Junior English Assignments, Fall Semester, 2016-2017

Junior English Assignments
Fall Semester, 2016-2017

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 23rd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Read over your Final Exam (received today). What questions/concerns do you have about the argumentative essay? What questions/concerns do you have about the English Regents Exam?

2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains and all table mates will share strategies for success on the English Regents.

3. College and Career Reminders:

  • Do you have a resume? If yes, explain the contents of your resume. See Ms. Conn's sample resumes.
  • Are you preparing for the SAT? When do you anticipate taking the SAT? See these resources: Ms. Conn's SAT vocabulary words and Ms. Conn's SAT roots.
  • What English skills (reading and writing) do you think you need for college and a future career? What career do you want to pursue? See here for career research: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Go to the search box in the top right-hand corner to type in a career. Then, you will see the salary, long-term success, and details about the career.

    4. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about English Regents and college and career preparation? What do you want to know? What did you learn this semester?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents by understanding how to be successful using the strategies provided? HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE): TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 24th at 12:15pm:

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:

    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:

    1.) Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2.) Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3.) Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4.) Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:


    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for literary elements (such as characterization, conflict, setting, and symbolism) that develop the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea.
    2.) Create a formal/informal outline of 3 paragraphs (about 1-1 and a 1/2 page), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary elements that develop the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph).
    3.) Write your essay of 3 paragraphs (intro. paragraph=4-6 sentences, body paragraph=10-12 sentences, and conclusion=4-6 sentences) that focuses on the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (include at least 3 quotes from the passage provided; give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Friday, January 20th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Read over your assigned section of strategies for the English Regents. Prepare to present it to the class.

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains and all table mates will share strategies for success on the English Regents.

    3. Work Period:

  • Do you have a resume? If yes, explain the contents of your resume. See Ms. Conn's sample resumes.
  • Are you preparing for the SAT? When do you anticipate taking the SAT? See these resources: Ms. Conn's SAT vocabulary words and Ms. Conn's SAT roots.
  • What English skills (reading and writing) do you think you need for college and a future career? What career do you want to pursue? See here for career research: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Go to the search box in the top right-hand corner to type in a career. Then, you will see the salary, long-term success, and details about the career.

    4. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about English Regents and college and career preparation? What do you want to know? What did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents by understanding how to be successful using the strategies provided? HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE): TUESDAY, JANUARY 24th at 12:15pm:

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:

    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:

    1.) Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2.) Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3.) Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4.) Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:


    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for literary elements (such as characterization, conflict, setting, and symbolism) that develop the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea.
    2.) Create a formal/informal outline of 3 paragraphs (about 1-1 and a 1/2 page), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary elements that develop the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph).
    3.) Write your essay of 3 paragraphs (intro. paragraph=4-6 sentences, body paragraph=10-12 sentences, and conclusion=4-6 sentences) that focuses on the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (include at least 3 quotes from the passage provided; give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Thursday, January 19th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are your questions/concerns about the English Regents Exam, college and career preparation?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share exemplary qualities of a central idea essay.

    3. Work Period:

  • Do you have a resume? If yes, explain the contents of your resume. See Ms. Conn's sample resumes.
  • Are you preparing for the SAT? When do you anticipate taking the SAT? See these resources: Ms. Conn's SAT vocabulary words and Ms. Conn's SAT roots.
  • What English skills (reading and writing) do you think you need for college and a future career? What career do you want to pursue? See here for career research: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Go to the search box in the top right-hand corner to type in a career. Then, you will see the salary, long-term success, and details about the career.

    4. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about English Regents and college and career preparation? What do you want to know? What did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents by understanding how to be successful on the the multiple-choice questions? MAKE UP ALL OWED HW (turn in ALL owed work by TOMORROW, Friday, January 20th--the last day of the semester): See previous days' assignments.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE): TUESDAY, JANUARY 24th at 12:15pm:

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:

    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:

    1.) Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2.) Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3.) Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4.) Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:


    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for literary elements (such as characterization, conflict, setting, and symbolism) that develop the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea.
    2.) Create a formal/informal outline of 3 paragraphs (about 1-1 and a 1/2 page), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary elements that develop the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph).
    3.) Write your essay of 3 paragraphs (intro. paragraph=4-6 sentences, body paragraph=10-12 sentences, and conclusion=4-6 sentences) that focuses on the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (include at least 3 quotes from the passage provided; give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Wednesday, January 18th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Read "Sonnet 18" by William Shakespeare. What is the poem's central idea/author's message (theme)?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share exemplary qualities of a central idea essay.

    3. Work Period: Using yesterday's notes on multiple-choice question types (see below) and the sample questions from the English Regents packet, create 5 multiple-choice questions (with four answer choices; circle the correct answer).

  • conflicts between characters
  • characters' feelings
  • characters' relationships
  • characters' actions
  • characters who change over time
  • central idea/theme/main idea/main concept
  • overall meaning of poem/passage
  • literary techniques/figurative language and their purpose in the passage/poem
  • structure of poem/passage
  • author's tone (positive or negative) toward the subject in the poem/passage
  • vocabulary in context
  • supporting details
  • author's purpose (key words: "serves to")

    4. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about English Regents preparation? What do you want to know? What did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents by understanding how to be successful on the the multiple-choice questions? MAKE UP ALL OWED HW (turn in ALL owed work by THIS Friday, January 20th--the last day of the semester): See previous days' assignments.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE): TUESDAY, JANUARY 24th at 12:15pm:

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:

    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:

    1.) Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2.) Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3.) Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4.) Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:


    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for literary elements (such as characterization, conflict, setting, and symbolism) that develop the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea.
    2.) Create a formal/informal outline of 3 paragraphs (about 1-1 and a 1/2 page), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary elements that develop the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph).
    3.) Write your essay of 3 paragraphs (intro. paragraph=4-6 sentences, body paragraph=10-12 sentences, and conclusion=4-6 sentences) that focuses on the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (include at least 3 quotes from the passage provided; give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Tuesday, January 17th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are three exemplary (outstanding) qualities about the exemplary central idea essay (attached to the rubric provided with your original central idea essay)?

    Show HW: Revision of Central Idea Essay.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share exemplary qualities of a central idea essay.

    3. Work Period: Take notes on multiple-choice question types:

  • conflicts between characters
  • characters' feelings
  • characters' relationships
  • characters' actions
  • characters who change over time
  • central idea/theme/main idea/main concept
  • overall meaning of poem/passage
  • literary techniques/figurative language and their purpose in the passage/poem
  • structure of poem/passage
  • author's tone (positive or negative) toward the subject in the poem/passage
  • vocabulary in context
  • supporting details
  • author's purpose (key words: "serves to")

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we prepare for the English Regents by understanding how to be successful on the Central Idea Essay and the multiple-choice questions? MAKE UP ALL OWED HW (turn in ALL owed work by THIS Friday, January 20th--the last day of the semester): See previous days' assignments.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE): TUESDAY, JANUARY 24th at 12:15pm:

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:

    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:

    1.) Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2.) Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3.) Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4.) Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:


    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for literary elements (such as characterization, conflict, setting, and symbolism) that develop the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea.
    2.) Create a formal/informal outline of 3 paragraphs (about 1-1 and a 1/2 page), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary elements that develop the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph).
    3.) Write your essay of 3 paragraphs (intro. paragraph=4-6 sentences, body paragraph=10-12 sentences, and conclusion=4-6 sentences) that focuses on the central idea and literary elements that develop the central idea. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (include at least 3 quotes from the passage provided; give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Friday, January 13th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Reminder instructions for the FINAL EXAM.

    2. Work Period: FINISH THE FINAL EXAM

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we effectively read non-fiction texts and compose an argumentative essay on the Final Exam? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, JANUARY 17th:
  • REWRITE the Central Idea Essay on A View From the Bridge (see the corrections provided by the teacher; make the corrections on the rewrite; bring in the original Central Idea Essay and highlight the corrections on the rewrite).

    Make up owed HW (turn in ALL owed work by NEXT Friday, January 20th--the last day of the semester): See previous days' assignments.

  • Thursday, January 12th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Reminder instructions for the FINAL EXAM.

    2. Work Period: FINAL EXAM

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we effectively read non-fiction texts and compose an argumentative essay on the Final Exam? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:
  • FINISH THE FINAL EXAM (you will not have to prepare for this exam; it's an argumentative essay with four texts). It will be 25% of your 3rd marking period. You will use your midterm exam as a guide for how to be successful on this exam!

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, JANUARY 17th:

  • REWRITE the Central Idea Essay on A View From the Bridge (see the corrections provided by the teacher; make the corrections on the rewrite; bring in the original Central Idea Essay and highlight the corrections on the rewrite).

    Make up owed HW (turn in ALL owed work by Friday, January 20th--the last day of the semester): See previous days' assignments.

  • Wednesday, January 11th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Listen to the instructions for the FINAL EXAM.

    2. Work Period: FINAL EXAM

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we effectively read non-fiction texts to prepare to compose an argumentative essay on the Final Exam? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 12th-FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:
  • FINAL EXAM (you will not have to prepare for this exam; it's an argumentative essay with four texts). It will be 25% of your 3rd marking period. You will use your midterm exam as a guide for how to be successful on this exam!

    Make up owed HW (turn in ALL owed work by Friday, January 20th--the last day of the semester): See previous days' assignments.

  • Tuesday, January 10th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are your strengths in the Central Idea Essay? What do you need to work on in composing the Central Idea Essay?

    Turn in HW: Turn in your Central Idea Essay and your copy of A View From the Bridge.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share personal assessments of their essays with the class.

    3. Work Period: Midterm Exam returns and portfolio folder updates. Add the Midterm Exams to your portfolio folders and add the teacher's comments in the goals sheet. Share any thoughts/concerns that you have with the Midterm Exam. How will the Midterm Exam prepare us for success on the Final Exam?

    4. K/W/L: What did you know about writing a central idea essay? What do you want to know about writing a central idea essay? What did you learn about writing an exemplary central idea essay?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we effectively compose a central idea essay on A View From the Bridge and how can we prepare for success on the Final Exam? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11th-FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:
  • FINAL EXAM (you will not have to prepare for this exam; it's an argumentative essay with four texts). It will be 25% of your 3rd marking period. You will use your midterm exam as a guide for how to be successful on this exam!

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

  • Monday, January 9th, 2017: 1. Work Period: Continue writing the Central Idea Essay. On the English Regents, you will be graded on four categories: content and analysis, command of evidence, coherence, organization and style, and control of conventions. Add sophisticated vocabulary: SAT List #1, The Scarlet Letter List #1, and The Scarlet Letter List #2. Your thesis statement for the central idea essay (3 paragraphs) for A View From the Bridge is at the end of the introduction. Suggested sentence starter includes the following:
  • The author, Arthur Miller, uses the literary technique of ________________(characterization, setting, conflict, tone, etc.) to develop his central idea of _______________(family, honor, love, or justice and the law) while it depicts (portrays) _______________________(briefly summarize the play; you may want to discuss Eddie's downfall, Eddie's romantic feelings for his niece and how they influence the plot, etc.).

    **Use the rubric and sample, exemplary essay as a guide.

    2. K/W/L: What do you know about writing a central idea essay? What do you want to know about writing a central idea essay? What did you learn today about writing an exemplary central idea essay?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we effectively compose a central idea essay on A View From the Bridge? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 10th:
  • Finish your central idea essay (part 3) on A View From the Bridge. See today's and Friday's handouts. THIS IS AN IMPORTANT GRADE! This is practice for the English Regents. TURN IN YOUR COPY OF A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11th-FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:

  • FINAL EXAM (you will not have to prepare for this exam; it's an argumentative essay with four texts). It will be 25% of your 3rd marking period. You will use your midterm exam as a guide for how to be successful on this exam!

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

  • Friday, January 6th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Compose a thesis statement for a central idea essay (3 paragraphs) for A View From the Bridge. Suggested sentence starter includes the following:
  • The author, Arthur Miller, uses the literary technique of ________________(characterization, setting, conflict, tone, etc.) to develop his central idea of _______________(family, honor, love, or justice and the law) while it depicts (portrays) _______________________(briefly summarize the play; you may want to discuss Eddie's downfall, Eddie's romantic feelings for his niece and how they influence the plot, etc.).

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share thesis statements at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share the best thesis statement with the class.
  • Review Part 3 (Central Idea Essay) instructions and circle key words.

    3. Work Period: Begin writing the Central Idea Essay. On the English Regents, you will be graded on four categories: content and analysis, command of evidence, coherence, organization and style, and control of conventions. Add sophisticated vocabulary: SAT List #1, The Scarlet Letter List #1, and The Scarlet Letter List #2.

    4. K/W/L: What do you know about writing a central idea essay? What do you want to know about writing a central idea essay? What did you learn today about writing an exemplary central idea essay?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we effectively compose a central idea essay on A View From the Bridge? DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 10th:
  • Finish your central idea essay (part 3) on A View From the Bridge. See today's handout.

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

  • Thursday, January 5th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Arrange the room and your groups to prepare to present your scene from A View From the Bridge. Presentation reminders: follow the grading rubric, introduce your scene, character roles, and bow at the end.

    2. Scene Presentations: Each group will present a brief introduction of your scene taken from A View From the Bridge. Include which classmate is playing each role. Consider your modern interpretation of the scene. Each group will be graded by the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    3. K/W/L: What do you know about your scene in A View From Bridge (consider what you will remember from today's presentation performance)? What do you want to know more about performance skills and A View From the Bridge? What did you learn from studying A View From the Bridge and today's performance presentation?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we effectively present chosen scenes from A View From the Bridge and apply our knowledge of the central ideas of family, love, honor and justice and the law? Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.
    Wednesday, January 4th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: In your group of 2-4 students, write an introduction to your scene (2-3 sentences) from A View From the Bridge. Include the answers to the following questions: What's your scene about? How does your scene fit into the entire play? Which central idea (family, love, honor or justice and the law) does your scene focus on and why? BE READY TO PRESENT ONE MINUTE OF YOUR SCENE TO THE CLASS!

    2. Discuss/Share: Share the Warm-Up with the class! Warm and cool feedback will be provided by the teachers.

    3. Work Period: Rehearsal for performances!

    4. K/W/L: What do you know about your scene in A View From Bridge (consider what you will remember for tomorrow's presentation performance)? What do you want to work on to be successful in tomorrow's presentation performance? What do you want to learn more about in your scene to be successful in tomorrow's performance?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare to present chosen scenes from A View From the Bridge and apply our knowledge of the central ideas of family, love, honor and justice and the law? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 5th, 2017:
    A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

    Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: In your group of 2-4 students practice reading your scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge and apply the requirements in the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge. Read aloud your character roles. Here are some suggested scenes:
  • pp. 7-9
  • pp. 37-39
  • pp. 62-63
  • pp. 83-85

    2. K/W/L: What do you know about your scene in A View From Bridge (consider what you will remember in the future)? What do you want to know about your scene? What do you want to learn more about in your scene?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare to present chosen scenes from A View From the Bridge and apply our knowledge of the central ideas of family, love, honor and justice and the law through the literary elements of characterization and conflict? DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 5th, 2017:
    A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

    Friday, December 23rd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: In your group of 2-4 students practice reading your scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge and apply the requirements in the Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge. Read aloud your character roles. Here are some suggested scenes:
  • pp. 7-9
  • pp. 37-39
  • pp. 62-63
  • pp. 83-85

    2. Gifts of Kindness!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we prepare to present chosen scenes from A View From the Bridge? DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 5th:
    A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

    Thursday, December 22nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Answer (CHOOSE ONE) one of the following DOK questions on A View From the Bridge. Write 1-2 sentences for your chosen question.
  • DOK 2: How would you summarize your scene from the play, A View From the Bridge?
  • DOK 3: How would you adapt your scene to create a different setting (time period or location)?
  • DOK 4: What would you research in your scene and why? Refer to the characters' dialogue, stage directions, or any other author's choices.

    SHOW HW: Show any owed HW>

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your first impressions of your novel. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Read Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge to know the requirements for presentation.

    4. Work Period: In your group of 2-4 students read your scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Read aloud your character roles. Interpret the scene in your own words (2-4 sentences). Here are some suggested scenes:

  • pp. 7-9
  • pp. 37-39
  • pp. 62-63
  • pp. 83-85

    5. K/W/L: What do you know about your scene in A View From Bridge (consider what you will remember in the future)? What do you want to know about your scene? What do you want to learn more about in your scene?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we prepare to present chosen scenes from A View From the Bridge? DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 5th:
    A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SCENE PRESENTATIONS (grade value=about 10% of the 3rd marking period). You will be graded as a group on the following Grading Rubric for A View From the Bridge.

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

    Wednesday, December 21st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Answer (CHOOSE ONE) one of the following DOK questions on A View From the Bridge. Write 1-2 sentences for your chosen question.
  • DOK 2: How would you classify (categorize, put in a group) this play, A View From the Bridge?
  • DOK 3: How would you elaborate (explain in detail) the reason that Arthur Miller (the playwright) wrote this play?
  • DOK 4: What would you want to research from this play and why? You should consider the setting, set design, or Arthur Miller's other choices.

    SHOW HW: Show any owed HW>

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your first impressions of your novel. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Finish Reviewing Discussion Questions on A View From the Bridge. Cite textual evidence (a quote from the play) to support each answer below.
    1.) How is the American Dream depicted (portrayed) in this play?
    2.) What life lessons are taught in this play?
    3.) What are your impressions (opinions/reflections) about Eddie, Catherine, Beatrice, Rodolpho, and Marco and their relationships?
    4.) Are these characters relatable to you, your friends, or family? Explain.
    5.)What is Arthur Miller's (the playwright) message about masculinity and femininity?
    6.) How is immigration portrayed in the play? What is your opinion about this portrayal of immigration?
    7.) What are your impressions about this play?
    8.) Did this play meet your expectations or were there any surprises?
    9.) What's your favorite scene/page number?
    10.) What do you predict will happen to the remaining characters after the play?

    4. Work Period: Choose 2-4 students to work with to present a scene of 2-3 pages from A View From the Bridge. Choose character roles. Read aloud the scene. Interpret the scene in your own words (2-4 sentences). Here are some suggested scenes:

  • pp. 7-9
  • pp. 37-39
  • pp. 62-63
  • pp. 83-85

    5. K/W/L: What do you know about this play (consider what you will remember in the future)? What do you want to know about this play? What do you want to learn more about in this play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we understand major themes, characters' relationships and personal connections to A View From the Bridge?

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

    Tuesday, December 20th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Answer (CHOOSE ONE) one of the following DOK questions on A View From the Bridge. Write 1-2 sentences for your chosen question.
  • DOK 2: How would you summarize the play?
  • DOK 3: How would you adapt the play to create a different setting?
  • DOK 4: How would you you create a thesis statement using this play another text we've read this year (The Scarlet Letter, "The War Prayer," "In Another Country," or "Soldier's Home") to develop a persuasive argument? Include the word "should" in your thesis statement. For example: People should...

    SHOW HW: Show the classwork questions on A View From the Bridge.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your first impressions of your novel. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Review Discussion Questions on A View From the Bridge. Cite textual evidence (a quote from the play) to support each answer below.
    1.) How is the American Dream depicted (portrayed) in this play?
    2.) What life lessons are taught in this play?
    3.) What are your impressions (opinions/reflections) about Eddie, Catherine, Beatrice, Rodolpho, and Marco and their relationships?
    4.) Are these characters relatable to you, your friends, or family? Explain.
    5.)What is Arthur Miller's (the playwright) message about masculinity and femininity?
    6.) How is immigration portrayed in the play? What is your opinion about this portrayal of immigration?
    7.) What are your impressions about this play?
    8.) Did this play meet your expectations or were there any surprises?
    9.) What's your favorite scene/page number?
    10.) What do you predict will happen to the remaining characters after the play?

    4. Review A View From the Bridge quiz answers.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we understand major themes, characters' relationships and personal connections to A View From the Bridge?

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

    Monday, December 19th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Finish answering the following Discussion Questions on A View From the Bridge. Cite textual evidence (a quote from the play) to support each answer below.
    1.) How is the American Dream depicted (portrayed) in this play?
    2.) What life lessons are taught in this play?
    3.) What are your impressions (opinions/reflections) about Eddie, Catherine, Beatrice, Rodolpho, and Marco and their relationships?
    4.) Are these characters relatable to you, your friends, or family? Explain.
    5.)What is Arthur Miller's (the playwright) message about masculinity and femininity?
    6.) How is immigration portrayed in the play? What is your opinion about this portrayal of immigration?
    7.) What are your impressions about this play?
    8.) Did this play meet your expectations or were there any surprises?
    9.) What's your favorite scene/page number?
    10.) What do you predict will happen to the remaining characters after the play?

    Show HW: The Scarlet Letter Essay Rewrite and the original essay.

    2. Discuss/Share: Review and take notes on the warm-up questions.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we understand major themes, characters' relationships and personal connections to A View From the Bridge? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
    Discussion Questions on A View From the Bridge. Cite textual evidence (a quote from the play) to support each answer below.
    1.) How is the American Dream depicted (portrayed) in this play?
    2.) What life lessons are taught in this play?
    3.) What are your impressions (opinions/reflections) about Eddie, Catherine, Beatrice, Rodolpho, and Marco and their relationships?
    4.) Are these characters relatable to you, your friends, or family? Explain.
    5.)What is Arthur Miller's (the playwright) message about masculinity and femininity?
    6.) How is immigration portrayed in the play? What is your opinion about this portrayal of immigration?
    7.) What are your impressions about this play?
    8.) Did this play meet your expectations or were there any surprises?
    9.) What's your favorite scene/page number?
    10.) What do you predict will happen to the remaining characters after the play?

    Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.

    Friday, December 16th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: SUPER QUIZ on A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE.

    SHOW HW: 6 T-Charts for the play.

    2. Discussion Questions:

  • How is the American Dream depicted (portrayed) in this play?
  • What life lessons are taught in this play?
  • What are your impressions (opinions/reflections) about Eddie, Catherine, Beatrice, Rodolpho, and Marco and their relationships?
  • Are these characters relatable to you, your friends, or family? Explain.
  • What is Arthur Miller's (the playwright) message about masculinity and femininity?
  • How is immigration portrayed in the play? What is your opinion about this portrayal of immigration?
  • What are your impressions about this play?
  • Did this play meet your expectations or were there any surprises?
  • What's your favorite scene/page number?
  • What do you predict will happen to the remaining characters after the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we be assessed on A View From the Bridge and understand major themes, characters' relationships and personal impressions? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 19th:
  • REWRITE The Scarlet Letter Essay. Make the corrections that Ms. Conn made and highlight those corrections on the rewritten essay. Bring the original essay (with Ms. Conn's corrections).
  • Thursday, December 15th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Midterm Exam Instruction Reminders (Finish Part 2-Essay)

    2. MIDTERM EXAM: PART 2.

    SHOW owed HW..

    3. Complete Goals Sheet for the 3rd marking period.

    4. Work on HW due tomorrow (finish reading A View From the Bridge, compose t-charts and complete owed HW).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we apply strategies for successfully reading and writing an argumentative essay on our midterm exam? DATE CHANGE: DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:
  • SUPER QUIZ (value=20% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. REVIEW SHEET IS HERE. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 6 T-CHARTS (VALUE=6 HW ASSIGNMENTS) for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 24-33
    2.) pp. 34-43
    3.) pp. 44-53
    4.) pp. 54-63
    5.) pp. 64-73
    6.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS: In your LA section, compose your T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge (you should have a total of 8 T-CHARTS). On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea, which is written at the top of the T-CHART (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. Use this LITERARY TECHNIQUES HANDOUT to guide you. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW: Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 19th:

  • REWRITE The Scarlet Letter Essay. Make the corrections that Ms. Conn made and highlight those corrections on the rewritten essay. Bring the original essay (with Ms. Conn's corrections).
  • Wednesday, December 14th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Midterm Exam Instruction Reminders (Finish Part 2-Essay)

    2. MIDTERM EXAM: PART 2.

    SHOW HW: Act 2 Central Idea Journal for A View From the Bridge.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we apply strategies for successfully reading and writing an argumentative essay on our midterm exam? FOR TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15th:
  • We will finish the MIDTERM EXAM, work on T-Charts, receive and review The Scarlet Letter essays, and set goals for the 3rd marking period grade. Bring in A View From the Bridge!!

    DATE CHANGE: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • SUPER QUIZ (value=20% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 6 T-CHARTS (VALUE=6 HW ASSIGNMENTS) for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 24-33
    2.) pp. 34-43
    3.) pp. 44-53
    4.) pp. 54-63
    5.) pp. 64-73
    6.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS: In your LA section, compose your T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge (you should have a total of 8 T-CHARTS). On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea, which is written at the top of the T-CHART (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. Use this LITERARY TECHNIQUES HANDOUT to guide you. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW: Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 19th:

  • REWRITE The Scarlet Letter Essay. Make the corrections that Ms. Conn made and highlight those corrections on the rewritten essay. Bring the original essay (with Ms. Conn's corrections).
  • Tuesday, December 13th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Midterm Exam Instruction Reminders (Finish Part 1-Reading Comprehension and Multiple-Choice Questions and Begin Part 2-Essay)

    2. MIDTERM EXAM: PART 1 and PART 2.

    SHOW owed HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we apply strategies for successfully reading a passage, answering multiple-choice questions and writing an argumentative essay on our midterm exam? TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (It will take Monday, December 12th-Wednesday, December 14th): Regents-style Exam on reading comprehension, multiple-choice questions, and an argumentative essay using 4 texts). It will be 25% of the 3rd marking period. You should use the Test-Taking Strategies that were given on Thursday, December 8th and Friday, December 9th.

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • SUPER QUIZ (value=20% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 6 T-CHARTS (VALUE=6 HW ASSIGNMENTS) for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 24-33
    2.) pp. 34-43
    3.) pp. 44-53
    4.) pp. 54-63
    5.) pp. 64-73
    6.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS: In your LA section, compose your T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge (you should have a total of 8 T-CHARTS). On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea, which is written at the top of the T-CHART (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. Use this LITERARY TECHNIQUES HANDOUT to guide you. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW: Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

  • Monday, December 12th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Midterm Exam Instructions (Part 1-Reading Comprehension and Multiple-Choice Questions)

    2. MIDTERM EXAM: PART 1.

    SHOW HW: Central Idea Journal for Act I of A View From the Bridge.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we apply strategies for successfully reading a passage and answering multiple-choice questions on our midterm exam? TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13th-WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (It will take Monday, December 12th-Wednesday, December 14th): Regents-style Exam on reading comprehension, multiple-choice questions, and an argumentative essay using 4 texts). It will be 25% of the 3rd marking period. You should use the Test-Taking Strategies that were given on Thursday, December 8th and Friday, December 9th.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • SUPER QUIZ (value=20% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 6 T-CHARTS (VALUE=6 HW ASSIGNMENTS) for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 24-33
    2.) pp. 34-43
    3.) pp. 44-53
    4.) pp. 54-63
    5.) pp. 64-73
    6.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS: In your LA section, compose your T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge (you should have a total of 8 T-CHARTS). On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea, which is written at the top of the T-CHART (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. Use this LITERARY TECHNIQUES HANDOUT to guide you. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW: Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

  • Friday, December 9th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are your goals for the 3rd marking period? Fill in your goal sheet (see your portfolio folder).

    SHOW any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Midterm Exam Strategies (continued): Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4. Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    4. HW Reminders and Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing next week.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand and apply strategies for our midterm exam on Monday-Wednesday of next week? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (It will take Monday, December 12th-Wednesday, December 14th): Regents-style Exam on reading comprehension, multiple-choice questions, and an argumentative essay using 4 texts). It will be 25% of the 3rd marking period. You will be given Test-Taking Strategies on Thursday, December 8th and Friday, December 9th (take notes! Study your notes!).


  • Read all of Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words, typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, Times New Roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. You may include textual evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • SUPER QUIZ (value=20% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 6 T-CHARTS (VALUE=6 HW ASSIGNMENTS) for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 24-33
    2.) pp. 34-43
    3.) pp. 44-53
    4.) pp. 54-63
    5.) pp. 64-73
    6.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS: In your LA section, compose your T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge (you should have a total of 8 T-CHARTS). On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea, which is written at the top of the T-CHART (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. Use this LITERARY TECHNIQUES HANDOUT to guide you. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW: Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

  • Thursday, December 8th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are three test-taking strategies for reading comprehension, multiple-choice questions and an argumentative essay?

    SHOW HW: T-Chart for pp. 14-23 in A View From the Bridge.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Midterm Exam Strategies:

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4. Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    4. HW Reminders and Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understanding strategies for our midterm exam on Monday-Wednesday of next week? MAKE UP HOMEWORK (last day is TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9th, for the 2nd marking period!):
  • See previous days' assignments.
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (more than 3 days late)
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (It will take Monday, December 12th-Wednesday, December 14th): Regents-style Exam on reading comprehension, multiple-choice questions, and an argumentative essay using 4 texts). It will be 25% of the 3rd marking period. You will be given Test-Taking Strategies on Thursday, December 8th and Friday, December 9th (take notes! Study your notes!).
  • Read all of Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words, typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, Times New Roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. You may include textual evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • SUPER QUIZ (value=20% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 6 T-CHARTS (VALUE=6 HW ASSIGNMENTS) for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 24-33
    2.) pp. 34-43
    3.) pp. 44-53
    4.) pp. 54-63
    5.) pp. 64-73
    6.) pp. 74-86

    T-CHART INSTRUCTIONS: In your LA section, compose your T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge (you should have a total of 8 T-CHARTS). On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea, which is written at the top of the T-CHART (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. Use this LITERARY TECHNIQUES HANDOUT to guide you. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW: Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

  • Wednesday, December 7th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What do you need CLARIFIED (make clear, make less confusing) about the T-Charts and the Central Idea Journals for A View From the Bridge? Look at the HW for the next two weeks.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    SHOW owed HW.

    3. Read-Aloud: Finish reading aloud pp. 14-23 in A View From the Bridge. What central ideas and literary elements can you focus on in your T-Charts and Central Idea Journals?

    4. Work Period: Work on the T-Chart for pp. 14-23.

    5. HW Reminders and Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we identify textual evidence of the central ideas and applicable literary elements in the first 20 pages of A View From the Bridge? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • In your LA section, compose a T-CHART for pp. 14-23 in A View From the Bridge. On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. Use this LITERARY TECHNIQUES HANDOUT to guide you. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW:
  • Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK (last day is THIS FRIDAY for the 2nd marking period!):

  • See previous days' assignments.
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (more than 3 days late)
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (It will take Monday, December 12th-Wednesday, December 14th): Regents-style Exam on reading comprehension, multiple-choice questions, and an argumentative essay using 4 texts). It will be 25% of the 3rd marking period. You will be given Test-Taking Strategies on Thursday, December 8th and Friday, December 9th (take notes! Study your notes!).
  • Read all of Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words, typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, Times New Roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. You may include textual evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • Read Act II (pp. 57-86) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be two pages (450-500 words; handwritten pages or typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, times new roman) and must include personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act II of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. Your evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15th:

  • SUPER QUIZ (value=20% of the 3rd marking period): You will be tested on ALL of A View From the Bridge. Review sheet will be given. You will prove that you've read the entire play!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • TURN IN 6 T-CHARTS (VALUE=6 HW ASSIGNMENTS) for A View From the Bridge for the following pages:
    1.) pp. 24-33
    2.) pp. 34-43
    3.) pp. 44-53
    4.) pp. 54-63
    5.) pp. 64-73
    6.) pp. 74-86

    In your LA section, compose your T-CHARTS for A View From the Bridge (you should have a total of 8 T-CHARTS). On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea, which is written at the top of the T-CHART (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. Use this LITERARY TECHNIQUES HANDOUT to guide you. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW: Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

  • Tuesday, December 6th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Compare and contrast the setting, characters, events, and/or conflicts in A View From the Bridge with your own life. (Feel free to make a Venn Diagram or T-Chart).

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    SHOW HW: T-Chart for pp. 3-13 in A View From the Bridge

    3. Read-Aloud: Read aloud pp. 14-23 in A View From the Bridge.

    4. Work Period: Work on the T-Chart for pp. 14-23.

    5. Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we identify textual evidence of the central ideas and applicable literary elements in the first 20 pages of A View From the Bridge? DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • In your LA section, compose a T-CHART for pp. 14-23 in A View From the Bridge. On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW:
  • Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

  • Read all of Act I (pp. 3-56) of A View From the Bridge. Central Idea Journal (value=THREE Homework Assignments): Write a journal focusing on one of these central ideas that are present in the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be TWO pages (450-500 words, typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, Times New Roman) and must include your personal reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence from Act I of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. You may include textual evidence may come from the following literary techniques: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21).

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK (last day is THIS FRIDAY for the 2nd marking period!):

  • See previous days' assignments.
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (more than 3 days late)
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Monday, December 5th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: In your LA section, compose a T-CHART for the first ten pages (pp. 3-13) in A View From the Bridge. On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW:
  • Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

    SHOW HW: Central Idea Journal on pp. 3-13

    2. Read-Aloud: Finish reading aloud pp. 3-13 in A View From the Bridge, if necessary.

    3. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share their chosen central ideas (love, honor, family, or justice and the law), textual evidence and quotes from their central idea journal HW.

    4. Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we focus on a central idea and a literary element/technique in the first ten pages of A View From the Bridge? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6th:
  • FINISH TODAY'S CLASSWORK: In your LA section, compose a T-CHART for the first ten pages (pp. 3-13) in A View From the Bridge. On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea. AN EXEMPLARY QUOTE, INTRODUCTION TO THE QUOTE AND ANALYSIS OF THE QUOTE CAN BE FOUND BELOW:
  • Alfieri stated in his soliloquy, "But this is Red Hook, not Sicily. This is the slum...this is the gullet of New York" (p. 4). Alfieri is characterized as an omniscient lawyer who has insider knowledge about the setting of this play and the background of the characters. He appears to be the informant about justice and the law, and provides this information to the audience.

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK (last day is THIS FRIDAY!):

  • See previous days' assignments.
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (more than 3 days late)
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Friday, December 2nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What can you predict about the plot, characters, and conflicts based on the stage directions on p. 3 of A View From the Bridge?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud: Read pp. 4-13 in A View From the Bridge and determine which central idea (theme/main idea/author's message).

    4. Work Period: In your LA section, compose a T-CHART for the first ten pages (pp. 3-13) in A View From the Bridge. On one side, include QUOTES (choose THREE; include the character speaking and the page #) from the play that support your chosen central idea (love, honor, family, or justice and the law). On the other side, include ANALYSIS (2-3 sentences for each quote) of how the author uses a chosen literary element/technique (characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone) to develop that central idea.

    5. Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we focus on a central idea and a literary element/technique in the first ten pages of A View From the Bridge? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 5th: Central Idea Journal on pp. 3-13 in A View From the Bridge: Write a journal focusing on one of these Central Ideas that are present in the opening of the play--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Your journal must be ONE page (typed, double-spaced pages with 12 point font, Times New Roman font; you can e-mail the journal to hconn@schools.nyc.gov). You must include your personal experiences/reflections/anecdotes/epiphanies and textual evidence (at least one reference to the play's revelation of one of these Central Ideas: Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law) from pp. 3-13 of A View From the Bridge to support the central idea. You don't need to include textual evidence at this time (since you don't have a copy of the play). Include a heading with the following: Ms. Conn/Ms. Valente, Your Name, Date, College Readiness, Period _____, Assignment Title: Central Idea Journal for pp. 3-13.

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (3+ days late)

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Thursday, December 1st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: On the first page of A View From the Bridge (p. 3), what can you infer (conclude based on the evidence) about the setting (time period and location) by reading the stage directions? Cite textual evidence to support your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Based on the introduction of the play, A View From the Bridge, share your answers from yesterday's questions:

  • What have you learned from this introduction, written by the playwright (author of the play), about the plot, characters, setting and conflicts? Cite textual evidence (specific page numbers and quotes).
  • Which themes--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law--are present in the play (according to the introduction)? Cite textual evidence (specific page numbers and quotes).

    4. Work Period: Read-Aloud the beginning (goal=the first five pages) in A View From the Bridge and determine which central idea (theme/main idea/author's message) that you want to focus on as you read: Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law. Find textual evidence (with page #s) to support your choice. Identify and analyze (explain) why you choose one of the following literary terms: characterization, conflict, metaphor, simile, setting, symbolism or tone. Your evidence should be cited like this example: Beatrice said, "Here, take the bags!" (21). Analysis: Beatrice is characterized as a demanding and compassionate woman who prioritizes family helping each other.

    5. Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read A View From the Bridge by using predictive strategies and examining literary techniques, including theme, conflict, setting, and characterization? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (3+ days late)
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Wednesday, November 30th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Preview the play, A View From the Bridge (1955), by Arthur Miller. What can you predict about the plot, characters, setting, and conflicts in this play?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the introduction of the play, A View From the Bridge.

  • What have you learned from this introduction, written by the playwright (author of the play), about the plot, characters, setting and conflicts? Cite textual evidence (specific page numbers and quotes).
  • Which themes--Love, Family, Honor, or Justice and the Law--are present in the play (according to the introduction)? Cite textual evidence (specific page numbers and quotes).

    4.
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read A View From the Bridge by using predictive strategies and examining literary techniques, including theme, conflict, setting, and characterization? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (3+ days late)
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Tuesday, November 29th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Read the exemplary argumentative essay (handout) and rubric. What would happen if you were the teacher of this student? Explain your assessment process.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Fishbowl Discussion: ORGANIZE (arrange; get in order) into a fishbowl. Students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below, CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE, offer interpretation (explain the text in your own words) and analysis (evaluation, exploration and dissection). The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented and evaluate the topics discussed (see the Discussion Evaluation Questions below). The inner circle students will speak one at a time, respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. In order to earn credit, everyone must participate by either answering discussion questions in the inner circle or completing evaluations in the outer circle. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS FOR EXEMPLARY ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY. INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING (cite textual evidence: identify quotes, page number, and paragraph number):

  • What conclusions can you draw about why this essay is exemplary (90+)?
  • What can you say about the exemplary essay's content, analysis and command of evidence (the most important components of the argumentative essay rubric)?
  • What can you say about warm (positive) and cool (suggestions for improvement) feedback for this exemplary essay?

    DISCUSSION SENTENCE STARTERS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • I discovered on page number_______that...
  • The author supports my claim/conclusion on page number_____that...
  • Readers can conclude that..
  • The author believes/thinks/argues that...because..
  • Adding to what_________(person) said, I think/believe/argue...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • A conclusion that I'm drawing is...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    DISCUSSION EVALUATION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) What discussion topics interested you today and why?
    2.) What quality conversations or individual comments emerged?
    3.) Which questions spurred the greatest amount of conversation and why?
    4.) Which questions failed to generate conversation and why?
    **Extra Credit Opportunity for Outside Circle: Earn extra participation credit for asking a DOK 3 or 4 Question to the Inner Circle Discussion about the exemplary essay.

    *These questions were taken from Boston University's School of Public Health.

    4. 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    K: What did you already know about the qualities of an exemplary, argumentative essay?
    W: What do you want to know about the qualities of an exemplary, argumentative essay?
    L: What did you learn about the qualities of an exemplary, argumentative essay?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively evaluate an exemplary, argumentative essay on The Scarlet Letter? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (3+ days late)
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Monday, November 28th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Fill out goals and action plan sheet. Organize portfolio folder.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Brainstorm on the assessment of an exemplary, argumentative essay on people overcoming adversity in The Scarlet Letter. What are the qualities of an exemplary, argumentative essay? Write a Top Ten List. Be prepared to do a Fishbowl Discussion on the evaluation of exemplary writing tomorrow.

    4. 3-2-1 Exit Slip:
    3 Tasks that you accomplished today.
    2 Tasks that you can predict we will be doing tomorrow.
    1 Question that you have about today's lesson.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare to evaluate exemplary, argumentative essays on The Scarlet Letter? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -30 points for lateness (3+ days late)
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: How would you SUMMARIZE your FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter?

    Turn in your HW: FINAL PAPER on The Scarlet Letter and return the novel.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Fishbowl Discussion: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below, CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE, offer interpretation (explain the text in your own words) and analysis (evaluation, exploration and dissection). The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and evaluate the quality of the questions and answers (see the Discussion Evaluation Questions below). The inner circle students will speak one at a time, respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. In order to earn credit, everyone must participate by either answering discussion questions in the inner circle or completing evaluations in the outer circle. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTERS 23 AND 24. INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING (cite textual evidence: identify quotes and page numbers in the novel):

  • What can you conclude about why Hawthorne (the author) had Dimmesdale appear angelic while delivering his most inspirational sermon (chapter 23)?
  • What can you say about Dimmesdale's revelation (chapter 23)?
  • What can you elaborate (explain in detail) about why the novel ends with so many mysteries (unknowns) in chapter 24?
  • What can you say about the significance on how Hester and Dimmesdale were buried on p. 228?

    DISCUSSION SENTENCE STARTERS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • I discovered on page number_______that...
  • The author supports my claim/conclusion on page number_____that...
  • Readers can conclude that..
  • The author believes/thinks/argues that...because..
  • Adding to what_________(person) said, I think/believe/argue...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • A conclusion that I'm drawing is...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    DISCUSSION EVALUATION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) What discussion topics interested you today and why?
    2.) What quality conversations or individual comments emerged?
    3.) Which questions spurred the greatest amount of conversation and why?
    4.) Which questions failed to generate conversation and why?
    **Extra Credit Opportunity for Outside Circle: Earn extra participation credit for asking a DOK 2, 3 or 4 Question to the Inner Circle Discussion about Chapter 23 or 24.

    *These questions were taken from Boston University's School of Public Health.

    3. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the effectiveness of today's fishbowl discussion?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we prove our literary knowledge and participate in discussion by focusing on the characters overcoming adversity in chapters 23 and 24 in The Scarlet Letter? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period! -10 points each day late.
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Read Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity and the Writing Standards. What do you need clarified (made clear) for tomorrow's FINAL PAPER?

    SHOW HW: T-Charts for the LAST chapters of The Scarlet Letter: Chapters 23 and 24.

    2. Fishbowl Discussion: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below, CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE, offer interpretation (explain the text in your own words) and analysis (evaluation, exploration and dissection). The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and evaluate the quality of the questions and answers (see the Discussion Evaluation Questions below). The inner circle students will speak one at a time, respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. In order to earn credit, everyone must participate by either answering discussion questions in the inner circle or completing evaluations in the outer circle. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTERS 20, 21 AND 22 INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING (cite textual evidence: identify quotes and page numbers in the novel):

  • What can you conclude about how DImmesdale has transformed since his encounter with Hester and Pearl in the forest (Refer to his transformation in Chapter 20)?
  • What can you say about the significance of the "holiday" that Hester and Dimmesdale are hoping to take together and the "holiday" for the people of Boston (Chapters 20 and 21)?
  • What can you conclude about the conflict between characters' public and private selves (like Hester and Dimmesdale in Chapter 22)?

    DISCUSSION SENTENCE STARTERS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • I discovered on page number_______that...
  • The author supports my claim/conclusion on page number_____that...
  • Readers can conclude that..
  • The author believes/thinks/argues that...because..
  • Adding to what_________(person) said, I think/believe/argue...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • A conclusion that I'm drawing is...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    DISCUSSION EVALUATION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) What discussion topics interested you today and why?
    2.) What quality conversations or individual comments emerged?
    3.) Which questions spurred the greatest amount of conversation and why?
    4.) Which questions failed to generate conversation and why?
    **Extra Credit Opportunity for Outside Circle: Earn extra participation credit for asking a DOK 2, 3 or 4 Question to the Inner Circle Discussion about Chapter 20, 21 or 22.

    *These questions were taken from Boston University's School of Public Health.

    3. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the effectiveness of today's fishbowl discussion?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we prove our literary knowledge and participate in discussion by focusing on the characters overcoming adversity in chapters 20, 21 and 22 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% of the 2nd marking period!
  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards. Use the Ways that the Characters in The Scarlet Letter Overcome Adversity to guide you in focusing your essay. You will be graded on the ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY RUBRIC (from the English Regents)-scroll to page 3. Reminder: Use ICE (Introduce each quote, Cite each quote, and Explain each quote) for each quote from the text in your essay.
  • RETURN your copy of THE SCARLET LETTER.
  • Monday, November 21st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Write your thesis statement for your FINAL PAPER. Sentence starters include the following:
  • People should overcome adversity because...
  • People should be in favor of overcoming adversity because...

    SHOW HW: Chapters 20, 21 and 22 T-Charts for The Scarlet Letter.

    2. Discuss/Share: Table groups will turn and talk over the Warm-Up. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Choose two characters in The Scarlet Letter that overcome adversity, write two ways that they overcome adversity, and identify two quotes for each character that support how they overcome adversity. Determine your counterclaim that challenges your thesis statement. Work on finding evidence (two quotes) to support the counterclaim. Then, challenge your counterclaim.

    4. Reflections:

  • What do you need to work on to finish your FINAL PAPER by Wednesday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of the characters overcoming adversity in chapters 20, 21 and 22 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (pp. 2223-228) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 25% (NOTE THE CHANGE) of the 2nd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Thursday, November 17th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Vocabulary Quiz on Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter.

    SHOW HW: Vocabulary Flashcards

    2. Fishbowl Discussion: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below, CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE, offer interpretation (explain the text in your own words) and analysis (evaluation, exploration and dissection). The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and evaluate the quality of the questions and answers (see the Discussion Evaluation Questions below). The inner circle students will speak one at a time, respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. In order to earn credit, everyone must participate by either answering discussion questions in the inner circle or completing evaluations in the outer circle. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTERS 17, 18 AND 19 INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING (cite textual evidence: identify quotes and page numbers in the novel):

  • How would you contrast Hester's ability to overcome adversity to Dimmesdale's inability to overcome adversity (chapter 17)?
  • What can you predict about the outcomes of Hester, Pearl, Chillingworth and Dimmesdale and why?
  • What can you conclude about Hester's relationship with Dimmesdale (based on chapters 17 and 18)?
  • What can you conclude about Pearl's influence over other characters in chapters 18 and 19?

    DISCUSSION SENTENCE STARTERS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • I discovered on page number_______that...
  • The author supports my claim/conclusion on page number_____that...
  • Readers can conclude that..
  • The author believes/thinks/argues that...because..
  • Adding to what_________(person) said, I think/believe/argue...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • A conclusion that I'm drawing is...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    DISCUSSION EVALUATION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) What discussion topics interested you today and why?
    2.) What quality conversations or individual comments emerged?
    3.) Which questions spurred the greatest amount of conversation and why?
    4.) Which questions failed to generate conversation and why?
    **Extra Credit Opportunity for Outside Circle: Earn extra participation credit for asking a DOK 2, 3 or 4 Question to the Inner Circle Discussion about Chapter 14, 15 or 16.

    *These questions were taken from Boston University's School of Public Health.

    3. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the effectiveness of today's fishbowl discussion?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we prove our vocabulary knowledge and participate in discussion by focusing on the characters overcoming adversity in chapters 17, 18 and 19 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), and chapter 22 (pp. 205-214) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (pp. 2223-228) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 2nd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Wednesday, November 16th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are three ways that characters in The Scarlet Letter overcome adversity?

    SHOW HW: T-Charts for Chapters 17, 18 and 19.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Table groups will turn and talk over the Warm-Up. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Introduce requirements for THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 2nd marking period! For the FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter, you must write 5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences stated in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages. You must follow the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.

    3. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the importance of argumentative essay writing?
  • How can we be successful on tomorrow's vocabulary quiz?

    Common Core Standards: W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we compose an argumentative essay on The Scarlet Letter and MAINTAIN strong writing skills? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ (20% of the 2nd marking period) for Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter.
  • FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for all 25 words from Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), and chapter 22 (pp. 205-214) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (pp. 2223-228) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 2nd marking period! It's -10 points each day late.

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Tuesday, November 15th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Should young people abide (follow) by this quote? "Keep your friends close and your enemies closer"--Sun Tzu, war leader, strategist, Chinese military general. Explain reasons for your answer. Refer to The Scarlet Letter as evidence to support your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Warm-Up with your table mates. Captains will share their table mates' answers.
  • Fishbowl Discussion: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below, CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE, offer interpretation (explain the text in your own words) and analysis (evaluation, exploration and dissection). The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and evaluate the quality of the questions and answers (see the Discussion Evaluation Questions below). The inner circle students will speak one at a time, respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. In order to earn credit, everyone must participate by either answering discussion questions in the inner circle or completing evaluations in the outer circle. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTERS 14, 15 AND 16 INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING (cite textual evidence: identify quotes and page numbers in the novel):
  • How would you compare and contrast Hester's transformation and Chillingworth's transformation in chapter 14?
  • What can you conclude about the significance of Pearl's role in this novel (with a focus on chapters 15 and 16)?
  • What can you conclude about Pearl's relationship with Hester and how the relationship positively affects Hester (with a focus on chapters 15 and 16)?
  • What personal, societal or textual connections can you relate to in chapters 14, 15 or 16 in The Scarlet Letter?

    DISCUSSION SENTENCE STARTERS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • I discovered on page number_______that...
  • The author supports my claim/conclusion on page number_____that...
  • Readers can conclude that..
  • The author believes/thinks/argues that...because..
  • Adding to what_________(person) said, I think/believe/argue...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • A conclusion that I'm drawing is...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    DISCUSSION EVALUATION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) What discussion topics interested you today and why?
    2.) What quality conversations or individual comments emerged?
    3.) Which questions spurred the greatest amount of conversation and why?
    4.) Which questions failed to generate conversation and why?
    **Extra Credit Opportunity for Outside Circle: Earn extra participation credit for asking a DOK 2, 3 or 4 Question to the Inner Circle Discussion about Chapter 14, 15 or 16.

    *These questions were taken from Boston University's School of Public Health.

    3. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the effectiveness of today's fishbowl discussion?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we PARTICIPATE in discussion by reviewing chapters 14, 15 and 16 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 17 (pp. 165-173), chapter 18 (pp. 174-179), and chapter 19 (pp. 180-186) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ (20% of the 2nd marking period) for Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter.
  • FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for all 25 words from Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), and chapter 22 (pp. 205-214) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (pp. 2223-228) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 2nd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Monday, November 14th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: With your table mates, compose a complex, sophisticated sentence using three of the assigned vocabulary words from Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter.

    SHOW HW: T-Charts for Chapters 14, 15 and 16.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Table groups will turn and talk over the Warm-Up. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter.

    3. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the importance of vocabulary skill building?

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of chapters 14, 15 and 16 in The Scarlet Letter and improve our vocabulary skills? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 17 (pp. 165-173), chapter 18 (pp. 174-179), and chapter 19 (pp. 180-186) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ (20% of the 2nd marking period) for Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter.
  • FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for all 25 words from Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), and chapter 22 (pp. 205-214) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (pp. 2223-228) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 2nd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Thursday, November 10th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Read the Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter. Choose one:
  • What historical event/time period can you describe that causes abhorrence, anguish and infirmity and makes you feel feeble and irksome?
  • What experience/activity helps you flourish and gives you eloquence, integrity, reverence and vivacity?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Fishbowl Discussion: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below, CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE, offer interpretation (explain the text in your own words) and analysis (evaluation, exploration and dissection). The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and evaluate the quality of the questions and answers (see the Discussion Evaluation Questions below). The inner circle students will speak one at a time, respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. In order to earn credit, everyone must participate by either answering discussion questions in the inner circle or completing evaluations in the outer circle. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTERS 12 AND 13 INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING (cite textual evidence: identify quotes and page numbers in the novel):
  • What can you conclude about the significance of Dimmesdale's standing on the scaffold (chapter 12)?
  • How have the people's perceptions of Hester changed and why (chapter 13)?
  • Why would you classify Hester as a role model for overcoming adversity (chapter 13)?
  • What personal, societal or textual connections can you relate to in chapters 12 and 13 in The Scarlet Letter?

    DISCUSSION SENTENCE STARTERS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • I discovered on page number_______that...
  • The author supports my claim/conclusion on page number_____that...
  • Readers can conclude that..
  • The author believes/thinks/argues that...because..
  • Adding to what_________(person) said, I think/believe/argue...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • A conclusion that I'm drawing is...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    DISCUSSION EVALUATION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) What discussion topics interested you today and why?
    2.) What quality conversations or individual comments emerged?
    3.) Which questions spurred the greatest amount of conversation and why?
    4.) Which questions failed to generate conversation and why?

    *These questions were taken from Boston University's School of Public Health.

    3. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the effectiveness of today's fishbowl discussion?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we PARTICIPATE in discussion by reviewing chapters 12 and 13 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 14 (pp. 147-152), chapter 15 (pp. 152-158), and chapter 16 (pp. 159-164) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 17 (pp. 165-173), chapter 18 (pp. 174-179), and chapter 19 (pp. 180-186) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ (20% of the 2nd marking period) for Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter.
  • FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for all 25 words from Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), and chapter 22 (pp. 205-214) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (pp. 2223-228) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 2nd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you should strive to write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: SAT Vocab. List #1, Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Wednesday, November 9th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: FREEWRITE (write at least one well-developed paragraph, which is 10-12 sentences):
    Write about your feelings on the election. Choose at least one of these questions to answer:
    1.) What are your concerns, thoughts and feelings?
    2.) What is the respectable response to the election outcome?
    3.) How is our country going to thrive?
    4.) What are your impressions about today's front pages on newspapers around the world?
    5.) What are your conclusions about the predictive polls getting the election outcome wrong? Read one of these articles:
  • "How did the pollsters get Trump, Clinton election so wrong?" from USA Today
  • "Anderson Cooper on Polls: What Did Everyone Get Wrong?" video
  • "How Politicians, Pollsters and Media Missed Trump's Groundswell"

    Show HW: Chapters 12-13 T-Charts

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Table groups will turn and talk over the Warm-Up. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Whole Class Discussion: How is this presidential/congress election comparable and contrasting to The Scarlet Letter?

    3. Work Period:

  • Read Biography of Nathaniel Hawthorne: What can you recognize or predict that you will see later in Hawthorne's novel, The Scarlet Letter, based on his personal characteristics, values and life history? What adversities did he experience? Refer to specific details in his biography. Be ready to share.
  • Introduce
  • Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter

    4. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the skills ACQUIRED today with the Regents-style multiple-choice question in the Warm-Up, the author's life and time period, and the vocabulary list?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How is the study of The Scarlet Letter comparable to our modern-day society? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 14 (pp. 147-152), chapter 15 (pp. 152-158), and chapter 16 (pp. 159-164) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 17 (pp. 165-173), chapter 18 (pp. 174-179), and chapter 19 (pp. 180-186) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ (20% of the 2nd marking period) for Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter.
  • FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for all 25 words from Vocabulary List #2 for The Scarlet Letter. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 20 (pp. 187-196), chapter 21 (pp. 197-204), and chapter 22 (pp. 205-214) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22nd:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 23 (pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (pp. 2223-228) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
    THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER: 50% of the 2nd marking period!

  • TURN IN (OR E-MAIL TO hconn@schools.nyc.gov) YOUR COPY OF THE SCARLET LETTER FINAL PAPER on Overcoming Adversity in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs; you must write the maximum number of sentences in the outline; 3-4 typed, double-spaced typed pages), following the Argumentative Essay Outline on Overcoming Adversity. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists: Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 and Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2).). Follow these Writing Standards.
  • Monday, November 7th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Read the discussion questions provided. Arrange in fishbowl format.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Fishbowl Discussion: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below, CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE, offer interpretation (explain the text in your own words) and analysis (evaluation, exploration and dissection). The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and evaluate the quality of the questions and answers (see the Discussion Evaluation Questions below). The inner circle students will speak one at a time, respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. In order to earn credit, everyone must participate by either answering discussion questions in the inner circle or completing evaluations in the outer circle. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTERS 10 AND 11 INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING (cite textual evidence: identify quotes and page numbers in the novel):
  • Why is Chillingworth's relationship with Dimmesdale considered an adversity for both men?
  • How does Dimmesdale help the townspeople overcome adversity?
  • What adversities are troubling Dimmesdale? How does he hope to overcome these adversities?
  • What personal, societal or textual connections can you relate to in chapters 10 and 11 in The Scarlet Letter?

    DISCUSSION SENTENCE STARTERS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • I discovered on page number_______that...
  • The author supports my claim/conclusion on page number_____that...
  • Readers can conclude that..
  • The author believes/thinks/argues that...because..
  • Adding to what_________(person) said, I think/believe/argue...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • A conclusion that I'm drawing is...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    DISCUSSION EVALUATION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) What discussion topics interested you today and why?
    2.) What quality conversations or individual comments emerged?
    3.) Which questions spurred the greatest amount of conversation and why?
    4.) Which questions failed to generate conversation and why?

    *These questions were taken from Boston University's School of Public Health.

    3. Reflections:

  • What conclusions can you draw about the effectiveness of today's fishbowl discussion?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • What discussion successes were ACQUIRED by reviewing chapters 10-11 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 12 (pp. 129-138) AND chapter 13 (pp. 139-146) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • Friday, November 4th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Chillingworth said that "some men bury their secrets...and "these men deceive themselves" (p. 116). As we've read, characters in The Scarlet Letter have buried some of their secrets. What are some long-term effects/outcomes that could happen to someone who buried their secrets? Consider the benefits and the drawbacks.

    Show HW: Chapters 10-11 T-Charts.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Table groups will turn and talk over the Warm-Up. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Review the Exam on Chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. Cite textual evidence for the incorrect answers.

    4. Reflections:

  • Why is exam review useful for growth and development as student in English? What was useful about yesterday's fishbowl discussion? What can we predict will happen next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How do we ACQUIRE an understanding of chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter by reviewing the contents of the exam? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 12 (pp. 129-138) AND chapter 13 (pp. 139-146) in The Scarlet Letter (text and audio available here). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quotes of ADVERSITY and TWO quotes OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) Include an INFERENCE for each quote: Write your conclusion that you gather from the evidence you included in your t-chart.
  • Thursday, November 3rd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: How would you persuade your peers to read The Scarlet Letter?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Table groups will turn and talk over the Warm-Up. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Warm-Up. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Fishbowl Discussion: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below, CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE, offer interpretation (explain the text in your own words) and analysis (evaluation, exploration and dissection). The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and evaluate the quality of the questions and answers (see the Discussion Evaluation Questions below). The inner circle students will speak one at a time, respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. In order to earn credit, everyone must participate by either answering discussion questions in the inner circle or completing evaluations in the outer circle. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
  • What conclusions can you draw about the internal conflicts that the characters in The Scarlet Letter have been experiencing?
  • What can you conclude is the author's purpose in writing this novel?
  • What personal, societal or textual connections can you relate to The Scarlet Letter?

    DISCUSSION SENTENCE STARTERS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • I discovered on page number_______that...
  • The author supports my claim/conclusion on page number_____that...
  • Readers can conclude that..
  • The author believes/thinks/argues that...because..
  • Adding to what_________(person) said, I think/believe/argue...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • A conclusion that I'm drawing is...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    DISCUSSION EVALUATION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • What students contributed to the discussion and why?
  • Did quality conversation or individual comments emerge? Why or why not?
  • What questions spurred the greatest amount of conversation?
  • Which questions failed to generate conversation?
  • How satisfied did the students in discussion appear?

    *These questions were taken from Boston University's School of Public Health.

    3. Reflections:

  • Review the Exam (chapters 1-9) answers.
  • What conclusions can you draw about the effectiveness of today's fishbowl discussion?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How did we ACQUIRE discussion strategies for success when analyzing the author's purpose, characters' conflicts, and discovered connections in The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 10 (pp. 113-121) and chapter 11 (pp. 122-128. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples (two examples of textual evidence in the form of brief quotes) of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) DON'T FORGET: You MUST include an INFERENCE FOR EACH QUOTE. The INFERENCE is your conclusion that you interpret for each quote.
  • Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: EXAM on Chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter

    Show owed HW.

    2. Work Period: Begin HW--reading chapters 10-11.

    3. Reflections: DOK 3: What can you predict will happen next in the novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • What does Hester ACQUIRE from her relationship with Pearl and Dimmesdale, as stated in chapters 8 and 9 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:
  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 10 (pp. 113-121) and chapter 11 (pp. 122-128. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples (two examples of textual evidence in the form of brief quotes) of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) DON'T FORGET: You MUST include an INFERENCE FOR EACH QUOTE. The INFERENCE is your conclusion that you interpret for each quote.
  • Tuesday, November 1st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What would happen to the plot of The Scarlet Letter if the setting was transported to Queens in 2016?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Review and take notes on the evidence of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 8 and 9. Consider the importance of the author's choices and how they impact the development of the plot.
  • Review the Study Guide for Chapters 1-9.

    3. Reflections: DOK 3: What conclusions can be drawn about Hester's relationships with the male characters, Dimmesdale and Chillingworth? Explain.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • What does Hester ACQUIRE from her relationship with Pearl and Dimmesdale, as stated in chapters 8 and 9 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:
  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period grade) on Chapters 1-9. You must study all class and homework notes on ADVERSITIES and OVERCOMING ADVERSITIES, as well as the inference (conclusion) for each chapter. Here's a review sheet for chapters 1-9. The Exam will only include multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read chapter 10 (pp. 113-121) and chapter 11 (pp. 122-128. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples (two examples of textual evidence in the form of brief quotes) of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in each T-CHART (include page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks; remember--the quotes can be short phrases. It's BEST to choose short phrases and understand what you're writing.) DON'T FORGET: You MUST include an INFERENCE FOR EACH QUOTE. The INFERENCE is your conclusion that you interpret for each quote.
  • Monday, October 31st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What crime in today's society is parallel (equivalent) to Hester's crime of adultery? Consider a crime that would cause public ignominy. Explain.

    Show HW: Chapter 9 T-Chart

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • New Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Review and take notes on the evidence of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 7 and 8. Consider the importance of the author's choices and how they impact the development of the plot.
  • Distribution of Study Guide for Chapters 1-9.

    3. Reflections: DOK 1: What does Hester ACQUIRE in chapters 7 and 8? DOK 3: What conclusions can be drawn about Hester's relationships with the male characters, Dimmesdale and Chillingworth? Explain.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • What does Hester ACQUIRE from being Pearl's mother, as stated in chapters 7 and 8 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:
  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period grade) on Chapters 1-9. You must study all class and homework notes on ADVERSITIES and OVERCOMING ADVERSITIES, as well as the inference (conclusion) for each chapter. Here's a review sheet for chapters 1-9. The Exam will only include multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.
  • Friday, October 28th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Which of the following central idea thesis statements is better? Explain your answer in 2-3 sentences.
    1.) Keeping secrets can be bad.
    2.) Keeping secrets can be bad because they end up hurting you more than if you dealt with the initial consequences.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.

    3. Mini-Lesson:
    1.) Outline handout is distributed. Explain and discuss outline for Task 3 (the central idea essay on the English Regents).
    2.) Read and review one sample paragraph for Task 3.
    3.) Checking for Understanding: Do you have any questions about how to write this paragraph? Does the outline make sense? (Thumbs up/thumbs down) What makes the sample paragraphs exemplary (strong/outstanding)? What do the sample paragraphs include?

    4. Guided Practice:
    1.) Read the second sample paragraph. Identify the facts and the analysis.
    2.) Complete an outline for your own paragraph. Use the Task 3 outline handout as your guide.
    3.) Begin writing the first paragraph for the Task 3 essay. Choose your own theme/central idea (suggestions: adversity or overcoming adversity) and literary device (suggestions: characterization or symbolism) for The Scarlet Letter. Use the Task 3 CCLS rubric to guide you (focusing on criteria 1 and 2).
    4.) Peer Assessment: Students will switch papers and use the first two criteria (on the Task 3 CCLS rubric) for peer assessment. What are their strengths and areas needing improvement?

    5. Reflections: Explain in 1-2 sentences (on an exit slip post-it note) if you agree/disagree with your peer's grading of your work. Explain why today's lesson was valuable.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we use textual evidence and analysis to best support a central idea in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • ONE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT: Read chapter 9 (pp. 104-112) in The Scarlet Letter. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks). Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains what you've determined based on the evidence.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period grade) on Chapters 1-9. You must study all class and homework notes on ADVERSITIES and OVERCOMING ADVERSITIES, as well as the inference (conclusion) for each chapter. Here's a review sheet for chapters 1-9. The Exam will only include multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.
  • Thursday, October 27th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Hester has a special talent in sewing, and she feels a sense of personal fulfillment and meaning in sewing for other people. What is one special talent of yours and how could that talent lead to a future career?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Review and take notes on the evidence of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 5 and 6. Consider the importance of the author's choices and how they impact the development of the plot.

    3. Reflections: What are your perceptions about Hester at her needle in chapter 5? Does Hester have a STRATEGY as to why she remains in Boston after her imprisonment has ended? Explain.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we understand the significance of Hester's role in chapter 5 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • ONE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT: Read chapter 9 (pp. 104-112) in The Scarlet Letter. In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks). Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains what you've determined based on the evidence.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:

  • EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period grade) on Chapters 1-9. You must study all class and homework notes on ADVERSITIES and OVERCOMING ADVERSITIES, as well as the inference (conclusion) for each chapter. Here's a review sheet for chapters 1-9. The Exam will only include multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.
  • Wednesday, October 26th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: As you read in chapter 5 of The Scarlet Letter, Hester does volunteer work, making clothes for the poor. What volunteer work have you done in the past or hope to do in the future and why?

    SHOW HW: T-Charts for chapters 6, 7 and 8 AND any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Review and take notes on the evidence of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 4 and 5. Consider the importance of the author's choices and how they impact the development of the plot.

    3. Reflections: What intrigued you about Hester and her relationship with her husband, Roger Chillingworth, in chapter 4, and what are your perceptions about Hester at her needle in chapter 5?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we understand the significance of the author's choices for Hester and Chillingworth in chapters 4 and 5 in The Scarlet Letter? N/A
    Tuesday, October 25th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are your impressions of The Scarlet Letter thus far? You may include positive and negative qualities of the novel. Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.

    3. Work Period: For each word in the vocabulary quiz do the following in your LS (Language Skills section): Compose vocabulary strategies (based on your learning style) for each vocabulary word on the quiz. Choose from one of the following strategies (from our Learning Styles handout we completed earlier this year; if you weren't here then, you can choose one of the following):

  • For Visual Learners: Draw a relevant picture, choose an online image (you may use your electronic device), create a cartoon, or create a meme.
  • For Auditory Learners: Create a song or mnemonic device (words associated with the vocabulary word to help you remember the definition) or invent an acronym (letters that stand for the definition, like PSA=public service announcement).
  • For Tactile Learners: Write physical movements that associate with the word or create a game to remember the words.

    **When finished with the vocabulary strategies, work on the HW due tomorrow!!

    4. Reflections: What was valuable, useful or intriguing from today's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • : L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words.
  • How can we improve our long-term memory of essential vocabulary words from The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 6, 7 and 8 (pp. 80-103) in The Scarlet Letter. Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks) for EACH CHAPTER. Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains each quote, which is what you've concluded based on the evidence from EACH CHAPTER.
  • ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY CLASS TIME (all work for the 1st marking period)!!
  • Monday, October 24th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What can you predict will happen next in The Scarlet Letter an why?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.

    3. Work Period: Review your vocabulary quiz for The Scarlet Letter (returned today). For each word on the vocabulary quiz, do the following in your LS (Language Skills section): Compose vocabulary strategies (based on your learning style) for each vocabulary word on the quiz. Choose from one of the following strategies (from our Learning Styles handout we completed earlier this year; if you weren't here then, you can choose one of the following):

  • For Visual Learners: Draw a relevant picture, choose an online image (you may use your electronic device), create a cartoon, or create a meme.
  • For Auditory Learners: Create a song or mnemonic device (words associated with the vocabulary word to help you remember the definition) or invent an acronym (letters that stand for the definition, like PSA=public service announcement).
  • For Tactile Learners: Write physical movements that associate with the word or create a game to remember the words.

    **We will finish these strategies in class tomorrow! SHOW HW DUE TODAY (Chapters 4 and 5 T-charts).

    4. Reflections: What was valuable, useful or intriguing from today's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • : L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words.
  • How can we improve our long-term memory of essential vocabulary words from The Scarlet Letter? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments)

    DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 24th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points): Read chapters 4 and 5 (pages 65-79) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for the evidence (1-2 sentences are sufficient): What inference (conclusion) can you draw from each quote?). YOU SHOULD HAVE TWO T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE TWO CHAPTERS).

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 6, 7 and 8 (pp. 80-103) in The Scarlet Letter. Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks) for EACH CHAPTER. Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains each quote, which is what you've concluded based on the evidence from EACH CHAPTER.
  • ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY CLASS TIME (all work for the 1st marking period)!!
  • Friday, October 21st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: For whom would you keep a secret, even if it means that you'd be punished? Explain reasons for your answer.

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Share evidence of adversities and overcoming adversities in chapter 3 in The Scarlet Letter. Fill in T-charts. What inferences (conclusions) can you draw from the evidence presented?

    3. Reflections: What's the author's purpose in sharing Hester's adversities and experiences overcoming adversity? What was valuable about our class discussion on chapters 2 and 3?

    Common Core Standards:

  • : RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we INTERPRET Hester's punishment and how she's overcoming the adversity detailed in chapter 3 in The Scarlet Letter? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments)

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 24th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points): Read chapters 4 and 5 (pages 65-79) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for the evidence (1-2 sentences are sufficient): What inference (conclusion) can you draw from each quote?). YOU SHOULD HAVE TWO T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE TWO CHAPTERS).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 6, 7 and 8 (pp. 80-103) in The Scarlet Letter. Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks) for EACH CHAPTER. Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains each quote, which is what you've concluded based on the evidence from EACH CHAPTER.
  • ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY CLASS TIME (all work for the 1st marking period)!!
  • Thursday, October 20th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Finish yesterday's classwork (in your LA section). Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you answer the following question: DOES HESTER PRYNNE'S PUNISHMENT FIT HER CRIME? Cite textual evidence (at least one quote, page # and paragraph #) to support your argument.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Share evidence of adversities and overcoming adversities in chapters 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter. Fill in T-charts. What inferences (conclusions) can you draw from the evidence presented?

    3. Reflections: What's author's purpose in sharing Hester's adversities and experiences overcoming adversity? What was valuable about our class discussion on chapters 2 and 3?

    Common Core Standards:

  • : RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we INTERPRET Hester's punishment and her crime detailed in chapters 1, 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments)

    DUE BY NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 24th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points): Read chapters 4 and 5 (pages 65-79) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for the evidence (1-2 sentences are sufficient): What inference (conclusion) can you draw from each quote?). YOU SHOULD HAVE TWO T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE TWO CHAPTERS).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 6, 7 and 8 (pp. 80-103) in The Scarlet Letter. Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks) for EACH CHAPTER. Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains each quote, which is what you've concluded based on the evidence from EACH CHAPTER.
  • ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY CLASS TIME (all work for the 1st marking period)!!
  • Wednesday, October 19th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up:
  • Why do people love gossip?
  • Why can gossip be so damaging to its victim (some say that gossip can be worse than murder!)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.

    3. Work Period:

  • In your LA section, write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you answer the following question: DOES HESTER PRYNNE'S PUNISHMENT FIT HER CRIME? Cite textual evidence (at least one quote, page # and paragraph #) to support your argument.

    SHOW HW: THREE T-CHARTS FOR CHAPTERS 1, 2 AND 3 in THE SCARLET LETTER.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on why it's important to understand Hester Prynne's crime and punishment, as well as the influence of gossip on her demeanor (behavior).

    Common Core Standards:

  • : RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we INTERPRET Hester's punishment and her crime detailed in chapters 1, 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments)

    DUE BY NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 24th:

  • TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points): Read chapters 4 and 5 (pages 65-79) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for the evidence (1-2 sentences are sufficient): What inference (conclusion) can you draw from each quote?). YOU SHOULD HAVE TWO T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE TWO CHAPTERS).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 6, 7 and 8 (pp. 80-103) in The Scarlet Letter. Identify TWO quoted examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART (include page #s, quoted phrases/sentences, with quotation marks) for EACH CHAPTER. Write an INFERENCE (CONCLUSION) of 1-2 sentences that explains each quote, which is what you've concluded based on the evidence from EACH CHAPTER.
  • ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY CLASS TIME (all work for the 1st marking period)!!
  • Tuesday, October 18th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What do you know about the Puritans? You may use your prior knowledge or your electronic devices.

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.

    2. Work Period:

  • Create a spider web graphic organizer for the setting: 1600's in Boston, Massachusetts. You may work with a table mate and use your electronic device to research life during the setting of this novel. Make your own graphic organizer in the LA section of your notebook. At the bottom of the graphic organizer, answer the following: How do you believe the setting will develop the plot of The Scarlet Letter? Write 2-3 sentences in which you refer to the evidence you researched on the setting to support your answer.
  • Work on HW due Wednesday.

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and predict what we will learn next week.

    Common Core Standards:

  • : RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we understand the significance of the setting developing the plot in The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for each piece of evidence: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence? Sentence starters include: Readers can infer that...Readers can conclude from this evidence that...A conclusion/inference is...YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS).
  • Monday, October 17th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Vocabulary Quiz on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1

    Turn in Vocabulary Story HW.

    2. Work Period:

  • Work on HW due Wednesday.

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and predict what we will learn next week.

    Common Core Standards:

  • : RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we improve our vocabulary and cite evidence for adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 17th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 (10% of the 1st marking period). You need to know the definitions and how to use the vocabulary words in sentences.
  • CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY using 15 words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. You MUST use your chosen vocabulary words correctly and underline the vocabulary words! Story topic/title choices MUST be one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. The genre of the story can be fiction, non-fiction, poetry, play/movie script, etc. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one, typed, double-spaced page (12 point font, Times New Roman). Include your name, both teachers' names (Ms. Conn and Ms. Valente), the date, and College Readiness, Period_____ in your heading.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for each piece of evidence: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence? Sentence starters include: Readers can infer that...Readers can conclude from this evidence that...A conclusion/inference is...YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS).
  • Friday, October 14th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Preview the novel, The Scarlet Letter. Read the synopsis (summary) on the back of the novel and examine the book cover. What predictions can you make about the characters' adversities?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read the list of chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. Write five titles that appeal to you and may be titles in which you could focus a creative vocabulary story.
  • In The Scarlet Letter (check out the novel today), read aloud chapter 1 (The Prison-Door)-pp. 45-46. In your LA section, create a T-Chart on Adversity vs. Overcoming Adversity. Find two pieces of textual evidence (cite properly, using quotation marks, page number, an paragraph number) from chapter 1 for each side of the T-Chart. Write one analytical sentence for each piece of evidence in which you answer the following question: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence? Sentence starter suggestions:
  • An inference about this evidence is...
  • Readers can infer that...
  • A reader may infer that...

    4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and predict what we will learn next week.

    Common Core Standards:

  • : RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we understand the meaning of adversity and understand its relevance to chapter 1 in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 17th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 (10% of the 1st marking period). You need to know the definitions and how to use the vocabulary words in sentences.
  • CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY using 15 words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. You MUST use your chosen vocabulary words correctly and underline the vocabulary words! Story topic/title choices MUST be one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. The genre of the story can be fiction, non-fiction, poetry, play/movie script, etc. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one, typed, double-spaced page (12 point font, Times New Roman). Include your name, both teachers' names (Ms. Conn and Ms. Valente), the date, and College Readiness, Period_____ in your heading.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points): Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in EACH T-CHART (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks AND answer this question for each piece of evidence: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence? Sentence starters include: Readers can infer that...Readers can conclude from this evidence that...A conclusion/inference is...YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS).
  • Thursday, October 13th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Look up the image of a celebrity on your electronic device (Eminem, Jay-Z, J.K. Rowling, Halle Berry, Walt Disney, Stephen Hawking, Malala Yousafzai, Jennifer Lopez, or Stevie Wonder). What adversity (struggle/misfortune/trouble) has this celebrity experienced? How has he/she overcome the adversity?

    Show vocabulary flashcard HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Review the answers to the "War Stories" Exam.

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and predict what we will learn tomorrow.

    Common Core Standards:

  • : RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we understand the meaning of adversity and its relevance to modern-day celebrities, which will prepare us to read The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 17th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 (10% of the 1st marking period). You need to know the definitions and how to use the vocabulary words in sentences.
  • CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY using 15 words from The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. You MUST use your chosen vocabulary words correctly and underline the vocabulary words! Story topic/title choices MUST be one of the chapter titles in The Scarlet Letter. The genre of the story can be fiction, non-fiction, poetry, play/movie script, etc. You MUST use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one, typed, double-spaced page (12 point font, Times New Roman). Include your name, both teachers' names (Ms. Conn and Ms. Valente), the date, and College Readiness, Period_____ in your heading.
  • Tuesday, October 11th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: EXAM on War Stories

    Show any owed homework.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Introduce The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine your success on the war stories exam.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we be successful on an assessment of the three war stories? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13th:
    FLASHCARDS for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Create flashcards for all 25 words. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition, an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists), the chapter and page number on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 17th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1 (10% of the 1st marking period). You need to know the definitions and how to use the vocabulary words in sentences.
  • Friday, October 7th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Authors use literary techniques to develop the plot of their stories. Which of the following literary techniques used by the war stories' authors was the most effective and why: mood, characterization, setting, symbolism, metaphor, hyperbole or satire?

    Show any owed homework.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.

    3. Review Game on the three war stories.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of the review game.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we effectively review for the upcoming exam on the three war stories? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11th:
  • WAR STORIES EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil). You will be tested on the following (the exam will not be open notes; you must review the answers to the following questions): "Soldier's Home":
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    "The War Prayer":
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story?
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful?
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic?
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story?
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?"
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message?
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story?

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Thursday, October 6th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Compare and contrast your life to Krebs' life. Be ready to share at least two similarities and two differences.

    Show HW: vocabulary story rewrite.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Review the answers to the homework on "Soldier's Home":
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • What is the author's purpose in writing Hemingway's "Soldier's Home"? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11th:
  • WAR STORIES EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil). You will be tested on the following (the exam will not be open notes; you must review the answers to the following questions): "Soldier's Home":
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    "The War Prayer":
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story?
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful?
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic?
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story?
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?"
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message?
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story?

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Wednesday, October 5th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are two PRINCIPLES (a moral, rule or belief that helps you know what is right or wrong) that you follow and why? For example, Krebs' PRINCIPLE in "Soldier's Home" is honesty because he is tired of the lies being told after war.

    Show HW: questions and annotations for "Soldier's Home" .

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • New Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Review the answers to the homework:
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • What is the author's purpose in writing Hemingway's "Soldier's Home"? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6th:
  • REWRITE Vocabulary Story (with teacher's edits). Highlight/Circle/Underline the corrections made in the rewritten story. You must bring in the original vocabulary story and the rewrite in order to earn credit.

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Friday, September 30th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Identify literary techniques used in "In Another Country." Find at least two literary techniques (such as similes, metaphors or repetition). What is the author's purpose for using these literary techniques?

    Show owed HW. .

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.

    3. Film Viewing: Watch Realities of War and Literary Devices in "In Another Country" Film. Examine the use of literary techniques (inverted phrases, similes, metaphors, parallelism, repetition) and their purpose in the developing the plot.

    4. Introduce HW.

    5. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • What is the author's purpose in using literary techniques in Hemingway's "In Another Country"? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
  • Read "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway. Second, annotate (take notes in the margin) and underline. Your annotations and underlining should be connected to the following questions. Next, you need to answer the questions below (that you will answer in the LA section of your notebook). Remember, you need to cite textual evidence (direct quotes and page #s) to support your answers.
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    DUE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6th:

  • REWRITE Vocabulary Story (with teacher's edits). Highlight/Circle/Underline the corrections made in the rewritten story. You must bring in the original vocabulary story and the rewrite in order to earn credit.

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Thursday, September 29th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Why are people so fascinated by 'before and after' photos? Explain your answer. You may use an electronic device to research and analyze the personal effects of 'before and after' photos.

    Show owed HW. .

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Discuss and take notes on "In Another Country" questions. Here's "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway. Do answer the following questions. Remember, cite textual evidence (write direct quotes, page #, and paragraph #). Also, annotate (take notes in the margins) and underline the story (you must show evidence of note-taking and underlining).
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    3. Film Viewing: Watch Realities of War and Literary Devices in "In Another Country" Film

    4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How does Hemingway use literary devices to develop the plot in "In Another Country"? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
    Wednesday, September 28th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: At the end of "In Another Country," we, the readers, learn that the injured soldiers were given lies since the photographs of restored soldiers weren't real. How do you feel about this revelation (surprising fact) and why?

    Show HW: "In Another Country" questions, annotations and underlining.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Distribute and review the vocabulary quizzes.
  • Discuss and take notes on "In Another Country" questions. Here's "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway. Do answer the following questions. Remember, cite textual evidence (write direct quotes, page #, and paragraph #). Also, annotate (take notes in the margins) and underline the story (you must show evidence of note-taking and underlining).
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How does Hemingway use literary devices to develop the plot in "In Another Country"? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
    Tuesday, September 27th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: In a football game, a political debate, and a war between countries, there are wins and there are losses. What are the wins and losses in a war? You can refer to the wins and losses for the soldiers, the civilians, or the countries.

    Turn in owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers with the entire class.
  • Discuss and take notes on yesterday's predictive questions and research in Preparing to read "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway.
    1.) What can you predict about the next story based on its title "In Another Country?"
    2.) Since this short story fits into the American War Unit, what predictions can you make about this story?
    3.) This story was published in 1927 by Ernest Hemingway. Research three facts about that year in American history and three facts about Ernest Hemingway that you believe likely influenced the composition of this short story.

    3. Work Period: Begin working on the HW.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How does Hemingway use literary devices to develop the plot in "In Another Country"? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:
  • Read "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway. Do not do the discussion questions at the end of the story. Do answer the following questions. Remember, cite textual evidence (write direct quotes, page #, and paragraph #). Also, annotate (take notes in the margins) and underline the story (you must show evidence of note-taking and underlining).
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Monday, September 26th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What were your strengths and challenges in your Central Idea Essay on The War Prayer?"

    Turn in HW: Central Idea Essay on "The War Prayer" and show the chart (composed in class last week).

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • New Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers (one reason for each student) with the entire class.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, write the following title: Preparing to read "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway.

  • What can you predict about the next story based on its title "In Another Country?"
  • Since this short story fits into the American War Unit, what predictions can you make about this story?
  • This story was published in 1927 by Ernest Hemingway. Research three facts about that year in American history and three facts about Ernest Hemingway that you believe likely influenced the composition of this short story.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of composing the Central Idea Essay on "The War Prayer."

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we successfully compose the Task 3 essay in the English Regents (Common Core), using the short story, "The War Prayer"? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
    Friday, September 23rd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are the components (qualities; parts) of a successful essay? Consider the components of an introductory paragraph, body paragraph and a concluding paragraph.

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers (one reason for each student) with the entire class.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, write the following title--Preparing to Write a Central Idea Essay on "The War Prayer." Then, create a chart of the following:

  • Literary Technique: Choose one literary technique, satire or hyperbole, that you would feel more comfortable writing an essay about "The War Prayer."
  • Central Idea: Choose one central idea, anti-war sentiments (feelings) or anti-religion sentiments, that you would feel more comfortable writing an essay about "The War Prayer."
  • Quotes: Identify and write three direct quotes (cite the paragraph # for each quote) from the story that equally support your chosen literary technique and your chosen central idea.
  • Analysis: How is the literary technique in each quote being used to support the central idea? Explain your answer for each quote in one or two sentences. Use this chart to guide you.

    4. Outline Format Introduction: Steps for Writing the Central Idea Essay (Task 3 on English Regents):

    A. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences):
    Step 1: Hook: A general statement about the central idea that interests the reader in the topic.
    Step 2: Identify the title and author of the text AND introduce the central idea and the literary technique.
    Step 3: Make an arguable thesis (claim) about how the author uses the literary technique to support the central idea of the text.

    B. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences):
    Step 1: Write a topic sentence introducing your examples (revealed as direct quotes from the text) of how the author uses the literary technique to develop the central idea.
    Step 2: Include a quotation/textual example to support your thesis.
    Step 3: Provide an explanation/analysis of your text-based example (quote) and how it works to support the central idea of the text.
    *You must repeat these steps so that you have provided 2 3 examples of how the literary technique supports the central idea.
    Step 4: Provide a concluding sentence that ties together the entire body paragraph.

    C. Concluding Paragraph (4-6 sentences):
    Step 1: Restate your thesis (claim).
    Step 2: Summarize the main points of your analysis.
    Step 3: Write a concluding sentence that leaves the reader with an interesting, final thought.

    5. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of creating a chart and essay outline.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we prepare to write the Task 3 essay in the English Regents (Common Core), using the short story, "The War Prayer"? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:
  • Finish the chart from today's classwork (see the details in the agenda).
  • Central Idea Essay on "The War Prayer"--an essay containing three paragraphs in which you apply the chart you composed in class and the outline below. Include the following heading: your name, your teachers' names: Ms. Conn and Ms. Valente, College Readiness, Period _____, and the date.
    Outline Format Introduction: Steps for Writing the Central Idea Essay (Task 3 on English Regents):

    A. Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences):
    Step 1: Hook: A general statement about the central idea that interests the reader in the topic.
    Step 2: Identify the title and author of the text AND introduce the central idea and the literary technique.
    Step 3: Make an arguable thesis (claim) about how the author uses the literary technique to support the central idea of the text.

    B. Body Paragraph (10-12 sentences):
    Step 1: Write a topic sentence introducing your examples (revealed as direct quotes from the text) of how the author uses the literary technique to develop the central idea.
    Step 2: Include a quotation/textual example to support your thesis. Remember, introduce each quote. Here are suggested words and phrases to introduce quotes. Remember, cite each quote (include the paragraph # in parentheses at the end of the quote). Remember, explain the quote in your own words and connect it to the literary technique and central idea.
    Step 3: Provide an explanation/analysis of your text-based example (quote) and how it works to support the central idea of the text.
    *You must repeat these steps so that you have provided 3 examples (quotes) of how the literary technique supports the central idea.
    Step 4: Provide a concluding sentence that ties together the entire body paragraph.

    C. Concluding Paragraph (4-6 sentences):
    Step 1: Restate your thesis (claim).
    Step 2: Summarize the main points of your analysis.
    Step 3: Write a concluding sentence that leaves the reader with an interesting, final thought.

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Thursday, September 22nd, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are influential factors (reasons) for why people become anti-war and anti-religion (atheists)?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers (one reason for each student) with the entire class.

    3. Mini-Lesson on Mark Twain's biography:

  • Fact or Fiction: Mark Twain's real name is Samuel Clemens. He was born two months prematurely and was not expected to live. He has no living direct descendants.

    4. Finish sharing your answers and taking notes on the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer.

    5. Work Period: In your LA section, write the following title--Preparing to Write a Central Idea Essay on "The War Prayer." Then, do the following:

  • Choose one literary technique, satire or hyperbole, that you would feel more comfortable writing an essay about "The War Prayer."
  • Choose one central idea, anti-war sentiments (feelings) or anti-religion sentiments, that you would feel more comfortable writing an essay about "The War Prayer."
  • Identify and write three direct quotes (cite the paragraph # for each quote) from the story that equally support your chosen literary technique and your chosen central idea.
  • How is the literary technique in each quote being used to support the central idea? Explain your answer for each quote in one or two sentences. Use this chart to guide you.

    6. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading this short story.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we prepare to write the Task 3 essay in the English Regents (Common Core), using the short story, "The War Prayer"? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
    Wednesday, September 21st, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Should high school students be required to read "The War Prayer"? Provide three reasons for your answer. Include a counterclaim (the opposing side).

    Show HW: "The War Prayer" questions and answers

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers to the Warm-Up. Then, captains will share their table mates' answers (one reason for each student) with the entire class.
  • Share your answers to the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer. 4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading this short story.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do the satire and hyperbole develop the central idea of the value of war in the short story, "The War Prayer"? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
    Tuesday, September 20th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: VOCABULARY QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1

    Show owed HW.

    2. Work Period: Pick up a copy of "The War Prayer" short story by Mark Twain. Before reading, do the following: In your LA section, answer the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?

    During the reading of "The War Prayer," answer the following questions:
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer. 4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading this short story.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • What is the purpose of reading a satirical, hyperbolic short story, "The War Prayer," and begin our war story unit? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

    Read "The War Prayer" short story by Mark Twain. Before reading, do the following: In your LA section, answer the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?

    During the reading of "The War Prayer," answer the following questions:
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer.

    Monday, September 19th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are the definitions of hyperbole and satire? What are examples of each literary term? You may write your own definitions or research them on electronic devices.

    Show HW: Show the 5 sections of your notebook/binder and turn in the completed contract and information form.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Share your answers with the captain. Table captains will share their table's answers. Captain roles include the following: rotate every Monday in order to earn classwork credit for the marking period, stand up and represent your table respectfully, and earn extra credit (up to 5 extra points on your marking period grade) by taking on an extra week as captain.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, answer the following questions for "The War Prayer" short story by Mark Twain:

  • What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
  • What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
  • Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
  • Prepare for the vocabulary quiz that will occur TOMORROW, Tuesday, on the SAT Vocabulary List #1.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine each activity's value.

    Common Core Standards: TBD

  • How can we prepare to read a satirical, hyperbolic short story, "The War Prayer," and begin our war story unit? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:

  • QUIZ on SAT Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Friday, September 16th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: What are the habits of good readers in high school? Make a "Top Ten" list! When you're finished, you should study for the Vocabulary Quiz on SAT Vocabulary List #1 (which will OCCUR (academic vocabulary word) on Tuesday).

    Show HW: Show the visual/auditory/tactile strategies for each vocabulary word AND the vocabulary flashcards for SAT Vocabulary List #1.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Share your answers with the captain. Table captains will share one habit of good readers from each table mate with the class.
  • Read over the class syllabus (distributed today).

    3. Work Period:

  • Provide ACCURATE (factual, truthful) facts about yourself and parents/guardians in the contract and information form at the back of the syllabus.
  • Prepare for the vocabulary quiz on Tuesday on the SAT Vocabulary List #1.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine each activity's value.

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we effectively understand class expectations and improve our vocabulary skills? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th:

  • Supplies for this class: A three-ring binder filled with loose-leaf paper for English, or a section in a larger binder or a notebook with the following, FIVE LABELED sections: Warm-ups and Aims (WA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), Regents Strategies (RS), and Homework (HW).
  • COMPLETED CONTRACT AND INFORMATION SHEET (last page of the syllabus given in class)

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:

  • QUIZ on SAT Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Thursday, September 15th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Finish Learning Style Inventory and determine if you're a visual, audio or tactile learner. Evaluate your score. Is your score as a visual, audio or tactile learner accurate, in your opinion? Explain your answer (one or two sentences). *If you're finished early, you may work on the homework (flashcards due tomorrow).

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your answers with the captain. Table captains will share the types of learners with the class.

    3. Work Period: Compose vocabulary strategies (based on your learning style) for each vocabulary word from the Vocabulary List #1. Choose from one of the following strategies:
    For Visual Learners: Draw a relevant picture, choose an online image, create a cartoon, or create a meme

    For Auditory Learners: Create a song or mnemonic device (words associated with the vocabulary word to help you remember the definition) or invent an acronym (letters that stand for the definition, like PSA=public service announcement)

    For Tactile Learners: Write physical movements that associate with the word or create a game to remember the words.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we effectively understand our learning styles and improve our vocabulary acquisition? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment), if necessary.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create 30 flashcards for SAT Vocabulary List #1 on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't use the sentences provided and don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Finish today's classwork: Compose vocabulary strategies (based on your learning style) for each vocabulary word from the Vocabulary List #1. Choose from one of the following strategies:
    For Visual Learners: Draw a relevant picture, choose an online image, create a cartoon, or create a meme

    For Auditory Learners: Create a song or mnemonic device (words associated with the vocabulary word to help you remember the definition) or invent an acronym (letters that stand for the definition, like PSA=public service announcement)

    For Tactile Learners: Write physical movements that associate with the word or create a game to remember the words

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th:

  • Supplies for this class: A three-ring binder/notebook filled for English (or a section in a larger binder) with the following, FIVE LABELED sections: Warm-ups and Aims (WA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), Regents Strategies (RS), and Homework (HW).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:

  • QUIZ on SAT Vocabulary List #1. Know the 30 vocabulary words, their definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Wednesday, September 14th, 2016: 1. Warm-Up: Receive Diagnostic Writing. Listen to today's work period instructions and homework due Friday.

    2. Work Period:

  • FINISH DIAGNOSTIC: ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING
  • Learning Style Inventory