12.3 (Reading Literature: Analyze the impact of the author's choice regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama)
  • How can we prepare an appropriate scene to present from A View From the Bridge? DATE CHANGE: DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6th:
  • A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded individually and as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 7th:

  • REWRITE THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER (make Ms. Conn's corrections)--bring in the original and the rewrite. You can type or handwrite (highlight your changes). VALUE=UP TO 20 EXTRA POINTS ON YOUR ESSAY GRADE!!
  • Monday, January 4th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What do you need to do to improve your scene taken from A View From the Bridge?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Review with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your groups of 2-4 students, read-aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Consider your modern interpretation of the scene. Apply the elements of the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge and the knowledge you acquired in the Do Now about your character's stage directions.

    4. Reflections: What do you need to practice tonight? What should you bring with you tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.6 (Speaking and Listening: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate) and RL.11-12.3 (Reading Literature: Analyze the impact of the author's choice regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama)
  • How can we prepare an appropriate scene to present from A View From the Bridge? DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6th:
  • A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded individually and as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 7th:

  • REWRITE THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER (make Ms. Conn's corrections)--bring in the original and the rewrite. You can type or handwrite (highlight your changes). VALUE=UP TO 20 EXTRA POINTS ON YOUR ESSAY GRADE!!
  • Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: How do you need to improve your scene from A View From the Bridge? (Verbally share!)

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Review with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your groups of 2-4 students, read-aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Consider your modern interpretation of the scene. Apply the elements of the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge and the knowledge you acquired in the Do Now about your character's stage directions.

    4. Gift of Kindness: Instructions will be provided. Gallery Walk.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.6 (Speaking and Listening: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate) and RL.11-12.3 (Reading Literature: Analyze the impact of the author's choice regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama)
  • How can we prepare an appropriate scene to present from A View From the Bridge? DUE (after the vacation) TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:
  • A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded individually and as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    DUE (after the vacation) WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6th:

  • REWRITE THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER (make Ms. Conn's corrections)--bring in the original and the rewrite. You can type or handwrite (highlight your changes). VALUE=UP TO 20 EXTRA POINTS ON YOUR ESSAY GRADE!!
  • Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Identify all of the stage directions for your character in your scene from A View From the Bridge? How would you briefly describe (2-3 sentences) the stage directions? Refer to your actions, props, physical interactions, gestures and facial expressions.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Review with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your groups of 2-4 students, read-aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Consider your modern interpretation of the scene. Apply the elements of the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge and the knowledge you acquired in the Do Now about your character's stage directions.

    4. Reflections: How did today's scene reading go? What do you need to work on tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.6 (Speaking and Listening: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate) and RL.11-12.3 (Reading Literature: Analyze the impact of the author's choice regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama)
  • How can we prepare an appropriate scene to present from A View From the Bridge? DUE (after the vacation) TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:
  • A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded individually and as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    DUE (after the vacation) WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6th:

  • REWRITE THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER (make Ms. Conn's corrections)--bring in the original and the rewrite. You can type or handwrite (highlight your changes). VALUE=THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!!
  • Monday, December 21st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Which character are you playing in your scene from A View From the Bridge? How would you briefly describe (2-3 sentences) your character in your chosen scene? Refer to their personality traits, actions, thoughts, feelings and interactions with other characters.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Review with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your groups of 2-4 students, read-aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Consider your modern interpretation of the scene.

    4. Reflections: How did today's scene reading go? What do you need to work on the rest of the week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBD
  • How can we prepare an appropriate scene to present from A View From the Bridge? DUE (after the vacation) TUESDAY, JANUARY 5TH:
  • A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded individually and as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.
  • Friday, December 18th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Review with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your groups of 2-4 students, read your chosen scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Assign character roles. Interpret the scene in your own words (2-4 sentences).

    Show HW: Your rewrite of a journal for A View From the Bridge and any owed HW.

    4. Reflections: How did today's scene reading go? What do you need to work on next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBD
  • How can we prepare an appropriate scene to present from A View From the Bridge? DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 5TH:
  • A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded individually and as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.
  • Thursday, December 17th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Which questions did you get wrong on your Quiz on A View From the Bridge and why?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Review the answers to the quiz.

    3. Work Period: Choose 2-4 students to work with to present a scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Assign character roles. Read aloud the scene. Interpret the scene in your own words (2-4 sentences).

    Show HW: Show your T-Charts (all 8 charts are due TODAY).

    4. Reflections: What are your impressions about this play? Did this play meet your expectations or were there any surprises? What's your favorite dialogue in the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • TBD
  • How can we choose an appropriate scene to present from A View From the Bridge? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18th:
  • CENTRAL IDEA JOURNAL REWRITE (30 POINTS=THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Rewrite one of your Central Idea Journals (from A View From the Bridge). Make corrections based on Ms. Conn's edits. Bring in the original journal (with the edits).
  • Wednesday, December 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What conflicts exist in A View From the Bridge and are they resolved? How do the conflicts between characters support any of the central ideas (love, honor, family, justice and the law)? Explain.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Refer to textual evidence to support your Do Now answers.

    2. Work Period: Work on your T-Charts (all 8 charts are due TOMORROW).

    Show owed HW: Central Idea Journals.

    3. Reflections: What are your impressions about this play? Did this play meet your expectations or were there any surprises? What's your favorite dialogue in the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of the plot events, character development, and central ideas in Acts I and II in A View From the Bridge? DATE CHANGE: DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17th:
  • TURN IN 8 T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 3-13, 2.) pp. 14-23, 3.) pp. 24-33, 4.) pp. 34-43, 5.) pp. 44-53, 6.) pp. 54-63, 7.) pp. 64-73, 8.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS:

  • In your LA section, do the following: On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (examples: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and tone) to develop that central idea.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18th:

  • CENTRAL IDEA JOURNAL REWRITE (30 POINTS=THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Rewrite one of your Central Idea Journals (from A View From the Bridge). Make corrections based on Ms. Conn's edits. Bring in the original journal (with the edits).
  • Tuesday, December 15th, 2015: 1. Do Now: SUPER QUIZ (about 15% of the 3rd marking period)

    2. Work Period: Work on your T-Charts (all 8 charts are due this Thursday).

    Show HW: Act II Central Idea Journal

    3. Reflections: What are your impressions about this play? Did this play meet your expectations or were there any surprises? What's your favorite dialogue in the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of the plot events, character development, and central ideas in Acts I and II in A View From the Bridge? DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17th:
  • TURN IN 8 T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 3-13, 2.) pp. 14-23, 3.) pp. 24-33, 4.) pp. 34-43, 5.) pp. 44-53, 6.) pp. 54-63, 7.) pp. 64-73, 8.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS:

  • In your LA section, do the following: On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (examples: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and tone) to develop that central idea.
  • Monday, December 14th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What is the playwright Arthur Miller's main message in Act 1?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Acting Presentations: Actors will present dialogue in Act 1 to support one of the following central ideas: Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law.

    4. Reflections: What are your impressions about this play? What predictions can you make about this play? What's your favorite dialogue in the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the playwright's message and dialogue to support the central ideas of justice and the law, family, love and honor in A View From the Bridge? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:
  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal: Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).
  • SUPER QUIZ (value=15% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review the following: the major events of the play, characterization of the major characters (Eddie, Catherine, Beatrice, Rodolpho, Marco, and Alfieri), evidence of all central ideas (love, family, honor, justice and the law), playwright's message and tone, and prove that you've read the entire play!

    DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • TURN IN 8 T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 3-13, 2.) pp. 14-23, 3.) pp. 24-33, 4.) pp. 34-43, 5.) pp. 44-53, 6.) pp. 54-63, 7.) pp. 64-73, 8.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS:

  • In your LA section, do the following: On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (examples: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and tone) to develop that central idea.
  • Friday, December 11th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What was a challenge in completing last night's assignment and what was a strength in completing last night's assignment? Here are the assignment instructions: Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Prepare to present dialogue from the first half of Act I from A View From the Bridge.

    4. Acting Presentations: Actors will present dialogue to support one of the following central ideas: Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law.

    4. Reflections: What are your impressions about this play? What predictions can you make about this play? What's your favorite dialogue in the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the author's use of literary elements/techniques to develop the central idea in A View From the Bridge? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:
  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal: Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).
  • SUPER QUIZ (value=15% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 8 T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 3-13, 2.) pp. 14-23, 3.) pp. 24-33, 4.) pp. 34-43, 5.) pp. 44-53, 6.) pp. 54-63, 7.) pp. 64-73, 8.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS:

  • In your LA section, do the following: On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (examples: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and tone) to develop that central idea.
  • Thursday, December 10th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm about your central idea: family, honor, love, or justice and the law. What are your personal experiences, opinions, and/or conflicts about this central idea?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, finish the T-CHART for the second ten pages (pp. 14-23) in A View From the Bridge. On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique to develop that central idea.

    4. Reflections: What are your first impressions about this play? What predictions can you make about this play? What's your favorite dialogue in the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the author's use of literary elements/techniques to develop the central idea in A View From the Bridge? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
  • Read Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal: Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).
  • SUPER QUIZ (value=15% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 8 T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 3-13, 2.) pp. 14-23, 3.) pp. 24-33, 4.) pp. 34-43, 5.) pp. 44-53, 6.) pp. 54-63, 7.) pp. 64-73, 8.) pp. 74-86
  • Wednesday, December 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Compare and contrast the setting, characters, events, and/or conflicts in A View From the Bridge with your own life. (Feel free to make a Venn Diagram or T-Chart)

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, finish the T-CHART for the first ten pages (pp. 3-13) and begin the T-CHART for the next ten pages (pp. 14-23) in A View From the Bridge. On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique to develop that central idea.

    4. Reflections: What are your first impressions about this play? What predictions can you make about this play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the author's use of literary elements/techniques to develop the central idea in A View From the Bridge? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
  • Read Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal: Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).
  • SUPER QUIZ (value=15% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 8 T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 3-13, 2.) pp. 14-23, 3.) pp. 24-33, 4.) pp. 34-43, 5.) pp. 44-53, 6.) pp. 54-63, 7.) pp. 64-73, 8.) pp. 74-86
  • Tuesday, December 8th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are literary elements and techniques that you are most comfortable using and why? Which of those literary elements or techniques can be found in A View From the Bridge? Here are suggestions: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, tone, metaphor, simile, and point of view.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Share how literary elements/techniques can develop a central idea (like in A View From the Bridge).

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, create a T-CHART for the first ten pages (pp. 3-13) in A View From the Bridge. On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique to develop that central idea.

    4. Reflections: What are your first impressions about this play? What predictions can you make about this play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the author's use of literary elements/techniques to develop the central idea in A View From the Bridge? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
  • Read Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal: Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).
  • SUPER QUIZ (value=15% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!
  • Monday, December 7th, 2015: 1. Do Now: On the first page of A View From the Bridge (p. 3), what can you infer (conclude based on the evidence) about the setting by reading the stage directions?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Share your impressions about the beginning (at least the first five pages) in A View From the Bridge and share which central idea that you want to focus on as you read: Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Share textual evidence (with page #s) to support your choice

    3. Work Period: Read the biography and synopsis on the back cover of A View From the Bridge.

    4. Reflections: What are your first impressions about this play? What predictions can you make about this play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • What can we infer from the stage directions, synopsis and author's biography of A View From the Bridge? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
  • Read Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal: Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).
  • SUPER QUIZ (value=15% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    Make up owed HW.

    OWED HOMEWORK: PAPER ON OVERCOMING ADVERSITY WAS DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (-30 points):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Friday, December 4th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing midterm exam questions and answers. Take notes on regents strategies.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Volunteers share which regents strategies work best for the midterm exam questions and answers.

    3. Work Period: Read the biography, synopsis on the back cover, and the introduction of A View From the Bridge. What are your first impressions? What predictions can you make about this play? Check out the play. Introduce the HW.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn about your your strengths and skills needing improvement?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we evaluate our strengths and skills needing improvement on the multiple-choice section of the English Regents and prepare to read A View From the Bridge? DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Read the beginning (at least the first five pages) in A View From the Bridge and determine which central idea that you want to focus on as you read: Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Find textual evidence (with page #s) to support your choice. Be ready to share.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th:

  • Read Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal: Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge.
  • Central Idea Journal: Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).
  • SUPER QUIZ (value=15% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    Make up owed HW.

    OWED HOMEWORK: PAPER ON OVERCOMING ADVERSITY WAS DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (-30 points):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Thursday, December 3rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Which English Regents strategy (for the multiple-choice questions section) are you most comfortable with and why?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Review midterm exam questions and answers.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn about your your strengths and skills needing improvement?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we evaluate our strengths and skills needing improvement on the multiple-choice section of the English Regents? Make up owed HW.

    OWED HOMEWORK: PAPER ON OVERCOMING ADVERSITY WAS DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (-30 points):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are benefits and drawbacks from analyzing the midterm (which was an excerpt from the English Regents)?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Review midterm exam questions and answers.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn about your your strengths and skills needing improvement?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we evaluate our strengths and skills needing improvement on the multiple-choice section of the English Regents? Make up owed HW.

    OWED HOMEWORK: PAPER ON OVERCOMING ADVERSITY WAS DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (-30 points):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Tuesday, December 1st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Identify the skills that you need to work on the midterm (these skills are on the English Regents). See your answer sheet from the midterm exam. Why do you believe these skills need to be improved?

    Show HW: Turn in the film analysis sheets.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Review midterm exam questions and answers.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn about your your strengths and skills needing improvement?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we evaluate our strengths and skills needing improvement on the multiple-choice section of the English Regents? Make up owed HW.

    OWED HOMEWORK: DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (TURNED IN OR E-MAILED BEFORE 3pm on Friday; -10 points e-mailed over the weekend; -10 points every day afterward):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Monday, November 30th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Film Viewing of The Scarlet Letter. Answer the following questions, citing textual evidence from the film.
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of sound (including music) in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    6. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?
    7. Are there any literary discrepancies between the movie and the novel? If yes, explain. If not, explain.
    8. How would you compare and contrast the novel and the film?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share Do Now answers and elaborate, citing textual evidence from the film version of The Scarlet Letter.

    3. Reflections: DOK 3: What conclusions can you draw from viewing the film and reading the novel, The Scarlet Letter?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.11-12.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on what addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience.
  • How do we evaluate the film version of The Scarlet Letter, analyzing the director's dramatic choices? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
  • Finish the classwork (conducted on Wednesday (11/25) and Monday (11/30)): Film Viewing of The Scarlet Letter. Answer the following questions, citing textual evidence from the film.
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of sound (including music) in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    6. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?
    7. Are there any literary discrepancies between the movie and the novel? If yes, explain. If not, explain.
    8. How would you compare and contrast the novel and the film?

    OWED HOMEWORK: DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (TURNED IN OR E-MAILED BEFORE 3pm on Friday; -10 points e-mailed over the weekend; -10 points every day afterward):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Wednesday, November 25th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Film Viewing of The Scarlet Letter. Answer the following questions, citing textual evidence from the film.
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of sound (including music) in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    6. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?
    7. Are there any literary discrepancies between the movie and the novel? If yes, explain. If not, explain.
    8. How would you compare and contrast the novel and the film?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share Do Now answers and elaborate, citing textual evidence from the film version of The Scarlet Letter.

    3. Reflections: DOK 3: What conclusions can you draw from viewing the film and reading the novel, The Scarlet Letter?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.11-12.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on what addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience.
  • How do we evaluate the film version of The Scarlet Letter, analyzing the director's dramatic choices? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
  • Finish the classwork (conducted on Wednesday (11/25) and Monday (11/30)): Film Viewing of The Scarlet Letter. Answer the following questions, citing textual evidence from the film.
    1. How do the set designs contribute to the mood the director is trying to establish?
    2. How do the costumes contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    3. How do the actors' choices contribute to the story the director is trying to tell?
    4. How do the props contribute to the image the director is trying to convey?
    5. Analyze the use of sound (including music) in the movie. Did it enhance the story that the director is trying to tell? What sounds would you have used to tell the story told by this movie?
    6. Describe the use of color in the film. Did it advance the emotions the director is trying to create? How would you have used color in the movie?
    7. Are there any literary discrepancies between the movie and the novel? If yes, explain. If not, explain.
    8. How would you compare and contrast the novel and the film?

    OWED HOMEWORK: DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (TURNED IN OR E-MAILED BEFORE 3pm on Friday; -10 points e-mailed over the weekend; -10 points every day afterward):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Tuesday, November 24th, 2015: 1. Do Now: DOK 2: How would you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) your paper and the exemplary paper (provided in class)? Refer to specific textual evidence. Sentence starter suggestions include the following:
  • One comparison between the exemplary paper and my paper is...
  • One contrast between the exemplary paper and my paper is...
  • On page 1, paragraph 2, sentence 2, the author says...
  • According to the text on page 1, paragraph 1, sentence 6...
  • The evidence to support my comparison/contrast is...

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Share Do Now answer and elaborate, citing textual evidence from the exemplary paper.

    3. Work Period: The class will break up into pairs (based on students who completed the argumentative paper and those who did not yet complete the paper). Using the GRADING RUBRIC, students will conduct a peer assessment. Students will give grades for each category of the argumentative essay rubric: thesis/claim, use of evidence, use of analysis, and organization/writing style/conventions. Students MUST provide evidence from their peers' argumentative papers for the grade for each category. Sentence starter suggestions include the following:

  • On page 1, paragraph 2, sentence 2, the author says...
  • According to the text on page 1, paragraph 1, sentence 6...
  • The evidence to support my peer's sophisticated writing is...
  • The evidence to support that my peer skillfully integrated information into the text to advance the thesis is...

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteer students will share work period evidence for each category of the grading rubric.

    5. Reflections/Quick Write: DOK 3: What conclusions can you draw from reading the exemplary paper and conducting a peer-assessment of the argumentative paper?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.11-12.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on what addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience.
  • How do we evaluate an exemplary argumentative paper and conduct peer-assessment of the argumentative paper on overcoming adversity in The Scarlet Letter? OWED HOMEWORK: DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (TURNED IN OR E-MAILED BEFORE 3pm on Friday; -10 points e-mailed over the weekend; -10 points every day afterward):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Monday, November 23rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: The fact that the "minister, leaning on Hester's shoulder and supported by her arm around him, approached the scaffold" (219) shows that that he
    A.) is concerned about his reputation
    B.) is actively avoiding a relationship with Hester
    C.) has little regard for Hester's reputation
    D.) is ready to openly repent for his sins

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share Do Now answer and elaboration.

    3. Table Competition: Review game on the rest of chapters 23 and 24.
    1.) Why was there "more than one account of what had been witnessed on the scaffold...the reader may choose among these theories" about how Dimmesdale died and what appeared on his chest?
    2.) Why does Chillingworth become "withered up, shrivelled away, and almost vanished from mortal sight" (224)?
    3.) Why does Chillingworth "bequeath a considerable amount of property, both here and in England, to little Pearl, the daughter of Hester Prynne" (225)?
    4.) How did Pearl become "the richest heiress of her day" (225)?
    5.) Why did people continue to bring "all their sorrows and perplexities, and besought her counsel"(227) to Hester?
    6.) Why was there a "space between, as if the dust of the two sleepers [Hester and Dimmesdale] had no right to mingle" (228)?

    4. Reflections: What was Hawthorne's primary message (theme) in The Scarlet Letter? What was your main message in your final paper on the novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we effectively review the final two chapters of The Scarlet Letter? OWED HOMEWORK: DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (TURNED IN OR E-MAILED BEFORE 3pm on Friday; -10 points e-mailed over the weekend; -10 points every day afterward):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Friday, November 20th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Reflect on the composition of your paper. What were your strengths? What are your challenges? What would you work on if you had more time?

    2. Discuss/Share: Share Do Now answers.

    3. Work Period: Turn in papers and novels. Read classmates' papers. Compare/Contrast your papers and your classmates. How would you compare your papers? How would you contrast your papers?

    4. Reflections

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we evaluate our and our peers' final drafts of the overcoming adversity paper? DUE TODAY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th (TURNED IN OR E-MAILED BEFORE 3pm; -10 points e-mailed over the weekend; -10 points every day afterward):
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Thursday, November 19th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read the Argumentative Essay Rubric. How would you describe the requirements in each category in the "Exceeds Standards (90-100)" column IN YOUR OWN WORDS?

    2. Discuss/Share: Share Do Now answers.

    3. Work Period--Gallery Walk Viewing of Rough Drafts:
    1.) DOK 1: What's an effective attention grabber in the intro. paragraph?
    2.) DOK 1: What's an effective thesis statement at the end of your intro. paragraph that addresses whether people should overcome adversity?
    3.) DOK 1: What's an effective body paragraph topic sentence that supports the thesis statement?
    4.) DOK 2: What do you notice about an effective citation (direct quotes that are phrases or one sentence each) that supports the thesis statement?
    5.) DOK 2: What do you notice about an effective introductory sentence before a citation?
    6.) DOK 2: What do you notice about an effective elaborating sentence after a citation?
    7.) DOK 2: What do you notice about an effective counterclaim?
    8.) DOK 2: What do you notice about an effective attack on the counterclaim (also called a rebuttal)?
    9.) DOK 3: How is an effective conclusion related to the thesis statement?
    10.) DOK 2: What can you say about effective transition words?
    11.) DOK 2: What do you notice about an effective sentence using sophisticated vocabulary?
    12.) DOK 3: What conclusions can you draw from an effective paper?

    4. Discuss/Share: Share evidence of your gallery walk findings.

    5. Reflections

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we evaluate peers' rough drafts of the overcoming adversity paper? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your FINAL PAPER (and rough draft) on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Avoid using any form of "I" or "you." Follow the GRADING RUBRIC.

    BRING IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.

  • Wednesday, November 18th, 2015: 1. Do Now: FINISH MIDTERM (15 minutes remaining).

    SHOW HW: Show rough draft of Overcoming Adversity paper and owed homework.

    2. Discuss/Share: Review evidence of adversities and overcoming adversities in chapter 22 of The Scarlet Letter.

    3. Work Period--Self-Assessment of Rough Draft:
    1.) Did you include an attention grabber in the intro. paragraph?
    2.) Did you include a clear thesis statement at the end of your intro. paragraph that addresses whether people should overcome adversity?
    3.) Did you write 4-6 sentences in the intro. paragraph?
    4.) Did you begin each body paragraph with a topic sentence that supports your thesis statement?
    5.) Did you include two citations (direct quotes that are phrases or one sentence each) in body paragraph #1 and two citations in body paragraph #2 that support your thesis statement?
    6.) Did you follow Ms. Conn's sample citation format (see the outline)?
    7.) Did you introduce each citation and and explain why each citation supports the thesis statement?
    8.) Did you include a clear counterclaim, with two citations in body paragraph #3, and an attack on the counterclaim?
    9.) Did you write 10=12 sentences for each body paragraph?
    10.) Did you write a conclusion that was 4-6 sentences, summarized and supported your thesis statement?
    11.) Did you write an organized paper with transitions and flow?
    12.) Did you use sophisticated vocabulary (including many vocabulary words taken from our vocabulary lists)?
    13.) Did you avoid grammatical errors, such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation errors?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we prove our knowledge of Regents-style multiple-choice questions? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER AND bring in (on Friday or Monday, November 23rd) the rough draft of the paper. Compose the FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Tuesday, November 17th, 2015: 1. Do Now: MIDTERM

    SHOW HW: Show T-Charts for chapters 23 and 24.

    2. Work Period: Work on owed homework or homework due tomorrow.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we prove our knowledge of Regents-style multiple-choice questions? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:
    ROUGH DRAFT OF THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER: Compose a rough draft of the paper on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you may write the minimum number of sentences listed in the outline; about 3-4 handwritten pages OR 2-3 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2). HOMEWORK VALUE=20 points (double value). Follow these Writing Standards.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER AND the rough draft of the paper. Compose the FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Monday, November 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What kinds of Regents questions can you expect on tomorrow’s midterm?

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class. Here are some answers: author's purpose, author's point of view, tone, characterization, figurative language (such as irony and symbolism), vocabulary in context, and inference.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Teacher analysis of T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapter 21 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will see on tomorrow's midterm?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapter 21 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (Regents-style midterm; multiple-choice questions only; review our Do Nows as practice; no need to study for this exam since you will receive reading passages to read and answer questions)--about 15% of the 3rd marking period.
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read the rest of the book--chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) AND chapter 24 (pp. 223-228). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:
    ROUGH DRAFT OF THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER: Compose a rough draft of the paper on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you may write the minimum number of sentences listed in the outline; about 3-4 handwritten pages OR 2-3 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2). HOMEWORK VALUE=20 points (double value). Follow these Writing Standards.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER AND the rough draft of the paper. Compose the FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Friday, November 13th, 2015: 1. Do Now: The minister questions himself: "Did I make a contract with him in the forest, and sign it with my blood?" (192). This question reflects the minister's previous temptation to
    A.) see Chillingworth
    B.) engage in immoralities
    C.) overcome his ignominy
    D.) present his election day sermon

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    SHOW HW: Show t-charts for chapters 20, 21 and 22.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Students (for class participation credit) will share their T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapter 20 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Monday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapter 20 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (Regents-style midterm; multiple-choice questions only; review our Do Nows as practice; no need to study for this exam since you will receive reading passages to read and answer questions)--about 15% of the 3rd marking period.
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read the rest of the book--chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) AND chapter 24 (pp. 223-228). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:
    ROUGH DRAFT OF THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER: Compose a rough draft of the paper on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you may write the minimum number of sentences listed in the outline; about 3-4 handwritten pages OR 2-3 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2). HOMEWORK VALUE=20 points (double value). Follow these Writing Standards.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER AND the rough draft of the paper. Compose the FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Thursday, November 12th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read your neighbor's creative vocabulary story. Compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) to your story. Evaluate using the following checklist:
    1.) Is there a title taken from one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter?
    2.) Does the story support the chosen title?
    3.) Are there 25 underlined vocabulary words in the story?
    4.) Do all 25 vocabulary words make sense in the context of the story?
    5.) Is the story one page typed or two handwritten pages?

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share your answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Introduce the The Scarlet Letter Paper Requirements. ROUGH DRAFT OF THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER: Compose a rough draft of the paper on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you may write the minimum number of sentences listed in the outline; about 3-4 handwritten pages OR 2-3 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2). HOMEWORK VALUE=20 points (double value). Follow these Writing Standards.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we evaluate our vocabulary stories and understand the requirements for The Scarlet Letter Paper? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th (LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD):
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), AND chapter 22 (pp. 205-214). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • LAST DAY TO CONTRIBUTE TO DISCUSSION ON THE SCARLET LETTER.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (Regents-style midterm; multiple-choice questions only; review our Do Nows as practice; no need to study for this exam since you will receive reading passages to read and answer questions)--about 15% of the 3rd marking period.
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read the rest of the book--chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) AND chapter 24 (pp. 223-228). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:
    ROUGH DRAFT OF THE SCARLET LETTER PAPER: Compose a rough draft of the paper on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you may write the minimum number of sentences listed in the outline; about 3-4 handwritten pages OR 2-3 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2). HOMEWORK VALUE=20 points (double value). Follow these Writing Standards.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER AND the rough draft of the paper. Compose the FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Tuesday, November 10th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Hester Prynne, as described on p. 174, can best be described as
    A.) cautious
    B.) critical
    C.) untamed
    D.) simple

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Students (for class participation credit) will share their T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapters 17, 18 and 19 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Thursday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapters 17, 18 and 19 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points): CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY using 25 words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You MUST use your chosen vocabulary words correctly and underline them! Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font). Include your name, my name, the date, and Junior English, Period_____ in your heading.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th (LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD):

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), AND chapter 22 (pp. 205-214). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • LAST DAY TO CONTRIBUTE TO DISCUSSION ON THE SCARLET LETTER.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (Regents-style midterm; multiple-choice questions only; review our Do Nows as practice; no need to study for this exam since you will receive reading passages to read and answer questions)--about 15% of the 3rd marking period.
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read the rest of the book--chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) AND chapter 24 (pp. 223-228). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: DETAILS TO COME! 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Monday, November 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: The narrator states that Dimmesdale and Hester were "each a ghost, and awe-stricken at the other ghost" (165) to suggest
    A.) ignominy
    B.) repentance
    C.) elation
    D.) shock

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    Show HW: T-Charts for Chapters 17, 18 and 19

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Students (for class participation credit) will share their T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapters 17 and 18 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapters 17 and 18 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY using 25 words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You MUST use your chosen vocabulary words correctly and underline them! Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten. Include your name, my name, the date, and Junior English, Period_____ in your heading.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th (LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD):

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), AND chapter 22 (pp. 205-214). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • LAST DAY TO CONTRIBUTE TO DISCUSSION ON THE SCARLET LETTER.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) AND chapter 24 (pp. 223-228). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: DETAILS TO COME! 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Friday, November 6th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Hester tells Pearl "as for the scarlet letter, I wear it for the sake of its gold thread" (158) in order to
    A.) create humor
    B.) emphasize the scarlet letter's beauty
    C.) validate the scarlet letter's greatness
    D.) avoid the scarlet letter's symbolism

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Students (for class participation credit) will share their T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapters 15 and 16 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Monday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapters 15 and 16 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 17 (pp. 165-173), chapter 18 (pp. 174-179), AND chapter 19 (pp. 180-186). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    BE READY TO SHARE YOUR T-CHART EVIDENCE AND ELABORATIONS TO EARN CLASS PARTICIPATION.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY using 25 words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You MUST use your chosen vocabulary words correctly and underline them! Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten. Include your name, my name, the date, and Junior English, Period_____ in your heading.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), AND chapter 22 (pp. 205-214). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) AND chapter 24 (pp. 223-228). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: DETAILS TO COME! 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Thursday, November 5th, 2015: 1. Do Now: As used at the bottom of p. 147, the phrase "its own nature" most nearly means
    A.) environment
    B.) features of wildlife
    C.) composition
    D.) non-living things

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Students (for class participation credit) will share their T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapters 13, 14, and 15 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapters 13, 14 and 15 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 17 (pp. 165-173), chapter 18 (pp. 174-179), AND chapter 19 (pp. 180-186). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    BE READY TO SHARE YOUR T-CHART EVIDENCE AND ELABORATIONS TO EARN CLASS PARTICIPATION.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY using 25 words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You MUST use your chosen vocabulary words correctly and underline them! Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten. Include your name, my name, the date, and Junior English, Period_____ in your heading.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), AND chapter 22 (pp. 205-214). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) AND chapter 24 (pp. 223-228). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: DETAILS TO COME! 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Wednesday, November 4th, 2015: 1. Do Now: The narrator states "that many people refused to interpret the scarlet A by its original signification. They said it meant Able..." (141). This indicates a transition in the citizens' attitude toward Hester that can best be described as
    A.) admiring to fearful
    B.) critical to sympathetic
    C.) humorous to angry
    D.) hopeful to cruel

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    Show HW: Show T-Charts for chapters 14, 15 and 16.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Students (for class participation credit) will share their T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapters 12 and 13 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapters 12 and 13 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 17 (pp. 165-173), chapter 18 (pp. 174-179), AND chapter 19 (pp. 180-186). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    BE READY TO SHARE YOUR T-CHART EVIDENCE AND ELABORATIONS TO EARN CLASS PARTICIPATION.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY using 25 words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You MUST use your chosen vocabulary words correctly and underline them! Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten. Include your name, my name, the date, and Junior English, Period_____ in your heading.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), AND chapter 22 (pp. 205-214). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) AND chapter 24 (pp. 223-228). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: DETAILS TO COME! 50% of the 3rd marking period!

  • TURN IN YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Monday, November 2nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: The narrator introduces the scene where Dimmesdale, "while standing on the scaffold...was overcome with a great horror of mind, as if the universe were gazing at a scarlet token on his naked breast, right over his heart" in order to show
    A.) his intense imagination
    B.) rebellion against Puritan rules
    C.) his guilt and desire for repentance
    D.) his desire to perform witchcraft

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Students (for class participation credit) will share their T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapters 12 and 13 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Wednesday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapters 12 and 13 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 14 (pp. 147-152), chapter 15 (pp. 152-158), AND chapter 16 (pp. 159-164). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    BE READY TO SHARE YOUR T-CHART EVIDENCE AND ELABORATIONS TO EARN CLASS PARTICIPATION.

  • Friday, October 30th, 2015: 1. Do Now: The narrator describes Dimmesdale seeing "a herd of diabolic shapes, that grinned and mocked at the pale minister, and beckoned him away with them..." (p. 127) to suggest that Dimmesdale is
    A.) respected B.) tortured C.) corrupt D.) indifferent

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    Show HW: Chapters 12 and 13 T-Charts

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Students (for class participation credit) will share their T-chart evidence and elaboration for chapters 10 and 11 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Monday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapters 10 and 11 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 14 (pp. 147-152), chapter 15 (pp. 152-158), AND chapter 16 (pp. 159-164). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST ELABORATE ON (EXPLAIN) the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    BE READY TO SHARE YOUR T-CHART EVIDENCE AND ELABORATIONS TO EARN CLASS PARTICIPATION.

  • Thursday, October 29th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Dimmesdale tells Chillingworth that "many a poor soul hath given its confidence to me...and after such an outpouring, O, what a relief I have witnessed in those sinful brethren!" (p. 115). This quote conveys a tone of
    A.) seriousness B.) sarcasm C.) empathy D.) reluctance

    *Explain why your answer is the correct one.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Review chapters 10 and 11 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence. Take additional notes in your t-chart.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapters 10 and 11 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 12 (pp. 129-138) AND chapter 13 (pp. 139-146). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST EXPLAIN the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • Wednesday, October 28th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read the 9-10 grading rubric (for baseline assessment) provided. Then, identify the strengths (+) and weaknesses (-) in each level for each trait.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Periods 2 and 7: Grade the 9th grade assessments, using the grading rubric provided.
  • Period 9 Only: Review questions/answers to The Scarlet Letter Exam.

    4. Discuss/Share: Review chapter 10 in The Scarlet Letter, focusing on evidence of characters' adversities and overcoming adversities. Be ready to explain the reasoning for the evidence and inferences made regarding the evidence.

    5. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we analyze the evidence, reasoning and inferences in chapter 10 of The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 12 (pp. 129-138) AND chapter 13 (pp. 139-146). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST EXPLAIN the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • Tuesday, October 27th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's work period (in your LA section): Look at the chapter titles for chapters 12-24. With neighbors at your table, divide up the chapter titles so that each person is assigned 4-5 chapter titles. Each person will write 1-2 sentences that predict what that chapter will focus on (use your prior knowledge: chapters 1-11 in The Scarlet Letter).

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Review questions/answers to The Scarlet Letter Exam.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • What are our strengths and weaknesses in our Scarlet Letter exam and what predictions can we make for the rest of the novel? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 12 (pp. 129-138) AND chapter 13 (pp. 139-146). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST EXPLAIN the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • Monday, October 26th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Chillingworth said that "some men bury their secrets...and "these men deceive themselves" (p. 116). What are the benefits and drawbacks of burying one's secrets?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Look at the chapter titles for chapters 12-24. With neighbors at your table, divide up the chapter titles so that each person is assigned 4-5 chapter titles. Each person will write 1-2 sentences that predict what that chapter will focus on (use your prior knowledge: chapters 1-11 in The Scarlet Letter).

    Show HW: Show chapters 10 and 11 T-Charts (include quotes, explanations and inferences to earn full credit).

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • What is the main message in chapter 10 and what predictions can we make for the rest of the novel? Make up owed homework!
    Friday, October 23rd, 2015: 1. Do Now: EXAM on chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter

    2. Work Period:

  • Work on homework (homework owed and homework due on Monday).

    3. Reflections: What did you learn today from reading chapter 10 (in the work period)? What can you predict will happen next in the novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 10 (pp. 113-121) and chapter 11 (pp. 122-128. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) NEW CHANGE: You MUST EXPLAIN the quotes (at least one sentence each) in your own words and prove why the quote fits as an adversity or overcoming adversity. INFERENCE: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • Thursday, October 22nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Should high school students be required to read The Scarlet Letter? Provide your answer (claim/thesis) and include three reasons to support your claim.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2:

  • Discuss and Take Notes on the evidence, author's purpose for these examples of adversities and overcoming adversities, and inferences (conclusions based on the evidence) for Chapters 8-9.
  • Distribution and Q & A on the Chapters 1-9 STUDY GUIDE

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • What are the significant roles of Dimmesdale and Chillingworth in chapter 9? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period grade) on Chapters 1-9. You must study all class and homework notes on ADVERSITIES and OVERCOMING ADVERSITIES, as well as the inference (conclusion) for each chapter. Here's a STUDY GUIDE (NOTE: you should know the inferences for each chapter). The Exam will only include multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.
  • Wednesday, October 21st, 2015: 1. Do Now: Just as Hester stands up for Pearl and Dimmesdale stands up for Hester, consider who stands up for you in times of adversity.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Discuss and Take Notes on the evidence, author's purpose for these examples of adversities and overcoming adversities, and inferences (conclusions based on the evidence) for Chapters 7-8.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify and understand the significance of evidence for adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 7-8? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21st:
  • ONE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT: Read chapter 9 (pp. 104-112) in The Scarlet Letter. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks). Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains what you've determined based on the evidence.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period grade) on Chapters 1-9. You must study all class and homework notes on ADVERSITIES and OVERCOMING ADVERSITIES, as well as the inference (conclusion) for each chapter. Here's a STUDY GUIDE. The Exam will only include multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.
  • Tuesday, October 20th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Is there a crime in today's society that is parallel to Hester's crime of adultery (consider a crime that would cause public ignominy)? Explain.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Discuss the Biography of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

  • What can you recognize or predict that you will see later in Hawthorne's novel, The Scarlet Letter, based on his personal characteristics, values and life history?
  • What adversities did he experience? Refer to specific details in his biography. Be ready to share.


  • Discuss and Take Notes on the evidence, author's purpose for these examples of adversities and overcoming adversities, and inferences (conclusions based on the evidence) for Chapters 6-8.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify and understand the significance of evidence for adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 6-8? DUE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21st:
  • ONE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT: Read chapter 9 (pp. 104-112) in The Scarlet Letter. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks). Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains what you've determined based on the evidence.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period grade) on Chapters 1-9. You must study all class and homework notes on ADVERSITIES and OVERCOMING ADVERSITIES, as well as the inference (conclusion) for each chapter. A review sheet will be provided. The Exam will only include multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.
  • Monday, October 19th, 2015: 1. Do Now: How would you describe an ideal parent?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Share answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read about Biography of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

  • What can you recognize or predict that you will see later Hawthorne's novel, The Scarlet Letter, based on his personal characteristics, values and life history?
  • What adversities did he experience? Refer to specific details in his biography. Be ready to share.

    Show HW: Show T-Charts and inferences for chapters 6-8.

    4. Discuss/Share:

  • Review evidence, author's purpose for these examples of adversities and overcoming adversities, and inferences (conclusions based on the evidence) for Chapters 6-8.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify and understand the significance of evidence for adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 6-8? Make up HW:
    See previous days' assignments.
    Friday, October 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary Lists 1-2

    2. Work Period: Work on the Homework.

    3. Discuss/Share:

  • Review evidence, author's purpose for these examples of adversities and overcoming adversities, and inferences (conclusions based on the evidence) for Chapter 5.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn on Monday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify and understand the significance of evidence for adversity and overcoming adversity in chapter 5? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 6, 7 and 8 (pp. 80-103) in The Scarlet Letter. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks) for EACH CHAPTER. Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains what you've determined based on the evidence from EACH CHAPTER.
    Thursday, October 15th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Why is the proverb (well-known saying) "Knowledge is Power" a true statement?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and share your Do Now answers with a neighbor. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: With a partner, find one piece of evidence on your assigned page of either a character's adversity or overcoming adversity. Be ready to explain the reasoning (author's purpose) for your evidence.

    4. Discuss/Share--Part 2:

  • Review evidence, author's purpose for these examples of adversities and overcoming adversities, and inferences (conclusions based on the evidence) for T-Charts for Chapters 4 and 5.

    5. Work Period: With a partner on the opposite side of the room, prepare for tomorrow's vocabulary test.

    6. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify and understand the significance of evidence for adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 4 and 5? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You need to know the definitions, how to use the words in sentences, and parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). The questions will not be multiple-choice.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
    Read chapters 6, 7 and 8 (pp. 80-103) in The Scarlet Letter. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks) for EACH CHAPTER. Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains what you've determined based on the evidence from EACH CHAPTER.

  • Tuesday, October 13th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What does the PSAT evaluate?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and share your Do Now answers with a neighbor. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share--Part 2: PSAT Review:

  • Review The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2.
  • PSAT Strategies:
    1.) If you see words that you don't know, use prior knowledge, which includes looking at the roots to connect to familiar words and recalling other languages (like Spanish, French, or Greek).
    2.) Cover up the answer choices. Then, find your own answer without being distracted by the answer choices. Write it in the margin. Finally, uncover your answer choices and identify the answer that matches yours (it's usually right!).
    3.) You can and should leave some questions unanswered (this means to omit some questions; figure that you should leave 2-3 questions blank per section).
    4.) Preview questions for line numbers. Then, underline the line numbers in the reading passages (before you read!). Finally, read the passages, keeping the underlined lines in mind since there will questions on these lines.
    5.) The most common question types are inferences (which include "infer," "imply," "suggest," "assume," and "conclude") and author's purpose (WHY the author makes choices throughout the reading passages).

    4. Work Period: Prepare for tomorrow's PSAT. Look at some sample questions (handouts provided).

    Show HW: T-Charts for Chapters 4 and 5 with inference sentences.

    5. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prepare for the PSAT? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:
  • Prepare for the PSAT. Check out this PSAT College Board resource.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16th:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You need to know the definitions, how to use the words in sentences, and parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). The questions will not be multiple-choice.
  • Friday, October 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: For whom would you keep a secret, even if it means that you are punished? Why?

    2. Discuss/Share--Part 1: Turn and share your Do Now answers with a neighbor. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share--Part 2: Share evidence of adversities and overcoming adversities in chapters 2 and 3. Fill T-charts. What inferences (conclusions) can you draw from the evidence presented?

    4. Work Period: Begin HW.

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the adversities and opportunities to overcome adversity in chapters 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points): Read chapters 4 and 5 (pages 65-79) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for the evidence (one sentence is sufficient): What inference (conclusion) can you draw from the evidence?). YOU SHOULD HAVE TWO T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE TWO CHAPTERS).

    DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16th:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You need to know the definitions, how to use the words in sentences, and parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). The questions will not be multiple-choice.
  • Thursday, October 8th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's argumentative paragraph. In your LA section, finish writing a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you answer the following question: DOES HESTER PRYNNE'S PUNISHMENT FIT HER CRIME? Cite textual evidence (at least one quote, page # and paragraph #) to support your argument.

    2. Discuss/Share--Part 1: Turn and share your Do Now answers with a neighbor. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share--Part 2: Share evidence of adversities and overcoming adversities in chapters 2 and 3. Fill T-charts. What inferences (conclusions) can you draw from the evidence presented?

    4. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the crime and punishment in chapters 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter? Make up Homework:
  • See previous days' assignments. THE LAST DAY OF THE 1st MARKING PERIOD IS TOMORROW: FRIDAY (all owed work MUST be turned in by tomorrow).

    DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16th:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You need to know the definitions, how to use the words in sentences, and parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). The questions will not be multiple-choice.
  • Wednesday, October 7th, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are the most popular topics of gossip today?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and share your Do Now answers with a neighbor. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you answer the following question: DOES HESTER PRYNNE'S PUNISHMENT FIT HER CRIME? Cite textual evidence (at least one quote, page # and paragraph #) to support your argument.

    SHOW HOMEWORK: Three T-Charts (Chapters 1, 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter)

    4. Discuss/Share: Share your Work Period arguments with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    5. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the crime and punishment in chapters 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter? Make up Homework:
  • See previous days' assignments. THE LAST DAY OF THE 1st MARKING PERIOD IS THIS FRIDAY (all owed work MUST be turned in by Friday).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You need to know the definitions, how to use the words in sentences, and parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). The questions will not be multiple-choice.
  • Monday (10/5)-Tuesday (10/6), 2015: Work Period:
  • In THE SCARLET LETTER, read chapter 1 (The Prison-Door)-pp. 45-46. Create a T-Chart on Adversity vs. Overcoming Adversity. Find at least two pieces of textual evidence (cite properly, using quotation marks, page numbers, and paragraph numbers) from chapter 1 for each side of the T-Chart. Write one analytical sentence for the evidence in which you answer the following question: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence?

  • Work on the Homework: THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): In THE SCARLET LETTER, read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for the evidence (one sentence is sufficient): What inference (conclusion) can you draw from the evidence?). YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS).

  • STUDY The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You need to know the definitions, how to use the words in sentences, and parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). The questions will not be multiple-choice.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we improve our vocabulary acquisition and citation of textual evidence? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for the evidence (one sentence is sufficient): What inference (conclusion) can you draw from the evidence?). YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS).

    Make up Homework:

  • See previous days' assignments.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You need to know the definitions, how to use the words in sentences, and parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). The questions will not be multiple-choice.
  • Friday, October 2nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: Create a facebook status update OR an image for your assigned words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and share your Do Now status update or image with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Vocabulary Review: Class review of vocabulary words, parts of speech, definitions, and original sentences from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2.

    4. Work Period:

  • Check out your copy of The Scarlet Letter.
  • Read chapter 1 (The Prison-Door)-pp. 45-46. Create a T-Chart on Adversity vs. Overcoming Adversity. Find two pieces of textual evidence (cite properly, using quotation marks, page numbers, and paragraph numbers) from chapter 1 for each side of the T-Chart. Write one analytical sentence for each piece of evidence in which you answer the following question: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence?

    5. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we improve our vocabulary acquisition and citation of textual evidence? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for each piece of evidence: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence?). YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS).

    Make up Homework:

  • See previous days' assignments.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. You need to know the definitions, how to use the words in sentences, and parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). The questions will not be multiple-choice.
  • Thursday, October 1st, 2015: 1. Do Now:
  • DOK #1: What career do you want to pursue?
  • DOK #2: How would you apply what you learned in citing textual evidence and acquiring new vocabulary to your future career?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: With your table mates, finish choosing five questions (preferably questions that you answered incorrectly) from your Exam on the war short stories. Then, cite textual evidence in the war short stories to support the Exam's correct answers. Be ready to share.

    4. Discuss/Share:

  • Review answers of the EXAM on "War Prayer," "In Another Country" and "Soldier's Home." Share your cited textual evidence (refer to page numbers and paragraph numbers) to support your answers.
  • Share your definitions and original sentences for each of the vocabulary words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2.

    6. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How are textual evidence citations and the acquisition of new vocabulary words related to our future careers (DOK #3)? Make up Homework:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Wednesday, September 30th, 2015: 1. Do Now: View the image of a celebrity at your table (Eminem, Jay-Z, J.K. Rowling, Halle Berry, Walt Disney, Stephen Hawking, Malala Yousafzai, Jennifer Lopez, and Stevie Wonder). What adversity (struggle/misfortune/trouble) has this celebrity experienced? How has he/she overcome the adversity?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: With your table mates, cite textual evidence in the war short stories to support the Exam's correct answers. Each student will be given 5 questions to cite the textual evidence. Be ready to share.

    Show HW: Vocabulary Flashcards for Lists 1 and 2 and the pie chart.

    4. Discuss/Share: Review answers of the EXAM on "War Prayer," "In Another Country" and "Soldier's Home." Use the textual evidence to support your answers.

    5. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we prepare to understand the themes of adversity and overcoming adversity, as will be seen in The Scarlet Letter? Make up Homework:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Monday, September 28th-Tuesday, September 29th, 2015: Work Period: DIAGNOSTIC EXAM (Write in pen only. You will need the whole period, since this is a two-day exam)

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we prove our ability to form arguments and cite textual evidence? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th:
  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2: Create flashcards for all 50 words. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition, an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists), the chapter and page number on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

  • INTERVIEW 10 teenage friends and ask them this question: What is the top adversity you are experiencing today? Then, once you've interviewed 10 friends, CREATE A PIE CHART in which you identify the percentages and label each adversity accurately (correctly). Each friend represents 10%. If two friends have the same answer, then you make their section 20%. Here are sample pie charts. Include labels and title like in this sample pie chart with labels and title.
  • Friday, September 25th, 2015: 1. Do Now: EXAM on "War Prayer," "In Another Country" and "Soldier's Home"

    2. Work Period #1:

  • In your Language Skills section (LS), define ADVERSITY. Write a personal, complex sentence using the word ADVERSITY correctly. Write another complex sentence using the word ADVERSITY correctly about the three war stories we read.
  • Inspect the novel, The Scarlet Letter (see our class copies). What adversities can you predict will be introduced in the novel? Read the back cover synopsis (summary) and identify one example of ADVERSITY and one example of OVERCOMING ADVERSITY that you will be reading in this novel (create an ADVERSITY/OVERCOMING ADVERSITY t-chart in your LA SECTION).

    3. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over your definition, sentences and predictions about adversities in The Scarlet Letter.
  • Student volunteers will contribute work period answers with the whole class.

    4. Work Period #2: Instructions and preparations for next week's Diagnostic Exam on Monday and Tuesday.

    5. Reflections: What did you learn today that you found useful or intriguing? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we prove our knowledge of the plot diagrams in an assessment of "Soldier's Home", "In Another Country" and "War Prayer"? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th:
  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2: Create flashcards for all 50 words. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition, an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists), the chapter and page number on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Interview 10 teenage friends and ask them this question: What is the top adversity you are experiencing today? Then, once you've interviewed 10 friends, make a pie chart in which you identify the percentages and label each adversity accurately (correctly). Each friend represents 10%. If two friends have the same answer, then you make their section 20%. Here are sample pie charts. Include labels and title like in this sample pie chart with labels and title.
  • Tuesday, September 22nd, 2015: 1. Do Now: What are the benefits and drawbacks of composing a plot diagram for a short story?

    2. Share/Discuss: Turn and talk over your Do Now answers with a neighbor. Share with the whole class. Sentence starters include the following:

  • The benefits of a plot diagram include...
  • The drawbacks of a plot diagram include...
  • The plot diagram accurately functions because...
  • The plot diagram does not function well because...

    3. Work Period:

  • Using the teacher's model on the board, fill in the rest of the Plot Diagram for "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway.
  • With a partner, fill in the plot diagram for "In Another Country".
  • With a partner fill in the plot diagram for "War Prayer".

    Show owed HW.

    4. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the plot diagrams. As a whole class, discuss the components of the plot diagrams for all three short stories. Cite textual evidence to support the components of the plot diagram. Sample sentence starter: On page ____, paragraph #_____, the ___________(component of the plot diagram) can be found. Take notes on the class-determined plot diagrams.

    5. Reflections Exit Slip:
    3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing on Friday.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    6. HW Reminder

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we understand the function (purpose) of the plot diagram, using "Soldier's Home", "In Another Country" and "War Prayer"? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Exam (50% of the 1st marking period grade) on all three short stories: "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway, "In Another Country" and "War Prayer". Know the Plot Diagram for each short story. Review the quizzes and class note-taking. Bring a #2 pencil.

  • ADD THE FOLLOWING TO YOUR PLOT DIAGRAM FOR "WAR PRAYER" by Mark Twain (study it for the exam, too!): Exposition: Setting-unknown location, church and street during a war; Situation-patriotic people celebrating their soldiers and wartime. Characters-aged stranger and minister. Rising Action: 1.) Anti-war people storming the street, 2.) Church fills with war heroes, families and volunteers, and 3.) Aged stranger enters the church. Climax: Stranger reveals he's the Lord's messenger. Falling Action: Stranger reveals if you bless yourself, then you're cursing your neighbor; Stranger asks the Lord for blessings on soldiers and curses on their enemies. Resolution: Stranger is believed to be a lunatic. Conflict: Protagonist=Stranger vs. Antagonist=enemies of war. Theme: War gives blessings to one side and curses to the others.
  • Monday, September 21st, 2015: 1. Do Now: What do you know about the components of a plot diagram?

    2. Share/Discuss: Share your prior knowledge from the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Fill in a Plot Diagram for "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway

    Show HW: Vocabulary Flashcards for the short stories.

    4. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the plot diagram. As a whole class, discuss the components of the plot diagram for "Soldier's Home." Discuss the symbols on the Annotation Bookmark. Share two annotation symbols per page and explain your reasoning for each symbol. Discuss these key elements of the story: characterization of the protagonist (Krebs), setting, characters' relationships, the protagonist's internal and external conflicts, and hardships of war.

    5. Reflections/HW:

  • What was valuable/intriguing about today's lesson on plot diagram and annotation symbols in "Soldier's Home"?

    Common Core Standards:

  • Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we understand the plot diagram and annotation symbols, using "Soldier's Home"? Make up owed homework:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Friday, September 18th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Quiz on "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway

    2. Work Period: Read & Annotate: Read and annotate (take notes) the class syllabus with the symbols on the Annotation Bookmark. Use two symbols per page and explain your reasoning for each symbol.

    Show HW: Show annotations (two symbols + reasoning per page) on "Soldier's Home."

    3. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the syllabus with a neighbor. Discuss as a whole class.

    4. Discuss/Share--Part 2: Turn and talk over the annotations on "Soldier's Home." Discuss these key elements of the story: characterization of the protagonist (Krebs), setting, characters' relationships, the protagonist's internal and external conflicts, and hardships of war. Share as a whole class.

    5. Reflections/HW:

  • What was valuable/intriguing about today's lesson on annotation symbols in "Soldier's Home"?
  • Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we understand the annotation symbols, using "Soldier's Home"? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • Fill out and get your parent/guardian to sign the last page of the syllabus.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Identify 20 unfamiliar words in the packet of short stories ("The War Prayer," "Soldier's Home," and "In Another Country"). Write the words in your LS section. Create flashcards for all the words. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition, an original sentence (not the sentence provided in a short story) and the title of the short story the word was taken from on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Thursday, September 17th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read the Annotation Bookmark at each table. Which symbol do you prefer and why? Which symbol do you think you will use the least and why?

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Read & Annotate: Re-read "In Another Country" and ANNOTATE (take notes) with the symbols on the Annotation Bookmark.

    4. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Work Period questions with a neighbor. Volunteers share their answers.

    5. Reflections/HW:

  • What was valuable/intriguing about today's lesson on annotation symbols?
  • Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we understand the annotation symbols, using "In Another Country"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous day's assignments.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:

  • Read the short story, "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway. Make at least TWO symbols on each page of the short story from the Annotation Bookmark and explain your reasoning. READING QUIZ (10% of the 1st marking period). You must know the following: characterization of the protagonist (Krebs), setting, characters' relationships, the protagonist's internal and external conflicts, and hardships of war.
  • Wednesday, September 16th, 2015: 1. Do Now: READING QUIZ on "In Another Country"

    Show HW:

  • Supplies for this class: A three-ring binder filled with loose-leaf paper for English (or a section in a larger binder) with the following, FIVE LABELED sections: Do Nows and Aims (DNA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), Regents Strategies (RS), and Homework (HW)
  • Good Deed paragraph

    2. Work Period: In your LA section, write "In Another Country" title, date, and the following questions, using textual evidence to support each answer. Work with a neighbor.
    1.) What's the significance of the title "In Another Country"?
    2.) What is the doctor's prognosis for the narrator? Why is this prognosis ironic?
    3.) How is camaraderie achieved in this story?
    4.) What are the soldiers' relationship with the machines?
    5.) What does the major tell the narrator about marriage and why?

    3. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Work Period questions with a neighbor. Volunteers share their answers.

    4. Whole-Class Discussion: Share work period questions/answers. How are the questions relevant today? Refer to a doctor-patient relationship, the establishment of camaraderie between people, people's relationships with machines, and the benefits and drawbacks of marriage.

    5. Reflections/HW: What was valuable/intriguing about today's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we understand the author's purpose and themes in "In Another Country"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous day's assignments.
  • Friday, September 11th, 2015: 1. Do Now: If you had one wish, what would it be and why?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now question with a neighbor. Volunteers share their answers.

    3. Whole-Class Discussion: What are the wishes expressed by the stranger in "The War Prayer"? How are these wishes ironic (opposite from their intention)? How do these wishes compare (show similarities) to the wishes of survivors, victims' families and observers on 9/11?

    4. Work Period: Finish reading "The War Prayer"--a short story by Mark Twain. This short story is filled with irony: anti-war sentiments. Identify textual evidence (at least three examples) that supports the ANTI-WAR theme. Use this heading:

    Ms. Conn                                 Your Name
    Class, Period                            Date
    Assignment: "The War Prayer"
          
                         Title
    

    5. Rules/Responsibilities in Room 232: With table groups, students will compete against other groups by answering these questions: What are the procedures for the following--

  • Daily lesson? (agenda on the board, copy do now, aim and date every day)
  • Supplies? (bring your own pen/pencil and paper every day; you cannot borrow from the teacher)
  • Class participation? (Consider raising hands, not talking unless addressed by teacher, and not getting out of your seat unless asked/told to do so)
  • Electronics and head gear? (not shown unless told by teacher to take out for academic purposes)
  • Late Assignments? (legitimate excuse note must be provided with homework, otherwise it's 1/2 credit for informal assignments and -10 points for formal assignments with a rubric)
  • Homework? (msconn.net)
  • Heading? (name, date, teacher's name, class name, period, and assignment title)
  • Bathroom and Late Logs? (sign in at the desk by the door)
  • Lockdown drill? (hide away from the windows, turn lights off, and remain silent until the "all clear" is on the PA)
  • Teacher's values? (look around the room--Shakespeare, acting in the classroom, college, inspirational quotes, Cornell notes, discussion strategies, standards, books, and msconn.net)

    6. Reflections/HW: Why was today's lesson valuable for you as a reader, writer and student of this class? Introduce the HW assignments.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we understand the author's purpose of irony in "The War Prayer"? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:
  • Supplies for this class: A three-ring binder filled with loose-leaf paper for English (or a section in a larger binder) with the following, FIVE LABELED sections: Do Nows and Aims (DNA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), Regents Strategies (RS), and Homework (HW). Here's the syllabus (we will review it next week).

  • Read "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway. Be ready for a READING QUIZ (10% of the 1st marking period) which will evaluate you on the following: examples of irony, theme, narrator's attitude toward machines, setting, characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, and other people's perceptions) of characters, and author's message.

  • Do a good deed (volunteering) in honor of 9/11 and write about your experience in a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) which you will TURN IN. You must include the proper heading (see classwork). Your good deed should involve a minimum of 1 hour of service to others. You MUST include the following: the description of the good deed, the reason you chose this good deed, how the good deed influenced others, how the good deed made you feel, and how the good deed will make the world a better place. Here are some suggestions: Use Volunteer Match to find a volunteer opportunity that matches your personal interests and location. Tutor a child in your neighborhood or family. Go grocery shopping for an elderly man/woman. Go to a homeless shelter and serve the guests a meal. No money is given for a good deed--it's volunteer only.
  • Thursday, September 10th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Seat assignments (arrange in alphabetical order, by last name).

    2. Work Period:
    A.) Why do high schools instill a sense of spirit at athletic games? How would you evaluate (on a score of 1-10; 10 is the highest) Info Tech's school spirit?
    B.) Why do nations instill patriotism during times of war? How would you evaluate American patriotism (on a score of 1-10; 10 is the highest)?
    C.) Why do people seek religion during times of war and suffering? How would you evaluate Americans' religiosity (on a score of 1-10; 10 is the highest)?
    **Write your answers on the paper provided.

    3. Discussion/Sharing: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Choose the question that intrigues (interests) you, and share your answer with that neighbor. Whole Class Sharing (volunteers).

    4. Work Period: Read "The War Prayer"--a short story by Mark Twain. This short story is filled with irony: anti-war sentiments. Identify textual evidence (at least three examples) that supports the anti-war theme.

    5. Discussion/Sharing: Whole-class sharing. No opt-out (everyone must share at least one example from their notecard).

    6. Reflections (Exit Slip): What does this short story reveal about people's behaviors in times of war?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do we identify textual evidence to support irony in Twain's "The War Prayer" and, as a result, understand his anti-war sentiments? N/A
    Wednesday, September 9th, 2015: 1. Do Now: Read excerpts from the statistics about Information Technology High School (excerpts will be provided in class) taken from the following:
  • 2014-2015 Quality Review Report (produced by the New York City Department of Education)
  • U.S. News and World Report Best High Schools article

    2. Discussion/Sharing: In groups of three, discuss the answer to the following question: Should Information Technology High School be considered an exemplary (outstanding) high school? Share the evidence from the statistics provided.

    3. Work Period: On the notecard provided, answer the discussion question "Should Information Technology High School be considered an exemplary (outstanding) high school?" Using at least three pieces of evidence (you MUST include two pieces of evidence from the Quality Review Report and U.S. News and World Report; you may also include your own personal knowledge/experiences from attending ITHS, as well as information from a family member, friend, or another news source), write an argument (you MUST fill the entire notecard--front and back) regarding whether or not Info Tech High School should be considered an exemplary (outstanding) high school.

    4. Discussion/Sharing: Whole-class sharing. No opt-out (everyone must share at least one sentence from their notecard).

    5. Reflections (Exit Slip): Turn in your notecard at the end of class (the notecard constitutes today's exit slip).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How do we identify evidence to support an argument and how do we establish an argument? N/A