Freshman English Assignments, Fall/Winter Semester, 2016-2017

Freshman English Assignments
Fall/Winter Semester, 2016-2017

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 23rd, 2017:
1. Warm-Up: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer.

2. Discuss/Share: Share your evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that develop his character as a hero.

3. Distribution and review of Final Exams

5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about elements of literacy? What do you want to know? What did you learn this semester that you will remember long-term?

Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify textual evidence to support the characterization of Odysseus as a hero on his journey? Good luck on any Regents Exams! It was a pleasure being your teacher. In the week ahead, when you have free time, read a good book, newspapers, magazines, online news (www.nytimes.com, www.cnn.com, www.wsj.com, and more), and exercise your mind and body. Stretch your limits! See you next semester!
    Friday, January 20th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer.

    2. Work Period: Complete the Character Map #2 for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero. THIS IS DUE BY THE END OF CLASS TODAY.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that develop his character as a hero.

    4. Make up any owed HW.

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about Odysseus from The Odyssey? What do you want to know? What did you learn today about Odysseus' character traits and textual evidence?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify textual evidence to support the characterization of Odysseus as a hero on his journey? N/A
    Thursday, January 19th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer.

    2. Work Period: Fill out the Character Map #2 for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero. THIS IS DUE BY THE END OF CLASS TOMORROW.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that develop his character as a hero.

    4. Make up any owed HW.

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about Odysseus from The Odyssey? What do you want to know? What did you learn today about Odysseus' character traits and textual evidence?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify textual evidence to support the characterization of Odysseus as a hero on his journey? DUE BY THE END OF CLASS, TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 20th:
  • Character Map #2 on Odysseus, the hero in the film, "The Odyssey."

    Make up owed homework BY THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 20th--the LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER (see previous days' assignments).

  • Wednesday, January 18th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer.

    2. Work Period: Fill out the Character Map #1 for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero. THIS IS DUE BY THE END OF CLASS TODAY.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that develop his character as a hero.

    4. Make up any owed HW.

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about Odysseus from The Odyssey? What do you want to know? What did you learn today about Odysseus' character traits and textual evidence?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify textual evidence to support the characterization of Odysseus as a hero on his journey? DUE BY THE END OF CLASS, FRIDAY, JANUARY 20th:
  • Character Map #2 on Odysseus, the hero in the film, "The Odyssey."

    Make up owed homework BY THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 20th--the LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER (see previous days' assignments).

  • Tuesday, January 17th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer.

    2. Work Period: Fill out the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that make him a hero. THIS IS DUE BY THE END OF CLASS TOMORROW.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your evidence to support Odysseus' character traits that develop his character as a hero.

    4. Make up any owed HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we identify textual evidence to support the characterization of Odysseus? DUE BY THE END OF CLASS TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18th:
  • Character Map #1 on Odysseus, the hero in the film, "The Odyssey."

    Make up owed homework BY THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 20th--the LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER (see previous days' assignments).

  • Friday, January 13th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: Reminder instructions for the FINAL EXAM.

    2. Work Period #1: FINISH the FINAL EXAM (read the texts, take notes in the margin, underline, circle key words, and write the essay today and tomorrow).

    3. Make up any owed HW.

    4. Work Period #2: Make a TOP TEN LIST of the characterization (Speech, Thoughts, Effects on others, Actions, and Looks) of a HERO. Prepare to watch the film on Odyssey by researching (on your electronic device) 3 reasons why the protagonist, Odysseus, is a hero. Here's a great resource: Brittanica.com.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts.
  • How can we compose a successful, argumentative essay (using textual evidence from three texts provided) on the FINAL EXAM? Make up owed homework BY NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 20th--the LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER (see previous days' assignments).
    Thursday, January 12th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: Reminder instructions for the FINAL EXAM.

    2. Work Period: FINAL EXAM (read the texts, take notes in the margin, underline, circle key words, and write the essay today and tomorrow).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts.
  • How can we compose a successful, argumentative essay (using textual evidence from three texts provided) on the FINAL EXAM? Make up owed homework BY FRIDAY, JANUARY 20th--the LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER (see previous days' assignments).

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:

  • FINISH THE FINAL EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period). Be ready to read passages, take notes in the margins, write a 5-paragraph, argumentative essay (with 3 body paragraphs that contain 10-12 sentences each), focus on the answer to the topic question (which will be your thesis in the introductory paragraph), and include abundant textual evidence to support your thesis. You will use your Midterm Exam to guide you (you have already received the graded midterm exam).
  • Wednesday, January 11th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: Listen to instructions for the FINAL EXAM.

    2. Work Period: FINAL EXAM (read the texts today, take notes in the margin, underline, circle key words, and prepare to write the essay tomorrow).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts.
  • How can we prepare to compose a successful, argumentative essay on the FINAL EXAM? Make up owed homework BY FRIDAY, JANUARY 20th--the LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER (see previous days' assignments).

    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 12th-FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:

  • FINAL EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period). Be ready to read passages, take notes in the margins, write a 5-paragraph, argumentative essay (with 3 body paragraphs that contain 10-12 sentences each), focus on the answer to the topic question (which will be your thesis in the introductory paragraph), and include abundant textual evidence to support your thesis. You will use your Midterm Exam to guide you (you have already received the midterm exam).
  • Tuesday, January 10th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: Midterm Exams returned. Fill out your portfolio folders with the grades you earned on the Midterm and the teacher's notes.

    SHOW owed HW..

    2. Discuss/Share Part 1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share warm and cool feedback from the teacher's notes on the Midterm Exam with each person at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share the warm and cool feedback on the Midterms with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share Part 2: Discuss Midterm Exam strategies for tomorrow's Midterm.

    4. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about strategies for success on an argumentative essay? What do you want to know further about how to be successful on an argumentative essay? What did you learn today about strategies for success on an argumentative essay?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts.
  • How can we compose a successful, argumentative essay on the FINAL EXAM by reviewing the contents of the Midterm Exam? Make up owed homework (see previous days' assignments.

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11th-FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:

  • FINAL EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period). Be ready to read passages, take notes in the margins, write a 5-paragraph, argumentative essay (with 3 body paragraphs that contain 10-12 sentences each), focus on the answer to the topic question (which will be your thesis in the introductory paragraph), and include abundant textual evidence to support your thesis. You will use your Midterm Exam to guide you (you will receive the midterm exam tomorrow).
  • Monday, January 9th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: Get a textbook and go to "The Journey," a poem by Mary Oliver on p. 442. What kind of journey (physical, emotional or spiritual journey) have you been on and why?

    SHOW owed HW..

    2. Discuss/Share Part 1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share one interesting message, personal thought/feeling/connection or textual connection from each person at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share Part 2"The Journey," a poem by Mary Oliver: Discuss the answers to the questions on p. 444 in the textbook.

    4. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about today's poem? What do you want to know further about today's poem? What did you learn in today's poem?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we ANALYZE (examine closely) the poem, "Journey" for figurative language and textual evidence? Make up owed homework (see previous days' assignments.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11th-FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:

  • FINAL EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period). Be ready to read passages, take notes in the margins, write a 5-paragraph essay (with 3 body paragraphs that contain 10-12 sentences each), focus on the answer to the topic question (which will be your thesis in the introductory paragraph), and include abundant textual evidence to support your thesis. You will use your Midterm Exam to guide you (you will receive the midterm exam tomorrow).
  • Friday, January 6th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: Get a textbook and go to "The Journey," a poem by Mary Oliver on p. 442. Identify an example of figurative language (like personification, metaphor, imagery, or repetition) in the poem (find a quote and the line number) AND explain why it's significant (important) to the poem's overall meaning.

    SHOW owed HW..

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share one interesting message, personal thought/feeling/connection or textual connection from each person at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period "The Journey," a poem by Mary Oliver: Answer the questions on p. 444 in the textbook. You have to finish this before the bell rings TODAY. This will count for classwork in jupitergrades.com.

    4. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about today's poem? What do you want to know further about today's poem? What did you learn in today's poem?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we ANALYZE (examine closely) the poem, "Journey" for figurative language and textual evidence? Make up owed homework (see previous days' assignments.
    Thursday, January 5th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: Get a textbook and read "The Journey," a poem by Mary Oliver on p. 442. Re-read the poem. Write a one-page journal in which you explain the poet's message, your thoughts and feelings, personal connections, and textual connections (relate to your independent novel). CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE (find quotes with line numbers) to support your claims. *This will count for classwork in jupitergrades.com. You MUST turn in TODAY.

    SHOW owed HW..

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share one interesting message, personal thought/feeling/connection or textual connection from each person at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period "The Journey," a poem by Mary Oliver: Answer the questions on p. 444 in the textbook. You will have time to finish this tomorrow. This will count for classwork in jupitergrades.com.

    4. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about today's poem? What do you want to know further about today's poem? What did you learn in today's poem?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we ANALYZE (examine closely) the poem, "Journey" for personal and textual connections and the author's message? Make up owed homework (see previous days' assignments.
    Wednesday, January 4th, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: QUIZ on your independent novel

    SHOW HW: 10 more post-it notes on your independent novel.

    2. Work Period: Get a textbook and read "The Journey," a poem by Mary Oliver on p. 442. Re-read the poem. Write a one-page journal in which you explain the poet's message, your thoughts and feelings, personal connections, and textual connections (relate to your independent novel).

    3. Read-Aloud and Discussion on "The Journey," a poem by Mary Oliver. What do you believe is the poet's message? What were your personal and textual connections to the poem? What literary techniques did the poet use and how did those techniques develop the poet's message?

    4. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about today's poem? What do you want to know further about today's poem? What did you learn in today's poem?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we understand and apply literary techniques in our independent novels and the poem, "Journey"? Make up owed homework (see previous days' assignments.

    Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017:
    1. Warm-Up: Arrange into your Book Club groups.

    SHOW owed HW..

    2. Book Club Work Period: Arrange into book clubs of 3-4 people per table (making certain that you're reading the same novel). Choose a Recorder, Discussion Leader, and Researcher(s). You will answer the following questions in your Book Club. Cite textual evidence (page numbers and quotes) for each question.
    1.) How are you experiencing the novel? Are you engaged (enjoying/interested) in the novel? Explain. How do you feel reading the novel--amused, sad, disturbed, confused, bored, or another feeling?
    2.) Describe the characterization of the main characters--speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and looks. Why do the characters do what they do? Describe the interactions between characters (in families and friendship). Do you admire or disapprove of the characters? Do they remind you of people you know?
    3.) Discuss the plot--main events of the story. Are the events engaging (interesting)? Is the novel a page-turner? Are you surprised by any of the events? Explain. Do you find the plot predictable? Explain.
    4.) What passages strike you as insightful (thoughtful)? Are there any powerful passages that make you think about your own life?
    5.) Has the novel changed you or taught you anything new? Have you been exposed to different ideas about people or a certain part of the world?

    ***TURN IN BOOK CLUB ANSWERS BY THE END OF CLASS. INCLUDE NAMES OF ALL BOOK CLUB MEMBERS AND THEIR ROLES: RECORDER, DISCUSSION LEADER AND RESEARCHER(S).

    3. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about today's lesson? What do you want to know further about today's lesson? What did you learn in today's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we better understand and be able to discuss characterization, plot, and lessons in our independent novels? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4th:
  • DUE TOMORROW: FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4th, 2017. COMPOSE 10 MORE POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL (10% of the 3rd marking period grade)! PROVE THAT YOU READ THE ENTIRE BOOK! KNOW AND APPLY THE DEFINITIONS FOR THE LITERARY TERMS: CHARACTERIZATION (including the mnemonic device, STEAL), CONFLICT, SETTING, SYMBOLISM, AND AUTHOR'S TONE. Be able to describe the characterization of the main characters in your novel--speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and looks. Why do the characters do what they do? Describe the interactions between characters (in families and friendship). Be able to discuss the plot--main events of the story. What are the conflicts in your novel (know the internal conflicts--what characters are struggling with--and the external conflicts--which characters have problems/struggles with other characters? Know the setting (time and place) of your novel. What is the author's tone (positive or negative) in your novel? What symbols exist in your novel and what do they represent?

    HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

  • Wednesday, December 23rd, 2016:
    1. Warm-Up: Work on your Book Club Questions with your group.

    SHOW owed HW..

    2. Gift of Kindness Activity

    3. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about today's lesson? What do you want to know further about today's lesson? What did you learn in today's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we apply our literary knowledge online? BOOK CLUB QUESTIONS WILL BE COMPLETED IN CLASS ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4th:

  • DATE CHANGE: FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4th, 2017. COMPOSE 10 MORE POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL (10% of the 3rd marking period grade)! PROVE THAT YOU READ THE ENTIRE BOOK! KNOW AND APPLY THE DEFINITIONS FOR THE LITERARY TERMS: CHARACTERIZATION (including the mnemonic device, STEAL), CONFLICT, SETTING, SYMBOLISM, AND AUTHOR'S TONE. Be able to describe the characterization of the main characters in your novel--speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and looks. Why do the characters do what they do? Describe the interactions between characters (in families and friendship). Be able to discuss the plot--main events of the story. What are the conflicts in your novel (know the internal conflicts--what characters are struggling with--and the external conflicts--which characters have problems/struggles with other characters? Know the setting (time and place) of your novel. What is the author's tone (positive or negative) in your novel? What symbols exist in your novel and what do they represent?

  • Thursday, December 22nd, 2016:
    1. Warm-Up: Answer (CHOOSE ONE) one of the following DOK questions on your independent novel. Write 1-2 sentences for your chosen question.
  • DOK 2: How would you classify (categorize, put in a genre) your novel?
  • DOK 3: How would you elaborate (explain in detail) the reason that the author wrote your novel?
  • DOK 4: What would you want to research from your novel and why? You should consider the historical background, setting, or the author's other choices.

    SHOW owed HW..

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share one DOK question and the answer from your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Book Club Discussion: Arrange into book clubs of 3-4 people per table (making certain that you're reading the same novel). Choose a Recorder, Discussion Leader, and Researcher(s). You will answer the following questions in your Book Club. Cite textual evidence (page numbers and quotes) for each question.
    1.) How are you experiencing the novel? Are you engaged (enjoying/interested) in the novel? Explain. How do you feel reading the novel--amused, sad, disturbed, confused, bored, or another feeling?
    2.) Describe the characterization of the main characters--speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and looks. Why do the characters do what they do? Describe the interactions between characters (in families and friendship). Do you admire or disapprove of the characters? Do they remind you of people you know?
    3.) Discuss the plot--main events of the story. Are the events engaging (interesting)? Is the novel a page-turner? Are you surprised by any of the events? Explain. Do you find the plot predictable? Explain.
    4.) What passages strike you as insightful (thoughtful)? Are there any powerful passages that make you think about your own life?
    5.) Has the novel changed you or taught you anything new? Have you been exposed to different ideas about people or a certain part of the world?

    4. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about today's lesson? What do you want to know further about today's lesson? What did you learn in today's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we better understand and be able to discuss characterization, plot, and lessons in our independent novels? HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • DATE CHANGE: FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4th, 2017. COMPOSE 10 MORE POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL (10% of the 3rd marking period grade)! PROVE THAT YOU READ THE ENTIRE BOOK! KNOW AND APPLY THE DEFINITIONS FOR THE LITERARY TERMS: CHARACTERIZATION (including the mnemonic device, STEAL), CONFLICT, SETTING, SYMBOLISM, AND AUTHOR'S TONE. Be able to describe the characterization of the main characters in your novel--speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and looks. Why do the characters do what they do? Describe the interactions between characters (in families and friendship). Be able to discuss the plot--main events of the story. What are the conflicts in your novel (know the internal conflicts--what characters are struggling with--and the external conflicts--which characters have problems/struggles with other characters? Know the setting (time and place) of your novel. What is the author's tone (positive or negative) in your novel? What symbols exist in your novel and what do they represent?

  • Wednesday, December 21st, 2016:
    1. Warm-Up: Answer (CHOOSE ONE) one of the following DOK questions on your independent novel. Write 1-2 sentences for your chosen question.
  • DOK 2: How would you summarize your novel so far?
  • DOK 3: How would you adapt your novel to create a different setting?
  • DOK 4: How would you you create a thesis statement using this novel to develop a persuasive argument? Include the word "should" in your thesis statement. For example: People should...

    SHOW HW: 5 more post-it notes.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share one DOK question and the answer from your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Book Club Discussion: Arrange into book clubs of 3-4 people per table (making certain that you're reading the same novel). Choose a Recorder, Discussion Leader, and Researcher(s). You will answer the following questions in your Book Club. Cite textual evidence (page numbers and quotes) for each question.
    1.) How are you experiencing the novel? Are you engaged (enjoying/interested) in the novel? Explain. How do you feel reading the novel--amused, sad, disturbed, confused, bored, or another feeling?
    2.) Describe the characterization of the main characters--speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and looks. Why do the characters do what they do? Describe the interactions between characters (in families and friendship). Do you admire or disapprove of the characters? Do they remind you of people you know?
    3.) Discuss the plot--main events of the story. Are the events engaging (interesting)? Is the novel a page-turner? Are you surprised by any of the events? Explain. Do you find the plot predictable? Explain.
    4.) What passages strike you as insightful (thoughtful)? Are there any powerful passages that make you think about your own life?
    5.) Has the novel changed you or taught you anything new? Have you been exposed to different ideas about people or a certain part of the world?

    4. K/W/L REFLECTIONS: What did you already know about today's lesson? What do you want to know further about today's lesson? What did you learn in today's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we better understand and be able to discuss characterization, plot, and lessons in our independent novels? HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 10 MORE POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL (10% of the 3rd marking period grade)! PROVE THAT YOU READ THE ENTIRE BOOK! KNOW AND APPLY THE DEFINITIONS FOR THE LITERARY TERMS: CHARACTERIZATION (including the mnemonic device, STEAL), CONFLICT, SETTING, SYMBOLISM, AND AUTHOR'S TONE.

  • Tuesday, December 20th, 2016:
    1. Warm-Up: Research (or use prior knowledge) the definitions of the following literary terms: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and author's tone.

    SHOW OWED HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your first impressions of your novel. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Literary Term Note-Taking: Take notes on approved definitions of the literary terms listed in the work period: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and author's tone. Learn the mnemonic device for characterization (STEAL: Speech, Thoughts, Effect on Others, Actions and Looks).

    4. Work Period: Work on the HW due tomorrow: 5 more post-it notes.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we better understand literary terms and apply them for use in our independent novels? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
  • TURN IN 5 MORE POST-ITS (each post-it should be on a different page in the novel--anywhere throughout the novel). Each Post-It MUST answer the following questions. Each Post-It MUST reference a LITERARY ELEMENT (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) and JOURNEY.
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 10 MORE POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL (10% of the 3rd marking period grade)! PROVE THAT YOU READ THE ENTIRE BOOK!

  • Monday, December 19th, 2016:
    1. Warm-Up: What are your first impressions of your independent reading novel? Write 2-3 sentences. You may want to consider the following: your opinions about the plot (major events of the story), character development (the actions, thoughts, feelings, speech and interactions between characters), and engagement (your personal interest in desiring to read more).

    SHOW HW: Show 5 post-it notes in your independent reading novel.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your first impressions of your novel. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Research the definitions of the following literary terms (write in your LA section): characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and author's tone.

    4. Literary Term Note-Taking: Take notes on approved definitions of the literary terms listed in the work period: characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, and author's tone. Learn the mnemonic device for characterization (STEAL: Speech, Thoughts, Effect on Others, Actions and Looks).

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we better understand literary terms and apply them for use in our independent novels? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
  • TURN IN 5 MORE POST-ITS (each post-it should be on a different page in the novel--anywhere throughout the novel). Each Post-It MUST answer the following questions:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 10 MORE POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL (10% of the 3rd marking period grade)! PROVE THAT YOU READ THE ENTIRE BOOK!

  • Friday, December 16th, 2016:
    1. Warm-Up: Midterm Exam (Period 2 only)/Complete Goal Sheet for the 3rd marking period.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and SHARE 3rd MARKING PERIOD SMART GOAL. Captains will gather their table mates' SMART GOAL FOR THE 3rd marking period. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read your independent book and compose post-it notes (see homework).

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we write a successful argumentative essay in the midterm exam? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 19th:
  • TURN IN 5 POST-ITS (each post-it should be on a different page in the novel--anywhere throughout the novel). Each Post-It MUST answer the following questions:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:

  • TURN IN 5 MORE POST-ITS (each post-it should be on a different page in the novel--anywhere throughout the novel). Each Post-It MUST answer the following questions:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 10 MORE POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL (10% of the 3rd marking period grade)! PROVE THAT YOU READ THE ENTIRE BOOK!

  • Thursday, December 15th, 2016:
    1. Warm-Up: Midterm Exam instructions reminders.

    2. MIDTERM EXAM (Argumentative Essay)

    3. Read your independent book and compose post-it notes (see homework).

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we write a successful argumentative essay in the midterm exam? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 19th:
  • TURN IN 5 POST-ITS (each post-it should be on a different page in the novel--anywhere throughout the novel). Each Post-It MUST answer the following questions:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:

  • TURN IN 5 MORE POST-ITS (each post-it should be on a different page in the novel--anywhere throughout the novel). Each Post-It MUST answer the following questions:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    HERE'S A SAMPLE POST-IT NOTE:
    Enrique is characterized as a young man who is hanging out in the wrong crowd and starting to get into trouble. His grandmother is "furious when he comes home late" (p. 43). He's headed on a dangerous journey that can lead to devastating consequences.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 10 MORE POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL (10% of the 3rd marking period grade)! PROVE THAT YOU READ THE ENTIRE BOOK!

  • Wednesday, December 14th, 2016:
    1. Warm-Up: Listen to Midterm Exam instructions.

    2. MIDTERM EXAM (Argumentative Essay)

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we write a successful argumentative essay in the midterm exam? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15th:
  • FINISH (PERIOD 2 ONLY) THE MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period): You will write an argumentative essay, using Seedfolks, "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and "Gettysburg Address." Review all of your notes. You will be allowed to use the texts and your notes to write the essay. Review these Strategies for the Midterm Exam (Argumentative Essay):
    1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read over your notes on the four texts (be ready to choose three texts), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three texts. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4. Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 20 POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.
  • Tuesday, December 13th, 2016: PERIOD 5 ONLY:
    1. Warm-Up: Listen to Midterm Exam instructions.

    2. MIDTERM EXAM (Argumentative Essay)

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we write a successful argumentative essay in the midterm exam? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • FINISH (PERIOD 2 WILL START IT TOMORROW) THE MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period): You will write an argumentative essay, using Seedfolks, "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and "Gettysburg Address." Review all of your notes. You will be allowed to use the texts and your notes to write the essay. Review these Strategies for the Midterm Exam (Argumentative Essay):
    1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read over your notes on the four texts (be ready to choose three texts), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three texts. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4. Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 20 POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.
  • Monday, December 12th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Read your independent novel and compose one post-it note in which you answer the following questions:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.

    SHOW HW: the six questions on the first 20 pages of your independent novel.

    2. Discuss/Share #1:

  • Turn and talk over the Warm-Up (what literary elements develop the central idea of journey in each of your novels?) with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Discuss and take notes on Strategies for the Midterm Exam (Argumentative Essay):
    1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read over your notes on the four texts (be ready to choose three texts), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three texts. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4. Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    3. Independent Reading: Read your novels and search for textual evidence of literary elements that support the central idea of journey and explain your reasoning on post-it notes.

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip:
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing the rest of the week.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand central idea of journey developing in our independent novels and prepare for the upcoming midterm exam? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13th and THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period): You will write an argumentative essay, using Seedfolks, "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and "Gettysburg Address." Review all of your notes. You will be allowed to use the texts and your notes to write the essay.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 20 POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, in which you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.
  • Friday, December 9th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: How do you rank the following independent novel choices and why?
  • Night
  • Enrique's Journey
  • Finding Miracles
  • Chinese Cinderella

    SHOW any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share #1:

  • Turn and talk over the Warm-Up (what did you think of this activity?) with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Discuss and take notes on yesterday's classwork questions (from your LS section).
    1.) Compare (find 2 similarities) and contrast (find 2 differences) creative writing and argumentative writing. Two similarities between creative and argumentative writing are brainstorming/pre-writing and organization of ideas. Two differences between creative and argumentative writing are using your imagination for creative writing and including textual evidence in argumentative writing.
    2.) What are are test-taking strategies for an argumentative essay test? Test-taking strategies include annotating the texts and watching time constraints.
    3.) What are FIVE MOST IMPORTANT COMPONENTS (qualities) of WRITING? Think about what good essays/stories should contain and how good writing can earn a high grade. Five important components of writing are focusing on the thesis (topic), including insightful analysis, organizing ideas, using sophisticated vocabulary, and proofreading grammar.

    3. Independent Reading Selection: Check out independent reading novels. Begin reading the first page. What are your first impressions? How does your chosen novel support the new unit's theme of journey?

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip:
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing next week.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • How can we choose our independent novels and prepare for the upcoming midterm exam? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 12th: Read a minimum of 20 pages in your independent reading novel. Answer the following questions in your LA section for the independent reading novel:
    1.) Where is the protagonist's journey going?
    2.) What are the motives for taking the journey?
    3.) What are the observations and experiences on the journey?
    4.) What are personal/character reflections, insights, illuminations or epiphanies (revelations)?
    5.) Who are the protagonist and other central character(s) introduced?
    6.) What is the setting (time period and location)?

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13th and NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period): You will write an argumentative essay, using Seedfolks, "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and "Gettysburg Address." Review all of your notes. You will be allowed to use the texts and your notes to write the essay.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINISH YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2017. COMPOSE 20 POST-IT NOTES throughout the novel, and you answer the questions below:
    1.) What literary elements (characterization, conflict, setting, symbolism, or author's tone) develop the central idea of journey in your novel?
    2.) Why do these literary elements develop the central idea of journey?
    *Identify the page number on each post-it. You may use a quote from the page, but you also need to answer the questions above, using EVIDENCE from your novel to support your answer.
  • Thursday, December 8th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are your strengths in the creative writing story?

    SHOW HW: Show the creative writing story.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Answer the following questions in your LS section.
    1.) Compare (find 2 similarities) and contrast (find 2 differences) creative writing and argumentative writing.
    2.) What are are test-taking strategies for an argumentative essay test?
    3.) What are FIVE MOST IMPORTANT COMPONENTS (qualities) of WRITING? Think about what good essays/stories should contain and how good writing can earn a high grade.

    4. Goal Sheet/Portfolio Folder: Enter your vocabulary story and the cool feedback (suggestions for improvement) recommended by Ms. Conn.

    45 Reflections/Exit Slip:
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • How can we write a creative writing story on journey? MAKE UP OWED HW (all owed homework MUST be turned in by TOMORROW, FRIDAY, the last day of the 2nd marking period!!)

    NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13th and NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period): You will write an argumentative essay, using Seedfolks, "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and "Gettysburg Address." Review all of your notes. You will be allowed to use the texts and your notes to write the essay.
  • Wednesday, December 7th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: How will your journey story begin? Here are some Images from "Humans of New York". What is the journey of one of these people? Here are some sentence starters:
  • It all started with...
  • Sometimes it's hard not to...
  • When I came home...
  • The Queen has arrived..

    SHOW HW: Show the 10 journey questions.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Work on the HW.

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip:
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing the rest of the week.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • How can we write a creative writing story on journey? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
    Journey: A Creative Writing Opportunity: You will write 1-2 pages (typed, double-spaced, 12 point, Times New Roman font; you can e-mail your paper to hconn@schools.nyc.gov before class time on Thursday). You must include the following in the heading: your name, Ms. Conn/Mr. Rollon, Elements of Literacy, Period____, the date, the assignment--Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey, and an original title. Your journey story can be non-fiction or fiction. You MUST include the following:
  • Exposition (the introduction of the story): the protagonist and other central character(s) are introduced, the setting is provided, the character introduces where the journey is going, and the motives for taking the journey. You may want to begin with a crisis/struggle that needs to be solved. The central characters reveal their desires to learn something from the journey they are about to begin.
  • Rising Action (second phase of the story): It includes a series of related events in which the protagonist is a participant. The observations and experiences on the journey are revealed. There's dramatic tension. As the journey progresses, the protagonist experiences one or more setbacks/obstacles/conflicts, which make it more difficult to complete the journey.
  • Crisis: It's the event right before the climax. For example: suppose you are writing a journey about taking a trip. You are at the airport, experiencing conflict about whether to hop on the plane or remain behind. This conflict creates a crisis, whether to begin the journey or not.
  • Climax: It's the turning point or main event of the story, which has the most tension and drama. It leads to a resolution of conflict and crisis.
  • Resolution: It's the final event of the story where unanswered questions are answered and the tension has subsided/ended. The writer shares an epiphany (a moment of revelation or insight) or lesson that he/she has learned from the journey. The story has reached its end.

    MAKE UP OWED HW (all owed homework MUST be turned in by FRIDAY, the last day of the 2nd marking period!!)

    NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13th and NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period): You will write an argumentative essay, using Seedfolks, "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and "Gettysburg Address." Review all of your notes. You will be allowed to use the texts and your notes to write the essay.
  • Tuesday, December 6th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What would you prefer to write in a creative writing paper: your own personal journey or a fictional journey? Explain reasoning for your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your LS section, answer the following questions:
    1.) What is a journey? Look up the definition using an electronic device.
    2.) What kind of people go on journeys?
    3.) What is achieved on a journey?
    4.) What are motivations for a journey?
    5.) What are observations and experiences on a journey?
    6.) What are personal reflections and insights on a journey?
    7.) Compare/Contrast a spiritual journey and a physical journey.
    8.) What is an example of a literary journey from a novel?
    9.) What are potential adversities (struggles/challenges) on a journey?
    10.) Who are three people that you know (relatives, friends, celebrities, characters in a movie or a novel) that have experienced a journey? Explain their journeys (one sentence per person).

    *When finished with the questions above, return to your portfolio folders and update your Goals Sheet with your goals and action plans for success (based on the recent quiz on "The Gettysburg Address").

    4. Discuss/Share #2:

  • Volunteers share their work period answers.
  • Finish reviewing "The Gettysburg Address" Quiz, if necessary.

    5. Reflections/Exit Slip:
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing the rest of the week.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • How can we prepare for our next unit on journey by recalling prior knowledge on journeys in texts, our own lives and our society? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Finish today's classwork. In your LS section, answer the following questions in complete sentences:
    1.) What is a journey? Look up the definition using an electronic device.
    2.) What kind of people go on journeys?
    3.) What is achieved on a journey?
    4.) What are motivations for a journey?
    5.) What are observations and experiences on a journey?
    6.) What are personal reflections and insights on a journey?
    7.) Compare/Contrast a spiritual journey and a physical journey.
    8.) What is an example of a literary journey from a novel?
    9.) What are potential adversities (struggles/challenges) on a journey?
    10.) Who are three people that you know (relatives, friends, celebrities, characters in a movie or a novel) that have experienced a journey? Explain their journeys (one sentence per person).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
    Journey: A Creative Writing Opportunity: You will write 1-2 pages (typed, double-spaced, 12 point, Times New Roman font; you can e-mail your paper to hconn@schools.nyc.gov before class time on Thursday). You must include the following in the heading: your name, Ms. Conn/Mr. Rollon, Elements of Literacy, Period____, the date, the assignment--Creative Writing: Personal or Fictional Journey, and an original title. Your journey story can be non-fiction or fiction. You MUST include the following:

  • Exposition (the introduction of the story): the protagonist and other central character(s) are introduced, the setting is provided, the character introduces where the journey is going, and the motives for taking the journey. You may want to begin with a crisis/struggle that needs to be solved. The central characters reveal their desires to learn something from the journey they are about to begin.
  • Rising Action (second phase of the story): It includes a series of related events in which the protagonist is a participant. The observations and experiences on the journey are revealed. There's dramatic tension. As the journey progresses, the protagonist experiences one or more setbacks/obstacles/conflicts, which make it more difficult to complete the journey.
  • Crisis: It's the event right before the climax. For example: suppose you are writing a journey about taking a trip. You are at the airport, experiencing conflict about whether to hop on the plane or remain behind. This conflict creates a crisis, whether to begin the journey or not.
  • Climax: It's the turning point or main event of the story, which has the most tension and drama. It leads to a resolution of conflict and crisis.
  • Resolution: It's the final event of the story where unanswered questions are answered and the tension has subsided/ended. The writer shares an epiphany (a moment of revelation or insight) or lesson that he/she has learned from the journey. The story has reached its end.

    MAKE UP OWED HW (all owed homework MUST be turned in by FRIDAY, the last day of the 2nd marking period!!)

  • Monday, December 5th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Interpret the following quote in your own words: "If a journey doesn't have something to teach you about yourself, then what kind of a journey is it?" Explain whether you agree or disagree with this quote.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' free-write summaries from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' free-write summaries with the class.

    3. Quiz Review: Review the answers to the Quiz on "The Gettysburg Address."

    4. Work Period: Update your portfolio folders with what you need to improve in your test-taking skills. 5. Reflections/Exit Slip:
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing the rest of the week.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • How can we evaluate our understanding of "The Gettysburg Address" and prepare for our next unit on journey? MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Friday, December 2nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: QUIZ on "The Gettysburg Address"

    Show owed HW.

    2. Work Period:

  • Text Under Discussion/Guided Questions/Commentary (with a partner)
  • Distribution of Argumentative Speeches and Portfolio Folders/Fill out Goals Sheet

    3. Reflections/Exit Slip:
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing the rest of the week.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • How can we understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" and analyze specific quotes from the speech? MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Thursday, December 1st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Why do you believe "The Gettysburg Address" is so popular? Explain your answer by citing textual evidence from the speech.

    Show HW: Vocabulary Story.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' free-write summaries from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' free-write summaries with the class.

    3. Work Period: Text Under Discussion/Guided Questions/Commentary

    *Check for Understanding: Thumbs up/Thumbs down

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip (turn in at the end of class):
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing the rest of the week.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" and analyze specific quotes from the speech? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
    QUIZ ON "Gettysburg Address." Know the answers to the questions on p. 30 (answers reviewed in class), class notes and Vocabulary. Know the DEFINITIONS of each of the following vocabulary words and BE ABLE TO WRITE A DETAILED SENTENCE USING EACH WORD (20% of the 2nd marking period grade):
    1.) Emancipate (verb)=free from slavery
    2.) Orator (noun)=an effective public speaker
    3.) Staggering (adjective)=shocking; surprising
    4.) Conceive (verb)=form or create
    5.) Proposition (noun)=a statement expressing a judgment, opinion or plan of action
    6.) Engage (verb)=to attract or interest
    7.) Address (noun)=a formal speech delivered to an audience
    8.) Endure (verb)=suffer or remain in existence
    9.) Fitting (adjective)=appropriate or suitable
    10.) Consecrate (verb)=make or declare sacred
    11.) Hallow (verb)=honor as holy
    12.) Detract (verb)=reduce or take away the value
    13.) Resolve (verb)=find a solution
    14.) Vain (adjective)=producing no result; worthless
    15.) Perish (verb)=to die or disappear
    16.) Repetition (noun)=the act of restating something that has already been said or written
    17.) Parallelism (noun)=use of repeating words or phrases to create a pattern
    18.) Rhetoric (noun)=language designed to have a persuasive or impressive effect on its audience (though it may appear insincere and lacking importance)
    19.) Infer (verb)=to conclude or interpret based on evidence
    20.) Theme (noun)=author's message or central idea
    Wednesday, November 30th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Using the notecard provided, compose a DOK (use the handout provided) multiple-choice question (with four answer choices) on "Gettysburg Address" (pp. 27-28 in the Collections textbook). Circle the correct answer. *If your question is chosen for the quiz on Friday, you will earn +5 extra credit on the quiz.

    Show owed HW/CW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' free-write summaries from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' free-write summaries with the class.

    3. Work Period: Vocabulary Story about the following question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You can choose to write a non-fiction or creative story on the question above. Your story must include 10 of the words taken from the vocabulary in "Gettysburg Address" (see the list below). You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story on how and why people unite or isolate themselves (you can refer to the texts we've studied in class so far--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and Seedfolks. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about unity or isolation of characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class tomorrow, Thursday, December 1st (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story.

    *Check for Understanding: Thumbs up/Thumbs down

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip (turn in at the end of class):
    3: Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2: Tasks that you can predict we will be doing the rest of the week.
    1: Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we compose DOK questions and apply our knowledge of "Gettysburg Address" and vocabulary skills in a writing piece? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
  • Finish today's classwork: Vocabulary Story about the following question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You can choose to write a non-fiction or creative story on the question above. Your story must include 10 of the words taken from the vocabulary in "Gettysburg Address" (see the list below). You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story on how and why people unite or isolate themselves (you can refer to the texts we've studied in class so far--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and Seedfolks. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about unity or isolation of characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class tomorrow, Thursday, December 1st (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    
    Ms. Conn/Mr. Rollon                                                              Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                                    Date
    Assignment: Vocabulary Story
          
                       Should People Unite or Isolate Themselves? 
    

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
    QUIZ ON "Gettysburg Address." Know the answers to the questions on p. 30 (answers reviewed in class), class notes and Vocabulary. Know the DEFINITIONS of each of the following vocabulary words and BE ABLE TO WRITE A DETAILED SENTENCE USING EACH WORD (20% of the 2nd marking period grade):
    1.) Emancipate (verb)=free from slavery
    2.) Orator (noun)=an effective public speaker
    3.) Staggering (adjective)=shocking; surprising
    4.) Conceive (verb)=form or create
    5.) Proposition (noun)=a statement expressing a judgment, opinion or plan of action
    6.) Engage (verb)=to attract or interest
    7.) Address (noun)=a formal speech delivered to an audience
    8.) Endure (verb)=suffer or remain in existence
    9.) Fitting (adjective)=appropriate or suitable
    10.) Consecrate (verb)=make or declare sacred
    11.) Hallow (verb)=honor as holy
    12.) Detract (verb)=reduce or take away the value
    13.) Resolve (verb)=find a solution
    14.) Vain (adjective)=producing no result; worthless
    15.) Perish (verb)=to die or disappear
    16.) Repetition (noun)=the act of restating something that has already been said or written
    17.) Parallelism (noun)=use of repeating words or phrases to create a pattern
    18.) Rhetoric (noun)=language designed to have a persuasive or impressive effect on its audience (though it may appear insincere and lacking importance)
    19.) Infer (verb)=to conclude or interpret based on evidence
    20.) Theme (noun)=author's message or central idea

  • Tuesday, November 29th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Free-write (5 minutes; goal=4-6 sentences) on the following argumentative question: Should people unite together or isolate themselves? Students will be assigned a side to free-write. What are your opinions? What textual evidence can support your argument--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," "Quilt of a Country," and Seedfolks?

    Show HW due today: Textual Evidence and ICE from "Gettysburg Address" supporting people uniting and isolating themselves.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' free-write summaries from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' free-write summaries with the class.

    3. Speed Debating: Arrange into Speed Debating format (students are already familiar with this arrangement; reminders will be offered). Read over your argumentative question from the Warm-Up and the HW, which is the following: Should people unite together or isolate themselves? Students will divide up into half the class, sitting across from a partner. One side of the room will support people uniting and finding common ground. The other side of the room will support people isolating themselves from other groups and avoiding a common ground. Students will use their HW and textual evidence from "Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better, Together," "Quilt of a Country," and Seedfolks to support their argument. Students will compose at least 1/2 a page of handwritten notes on new information learned during Speed Debating in their LA section. TWO MINUTES PER DEBATE.

  • DOK 3 question prompts: What facts would you select to support your argument on people uniting together or isolating themselves? What would happen if all people in America united together or isolated themselves? What can you conclude that the authors of the articles and the novel Seedfolks would answer for the question--Should people unite together or isolate themselves?

    *Check for Understanding: Thumbs up/Thumbs down

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip (turn in at the end of class):
    K: What did you know already about your argumentative topic of unity or isolation?
    W: What do you want to know about your argumentative topic of unity or isolation?
    L: What did you learn today about your argumentative topic of unity or isolation or from the speed debating?
    PREDICTION: What can you PREDICT (anticipate; forecast) we will do with the free-write and speed debating note-taking?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we engage in speed debating to prepare to write an argumentative essay on whether people should choose to unite together or isolate themselves? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
    QUIZ ON "Gettysburg Address." Know the answers to the questions on p. 30 (answers reviewed in class), class notes and Vocabulary. Know the DEFINITIONS of each of the following vocabulary words and BE ABLE TO WRITE A DETAILED SENTENCE USING EACH WORD (20% of the 2nd marking period grade):
    1.) Emancipate (verb)=free from slavery
    2.) Orator (noun)=an effective public speaker
    3.) Staggering (adjective)=shocking; surprising
    4.) Conceive (verb)=form or create
    5.) Proposition (noun)=a statement expressing a judgment, opinion or plan of action
    6.) Engage (verb)=to attract or interest
    7.) Address (noun)=a formal speech delivered to an audience
    8.) Endure (verb)=suffer or remain in existence
    9.) Fitting (adjective)=appropriate or suitable
    10.) Consecrate (verb)=make or declare sacred
    11.) Hallow (verb)=honor as holy
    12.) Detract (verb)=reduce or take away the value
    13.) Resolve (verb)=find a solution
    14.) Vain (adjective)=producing no result; worthless
    15.) Perish (verb)=to die or disappear
    16.) Repetition (noun)=the act of restating something that has already been said or written
    17.) Parallelism (noun)=use of repeating words or phrases to create a pattern
    18.) Rhetoric (noun)=language designed to have a persuasive or impressive effect on its audience (though it may appear insincere and lacking importance)
    19.) Infer (verb)=to conclude or interpret based on evidence
    20.) Theme (noun)=author's message or central idea
    Monday, November 28th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Fill out Goal Setting Handout and organize student portfolio folders.

    SHOW CLASSWORK from last Wednesday: answers to the questions on p. 30 for "The Gettysburg Address"

    2. Discuss/Share--"The Gettysburg Address Review:

  • Review the questions and answers for "The Gettysburg Address" on p. 30 (Collections Textbook). Take notes on the answers.

    3. Introduce HW.

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip: 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" in our unit on Common Ground? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:
    Should people unite together OR isolate themselves? Find one piece of textual evidence (a quoted phrase) to support uniting together and one piece of textual evidence (a quoted phrase) to support isolating themselves from the "Gettysburg Address" by President Abraham Lincoln (1863). For each piece of textual evidence (quoted phrase), do ICE (Introduce the quote, Cite the quote--which paragraph the quote comes from, and Explain the quote in your own words). HERE'S AN EXAMPLE:
  • People should unite together. President Lincoln supports unity when he stated in his "Gettysburg Address," that the living "be dedicated here to the unfinished work..." (paragraph 4). This shows that people should come together to remember the people who died and couldn't finish their work of providing freedom for others.
  • People should isolate themselves from others. In "Gettysburg Address," President Lincoln stated "these dead shall not have died in vain" (paragraph 4). Since thousands of people died because they were united against a common enemy, it's better to isolate from other people.

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
    QUIZ ON "Gettysburg Address." Know the answers to the questions on p. 30 (answers reviewed in class), class notes and Vocabulary. Know the DEFINITIONS of each of the following vocabulary words and BE ABLE TO WRITE A DETAILED SENTENCE USING EACH WORD (20% of the 2nd marking period grade):
    1.) Emancipate (verb)=free from slavery
    2.) Orator (noun)=an effective public speaker
    3.) Staggering (adjective)=shocking; surprising
    4.) Conceive (verb)=form or create
    5.) Proposition (noun)=a statement expressing a judgment, opinion or plan of action
    6.) Engage (verb)=to attract or interest
    7.) Address (noun)=a formal speech delivered to an audience
    8.) Endure (verb)=suffer or remain in existence
    9.) Fitting (adjective)=appropriate or suitable
    10.) Consecrate (verb)=make or declare sacred
    11.) Hallow (verb)=honor as holy
    12.) Detract (verb)=reduce or take away the value
    13.) Resolve (verb)=find a solution
    14.) Vain (adjective)=producing no result; worthless
    15.) Perish (verb)=to die or disappear
    16.) Repetition (noun)=the act of restating something that has already been said or written
    17.) Parallelism (noun)=use of repeating words or phrases to create a pattern
    18.) Rhetoric (noun)=language designed to have a persuasive or impressive effect on its audience (though it may appear insincere and lacking importance)
    19.) Infer (verb)=to conclude or interpret based on evidence
    20.) Theme (noun)=author's message or central idea

  • Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What unites people of diverse backgrounds in the U.S.? Identify at least two uniting qualities/ideas.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Work Period:

  • Finish reading "The Gettysburg Address" on pp. 27-28 in your textbook. In your LA section, begin writing the following: Identify one annotation (see the annotation bookmark, 5W's and 1 H (who, what, when, where, why is the author writing this speech, and how are the events occurring), and a brief summary (2-3 sentences) for the entire speech.
  • Answer the following questions in your LA section: What important U.S. document is President Lincoln referring to when he says "Four score and seven years ago..."? What's his purpose for referring to this important U.S. document? With a partner, answer the questions on p. 30.

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip: 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1, SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we begin to understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" in our unit on Common Ground? MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous day's assignment).
    HAVE A WONDERFUL THANKSGIVING! REMEMBER TO BE GRATEFUL!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
    QUIZ ON "Gettysburg Address" class questions, answers, notes and Vocabulary: Know the DEFINITIONS of each of the following vocabulary words and BE ABLE TO WRITE A DETAILED SENTENCE USING EACH WORD (20% of the 2nd marking period grade):
    1.) Emancipate (verb)=free from slavery
    2.) Orator (noun)=an effective public speaker
    3.) Staggering (adjective)=shocking; surprising
    4.) Conceive (verb)=form or create
    5.) Proposition (noun)=a statement expressing a judgment, opinion or plan of action
    6.) Engage (verb)=to attract or interest
    7.) Address (noun)=a formal speech delivered to an audience
    8.) Endure (verb)=suffer or remain in existence
    9.) Fitting (adjective)=appropriate or suitable
    10.) Consecrate (verb)=make or declare sacred
    11.) Hallow (verb)=honor as holy
    12.) Detract (verb)=reduce or take away the value
    13.) Resolve (verb)=find a solution
    14.) Vain (adjective)=producing no result; worthless
    15.) Perish (verb)=to die or disappear
    16.) Repetition (noun)=the act of restating something that has already been said or written
    17.) Parallelism (noun)=use of repeating words or phrases to create a pattern
    18.) Rhetoric (noun)=language designed to have a persuasive or impressive effect on its audience (though it may appear insincere and lacking importance)
    19.) Infer (verb)=to conclude or interpret based on evidence
    20.) Theme (noun)=author's message or central idea

    Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Why does Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" (pp. 27-28 in Collections Textbook) fit into our semester theme of "finding common ground"?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Finish reviewing and taking notes on the definitions of the vocabulary from "Gettysburg Address" by President Lincoln (1863).

    3. Read-Aloud: Begin reading "The Gettysburg Address" on pp. 27-28 in your textbook. In your LA section, begin writing the following: Identify one annotation per page (see the annotation bookmark, 5W's and 1 H (who, what, when, where, why is the author writing this speech, and how are the events occurring) for each page, and a brief summary (2-3 sentences) per page.

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip: 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1, SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we begin to understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" in our unit on Common Ground? MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous day's assignment).
    Monday, November 21st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Speech Presentation and Evaluation Reminders

    2. Speech Presentations:

  • ALL remaining student speakers will present their speeches.
  • SHOW HW: Vocabulary definitions and sentence composition.
  • Student listeners will fill out the Argumentative Speech Evaluation.
  • Q & A: After speech presentations, student volunteers will have the opportunity to ask questions to the student speakers. Volunteers will use the DOK question stems to ask questions, with a focus on DOK 2 and DOK 3. Suggested questions include the following: How would you summarize your speech's message? How would you apply what you learned in writing this argumentative speech to another writing assignment? How would you describe the sequence (order) of your writing process? What would happen if you wrote another argumentative speech?

    3. Discuss/Share: Review the definitions of the vocabulary from "Gettysburg Address" by President Lincoln (1863).

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip: 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1, SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we effectively compose, deliver and evaluate argumentative speeches? MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous day's assignment).
    Friday, November 18th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Speech Presentation and Evaluation Reminders

    2. Speech Presentations:

  • ALL remaining student speakers will present their speeches.
  • Student listeners will fill out the Argumentative Speech Evaluation.
  • Q & A: After speech presentations, student volunteers will have the opportunity to ask questions to the student speakers. Volunteers will use the DOK question stems to ask questions, with a focus on DOK 2 and DOK 3. Suggested questions include the following: How would you summarize your speech's message? How would you apply what you learned in writing this argumentative speech to another writing assignment? How would you describe the sequence (order) of your writing process? What would happen if you wrote another argumentative speech?

    3. Reflections/Exit Slip: 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1, SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we effectively compose, deliver and evaluate argumentative speeches? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:
  • DEFINE the following vocabulary words and WRITE A DETAILED SENTENCE USING EACH WORD (in your LS section):
    1.) Emancipate
    2.) Orator
    3.) Staggering
    4.) Conceive
    5.) Proposition
    6.) Engage
    7.) Conceive
    8.) Endure
    9.) Fitting
    10.) Consecrate
    11.) Hallow
    12.) Detract
    13.) Resolve
    14.) Vain
    15.) Perish
    16.) Repetition
    17.) Parallelism
    18.) Rhetoric
    19.) Infer
    20.) Theme
  • Thursday, November 17th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Speech Presentation and Evaluation Reminders

    2. Speech Presentations:

  • Student speakers will present their speeches.
  • Student listeners will fill out the Argumentative Speech Evaluation.
  • Q & A: After speech presentations, student volunteers will have the opportunity to ask questions to the student speakers. Volunteers will use the DOK question stems to ask questions, with a focus on DOK 2 and DOK 3. Suggested questions include the following: How would you summarize your speech's message? How would you apply what you learned in writing this argumentative speech to another writing assignment? How would you describe the sequence (order) of your writing process? What would happen if you wrote another argumentative speech?

    3. Reflections/Exit Slip: 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1, SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we effectively compose, deliver and evaluate argumentative speeches? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18th: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. If you're not ready on the assigned day (see below), you will receive -10 points each day late. The last day to present is TOMORROW! You will present your Argumentative Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Period 2: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E, Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z; Period 5: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-D, Wednesday: Last names beginning with E-L, Thursday: Last names beginning with M-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.


  • WRITING CONTENT OF ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary, such as Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I"). Include a counterclaim sentence and a sentence that challenges the counterclaim. Here are suggested sentence starters. Counterclaim Sentence Starters:

  • On the other hand, some people may believe that...
  • The opposing side states...

    Sentence Starters for Challenge to Counterclaim:

  • This counterclaim is wrong because...
  • It's easy to challenge this counterclaim because...

    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Wednesday, November 16th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What do speakers in our class need to work on in their argumentative speech presentations? What are strengths in their speeches?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Speech Presentations:

  • Student speakers will present their speeches.
  • Student listeners will fill out the Argumentative Speech Evaluation.
  • Q & A: After speech presentations, student volunteers will have the opportunity to ask questions to the student speakers. Volunteers will use the DOK question stems to ask questions, with a focus on DOK 2 and DOK 3. Suggested questions include the following: How would you summarize your speech's message? How would you apply what you learned in writing this argumentative speech to another writing assignment? How would you describe the sequence (order) of your writing process? What would happen if you wrote another argumentative speech?

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip: 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1, SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we effectively compose, deliver and evaluate argumentative speeches? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. If you're not ready on the assigned day (see below), you will receive -10 points each day late. The last day to present is this Friday. You will present your Argumentative Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Period 2: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E, Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z; Period 5: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-D, Wednesday: Last names beginning with E-L, Thursday: Last names beginning with M-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.


  • WRITING CONTENT OF ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary, such as Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I"). Include a counterclaim sentence and a sentence that challenges the counterclaim. Here are suggested sentence starters. Counterclaim Sentence Starters:

  • On the other hand, some people may believe that...
  • The opposing side states...

    Sentence Starters for Challenge to Counterclaim:

  • This counterclaim is wrong because...
  • It's easy to challenge this counterclaim because...

    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Tuesday, November 15th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Read the Argumentative Speech Evaluation. What is confusing or not clear?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Speech Presentations:

  • Student speakers will present their speeches.
  • Student listeners will fill out the Argumentative Speech Evaluation.
  • Q & A: After each speech, student volunteers will have the opportunity to ask questions to the student speakers. Volunteers will use the DOK question stems to ask questions, with a focus on DOK 2 and DOK 3. Suggested questions include the following: How would you summarize your speech's message? How would you apply what you learned in writing this argumentative speech to another writing assignment? How would you describe the sequence (order) of your writing process? What would happen if you wrote another argumentative speech?

    4. Reflections/Exit Slip: 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1, SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we effectively compose, deliver and evaluate argumentative speeches? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th/THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. If you're not ready on the assigned day (see below), you will receive -10 points each day late. The last day to present is this Friday. You will present your Argumentative Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Period 2: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E, Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z; Period 5: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-D, Wednesday: Last names beginning with E-L, Thursday: Last names beginning with M-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.


  • WRITING CONTENT OF ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary, such as Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I"). Include a counterclaim sentence and a sentence that challenges the counterclaim. Here are suggested sentence starters. Counterclaim Sentence Starters:

  • On the other hand, some people may believe that...
  • The opposing side states...

    Sentence Starters for Challenge to Counterclaim:

  • This counterclaim is wrong because...
  • It's easy to challenge this counterclaim because...

    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Monday, November 14th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up:
  • What do you need to work on in your writing and delivery of the argumentative speech? You may consider the following: including more evidence, writing more details, practicing eye contact and appearing prepared.
  • Insert your graded work in the folders provided.

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Speech Practice Work Period:

  • In table groups, practice reading aloud the introductory paragraphs.
  • Volunteers share their work period practice.

    4. Reflections: Speech reminders. What do you need to practice the most to excel in your speech presentation this week? Look over the rubrics for your speech presentation:

  • Argumentative Speech rubrics presented: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we effectively compose and deliver argumentative speeches? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th/THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. If you're not ready on the assigned day (see below), you will receive -10 points each day late. The last day to present is this Friday. You will present your Argumentative Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Period 2: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E, Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z; Period 5: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-D, Wednesday: Last names beginning with E-L, Thursday: Last names beginning with M-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.


  • WRITING CONTENT OF ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary, such as Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I"). Include a counterclaim sentence and a sentence that challenges the counterclaim. Here are suggested sentence starters. Counterclaim Sentence Starters:

  • On the other hand, some people may believe that...
  • The opposing side states...

    Sentence Starters for Challenge to Counterclaim:

  • This counterclaim is wrong because...
  • It's easy to challenge this counterclaim because...

    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Thursday, November 10th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Why is the process of writing and delivering an argumentative speech a useful skill in high school?

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Introduce the rubrics for your speech presentation:

  • Argumentative Speech rubrics presented: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.

    4. Speech Practice/Reflections: In table groups, practice reading aloud the introductory paragraphs. What do you need to practice the most to excel in your speech presentation next week?

    4. Open Sharing: Volunteers share their work period practice.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we effectively compose and deliver argumentative speeches? DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th/THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Period 2: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E, Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z; Period 5: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-D, Wednesday: Last names beginning with E-L, Thursday: Last names beginning with M-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.


  • WRITING CONTENT OF ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary, such as Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I"). Include a counterclaim sentence and a sentence that challenges the counterclaim. Here are suggested sentence starters. Counterclaim Sentence Starters:

  • On the other hand, some people may believe that...
  • The opposing side states...

    Sentence Starters for Challenge to Counterclaim:

  • This counterclaim is wrong because...
  • It's easy to challenge this counterclaim because...

    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Wednesday, November 9th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: FREEWRITE (write at least one full, handwritten page OR at least 1/2 page, typed):
    Write about your feelings on the election. Here are some suggested questions to answer: What are your concerns, thoughts and feelings? What is the respectable response to the election outcome? Why is our country going to thrive? What are your impressions about today's front pages on newspapers around the world?

    Show any owed HW: Revision of Argumentative Speech.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' thoughts, concerns or feelings from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: What conclusions can you draw about the predictive polls on the election outcome? Find your answer from one of the following links below:

  • "How did the pollsters get Trump, Clinton election so wrong?" from USA Today
  • "Anderson Cooper on Polls: What Did Everyone Get Wrong?" video
  • "How Politicians, Pollsters and Media Missed Trump's Groundswell"

    4. Open Sharing: Volunteers share their work period reactions.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • Why did the predictive polls get it so wrong about this presidential election? DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th/THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Period 2: Monday: Last names beginning with A-E, Tuesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Wednesday: Last names beginning with N-Z; Period 5: Monday: Last names beginning with A-D, Tuesday: Last names beginning with E-L, Wednesday: Last names beginning with M-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.


  • WRITING CONTENT OF ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Monday, November 7th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Compose a counterclaim (a sentence that presents the opposing side to your thesis from your argumentative speech). Then, create a sentence that challenges that counterclaim. Counterclaim Sentence Starters:
  • On the other hand, some people may believe that...
  • The opposing side states...

    Sentence Starters for Challenge to Counterclaim:

  • This counterclaim is wrong because...
  • It's easy to challenge this counterclaim because...

    Show your HW: Revision of Argumentative Speech.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Argumentative Speech rubrics presented: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.

    4. Reflections/Sharing: What do you need to practice the most to excel in your speech presentation next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.4 and SL.9-10.6
  • How can we understand the content and delivery requirements of the argumentative speech? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14th/TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Period 2: Monday: Last names beginning with A-E, Tuesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Wednesday: Last names beginning with N-Z; Period 5: Monday: Last names beginning with A-D, Tuesday: Last names beginning with E-L, Wednesday: Last names beginning with M-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Rubric and Speech Delivery Rubric.


  • WRITING CONTENT OF ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Friday, November 4th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: In "Quilt of a Country," the author stated, "With the end of the cold war there was the creeping concern that without a focus for hatred and distrust, a sense of national identity would evaporate..." What do you believe would happen if there were no more wars and hatred of others in America?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Finish reading the news article, "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Take on the following roles and take notes on the following active reading strategies in your LA section: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark annotations using the Annotation Bookmark, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Identify and define vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less.

    4. Reflections/Sharing: DOK 3: What facts would you gather to support the value of this news article? Thumbs up/Thumbs down evaluation of this article.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively interpret the value of Anna Quindlen's news article "Quilt of a Country"? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th: REWRITE the Argumentative Speech (make corrections identified by the teacher and HIGHLIGHT the corrections in your rewritten paper). Bring in the original paper (with the corrections) and the rewrite in order to earn credit. If you did not do the assignment, you must complete it. Here are the details of the assignment:
  • COMPOSE AN ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Thursday, November 3rd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: The author, Anna Quindlen, states in "Quilt of a Country" that "the citizens of the United States have come together once more because of armed conflict and enemy attack (9/11)." What's another time/event (since you've been alive, in the past 15 years) when Americans have united despite our differences?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Continue reading the news article, "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Take notes on the following active reading strategies in your LA section: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark annotations using the Annotation Bookmark, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Identify and define vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less.

    4. Reflections/Sharing: DOK 3: What facts would you gather to support the value of this news article? Thumbs up/Thumbs down evaluation of this article.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively interpret the value of Anna Quindlen's news article "Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed HW: See previous day's assignment.
    Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: The author, Anna Quindlen, states that America is filled with diverse races and ethnicities in conflict, and she questions why all of us don't just divide into new nations. Do you believe that America should divide into new nations? Explain your answer (1-2 sentences).

    Turn in owed HW: rough draft speeches

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Continue reading (read-aloud as a class) the news article, "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Take notes on the following active reading strategies in your LA section: 1.) ANNOTATIONS: Mark annotations using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Identify and define vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less. YESTERDAY'S CLASS NOTES: Annotations: "like a crazy quilt" (p. 3)-an interesting simile comparing quilt to diverse people; Vocabulary: bigotry (p. 3)=prejudice or discrimination; Summary: Our country should fail because it's so diverse (p. 3). We need to read about tragedies and failures to have gratitude for our own lives (p. 4, paragraph 1). People choose to segregate themselves according to their backgrounds, and this is in conflict with creating community (p. 4, paragraph 2). TODAY'S CLASS NOTES: Annotations: *What is the point of a nation..." (p. 4, paragraph 3). This is interesting because it's asking about what's the purpose of a divided country. Vocabulary: fisticuffs (p. 4)=fighting with fists; chauffeur (p. 4)=to work as an employed, personal driver; disparate (p. 5)=different or diverse; Summary: We in the U.S. are always side by side in conflict, so perhaps we should divide and live peacefully (p. 4, paragraph 3). We Americans have united, instead of divided, as a result of tragic events of 9/11 (p. 5, paragraph 1).

    4. Reflections/Sharing: DOK 3: What facts would you gather to support the value of this news article? Thumbs up/Thumbs down evaluation of this article. Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively interpret the value of Anna Quindlen's news article "Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed HW: See previous day's assignment.
    Tuesday, November 1st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: DOK 3: What is your interpretation of the following statement: "all men are created equal, though everyone knows that most men consider themselves better than someone" (Anna Quindlen)? Explain in your own words. (This quote was taken from the first paragraph of "Quilt of a Country")

    Turn in owed HW: rough draft speeches

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Continue reading (read-aloud as a class) the news article, "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." Take notes on the following active reading strategies in your LA section: 1.) ANNOTATIONS: Mark annotations using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Identify and define vocabulary (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less. TODAY'S CLASS NOTES: Annotations: "like a crazy quilt" (p. 3)-an interesting simile comparing quilt to diverse people; Vocabulary: bigotry (p. 3)=prejudice or discrimination; Summary: Our country should fail because it's so diverse (p. 3). We need to read about tragedies and failures to have gratitude for our own lives (p. 4, paragraph 1). People choose to segregate themselves according to their backgrounds, and this is in conflict with creating community (p. 4, paragraph 2).

    4. Reflections/Sharing: DOK 3: What facts would you gather to support the value of this news article? Thumbs up/Thumbs down evaluation of this article. Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively interpret the value of Anna Quindlen's news article "Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed HW: See previous day's assignment below:
  • COMPOSE AN ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Monday, October 31st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Briefly explain the meaning of QUILT. You may use an electronic device or your prior knowledge. (We are preparing to read a news article called "Quilt of a Country")

    Turn in HW: rough draft speeches

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: What do you think the title, "QUILT OF A COUNTRY", means? What can you predict about a news article with that title that is dated September 26, 2001? Begin reading the first paragraph of "QUILT OF A COUNTRY." What are active reading strategies (especially when encountering this kind of challenging text)? (Answer all questions and note-taking in your LA section)

    4. Reflections/Sharing: How would you evaluate your understanding of today's news article? Fist to five evaluation. Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Anna Quindlen's news article "Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed HW: See previous day's assignment below:
  • COMPOSE AN ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Friday, October 28th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What's a challenge in this argumentative speech? Choose from one of the following (or choose your own): the attention grabber, the organization of ideas, gathering evidence to support the thesis, or the conclusion.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Work on completing the HW, which is following the Argumentative Speech Outline below.
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

    4. Reflections/Sharing: What did you accomplish today? What do you need to finish in order to complete the Argumentative Speech? Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prepare an argumentative speech using an argumentative idea taken from "Making the Future Better, Together"? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • COMPOSE AN ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Thursday, October 27th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Create an argumentative question that's addressed in "Making the Future Better, Together". You should feel strongly about the issue, have a clear PERSPECTIVE (definition: point of view; word of the week) and be prepared to write an argumentative speech on the question. Here are suggestions: Should people build bridges with people from different backgrounds? Should people do community service? Should government intervene in people's lives to stop discrimination?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Introduce Argumentative Speech Outline: Read aloud as a class.
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

    4. Read Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet (this is an elaboration of the outline above).

    5. Work Period: Work on beginning to compose your argumentative essay on the self-created question of your choice. Use the outline above to guide you.

    6. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about today's lesson and what can you predict we will do tomorrow and next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prepare an argumentative speech using an argumentative idea taken from "Making the Future Better, Together"? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • COMPOSE AN ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH (three paragraphs; rough draft). Follow the outline below and the Writing Persuasive Essays Worksheet to guide you. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Mr. Rollon (period 2 only), English, Period ______, and an original title.

    Argumentative Speech Format/Outline:
    I. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
    A. Attention Grabber (question, quote, anecdote, shocking fact or statistic, or imaginative scenario)
    B. Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
    C. Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    II. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences)
    A. Topic Sentence (state the purpose of the paragraph)
    B. Supporting Details with ICE (Introduce Citations (quotes from a text), and Explain the citations in your own words); use at least two citations from "Making the Future Better, Together". Here's an example: Mr. Patel spoke to the Freshman class at George Washington University about the importance of community service. He said, "When you serve, you are part of the future" (p. 7). By emphasizing that community service would greatly influence the future of America, young people will likely feel compelled to engage in voluntary contributions of their precious time. Sentence Starters for Introducing and Explaining Citations. You may want to include personal opinions and anecdotes. You are allowed and encouraged to use first person (any form of "I").
    C. Making Connections (connect the supporting details back to the thesis)

    III. Conclusion (4-6 sentences)
    A. Restatement of thesis and main points
    B. Clinching Statements

  • Wednesday, October 26th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Did you enjoy your community service experience? Explain your answer.

    Turn in HW: COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT, attached paper on community service experience, and any owed HW for the 1st marking period.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review the answers to take-home quiz packet: "Making the Future Better, Together"

    3. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about today's lesson and what can you predict we will do the rest of this week? What skills do you need to work on in the future (based on the take-home quiz and the homework)?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we evaluate our homework on community service and the understanding of the take-home quiz on "Making the Future Better, Together"? N/A
    Tuesday, October 25th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are three things that effective speakers do when presenting a speech?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period #1: Finish yesterday's questions below:
    Write your position statement on the following question: Should the U.S. mandate (require) people to do community service? A position statement is like a thesis statement. It identifies the issue and your position on it in one sentence. For example: We, the people of The United States, should be (or should not be) mandated to do community service because of ________________ , __________________, and _________________.

  • Identify your audience. Although you will be presenting to our class, you should think about what group of people is your real-world audience. Answer the following questions, and then identify the group of people that is your real-world audience. After answering these questions, write down your real-world audience.
    a. Who is affected by this issue?
    b. Who might be in a position to influence the results of this issue?
    c. What might this audience (your fellow classmates) already know about the issue?
    d. What views or opinions might this audience (your fellow classmates) already have?
    e. What might your audience not know about this issue that you know?
    f. What details or words might appeal to this audience’s emotions? Reasoning?
    g. Your purpose is to persuade the audience. What do you want the audience to do as a result of listening to your speech?

    4. Work Period #2: Write a Top Ten List for Effective Speaking Skills. Identify (with an *) which skills that you need to work on to become an effective speaker when presenting to the class.

    5. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about today's lesson and what can you predict we will do the rest of this week? What do you need to accomplish to get the community service homework done for tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prepare to write a persuasive speech on the ISSUE of mandating community service? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK (turned in during class time only) MUST be turned in for the 1st marking period.

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT
  • Monday, October 24th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are the components (qualities) of a good speech? Think about what should go in the introduction, body paragraphs and conclusion.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:
    Write your position statement on the following question: Should the U.S. mandate (require) people to do community service? A position statement is like a thesis statement. It identifies the issue and your position on it in one sentence. For example: We, the people of The United States, should be (or should not be) mandated to do community service because of ________________ , __________________, and _________________.

  • Identify your audience. Although you will be presenting to our class, you should think about what group of people is your real-world audience. Answer the following questions, and then identify the group of people that is your real-world audience. After answering these questions, write down your real-world audience.
    a. Who is affected by this issue?
    b. Who might be in a position to influence the results of this issue?
    c. What might this audience (your fellow classmates) already know about the issue?
    d. What views or opinions might this audience (your fellow classmates) already have?
    e. What might your audience not know about this issue that you know?
    f. What details or words might appeal to this audience’s emotions? Reasoning?
    g. Your purpose is to persuade the audience. What do you want the audience to do as a result of listening to your speech?

    4. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about today's lesson and what can you predict we will do the rest of this week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prepare to write a persuasive speech on the ISSUE of mandating community service? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK (turned in during class time only) MUST be turned in for the 1st marking period.

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT
  • Friday, October 21st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Identify a celebrity who has volunteered his/her time to help the community or other people in need. Explain the celebrity's volunteer work. (You may research on an electronic device)

    Turn in any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Arrange into Speed Debating format (instructions will be reviewed). Read over your argumentative question from the HW, which is an important ISSUE on mandating community service: Should the U.S. mandate community service for all people?
  • Students will divide up into half the class, sitting across from a partner. One side of the room will be pro (in favor) of the U.S. mandating community service for all people. The other side of the room will be con (against) the U.S. mandating community service for all people. Students will use their HW and textual evidence from "Making the Future Better, Together". Students will compose at least one full page of handwritten notes (from today and yesterday's classwork) on new information learned during Speed Debating in their LA section. TWO MINUTES PER DEBATE.

    4. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about speed debating and discussing the ISSUE of mandating community service?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively articulate our opinions on the ISSUE of whether Americans should have mandated community service? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK (turned in during class time only) MUST be turned in for the 1st marking period.

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT
  • Thursday, October 20th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Read COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT. What challenges do you anticipate in getting this community service accomplished?

    Turn in any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Arrange into Speed Debating format (instructions will be provided). Read over your argumentative question from the HW, which is an important ISSUE on mandating community service: Should the U.S. mandate community service for all people?
  • Students will divide up into half the class, sitting across from a partner. One side of the room will be pro (in favor) of the U.S. mandating community service for all people. The other side of the room will be con (against) the U.S. mandating community service for all people. Students will use their HW and textual evidence from "Making the Future Better, Together". Students will take at least 1/2 page of handwritten notes on new information learned during Speed Debating in their LA section. TWO MINUTES PER DEBATE.

    4. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about today's speed debating and discussing the ISSUE of mandating community service?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively articulate our opinions on the ISSUE of whether Americans should have mandated community service? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK (turned in during class time only) MUST be turned in for the 1st marking period.

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT
  • Wednesday, October 19th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What is a community service activity (examples: tutoring, giving out food at a homeless shelter, spending time with residents at a nursing home) that you'd enjoy and why?

    Turn in Take-Home Quiz and show HW (argumentative paragraph on community service).

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:
    Finish yesterday's classwork. In your LA section, do the following:
    Compose a newspaper article on the importance of community service to make the world a better place. You must include the following:

  • A newspaper article in the form of a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on who, what, when, where and why. You may want to highlight yourself or a classmate as volunteers who give back to your community OR you can create a fictional character who is a volunteer and worthy of recognition. You must include at least two quotes from "Making the Future Better, Together" and at least one quote from yourself or one of your classmates (interviewed yesterday).
  • You need a headline for your article. Here are some examples: "The Rise of a Community Hero" or "How to Create a Utopia: A Teenager's Perspective."

    4. Introduce HW.

    5. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about today's newspaper article composition? Students will share any new findings/epiphanies (revelations) from your composition.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively articulate our opinions on the ISSUE of whether Americans should have mandated community service? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK (turned in during class time only) MUST be turned in for the 1st marking period.

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT
  • Tuesday, October 18th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are the essential (most important) components (qualities or content) of a newspaper article?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • In your LA section, compose a newspaper article on the importance of community service to make the world a better place. You must include the following:
  • A newspaper article in the form of a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on who, what, when, where and why. You may want to highlight yourself or a classmate as volunteers who give back to your community OR you can create a fictional character who is a volunteer and worthy of recognition.
  • You must include at least two quotes from "Making the Future Better, Together" and at least one quote from yourself or one of your classmates (interviewed yesterday).
  • You need a headline for your article. Here are some examples: "The Rise of a Community Hero" or "How to Create a Utopia: A Teenager's Perspective."
  • An illustration/downloaded image that fits with your news article

    *If you don't finish in class today, we will have time tomorrow in class to complete the newspaper article assignment.

    5. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about today's activities? What can you predict we will do tomorrow and the rest of the week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization and analysis of content.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively compose a newspaper article on the value of community service? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • Finish reading "Making the Future Better, Together".
  • TAKE-HOME QUIZ (10% of the 1st marking period): Complete ALL of the Close Read Notes and answer each questions (filling in the lines and following the directions for each question). This will count as a TAKE-HOME QUIZ. For each question and direction that you follow, you will earn credit. If you do not complete and follow the direction correctly, you will not earn credit. You can easily earn a 100% for completing all the questions and following the directions. IF YOU DON'T TURN IT IN TOMORROW, EACH DAY LATE WILL BE -10 points.
  • Argumentative Writing:: Should the U.S. mandate (force; require) all citizens to do community service? (Community service is defined as voluntary work that is intended to benefit a community or people in need) Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you do the following:
  • Establish your claim regarding whether or not American citizens should be mandated to do community service.
  • Present the opposing claim (counterclaim) and why it's not effective or appropriate.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from "Making the Future Better, Together" to support your argument.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words such as: in addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, and consequently).
  • Follow the conventions of standard English (use proper grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:

  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK (turned in during class time only).

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT
  • Monday, October 17th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What community service (volunteering to help people or a community in need) have you done and why? If you have not done any community service, what kind of volunteering would you like to do in the future?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • In your LA section, write down the following: Interview two classmates (from other tables) and ask them to share the following: Tell me about a time when you did community service OR tell me what kind of community service that you'd like to do in the future. Write their answer in quotes. Find out what your classmates did and how they felt about the volunteering experience. Each quote should be 2-3 sentences. Here's an example: John Smith said, "I volunteered to tutor my 7-year-old cousin in reading because he needed to practice and my aunt couldn't afford to pay someone to help him. I really enjoyed helping my cousin, and it made me realize that I have teaching skills that may turn into a career one day."
  • Work on homework that's due Wednesday.

    5. Reflections/Sharing: What was valuable about today's activities? What can you predict we will do tomorrow and the rest of the week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we understand the value of community service through discussion and the interview process? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • Finish reading "Making the Future Better, Together".
  • TAKE-HOME QUIZ (10% of the 1st marking period): Complete ALL of the Close Read Notes and answer each questions (filling in the lines and following the directions for each question). This will count as a TAKE-HOME QUIZ. For each question and direction that you follow, you will earn credit. If you do not complete and follow the direction correctly, you will not earn credit. You can easily earn a 100% for completing all the questions and following the directions.
  • Argumentative Writing:: Should the U.S. mandate (force; require) all citizens to do community service? (Community service is defined as voluntary work that is intended to benefit a community or people in need) Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you do the following:
  • Establish your claim regarding whether or not American citizens should be mandated to do community service.
  • Present the opposing claim (counterclaim) and why it's not effective or appropriate.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from "Making the Future Better, Together" to support your argument.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words such as: in addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, and consequently).
  • Follow the conventions of standard English (use proper grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation).
  • Friday, October 14th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Why do people discriminate (treat unfairly or differently) against others?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Discuss the first page of "Making the Future Better, Together" and share the answers from an annotator, vocabulary guru, summarizer and speaker (from Tuesday's lesson). What do the "stares and scowls" (p. 3, paragraph 1) suggest? Why does Mr. Patel recall George Washington's words about the U.S.?

    3. Work Period #1 : Read the second page of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Reflections/Sharing #1: Discuss and take notes on the Work Period #1 answers.

    5. Work Period #2: Read the third page of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    5. Reflections/Sharing #2: Discuss and take notes on Work Period #2 answers.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we practice good reading habits that include making annotations, identifying unknown words, and summarizing text in our own words? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • Finish reading "Making the Future Better, Together".
  • TAKE-HOME QUIZ (10% of the 1st marking period): Complete ALL of the Close Read Notes and answer each questions (filling in the lines and following the directions for each question). This will count as a TAKE-HOME QUIZ. For each question and direction that you follow, you will earn credit. If you do not complete and follow the direction correctly, you will not earn credit. You can easily earn a 100% for completing all the questions and following the directions.
  • Argumentative Writing:: Should the U.S. mandate (force; require) all citizens to do community service? (Community service is defined as voluntary work that is intended to benefit a community or people in need) Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you do the following:
  • Establish your claim regarding whether or not American citizens should be mandated to do community service.
  • Present the opposing claim (counterclaim) and why it's not effective or appropriate.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from "Making the Future Better, Together" to support your argument.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words such as: in addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, and consequently).
  • Follow the conventions of standard English (use proper grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation).
  • Thursday, October 13th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are two great components (qualities) of America?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Discuss the first page of "Making the Future Better, Together" and share the answers from an annotator, vocabulary guru, summarizer and speaker (from Tuesday's lesson).
  • Review answers to the Seedfolks exam.

    3. Work Period #1 : Read the second page of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    4. Reflections/Sharing #1: Discuss and take notes on the Work Period #1 answers.

    5. Work Period #2: Read the third page of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    5. Reflections/Sharing #2: Discuss and take notes on Work Period #2 answers.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we practice good reading habits that include making annotations, identifying unknown words, and summarizing text in our own words? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK
    Tuesday, October 11th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: If you could create a better future for America, what are two components (qualities) that you would include?

    Show HW: Well-developed paragraph on the following question: Should Americans be required to make a better future together?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period #1 : In the Collections Textbook, read the Background of Author, Eboo Patel, of "Making the Future Better, Together." Answer the following questions in your LA section:

  • What are your first impressions of the author?
  • What predictions can you make about his article?

    4. Reflections/Sharing: Discuss the Work Period #1 answers.

    5. Work Period #2: Read the first page of "Making the Future Better, Together" in the Close Reader. Implement (use) active reading strategies in your LA section, which include the following roles: 1.) ANNOTATOR: Mark one annotation using the Annotation Guide, 2.) VOCABULARY GURU: Look up three vocabulary words (unknown words), 3.) SUMMARIZER: Summarize in 20 words or less, and 4.) SPEAKER: Share your table's answers with the class.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we practice good reading habits that include making predictions and annotations? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK
    Friday, October 7th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: EXAM on Seedfolks

    Show owed HW. .

    2. Work Period: Now that we just finished reading a novel about neighbors finding common ground through gardening, we're going to continue to explore the concept of working together. Should Americans be required to make a better future together? Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you do the following:

  • Establish your claim regarding whether or not American citizens should be required to make a better future together.
  • Present the opposing claim (counterclaim) and why it's not effective or appropriate.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from Seedfolks to support your argument. Use your class notes or the packet provided in class.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words such as: in addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, and consequently).
  • Follow the conventions of standard English (use proper grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation).

    3. Reflections/Sharing: Are you satisfied with your performance on today's exam and today's writing assignment? Explain your answer.

  • Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we be effectively assessed on our knowledge of the novel, Seedfolks? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11th:
  • Finish today's in-class writing assignment in which you answer the following question: Should Americans be required to make a better future together? Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you do the following:
  • Establish your claim regarding whether or not American citizens should be required to make a better future together.
  • Present the opposing claim (counterclaim) and why it's not effective or appropriate.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from Seedfolks to support your argument.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words such as: in addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, and consequently).
  • Follow the conventions of standard English (use proper grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation).
  • Thursday, October 6th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What was the value in reading Seedfolks?

    Show owed HW. .

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • New Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review and take notes on the questions for chapters 11, 12 and 13:
    Chapter 11 (Maricela):
    1.) Why does Maricela have low self-esteem?
    2.) Why did the program for pregnant teens connect to the community garden?
    3.) Why did Maricela become more positive and hopeful about the future at the end of the chapter?

    Chapter 12 (Amir):
    1.) How does Amir contrast (find differences) between India and America?
    2.) What did Amir explain is the transformative (changing) power of the garden?
    3.) How does the garden combat (battle) ignorance (lack of knowledge or information) of other people?

    Chapter 13 (Florence)
    1.) Why is Florence only an observer of the garden and not an active participant?
    2.) Why is the garden an idle place for a few months?
    3.) According to Florence, what are two benefits of the garden?

    3. Reflections/Sharing:

  • Exam Review Game
  • What was the most valuable fact/lesson/discovery learned today and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • What are the major benefits of the garden that the author EMPHASIZES (shows importance) in Seedfolks? MAJOR EXAM WILL OCCUR TOMORROW FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th on Seedfolks and class notes. The EXAM will be 50% of your 1st marking period grade! Make sure that you review your class notes and all the answers to the STUDY GUIDE (which compiles all the homework questions). Bring in a #2 pencil tomorrow (you will not be provided with one). The exam will only include multiple-choice questions. You cannot use any notes or electronic devices.
    Wednesday, October 5th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Why does the author end the novel with this line: "we waved and waved to each other" (p. 87)? You may refer to other parts of the novel that may influence the line or the significance (importance) of the last chapter (Florence).

    Show HW: creative activity (diary entry, comic strip, song or poem) and questions for chapters 11, 12 and 13.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • New Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review and take notes on the questions for chapters 11, 12 and 13:
    Chapter 11 (Maricela):
    1.) Why does Maricela have low self-esteem?
    2.) Why did the program for pregnant teens connect to the community garden?
    3.) Why did Maricela become more positive and hopeful about the future at the end of the chapter?

    Chapter 12 (Amir):
    1.) How does Amir contrast (find differences) between India and America?
    2.) What did Amir explain is the transformative (changing) power of the garden?
    3.) How does the garden combat (battle) ignorance (lack of knowledge or information) of other people?

    Chapter 13 (Florence)
    1.) Why is Florence only an observer of the garden and not an active participant?
    2.) Why is the garden an idle place for a few months?
    3.) According to Florence, what are two benefits of the garden?

    3. Reflections/Sharing:

  • What was the most valuable fact/lesson/discovery learned today and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • What is the author's purpose for the resolution of Seedfolks? MAJOR EXAM WILL OCCUR THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th on Seedfolks and class notes. The EXAM will be 50% of your 1st marking period grade! Make sure that you take copious (abundant), ACCURATE notes. STUDY GUIDE IS HERE.
    Friday, September 30th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Why is gardening considered a form of mental and physical therapy?

    Show owed HW..

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Choose from one of the following Creative Activities for Seedfolks:

  • Diary Entry: Write a diary entry (one handwritten page or 1/2 page of typed, double-spaced) for one character from the novel. You should include what comes after the events in the novel, the character's actions, thoughts, feelings and interactions with other characters.
  • Comic Strip: Create a comic strip of four images and captions for each image (three sentences for each caption).
  • Song/Poem: Write a 14-line song/poem in which you capture the essentials (most important qualities) of the novel. You must include imagery (words that create mental pictures), similes (a comparison between two unlike things using like or as) and repetition (repeating of words or phrases)

    4. Reflections/Sharing:

  • What was the most valuable fact/lesson/discovery learned today and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we engage in creative activities of significant (important) events and characters in Seedfolks? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
    READ CHAPTERS 11, 12, AND 13 in Seedfolks. Answer the following questions:
    Chapter 11 (Maricela):
    1.) Why does Maricela have low self-esteem?
    2.) Why did the program for pregnant teens connect to the community garden?
    3.) Why did Maricela become more positive and hopeful about the future at the end of the chapter?

    Chapter 12 (Amir):
    1.) How does Amir contrast (find differences) between India and America?
    2.) What did Amir explain is the transformative (changing) power of the garden?
    3.) How does the garden combat (battle) ignorance (lack of knowledge or information) of other people?

    Chapter 13 (Florence)
    1.) Why is Florence only an observer of the garden and not an active participant?
    2.) Why is the garden an idle place for a few months?
    3.) According to Florence, what are two benefits of the garden?

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
    Choose of the following Creative Activities for Seedfolks:

  • Diary Entry: Write a diary entry (one handwritten page or 1/2 page that's typed, 12 point font, and double-spaced) for one character from the novel. You should include what comes after the events in the novel, the character's actions, thoughts, feelings and interactions with other characters.
  • Comic Strip: Create a comic strip of four images and captions for each image (three sentences for each caption) that portray important chapters from the novel. Song/Poem: Write a 14-line song/poem in which you capture the essentials (most important qualities) of the novel. You must include imagery (words that create mental pictures), a simile (a comparison between two unlike things using like or as) and repetition (repeating of words or phrases)

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    LOOKING AHEAD: MAJOR EXAM WILL OCCUR ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th on Seedfolks and class notes. The EXAM will be 50% of your 1st marking period grade! Make sure that you take copious (abundant), ACCURATE notes. A Study Guide will be provided.

  • Thursday, September 29th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What do you believe is the author's purpose in writing Seedfolks? You should refer to evidence from the novel to support your answer.

    Show HW: Chapters 9 and 10 questions.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review Chapters 9 and 10 questions and answers. Cite textual evidence to support your answers. Take notes.


    Chapter 9 (Curtis) Questions in Seedfolks: For each question below, answer the question in your own words and then cite textual evidence (a quote and the paragraph # in which the quote was found).
    1.) How has Curtis grown and developed?
    2.) How would you describe the relationship between Lateesha and Curtis?
    3.) What inferences (conclusions) can you draw about Curtis' relationship with his tomatoes?

    Chapter 10 (Nora) Questions in Seedfolks: For each question below, answer the question in your own words and then cite textual evidence (a quote and the paragraph # in which the quote was found).
    1.) Why can't Mr. Myles communicate with Nora?
    2.) Why did Mr. Myles dramatically change from sleepy to vibrant (lively)?
    3.) Why does Nora COMPARE gardening to a soap opera?

    3. Work Period: Work on HW: chapters 9 and 10 questions.

    4. Reflections/Sharing:

  • What was the most valuable fact/lesson/discovery learned today and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How does the garden positively influence Curtis and Mr. Myles in chapters 9 and 10 of Seedfolks? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
    READ CHAPTERS 11, 12, AND 13 (questions will be posted soon) AND MORE TO COME.

    LOOKING AHEAD: MAJOR EXAM WILL OCCUR ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th on Seedfolks and class notes. The EXAM will be 50% of your 1st marking period grade! Make sure that you take copious (abundant), ACCURATE notes. A Study Guide will be provided.

    Wednesday, September 28th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: The garden evokes (calls forth) special meaning (importance) for each of the characters. What kind of extracurricular activity evokes special meaning for you and why?

    Show HW: Chapters 7 and 8 questions.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Distribute and review vocabulary quiz answers.
  • Review Chapters 7 and 8 questions and answers. Cite textual evidence to support your answers. Take notes.


    Chapter 7 (Virgil) Questions in Seedfolks:
    1.) Why does Virgil's father CONSIDER the garden so meaningful?
    2.) What's the author's purpose in COMPARING the lettuce to a baby?
    3.) Why does Virgil COMPARE his father to a child?
    4.) Why does Virgil end the chapter with the quote "save our lettuce"?

    Chapter 8 (Sae Young) Questions in Seedfolks:
    1.) What are the two tragic events in Sae Young's life?
    2.) How has Sae Young's personality changed as a result of these tragic events?
    3.) How does the garden make Sae Young feel?

    3. Work Period: Work on HW: chapters 9 and 10 questions.

    4. Reflections/Sharing:

  • What was the most valuable fact/lesson/discovery learned today and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How does the community garden give hope and personal meaning to the characters, Virgil's father and Sae Young, in chapters 7 and 8 of Seedfolks? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:
    Chapter 9 (Curtis) Questions in Seedfolks: For each question below, answer the question in your own words and then cite textual evidence (a quote and the paragraph # in which the quote was found).
    1.) How has Curtis grown and developed?
    2.) How would you describe the relationship between Lateesha and Curtis?
    3.) What inferences (conclusions) can you draw about Curtis' relationship with his tomatoes?

    Chapter 10 (Nora) Questions in Seedfolks: For each question below, answer the question in your own words and then cite textual evidence (a quote and the paragraph # in which the quote was found).
    1.) Why can't Mr. Myles communicate with Nora?
    2.) Why did Mr. Myles dramatically change from sleepy to vibrant (lively)?
    3.) Why does Nora COMPARE gardening to a soap opera?

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    LOOKING AHEAD: MAJOR EXAM WILL OCCUR ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th on Seedfolks and class notes. The EXAM will be 50% of your 1st marking period grade! Make sure that you take copious (abundant), ACCURATE notes. A Study Guide will be provided.

    Tuesday, September 27th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Can a paradise ever be accomplished? Why or why not?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review Chapters 4, 5 and 6 questions and answers. Cite textual evidence to support your answers. Take notes.

    Chapter 4:
    1.) What is the meaning of the metaphor (COMPARISON between two unlike things without using like or as) in which Gonzalo states, "He (his father) got younger. I got older" (p. 18)?
    2.) What is the author's purpose for stating the simile (COMPARISON between two unlike things using like or as) that Tio Juan is "just like a kid in diapers"?
    3.) What type of figurative language is the phrase that Tio Juan "changed from a baby back into a man" (p. 22)? What influenced Tio Juan's change?

    Chapter 5 Questions:
    1.) What's Leona's false assumption (wrong conclusion) about the people's activity in the vacant lot? Why do you believe she made this false assumption?
    2.) How would you describe the city in which Leona lives?
    3.) Info Tech High School's mission is to teach our students to "prove it" with evidence. How does Leona "prove it" at the end of the chapter?

    Chapter 6 Questions:
    1.) How does Sam hope to positively influence people in Cleveland? Is it effective?
    2.) Why does Sam COMPARE the garden to "paradise"?
    3.) Why does Sam believe that the garden is not COMPARABLE to a "paradise"?

    3. Work Period: Work on HW: chapters 7 and 8 questions.

    4. Reflections/Sharing:

  • What was the most valuable fact/lesson/discovery learned today and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do the characters create "paradise" in their community in chapters 4, 5 and 6 of Seedfolks? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:
    Chapter 7 (Virgil) Questions in Seedfolks:
    1.) Why does Virgil's father CONSIDER the garden so meaningful?
    2.) What's the author's purpose in COMPARING the lettuce to a baby?
    3.) Why does Virgil COMPARE his father to a child?
    4.) Why does Virgil end the chapter with the quote "save our lettuce"?

    Chapter 8 (Sae Young) Questions in Seedfolks:
    1.) What are the two tragic events in Sae Young's life?
    2.) How has Sae Young's personality changed as a result of these tragic events?
    3.) How does the garden make Sae Young feel?

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    LOOKING AHEAD: MAJOR EXAM WILL OCCUR ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th on Seedfolks and class notes. The EXAM will be 50% of your 1st marking period grade! Make sure that you take copious (abundant), ACCURATE notes. A Study Guide will be provided.

    Monday, September 26th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: How can you help to create "paradise" in your family/community/school? Recall how the characters in Seedfolks positively influenced other people and their neighborhood: Gonzalo took care of Tio Juan, Leona brought her neighborhood's trash to the Public Health Department, and Sam smiled and conversed with his neighbors.

    SHOW HW: Chapters 4, 5 and 6 questions and answers.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • New Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review HW: Chapters 4, 5 and 6 questions and answers.

    Chapter 4:
    1.) What is the meaning of the metaphor (COMPARISON between two unlike things without using like or as) in which Gonzalo states, "He (his father) got younger. I got older" (p. 18)?
    2.) What is the author's purpose for stating the simile (COMPARISON between two unlike things using like or as) that Tio Juan is "just like a kid in diapers"?
    3.) What type of figurative language is the phrase that Tio Juan "changed from a baby back into a man" (p. 22)? What influenced Tio Juan's change?

    Chapter 5 Questions:
    1.) What's Leona's false assumption (wrong conclusion) about the people's activity in the vacant lot? Why do you believe she made this false assumption?
    2.) How would you describe the city in which Leona lives?
    3.) Info Tech High School's mission is to teach our students to "prove it" with evidence. How does Leona "prove it" at the end of the chapter?

    Chapter 6 Questions:
    1.) How does Sam hope to positively influence people in Cleveland? Is it effective?
    2.) Why does Sam COMPARE the garden to "paradise"?
    3.) Why does Sam believe that the garden is not COMPARABLE to a "paradise"?

    3. Reflections/Sharing:

  • What was the most valuable fact/lesson/discovery learned today and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How do the characters create "paradise" in their community in chapters 4, 5 and 6 of Seedfolks? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    LOOKING AHEAD: MAJOR EXAM WILL OCCUR ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th on Seedfolks and class notes. The EXAM will be 50% of your 1st marking period grade! Make sure that you take copious (abundant), ACCURATE notes. A Study Guide will be provided.

    Friday, September 23rd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: How can an adult be called a "child" and how can a child be called a "grown up"? Explain situations when these labels may be ACCURATE.

    SHOW HW: Vocabulary Story Rewrite (with highlighted corrections) and the original vocabulary story.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Finish reading chapter 3 (Wendell) and chapter 4 (Gonzalo) in Seedfolks--pp. 11-22. In your LA section, write the title Seedfolks, Chapters 3-4, and the date. Then, answer the following questions and include textual evidence (page numbers and direct quotes) to support each answer.
    Chapter 3
    1.) Why was Kim afraid of Wendell if he was doing an act of kindness for her plants?
    2.) What can you infer (or assume) is the reason that Wendell performs this act of kindness?
    3.) How can you COMPARE Wendell to Kim's father (from chapter 1)?
    Chapter 4:
    1.) What is the meaning of the metaphor (COMPARISON between two unlike things without using like or as) in which Gonzalo states, "He (his father) got younger. I got older" (p. 18)?
    2.) What is the author's purpose for stating the simile (COMPARISON between two unlike things using like or as) that Tio Juan is "just like a kid in diapers"?
    3.) What type of figurative language is the phrase that Tio Juan "changed from a baby back into a man" (p. 22)? What influenced Tio Juan's change?

    4. Reflections/Sharing:

  • Review the questions and answers for chapters 3 and 4.
  • What was the most valuable fact/lesson/discovery learned today and why?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of finding meaning in life in chapters 3-4 of Seedfolks? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:
  • Finish today's classwork (Read and answer questions for Chapter 4--Gonzalo):
    1.) What is the meaning of the metaphor (COMPARISON between two unlike things without using like or as) in which Gonzalo states, "He (his father) got younger. I got older" (p. 18)?
    2.) What is the author's purpose for stating the simile (COMPARISON between two unlike things using like or as) that Tio Juan is "just like a kid in diapers"?
    3.) What type of figurative language is the phrase that Tio Juan "changed from a baby back into a man" (p. 22)? What influenced Tio Juan's change?


  • Read chapters 5 and 6 in Seedfolks. Answer the following questions, and make sure to include textual evidence (direct quotes and paragraph numbers).
    Chapter 5 Questions:
    1.) What's Leona's false assumption (wrong conclusion) about the people's activity in the vacant lot? Why do you believe she made this false assumption?
    2.) How would you describe the city in which Leona lives?
    3.) Info Tech High School's mission is to teach our students to "prove it" with evidence. How does Leona "prove it" at the end of the chapter?

    Chapter 6 Questions:
    1.) How does Sam hope to positively influence people in Cleveland? Is it effective?
    2.) Why does Sam COMPARE the garden to "paradise"?
    3.) Why does Sam believe that the garden is not COMPARABLE to a "paradise"?

    LOOKING AHEAD: MAJOR EXAM WILL OCCUR ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th on Seedfolks and class notes. The EXAM will be 50% of your 1st marking period grade! Make sure that you take copious (abundant), ACCURATE notes. A Study Guide will be provided.

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Thursday, September 22nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What gives people meaning (fulfillment, purpose) in their lives? For example, what gives you, your friends or your parents meaning in their lives?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read chapter 3 (Wendell) and chapter 4 (Gonzalo) in Seedfolks--pp. 11-22. In your LA section, write the title Seedfolks, Chapters 3-4, and the date. Then, answer the following questions and include textual evidence (page numbers and direct quotes) to support each answer.
    Chapter 3
    1.) Why was Kim afraid of Wendell if he was doing an act of kindness for her plants?
    2.) What can you infer (or assume) is the reason that Wendell performs this act of kindness?
    3.) How can you COMPARE Wendell to Kim's father (from chapter 1)?
    Chapter 4:
    1.) What is the meaning of the metaphor (COMPARISON between two unlike things without using like or as) in which Gonzalo states, "He (his father) got younger. I got older" (p. 18)?
    2.) What is the author's purpose for stating the simile (COMPARISON between two unlike things using like or as) that Tio Juan is "just like a kid in diapers"?
    3.) What type of figurative language is the phrase that Tio Juan "changed from a baby back into a man" (p. 22)? What influenced Tio Juan's change?

    4. Reflections: Share work period answers with the class. Reflect on what we learned today and determine each activity's value.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of finding meaning in life in chapters 3-4 of Seedfolks? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:

  • Rewrite your vocabulary story. Make the corrections that Ms. Conn made on your original vocabulary story, and Highlight the corrections on your revised paper. Bring in both the original and the revised papers to earn homework credit.
  • Wednesday, September 21st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up:
  • What do people from other states falsely assume about New Yorkers?
  • Why do people make these false assumptions?
  • What false assumptions (wrong conclusions) do people make about others today?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Share your answers for chapters 1 and 2, and cite strong textual evidence (with page numbers) to support your answer.
    1. What 'common ground' do the characters share?
    2. What is the symbolism of the lima beans?
    3. What false assumption did Ana make in chapter 2?
    4. On p. 10, Ana lay down Kim's beans "as gently as sleeping babies." What literary technique is she using and what is the author's purpose for using this phrase?
    5. How can you COMPARE Ana and Kim in chapters 1 and 2. How are they similar?

    3. Work Period: Read Read chapter 3 (Wendell) in Seedfolks--pp. 11-16. In your LA section, write the title Seedfolks, Chapter 3 (Wendell), and the date. Then, answer the following questions:
    1.) Why was Kim afraid of Wendell if he was doing an act of kindness for her plants? Find textual evidence to support your answer.
    2.) What can you infer (or assume) is the reason that Wendell performs this act of kindness? Find textual evidence to support your answer.

    4. Reflections: Share work period answers with the class. Reflect on what we learned today and determine each activity's value.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of literary techniques and textual evidence in the first two chapters of Seedfolks? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:

  • Rewrite your vocabulary story. Make the corrections that Ms. Conn made on your original vocabulary story, and Highlight the corrections on your revised paper. Bring in both the original and the revised papers to earn homework credit.
  • Tuesday, September 20th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: VOCABULARY QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    Show owed HW.

    2. Work Period:

  • Read pp. 1-10, which are chapters 1 (Kim) and 2 (Ana) in Seedfolks, and answer the following questions: in your LA section of your notebook. Cite strong textual evidence (with page numbers) to support your answer.
    1. What 'common ground' do the characters share?
    2. What is the symbolism of the lima beans?
    3. What false assumption did Ana make in chapter 2?
    4. On p. 10, Ana lay down Kim's beans "as gently as sleeping babies." What literary technique is she using and what is the author's purpose for using this phrase?

    3. Reflections: Volunteers will share work period answers (while also citing textual evidence that includes page numbers) with the class. Reflect on what we learned today and determine each activity's value.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of literary techniques and textual evidence in the first two chapters of Seedfolks? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
    Monday, September 19th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: In your Warm-ups and Aims (WA) section, write the following: What are 3 literary techniques/elements (include their definitions) that are commonly found in works of literature? One example is setting=the time and place of a story. Use your prior knowledge, not an electronic device.

    Show HW:

  • Show your four, ACCURATELY labeled sections of your notebook/binder: Warm-ups and Aims (WA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), and Homework (HW).
  • Turn in your completed contract and information form.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Share your answers with the new captain. Table captains will share one literary technique/element from each table mate with the class. Captain roles include the following: rotate every Monday in order to earn classwork credit for the marking period, stand up and represent your table respectfully, and earn extra credit (up to 5 extra points on your marking period grade) by taking on an extra week as captain.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read chapters 1 (Kim) and 2 (Ana) in Seedfolks and answer the following questions: in your LA section of your notebook. Cite strong textual evidence (with page numbers) to support your answer.
    1. What 'common ground' do the characters share?
    2. What is the symbolism of the lima beans?
    3. What false assumption did Ana make in chapter 2?

  • Prepare for the vocabulary quiz that OCCURS tomorrow, Tuesday on the following: Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    4. Reflections: Volunteers will share work period answers (while also citing textual evidence that includes page numbers) with the class. Reflect on what we learned today and determine each activity's value.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of literary techniques and textual evidence in the first chapters of Seedfolks? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:

  • QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Friday, September 16th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are the habits of good readers in high school? Make a "Top Ten" list! When you're finished, you should study for the Vocabulary Quiz on Seedfolks Vocabulary List, which will OCCUR (academic vocabulary word) on Tuesday.

    Show HW: Show the visual/auditory/tactile strategies for each vocabulary word AND the vocabulary flashcards for Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Share your answers with the captain. Table captains will share one habit of good readers (one habit that the entire table has in common) with the class.
  • Read over the class syllabus (distributed today).

    3. Work Period:

  • Provide ACCURATE (factual, truthful) facts about yourself and parents/guardians in the contract and information form at the back of the syllabus.
  • Prepare for the vocabulary quiz on Tuesday on the Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine each activity's value.

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we effectively understand class expectations and improve our vocabulary skills? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th:

  • Supplies for this class: A three-ring binder filled with loose-leaf paper for English, or a section in a larger binder or a notebook with the following, FOUR LABELED sections: Warm-ups and Aims (WA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), and Homework (HW).
  • COMPLETED CONTRACT AND INFORMATION SHEET (last page of the syllabus given in class)

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:

  • QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Thursday, September 15th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Finish Learning Style Inventory and determine if you're a visual, audio or tactile learner. Evaluate your score. Is your score as a visual, audio or tactile learner accurate (academic vocabulary word #1), in your opinion? Explain your answer (one or two sentences). *If you're finished early, you may work on the homework (flashcards due tomorrow).

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your answers with the captain. Table captains will share the types of learners with the class.

    2. Work Period: Compose vocabulary strategies (based on your learning style) for each vocabulary word from the Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Choose from one of the following strategies:

    For Visual Learners:

  • Draw a relevant picture, choose an online image, create a cartoon, or create a meme

    For Auditory Learners:

  • Create a song or mnemonic device (words associated with the vocabulary word to help you remember the definition) or invent an acronym (letters that stand for the definition, like PSA=public service announcement)

    For Tactile Learners:

  • Write physical movements that associate with the word or create a game to remember the words

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine each activity's value.

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we effectively understand our learning styles and improve our vocabulary skills? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Finish today's classwork: Compose vocabulary strategies (based on your learning style) for each vocabulary word from the Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Choose from one of the following strategies:
    For Visual Learners: Draw a relevant picture, choose an online image, create a cartoon, or create a meme

    For Auditory Learners: Create a song or mnemonic device (words associated with the vocabulary word to help you remember the definition) or invent an acronym (letters that stand for the definition, like PSA=public service announcement)

    For Tactile Learners: Write physical movements that associate with the word or create a game to remember the words

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th:

  • Supplies for this class: A three-ring binder filled with loose-leaf paper for English, or a section in a larger binder or a notebook with the following, FOUR LABELED sections: Warm-ups and Aims (WA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), and Homework (HW).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:

  • QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Wednesday, September 14th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Receive Diagnostic Writing. Listen to today's work period instructions and homework due Friday.

    2. Work Period:

  • FINISH DIAGNOSTIC: ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING
  • Learning Style Inventory: determine if you're a visual, audio or tactile learner
  • Begin HW (vocabulary flashcards), if time allows.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we effectively read texts to develop an argument and compose an argumentative essay? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:

  • QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Tuesday, September 13th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Receive Diagnostic and preview the instructions.

    Turn in Vocabulary Story HW.

    2. Work Period: DIAGNOSTIC: ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we effectively read texts to develop an argument and compose an argumentative essay? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:

  • QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Friday, September 9th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What's the definition of "common ground"? With whom do you have common ground? Think of family, friends, and members of a sport/club. You may determine your own answer or use an electronic device to research the answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: In your assigned tables, the captain (designated in yesterday's class) will lead the table mates to determine the common ground of everyone at the table. Each captain will share their table's common ground with the entire class.

    3. Vocabulary List: Seedfolks Vocabulary List will be introduced.

    4. Work Period: Homework will be introduced and students will begin working on homework independently.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners an follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task.
  • : L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we acquire new vocabulary and begin to compose writing which incorporates the vocabulary? ***Remember that this Sunday is 9/11. My recommendation (this is not a homework assignment) is to do a good deed (volunteering) in honor of 9/11. Use Volunteer Match to find a volunteer opportunity that matches your personal interests and location. Tutor a child in your neighborhood or family. Go grocery shopping for an elderly man/woman. Go to a homeless shelter and serve the guests a meal. No money is given for a good deed--it's volunteer only.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13th:

  • Vocabulary Story about "Common Ground": You will write a creative story on the topic of "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). Your story must include 10 of the words taken from Seedfolks Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Common Ground." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Tuesday, September 13th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn                                                              Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                            Date
    Assignment: Vocabulary Story
          
                       Original Title
    
  • Thursday, September 8th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What is a highlight from your summer? Write your answer on the paper provided. (Seat assignments will be given at this time)

    2. Discuss/Share: In your assigned tables, a captain will be designated. Students will share their Warm-Up answers with the captain. The captain will then share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Emergency Procedure and Essential Rules: Teacher will introduce classroom emergency procedure and essential rules.

    4. 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's activities or class procedures.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.4
  • How can we get to know each other and understand classroom rules and procedures? N/A