Assignments for Ninth Grade, Spring 06

Assignments for Ninth Grade
Spring 2006

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Wednesday, June 14 1.)Do Now: Review FINAL WEBFOLIOS.

2.) The Spelling/Vocabulary Bee will continue to take place TODAY. Prizes will be awarded! Here are the words: Word List #1 and Word List #2.

  • How can you improve your language skills (organization of writing, spelling, vocabulary, and resume writing)?

  • Enjoy your summer! Work on building up your resume--get a job, volunteer (keep track of service hours!), take a class, write in a journal about a trip, read some good books, and enjoy some relaxation!
  • Tuesday, June 13 1.)Do Now: Review of FINAL WEBFOLIO requirements and spelling/vocabulary bee information.

    2.)Work on FINAL WEBFOLIO. Also, if you have any make-up HW to turn in, this is the LAST DAY TO TURN IN HW!

    3.) The Spelling/Vocabulary Bee will take place TODAY. Prizes will be awarded! Here are the words: Word List #1 and Word List #2.

  • How can you improve your language skills (organization of writing, spelling, vocabulary, and resume writing)?
  • DUE TONIGHT:
  • BY MIDNIGHT: FINAL WEBFOLIO
  • Monday, June 12 1.)Do Now: Review of FINAL WEBFOLIO requirements and spelling/vocabulary bee information.

    2.)Work on FINAL WEBFOLIO.

    3.) The Spelling/Vocabulary Bee will take place on Tuesday, June 13th--the last day of classes. Technology Prizes will be awarded! Here are the words: Word List #1 and Word List #2.

  • How can you improve your language skills (organization of writing, spelling, vocabulary, and resume writing)?
  • DUE TOMORROW:
  • ALL make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions, vocabulary, journal entries, etc.
  • BY MIDNIGHT: FINAL WEBFOLIO
  • FOR CLASS (for fun--not required!): Prepare for the first ever in-class Spelling/Vocabulary Bee!! Technology Prizes will be awarded! Here are the words: Word List #1 and Word List #2.
  • Friday, June 9 1.)Do Now: Resume viewing and analysis. Students and teacher view classmates' webpages and resumes and critique them.

    2.)Introduction of Final HW assignment for the school year--due Tuesday by midnight: FINAL WEBFOLIO.

    3.) Spelling/Vocabulary Bee instructions: The Bee will take place on Tuesday, June 13th--the last day of classes. Technology Prizes will be awarded!

  • How can you improve your language skills (organization of writing, spelling, vocabulary, and resume writing)?
  • DUE TUESDAY:
  • ALL make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions, vocabulary, journal entries, etc.
  • BY MIDNIGHT: FINAL WEBFOLIO
  • FOR CLASS (for fun!): Prepare for the first ever in-class Spelling/Vocabulary Bee!! Technology Prizes will be awarded! Here are the words: Word List #1 and Word List #2.
  • Wednesday, June 7 1.)Do Now: Exchange your resume with an assigned classmate. Identify strengths and suggestions for improvement (examine spelling, capitalization, punctuation, organization, read-ability, etc.).

    2.) Student Volunteer uploads resume using PUTTY--display on LCD projector to show entire class.

    3.) Work on updating personal resumes. Use the following student samples to guide you: Catherine Reyes, Lillian Pena, Dylan O'Hehir, Rocky Ramotar, Chris Cruz.

  • What are your personal, academic, and career strengths and how can you effectively organize them in an easy-to-read resume?

  • DUE FRIDAY: Post your resume on your webpage under resume.html (there should be a link on your homepage). See the samples listed in today's classwork agenda to guide you.
  • Make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions, vocabulary and journal entries.
  • Tuesday, June 6 1.)Do Now: Read a neighbor's Journal Entry #14 and be ready to share your comments with class.

    2.)Discuss Journal Entry #14: Why Today's Teenagers Should Read the Novel and See the Film of To Kill a Mockingbird.

    3.) Return to student resumes (which were saved on laptops). Examine student samples: Catherine Reyes, Lillian Pena, Dylan O'Hehir, Rocky Ramotar, Chris Cruz. HOW HAVE THESE STUDENT RESUMES BEEN FORMATTED? WHAT ARE THEIR STRENGTHS? WHAT SHOULD THEY IMPROVE? HOW WILL YOU USE THESE SAMPLES TO GUIDE YOU IN CREATING YOUR RESUMES?

    4.) Begin working on updating your resume.

  • What are your personal, academic, and career strengths and how can you highlight them in a resume?

  • Bring your resume tomorrow--you may hand print, though a typed version is recommended. It is also recommended that you post your resume on your webpage. See the samples listed in today's classwork agenda.
  • Make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions, vocabulary and journal entries.
  • Monday, June 5 1.)Do Now: View the concluding scenes of To Kill a Mockingbird. Take notes to answer the following questions: Why should today's teenagers see this film (created in 1962)? What important lessons can today's teenagers gather from this film? What can today's teenagers learn about film-making and film analysis from viewing this film? Discuss questions and answers.

    2.)Gallery Walk of HW advertisement posters for To Kill a Mockingbird. Students post comments on each classmate's poster--answering these questions: Does the poster persuade you to read the book or see the film? Why/Why not?

    3.) Discuss reactions to advertisement posters.

    4.) Journal Entry #14: Why Today's Teenagers Should Read the Novel and See the Film of To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • What are valuable reasons to read the novel and view the film on To Kill a Mockingbird?

  • Finish today's in-class Journal Entry #14: Why Today's Teenagers Should Read the Novel and See the Film of To Kill a Mockingbird. Be prepared to discuss tomorrow.
  • Make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions and vocabulary.
  • Friday, June 2 1.)Do Now: Review yesterday's viewing of the film To Kill a Mockingbird. Focus on the sound effects, setting choices by the director, and characterization of each of the characters. Did the film meet your expectations? Explain your opinions in class. Revise your notes, if necessary.

    2.) Film--TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Take notes on your designated topic: character analysis, setting, or sound effects or all of them. This will help you for the weekend HW of a movie or novel advertisement.

    3.) Introduce HW.

  • Examine the characterization (appearance, personality, interaction between characters, dialogue), setting (choice of props, organization of setting, director's portrayal of setting), and sound effects (director's choice, the purpose of sound) in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • DUE MONDAY:
  • Movie/Novel Advertisement for To Kill a Mockingbird: You will make a poster advertisement to "sell" the novel or movie version to teenagers today in 2006. You may want to research movie marketing in the 1960s to gather some ideas, but remember you are marketing it to NYC teens in 2006. How will you capture people's attention and target teens? Another good resource is Analyzing Movie Posters.
  • Make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions and vocabulary.
  • Thursday, June 1 1.)Do Now: Review the opening of the Film (yesterday's viewing)--To Kill a Mockingbird. Focus on the sound effects, setting choices by the director, and characterization of each of the characters. Did the film meet your expectations? Explain your opinions in class. Revise your notes, if necessary.
    2.) Film--TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Take notes on your designated topic: character analysis, setting, or sound effects or all of them. This will help you for tonight's Journal Entry #13: Day 3 HW.

  • Examine the characterization (appearance, personality, interaction between characters, dialogue), setting (choice of props, organization of setting, director's portrayal of setting), and sound effects (director's choice, the purpose of sound) in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Journal #13: Day 3--Film Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird (focus on new analysis--whether it's characterization, setting, or sound effects or all of them; due tomorrow!). Some questions that you might like to answer in your journal: Did the director accurately portray the characters, setting, and sound that the author (Harper Lee) revealed (or did not reveal) in her novel? What were your impressions of the characters, setting, and sound effects? Did the actors/actresses present the novel characters effectively? How did the setting (1930's in Maycomb, Alabama) reveal itself in the film? Were the sound effects effective? Why/Why not? What would you have changed in the film? Explain your reasoning for all of the above.
  • Make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions and vocabulary.
  • Wednesday, May 31 1.)Do Now: Review the opening of the Film (yesterday's viewing)--To Kill a Mockingbird. Focus on the sound effects, setting choices by the director, and characterization of each of the characters. Did the film meet your expectations? Explain your opinions in class.
    2.) Film--TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Take notes on your designated topic: character analysis, setting, or sound effects. This will help you for Journal Entry #12: Days 1 and 2 HW.

  • Examine the characterization (appearance, personality, interaction between characters, dialogue), setting (choice of props, organization of setting, director's portrayal of setting), and sound effects (director's choice, the purpose of sound) in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Journal #12: Days 1 and 2--Film Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird (focus on new analysis--whether it's characterization, setting, or sound effects or all of them; due tomorrow!). Since yesterday's film viewing was not discussed, you will just continue with Journal #12--using the in-class notes taken during the film viewing for both days.
  • Make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions and vocabulary.
  • Tuesday, May 30 1.)Do Now: Instructions for Film--To Kill a Mockingbird.
    2.) Film--TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Take notes on your designated topic: character analysis, setting, or sound effects.

  • Examine the characterization (appearance, personality, interaction between characters, dialogue), setting (choice of props, organization of setting, director's portrayal of setting), and sound effects (director's choice, the purpose of each sound) in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Journal #12: Film Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird: Day 1 (due tomorrow!)
  • Make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions and vocabulary.
  • Friday, May 26 1.)Do Now: Introduce Final Essay Exam instructions.
    2.) FINAL ESSAY EXAM FOR TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
    3.) If time remains, read a book or newspaper of your choice.

  • Examine the themes (author's messages/main ideas), characterization and/or foreshadowing from the textual evidence analyzed in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Make up HW owed (if necessary): Chapters 1-31 Questions and vocabulary.
  • Thursday, May 25 1.)Do Now: Identify three themes that you are confident in writing your final essay on To Kill a Mockingbird. Work on developing support from the novel for each of the themes.
    2.) Discuss questions for chapters 22-31.
    3.) Continue to work on preparation for the Final Essay Exam on To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Examine the themes (author's messages/main ideas), characterization and foreshadowing from the textual evidence analyzed in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Final Essay Exam on all of To Kill a Mockingbird will be TOMORROW. Study the Chapters 1-31 Questions and themes. Use the review sheet to guide you in your preparation for the Final Essay (which will be counted as an in-class test--having double value).
  • Wednesday, May 24 1.)Do Now: Final Quiz on chapters 22-31 in To Kill a Mockingbird.
    2.) Discuss themes, characterization, and foreshadowing in chapters 22-31.
    3.) Introduce the Review Sheet for the Final Essay on To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Examine the themes (author's messages/main ideas), characterization and foreshadowing from the textual evidence analyzed in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Final Essay Exam on all of To Kill a Mockingbird will be on Friday (May 26th). Study the Chapters 1-31 Questions and themes. You will also receive a review sheet that will help you sufficiently prepare for the Final Essay (which will be counted as an in-class test--having double value). START PREPARING NOW!

    Make-up HW:

  • Read the Chapters 28-31 packet and complete ALL of the chapter questions for 22-31.
  • Vocabulary for Chapters 27-31 (Chapters 29-31 Vocabulary--ONLY 5 words per chapter).
  • Journal Entry #11: What Literature and Current Events Can Teach Us
  • Tuesday, May 23 WORK PERIOD: Work on the assignments that are due TOMORROW and prepare for the Final Quiz (tomorrow!) on Chapters 22-31, reviewing the answers for the chapters 22-31 questions. Good luck!

  • Examine the author's purpose and lessons learned from the characters' maturation as explained in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • DUE TOMORROW:
  • Read the Chapters 28-31 packet and complete ALL of the chapter questions for 22-31.
  • Vocabulary for Chapters 27-31 (Chapters 29-31 Vocabulary--ONLY 5 words per chapter).
  • Journal Entry #11: What Literature and Current Events Can Teach Us
  • Final Quiz on Chapters 22-31 will be TOMORROW (Wednesday) and Final Essay on all of To Kill a Mockingbird will be on Friday (May 26th). In order to prepare for the quiz, you should review your chapter questions and answers as well as the Do Nows from classwork. In order to prepare for the Final Essay, you should review all of the chapter questions from chapter 1-31. You will also receive a review sheet this week that will help you sufficiently prepare for the Final Essay (which will be counted as an in-class test--having double value). START PREPARING NOW!
  • Monday, May 22 1.) Do Now=Journal Entry #11: What Literature and Current Events Can Teach Us

    2.)Read aloud Chapter 27, focusing on the messages that the author, Harper Lee, is trying to teach us!

    2.) Answer the Chapter 27 Questions and find your 10 unknown words.

    3.) Work on HW.

  • Examine the author's purpose and lessons learned from the characters' maturation as explained in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • DUE WEDNESDAY:
  • Read the Chapters 28-31 packet and complete ALL of the chapter questions for 22-31.
  • Vocabulary for Chapters 27-31 (Chapters 29-31 Vocabulary--ONLY 5 words per chapter).
  • Final Quiz on Chapters 22-31 will be on Wednesday (May 24th) and Final Essay on all of To Kill a Mockingbird will be on Friday (May 26th). In order to prepare for the quiz, you should review your chapter questions and answers as well as the Do Nows from classwork. In order to prepare for the Final Essay, you should review all of the chapter questions from chapter 1-31. You will also receive a review sheet this week that will help you sufficiently prepare for the Final Essay (which will be counted as an in-class test--having double value). START PREPARING NOW!
  • Friday, May 19 1.) Do Now=Finish reading chapter 26, identifying 5 unknown words and answering the chapter 26 questions.

    2.) Discuss the reading above and review the questions/answers.

    2.) Share the news you read and what Americans can learn from current events happening around the world.

    3.) Introduce HW.

  • Examine the author's purpose and lessons learned from the characters' maturation as explained in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Finish the chapter questions for chapters 22-26.
  • Make up vocabulary for any previous chapters which you may owe.
  • If necessary, make up the news article assignment from yesterday's HW. Bring in the news article on Monday.
  • LOOKING AHEAD TO NEXT WEEK: Final Quiz on Chapters 22-31 will be on Wednesday (May 24th) and Final Essay on all of To Kill a Mockingbird will be on Friday (May 26th). In order to prepare for the quiz, you should review your chapter questions and answers as well as the Do Nows from classwork. In order to prepare for the Final Essay, you should review all of the chapter questions from chapter 1-31. You will also receive a review sheet next week that will help you sufficiently prepare for the Final Essay (which will be counted as an in-class test--having double value). START PREPARING NOW!
  • Thursday, May 18 1.) Do Now=Respond to the following statements and provide evidence from chapter 26 and previously read chapters in To Kill a Mockingbird:
  • All children grow up.
  • People should know international, national, and local current events.
  • Practice what you preach.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above and explain the statements' significance in terms of Chapter 26.

    2.) With a partner, answer Chapter 26 questions. Also, identify and define 5 unknown words.

    3.) Review the questions and vocabulary.

    4.) Introduce HW.

  • Examine the author's purpose and lessons learned from the characters' maturation as explained in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Read an article in a newspaper (use THE NEW YORK TIMES--use login: infotechnyc password: power) on an international (world) news event. Write a two paragraph response, which includes a summary of the article and a description of lessons learned and what Americans can do to apply the lessons learned.
  • Wednesday, May 17 1.) Do Now=Finish reading Chapter 25.

    2.) Answer the Chapter 25 questions. Also, identify and define 5 unknown words.

    3.) Review the questions and vocabulary.

    4.) Read Chapter 26.

  • Examine the differences between the court of public opinion and the court of law, as explained in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • DUE FRIDAY:
  • Read an article in a newspaper (use THE NEW YORK TIMES--use login: infotechnyc password: power) on an international (world) news event. Write a two paragraph response, which includes a summary of the article and a description of lessons learned and what Americans can do to apply the lessons learned.
  • Make up any HW owed--chapters 22-25 questions, vocabulary for chapters 22-25, and journal entry #10.
  • Tuesday, May 16 1.) Do Now=Read a neighbor's journal and identify at least one strength and one suggestion for improvement in his/her writing.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above.

    3.) Read Chapter 25 aloud, while also answering the Chapter 25 questions. Also, identify 5 unknown words.

  • Examine important themes and messages the author sends us, the readers, in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Make up any HW owed--chapters 22-24 questions, vocabulary for chapters 22-24, and journal entry #10.
  • Monday, May 15 1.) Do Now=Respond to the following statements and provide evidence from To Kill a Mockingbird: Women are natural comforters. Women enjoy storytelling. You can't live with women and you can't live without them.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above and explain the statements' significance in terms of Chapter 24.

    3.) Discuss Chapter 24, focusing on the Chapter 24 questions.

    4.) Begin HW Journal Entry #10: Women in Society--Then and Now

  • Examine perceptions and the role of women today and in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Journal Entry #10--Women in Society: Then and Now
  • Make up any homework for Chapters 1-24 Questions and vocabulary words for all chapters.
  • Friday, May 12 1.) Do Now: Finish discussing Chapter 23 Questions.

    2.) Read (silently) Chapter 24, identifying 10 unknown words and beginning to answer Chapter 24 questions.

  • To examine lessons learned from the characters and plot events in To Kill a Mockingbird and be able to apply them to our personal lives and society today.

  • Answer Chapter 24 Questions and define Chapter 24 unknown words.
  • Thursday, May 11 1.) Do Now: Finish reading Chapter 23 (silently) in To Kill a Mockingbird. Finish answering Chapter 23 questions. Show any homework owed.

    2.) Discuss Chapter 23 and Chapter 23 questions.

  • To examine lessons learned from the characters and plot events in To Kill a Mockingbird and be able to apply them to our personal lives and society today.

  • Make up any homework necessary for chapters 22 and 23.
  • Wednesday, May 10 1.) Do Now: Finish reading Chapter 23 (silently) in To Kill a Mockingbird. Begin answering Chapter 23 questions. Show your Chapter 23 vocabulary and yesterday's classwork notes--Chapter 22 questions.

    2.) Finish answering Chapter 23 questions with your table neighbors.

    3.) Review Chapter 23 questions as a class.

  • To examine lessons learned and characters' behaviors in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Make up any homework necessary for chapters 22 and 23.
  • Tuesday, May 9 1.) Do Now: Finish reading aloud Chapter 22 in To Kill a Mockingbird--discussing and taking notes on Chapter 22 questions.

    2.) Begin reading Chapter 23 (pp. 217-227) silently. Identify 10 unknown words and begin working on answering Chapter 23 questions.

  • To examine lessons learned and characters' behaviors in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Look up the definitions and parts of speech of your chosen 10 vocabulary words in chapter 23.
  • Monday, May 8 1.) Do Now: What important life lesson has Atticus taught his children? What important life lesson have you learned from a parent/grandparent/adult role model? Write in your notebook. Discuss with neighbor and whole class.

    2.) Read aloud Chapter 22 in To Kill a Mockingbird and discuss/take notes on chapter 22 questions.

    3.) Review To Kill a Mockingbird test--grading for multiple choice and essay.

  • To examine lessons learned and characters' behaviors in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Look up the definitions and parts of speech of the 10 assigned vocabulary words (given in class today) in chapter 22.
  • Friday, May 5 1.) Do Now: Finish creating "Jeopardy" questions for chapters 8-21.

    2.) Play "Jeopardy"!

    3.) To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 8-21 Quiz

    4.) Review Quiz.

  • To examine characterization, setting, symbolism, and conflicts in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • No HW due to the end of the marking period. Enjoy the weekend!
  • Thursday, May 4 1.) Do Now: Imagine you will be recognized as a hero in the world-famous Time Magazine in the year 2026 (20 years from now). Explain why you are bestowed this wonderful honor.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above with your table mates and the whole class. 3.) Finish discussing Chapters 18-21 Questions--take notes on answers.

    4.) Review for Chapters 8-21 Quiz tomorrow.

  • To examine the themes of "heroes" in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • QUIZ on CHAPTERS 8-21 TOMORROW. The best method of studying is reviewing the chapters 8-21 questions and understanding the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, language/speech, and other people's points of view) of main characters, setting, conflicts, and main events of the plot.
  • Make up any homework owed for chapters 1-21 in To Kill a Mockingbird--this includes vocabulary for each chapter, chapter questions, and journal entries #1-9. TOMORROW IS THE LAST DAY TO TURN IN ANY LATE HOMEWORK!
  • Wednesday, May 3 1.) Do Now: What words, phrases, and names come to mind as you consider "heroes" and "heroism"? Think not only of names, but also common nouns - perhaps synonyms or near - synonyms such as "courage" or places or objects that you associate with heroes and heroism. Are any figures from the past heroes to you? What about fictional figures as heroes? Or people who are not necessarily famous? People who are highly regarded by your parents, or by people in other times and cultures? What would be defined as "heroes" and "heroism" in To Kill a Mockingbird?

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above with your table mates and the whole class. 3.) Finish discussing Chapters 18-21 Questions--take notes on answers.

  • To examine the themes of "heroes" and "heroism" in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • QUIZ on CHAPTERS 8-21 on FRIDAY. The best method of studying is reviewing the chapters 8-21 questions and understanding the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, language/speech, and other people's points of view) of main characters, setting, conflicts, and main events of the plot.
  • Make up any homework owed for chapters 1-21 in To Kill a Mockingbird--this includes vocabulary for each chapter, chapter questions, and journal entries #1-9.
  • Tuesday, May 2 1.) Do Now: How do you feel about Mayella Ewell? Write at least one paragraph (4-7 sentences) explaining your feelings. Do NOT use any form of "I" (first person) in your writing. For example, "Mayella Ewell is a __________ person..." Discuss your writing with a neighbor and the class.

    2.) Discuss Journal Entry #9: Tom Robinson is innocent! 3.) Discuss Chapters 18-21 Questions--take notes on answers.

  • To examine evidence that supports Tom Robinson's innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Make up any homework owed for chapters 1-21 in To Kill a Mockingbird--this includes vocabulary for each chapter, chapter questions, and journal entries #1-9.
  • Monday, May 1 1.) Do Now: Read a neighbor's journal entry on "Tom Robinson is innocent!" Write post-it comments answering these questions: Did your neighbor write sufficient evidence supporting the topic? Did your neighbor grab your attention in the introduction? Did he/she organize the journal writing? Did he/she write a strong conclusion?

    2.) Share journal entries! 3.) Finish journal entry, if necessary.

    4.) Begin vocabulary HW.

  • To examine evidence that supports Tom Robinson's innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Define vocabulary for chapters 18-21 (10 words per chapter).
  • Make up any homework owed for chapters 1-17 in To Kill a Mockingbird--this includes vocabulary for each chapter, chapter questions, and journal entries.
  • Friday, April 28 Work Period
  • To examine lessons learned in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • DUE MONDAY: Read chapters 18-21. Circle 10 unknown words per chapter. Write Journal #9: Tom Robinson is innocent! Don't forget--it must be 250 words or more and focused on the topic!
  • Make up any homework owed for chapters 1-17 in To Kill a Mockingbird--this includes vocabulary for each chapter, chapter questions, and journal entries.
  • Thursday, April 27 1.) Do Now: Identify at least 3 themes (universal messages/lessons learned) in To Kill a Mockingbird.

    2.) Finish discussing Chapter 14-17 Questions--take notes and discuss.

    3.) Introduce chapters 18-21 (courtroom trial of Tom Robinson and the verdict!).

  • To examine lessons learned in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • DUE MONDAY: Read chapters 18-21. Circle 10 unknown words per chapter. Write Journal #9: Tom Robinson is innocent! Don't forget--it must be 250 words or more and focused on the topic!
  • Make up any homework owed for chapters 1-17 in To Kill a Mockingbird--this includes vocabulary for each chapter, chapter questions, and journal entries.
  • Wednesday, April 26 1.) Do Now: Read the following--At the jailhouse and in the courtroom, we see how Atticus tries to protect his children from the ugly realities of adult life. Atticus did not want his children to be in court, but they manage to see most of the trial. Do you think that it was good or bad for them to be there? Write Journal Entry #8--What Children Should Not Be Allowed to See. Write your opinions about what you think children should not be allowed to see. You may include whether you think it right for young people to be able to witness criminal trials, be exposed to violence, sex, inappropriate language, etc.

    2.) Discuss/Share journal entries with a partner and with the whole class. 3.) Finish discussing and taking notes on the questions for chapters 14-17 in To Kill a Mockingbird, examining evidence of kindness and cruelty.

  • To examine appropriate and inappropriate situations for children in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Make up any homework owed for chapters 1-17 in To Kill a Mockingbird--this includes vocabulary for each chapter, chapter questions, and journal entries.
  • Tuesday, April 25 1.) Do Now: Create a Venn Diagram or chart (by yourself or with partner) between the speaker of Sonnet 130 and a character of your choice from To Kill a Mockingbird.

    2.) Discuss the Venn/chart with the class.

    3.) Discuss questions for chapters 14-17 in To Kill a Mockingbird, examining evidence of kindness and cruelty.

  • To examine independent thinking and non-conforming behaviors in To Kill a Mockingbird and "Sonnet 130".

  • Look up definitions for vocabulary in chapters 14-17 in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Monday, April 24 1.) Do Now: Read Sonnet 130--Shakespeare's poem--to commemorate his birthday, April 23, 1564. Answer the following questions below:
  • Interpret the poem's purpose and meaning.
  • Describe the speaker's feelings.
  • Describe the speaker and explain what makes him unique/different.
  • Identify poetic techniques/terms.
  • Which characters in To Kill a Mockingbird are similar to the speaker?

    2.) Discuss the poem "Sonnet 130" and answers to the questions above.

    3.) Discuss chapters 14-17 in To Kill a Mockingbird, examining evidence of kindness and cruelty.

    4.) Begin answering questions for chapters 14-17

  • To examine independent thinking and non-conforming behaviors in To Kill a Mockingbird and "Sonnet 130".
  • FINISH the Vacation HW--due TOMORROW Tuesday, April 25th:
  • Finish reading the packet of chapters 14-17 (circle at least 10 unknown words for each chapter) and the corresponding Journal Entry #7: Acts of Kindness and Cruelty in Chapters 14-17 of To Kill a Mockingbird. HINT: Underline/Circle examples of kindness and cruelty in these chapters--this will make it easier to write your journal; you'll be able to refer back to the text quickly. In your journal entry, write evidence of acts of kindness and cruelty and write your opinions of the evidence in these chapters in the novel.
  • Wednesday April 12 1.) Do Now: Review/Summarize the first half of chapter 13--the characterization of Aunt Alexandra and her influence in Maycomb.

    2.) Finish reading chapter 13 aloud and answer chapter 13 questions as a class.

    3.) Introduce Vacation HW: Chapters 13-17 packet and Journal Entry #7--due Tuesday, April 25th.

  • To examine appropriate behaviors, language and family characteristics in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Vacation HW--due Tuesday, April 25th:
  • Read the packet of chapters 14-17 (circle at least 10 unknown words for each chapter) and the corresponding Journal Entry #7: Acts of Kindness and Cruelty in Chapters 14-17 of To Kill a Mockingbird. HINT: Underline/Circle examples of kindness and cruelty in these chapters--this will make it easier to write your journal; you'll be able to refer back to the text quickly. In your journal entry, write evidence of acts of kindness and cruelty and write your opinions of the evidence in these chapters in the novel.

    MAKE-UP HOMEWORK:

  • If you owe any homework, this is the time to do it--over your long vacation! Work on making up chapters 1-13 questions and vocabulary (10 unknown words per chapter--look up their definitions). If you owe any questions, vocabulary or advice poem, you MUST turn it in after vacation--Monday, April 24th.


  • ENJOY SOME MUCH NEEDED TIME OFF!
  • Tuesday April 11 1.) Do Now: How are you similar to your family members and previous generations (ancestry)? How are you different? Write in your notebook notes.

    2.) Share your Do Now with a neighbor and with the class.

    3.) Finish discussing chapters 11 and 12 questions and identify appropriate and inappropriate behaviors mentioned in these chapters--both in Maycomb County and in Calpurnia's church/neighborhood.

    4.) Read chapter 13 aloud. Answer the Chapter 13 Questions as a class. Why does Aunt Alexandra come to the Finch home? Why does she fit so well into the fabric of Maycomb County?

  • To examine appropriate behaviors, language and family characteristics in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • MAKE-UP HOMEWORK:
  • If you owe any homework, this is the night to do it! Work on making up chapters 1-12 questions and vocabulary (10 unknown words per chapter--look up their definitions). If you owe any questions, vocabulary, Vocabulary Story #1 (-10 points for each day late--it was due on Wednesday, April 5th!), or advice poem, turn it in ASAP.

    Vacation HW--due Tuesday, April 25th:

  • Begin working on your vacation HW: read the packet of chapters 14-17 and the corresponding Journal Entry #7: Acts of Kindness and Cruelty in Chapters 14-17 of To Kill a Mockingbird. Write evidence of acts of kindness and cruelty and write your opinions of the evidence in these chapters in the novel.

  • Monday April 10 1.) Do Now: Provide examples of inappropriate behavior in your town, neighborhood, and home. How would someone become an outcast in your town, neighborhood, and home? Write in your notebook notes.

    2.) Share your Do Now with a neighbor and with the class.

    3.) Discuss chapter 11 and 12 questions and identify appropriate and inappropriate behaviors mentioned in these chapters--both in Maycomb County and in Calpurnia's church/neighborhood.

    4.) Begin reading chapter 13 aloud. Why does Aunt Alexandra come to the Finch home? Why does she fit so well into the fabric of Maycomb County?

  • To examine appropriate behaviors and language in different settings in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • MAKE-UP HOMEWORK:
  • If you owe any homework, this is the night to do it! Work on making up chapters 1-12 questions and vocabulary (10 unknown words per chapter--look up their definitions). If you owe any questions, vocabulary, Vocabulary Story #1 (-10 points for each day late--it was due on Wednesday, April 5th!), or advice poem, turn it in ASAP.

  • Friday April 7 1.) Do Now: Identify at least two poetic sentences in To Kill a Mockingbird--poetic meaning using a poetic term, such as simile, metaphor, personification, irony or hyperbole.

    2.) Share your poetic sentence with a neighbor and with the class.

    3.) Finish reading chapter 11 in To Kill a Mockingbird--characterize Mrs. Dubose--her personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, and other people's POV, and explain Atticus' advice to Jem and Scout on how to react and deal with Mrs. Dubose.

    4.) Work on beginning to answer chapter 11 questions and identify chapter 11 vocabulary.

  • To examine characterization of Atticus and Mrs. Dubose--personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, and other people's points of view--in chapter 11 in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Read Chapter 12 and complete chapter 12 questions and vocabulary (10 unknown words--look up their definitions). If you owe any questions, vocabulary, Vocabulary Story #1 (-10 points for each day late--it was due on Wednesday!), or advice poem, turn it in ASAP.

  • Thursday April 6 1.) Do Now: Read a neighbor's Advice Poem and identify the two poetic devices used.

    2.) Sharing of Advice Poems from characters in To Kill a Mockingbird!

    3.) Finish reading chapter 11 in To Kill a Mockingbird--characterize Mrs. Dubose--her personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, and other people's POV, and explain Atticus' advice to Jem and Scout on how to react and deal with Mrs. Dubose.

    4.) Work on beginning to answer chapter 11 questions and identify chapter 11 vocabulary.

  • To examine characterization of Atticus and Mrs. Dubose--personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, and other people's points of view--in chapter 11 in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • If necessary, make up any late homework for chapters 1-11 questions and vocabulary, Vocabulary Story #1 (-10 points for each day late--it was due yesterday!), and advice poem.

  • Wednesday April 5 1.) Do Now: Read Marcus Garvey's "Keep it Cool"--an advice poem. Identify three poetic terms used in his poem. Discuss other poetic terms that the class knows. What kind of advice might Atticus give to kids today? What about other characters--Calpurnia, Miss Maudie, Jem, or Scout?

    2.) Read chapter 11 in To Kill a Mockingbird--characterize Mrs. Dubose--her personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, and other people's POV, and explain Atticus' advice to Jem and Scout on how to react and deal with Mrs. Dubose.

    3.) Introduce poetry HW.

  • To examine characterization--personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, and other people's points of view--in chapter 11 in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • WORK DUE TOMORROW:
  • Use at least 2 poetic devices in which you write an advice poem (advice from one character in TKAM to another) of 7 lines or more.
  • If necessary, make up any late homework for chapters 1-10 questions and vocabulary.

    VOCABULARY STORY #1--IT WAS DUE TODAY. SEE INSTRUCTIONS HANDOUT (GIVEN IN CLASS). FOR EACH DAY LATE, -10 POINTS.

  • Tuesday April 4 1.) Do Now: Reflection=Write at least one paragraph (4-7 sentences) about a time when a parent or close relative (brother, sister, aunt, uncle, or grandparent) made you proud. Explain what he/she accomplished and describe your reaction in detail. At this time, also show your HW questions and vocabulary for Chapters 8-10 and any work owed.

    2.) Review Chapters 9 and 10, focusing on the Chapters 9 and 10 Questions.

  • To examine characterization--personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, and other people's points of view--in chapters 9 and 10 in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • If necessary, make up any late homework for chapters 1-10 questions and vocabulary.

    VOCABULARY STORY #1--DUE TOMORROW--WEDNESDAY. SEE INSTRUCTIONS HANDOUT (GIVEN IN CLASS). FOR EACH DAY LATE, -10 POINTS.

  • Monday April 3 1.) Do Now: Work on your To Kill a Mockingbird Vocabulary Story. If you have completed your writing, then exchange with a neighbor and ask for critical feedback. Use the grading rubric Ms. Conn provided to analyze each other's writing. At this time, show your HW questions and vocabulary for Chapters 8-10 and any work owed.

    2.) Review Chapters 9 and 10, focusing on the Chapters 9 and 10 Questions.

  • To examine implied evidence of setting and characterization in chapters 9 and 10 in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • If necessary, make up any late homework for chapters 1-10 questions and vocabulary.

    VOCABULARY STORY #1--DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5TH. SEE INSTRUCTIONS HANDOUT (GIVEN IN CLASS)

  • Friday March 31 1.) Do Now: Read Chapters 9 and 10 (packet or your own copy of To Kill a Mockingbird). Search for answers to the Chapters 9 and 10 Questions as you read.

    2.) Work on finding your 10 unknown words for Chapter 9 and for Chapter 10.

    3.) Work on writing your Vocabulary Story #1 (it's due Wednesday!).

    3.)Make up any reading, questions, and/or vocabulary from previous chapters in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • To examine implied evidence of setting and characterization in chapters 9 and 10 in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • WORK DUE MONDAY:
  • Read Chapters 9 and 10 in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Answer Chapters 9 and 10 Questions in your notebook.
  • Find 10 unknown words for each chapter--chapter 9 and chapter 10--and look up their definitions. Please identify page number for each unknown word.
  • If necessary, make up any late homework for chapters 1-8 questions and vocabulary.

    VOCABULARY STORY #1--DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5TH. SEE INSTRUCTIONS HANDOUT (GIVEN IN CLASS)

  • Thursday March 30 1.) Do Now: Review Chapter 8 Questions and discuss Chapter 8 in To Kill a Mockingbird, focusing on the development of setting and the people of Maycomb County.

    2.) Introduce instructions for Vocabulary Story #1 and discuss the elements of parts of speech of nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs.

    3.)Begin reading chapter 9 HW, finding 10 unknown words.

  • To examine implied evidence of setting and characterization chapter 8 in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • ALL DUE MONDAY:
  • Read Chapters 9 and 10 packet for To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Answer Chapters 9 and 10 Questions in your notebook.
  • Find 10 unknown words for each chapter--chapter 9 and chapter 10--and look up their definitions. Please identify page number for each unknown word.
  • Make up any late homework for chapters 1-8 questions and vocabulary.

    VOCABULARY STORY #1--DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5TH. SEE INSTRUCTIONS HANDOUT (GIVEN IN CLASS)

  • Wednesday March 29 1.) Do Now: Answer Chapter 8 Questions for To Kill a Mockingbird.

    2.) Discuss Chapter 8 Questions and Answers, focusing on development of setting and the people of Maycomb County.

    3.) If time allows, discuss the elements of parts of speech of nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. Begin vocabulary HW.

  • To examine implied evidence of setting and characterization chapter 8 in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Look up the definitions of your chosen 10 unknown words in chapter 8 of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Tuesday March 28 1.) Do Now: Discuss instructions for today's chapters 1-7 exam on To Kill a Mockingbird.

    2.) TEST ON CHAPTERS 1-7

  • To evaluate understanding and application of literary ideas presented chapters 1-7 in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Read chapter 8 packet. Underline and take notes in the margin on different characters' proper and improper behavior.
  • Identify 10 unknown words in the reading.
  • Monday March 27 1.)Do Now: Guidance Counselor, Ms. Becker, visits to speak about the high school experience and acquisition of credits.

    2.) Review components of upcoming test on chapters 1-7.

  • To analyze themes and literary elements in chapters 1-7 in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • HW due TOMORROW: Finish reading chapters 1-7 in To Kill a Mockingbird. Complete chapters 1-7 questions. Identify and define 10 unknown words for each chapter for chapters 1-7. Study the questions and answers, literary element flashcards, and themes in chapters 1-7-- YOU WILL NEED TO KNOW ALL OF THIS INFORMATION FOR THE TEST ON CHAPTERS 1-7 TOMORROW.
  • Friday March 24 1.)Do Now: Finish finding 10 unknown words for each chapter of chapters 1-7. Review literary element definitions for the upcoming test.

    2.) Review components of upcoming test on chapters 1-7.

    3.) If time remains, read chapter 7 and work on answering chapter 7 questions.

  • To analyze and apply literary elements to a classic text, To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • HW due Tuesday: Finish reading chapters 1-7 in To Kill a Mockingbird. Complete chapters 1-7 questions. Identify and define 10 unknown words for each chapter for chapters 1-7. Study the questions and answers, literary element flashcards, and themes in chapters 1-7-- YOU WILL NEED TO KNOW ALL OF THIS INFORMATION FOR THE TEST ON CHAPTERS 1-7 ON TUESDAY.
  • Thursday March 23 1.)Do Now: Compare and make any changes to your literary element flashcards.
    While working on the "Do Now," Ms. Conn will check the following homework=chapter 5 vocabulary definitions and any work owed.

    2.) Discuss the opinion statements and determine themes in the beginning chapters of To Kill a Mockingbird.

    3.) Read-aloud Chapter 6 in To Kill a Mockingbird. Identify ten unknown words and begin to answer the chapter 6 questions.

  • To analyze the use of language and behavior to depict settings (time period and place), which helps elucidate the language and behavior of the setting in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • HW due Tuesday: Finish reading chapters 1-7 in To Kill a Mockingbird. Complete chapters 1-7 questions. Study the questions and answers, literary element flashcards, and themes in chapters 1-7--TEST ON CHAPTERS 1-7 ON TUESDAY.
  • Wednesday March 22 1.)Do Now: Respond to the statements you are given and be ready to share your personal thoughts and connections to To Kill a Mockingbird.
    While working on the "Do Now," Ms. Conn will check the following homework=literary element flashcards owed, chapters 1-4 questions and answers, Journal Entry #6, and 40 unknown words and definitions from chapters 1-4.

    2.) Read-aloud Chapter 5 in To Kill a Mockingbird. Identify ten unknown words and begin to answer the chapter 5 questions.

    4.) If time remains, begin to look up the definitions for chapter 5 unknown words and answer the chapter 5 questions.

  • To analyze the use of language and behavior to depict settings (time period and place), which helps elucidate the language and behavior of the setting in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Look up the definitions of your ten chosen unknown words in chapter 5.
  • Tuesday March 21 1.)Do Now: Silently finish reading chapter 4 of To Kill a Mockingbird. Identify 10 unknown words. Begin working on answering the Chapter 4 Questions.
    While working on the "Do Now," Ms. Conn will check the following homework=literary element flashcards owed, chapters 1-3 questions and answers, Journal Entry #6, and 30 unknown words and definitions from chapters 1-3.

    2.) Discuss the chapter 4 questions and answers.

    4.) If time remains, begin to look up the definitions for chapter 4 unknown words.

  • To analyze the use of appropriate language and behavior to depict settings (time period and place), which helps elucidate the language in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Finish Chapter 4 Questions in your notes.
  • Look up the definitions of your ten chosen unknown words in chapter 4.
  • Monday March 20 1.)Do Now: Think of words and phrases you and your generation commonly use that older generations don't use (such as generational slang words for car, money, house or clothing or even different expressions over time for interjections such as gee whiz, right on, etc.). For each word, identify a parallel word or phrase that older generations used in the past or even still today. Next, work in small groups to develop at least two sentences of dialogue that make use of words peculiar to YOUR generation, and two or more sentences of dialogue - preferably but not necessarily on the same subject - as spoken by people from another generation. Keep the language of each dialogue appropriate to the speakers in their own time period. [Skilled authors attempt to portray speech patterns and vocabulary that reflect the language of the times and the environments in which the characters live. To ascribe words or language styles that are historically or culturally inaccurate for the characters in a work would be a literary flaw.] While working on the "Do Now," Ms. Conn will check the following homework=literary element flashcards owed, chapters 1-3 questions and answers, Journal Entry #6, and 30 unknown words and definitions from chapters 1-3.

    2.) Discuss the evolution of language, by sharing the generational words/phrases.

    3.) Read aloud Chapter 4 in To Kill a Mockingbird, focusing on styles of language appropriate to the setting, such as "yonder," "hush," "reckon," "yawl," "wallows," the use of "sir" when speaking to Atticus, and racial epithets.

    4.) If time remains, review/Discuss the literary element vocabulary (Antagonist, characterization, climax, conflict, figurative language, foreshadowing, irony, mood, plot (events of the plot=initial incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution), point of view, protagonist, setting, symbolism, theme, tone, and tragic flaw) and examples in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • To analyze the use of appropriate language to depict settings (time period and place), which helps elucidate the language in To Kill a Mockingbird,
  • MAKE-UP HOMEWORK (if necessary):
  • Look up the definitions for the 30 unknown words you have found in To Kill a Mockingbird--10 words from each chapter. You may want to use Online Dictionary or Merriam-Webster Dictionary.
  • Finish answering Chapters 1-3 Questions for To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Journal #6 (250 words or more): First Impressions of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Literary Element Flaschards for the following literary element vocabulary (Antagonist, characterization, climax, conflict, figurative language, foreshadowing, irony, mood, plot (events of the plot=initial incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution), point of view, protagonist, setting, symbolism, theme, tone, and tragic flaw. Use this LITERARY ELEMENT LINK. You must follow these directions for flashcards: On the front (unlined), write the word, part of speech and create a picture that reminds you of the word. On the back, you must write the definition in your own words and write an original sentence OR identify an example from a novel you have read.
  • Friday March 17 1.)Do Now: Journal Entry #6: First Impressions of To Kill a Mockingbird. Writing Suggestions: Write about your first impressions of the characters, the setting, the writing style, the author's purpose in writing, the meaning of the title, and your predictions. If necessary, finish silently reading up to and including chapter 3 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

    2.) Discuss/Share Journal Entry #6.

    3.) Review/Discuss the literary element vocabulary (Antagonist, characterization, climax, conflict, figurative language, foreshadowing, irony, mood, plot (events of the plot=initial incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution), point of view, protagonist, setting, symbolism, theme, tone, and tragic flaw) and examples in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • To determine the key components necessary in order to understand the theme of "acting responsibly."
  • To introduce the characte and literary elements in chapters 1-3 in To Kill a Mockingbird and present evidence that supports the theme of "acting responsibly."

  • Finish looking up the definitions for the 30 unknown words you have found in To Kill a Mockingbird--10 words from each chapter. You may want to use Online Dictionary or Merriam-Webster Dictionary.
  • Finish answering Chapters 1-3 Questions for To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Finish today's classwork--Journal #6 (250 words or more): First Impressions of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Thursday March 16 1.)Do Now: Silently read up to and including chapter 3 of To Kill a Mockingbird.
    *As you read, do the following:
  • Find 10 unknown words--write these words in your vocabulary section of your notebook and include the page #.
  • Begin to answer the following questions (if you do not finish, don't worry--we will discuss them):
    A.) Which characters inform Scout about proper behavior? How do these characters tell her to act?
    B.) What is Walter Cunningham like? What does his behaviour during lunch suggest about his home life?
    C.) Describe Miss Caroline's interactions with Burris Ewell. What does this suggest about Miss Caroline? What does this suggest about the Ewells?
    D.) What do you think of the way Atticus treats Walter?
    E.) Does Scout learn anything from Walter's visit? What do you think this is?
    F.) Atticus says that you never really understand a person £�ntil you climb into his skin and walk around in it￾� What does this mean? What does this lesson suggest about Atticus? Is it an easy thing for Scout to learn?

    2.) Review/Discuss Chapter 3.

    3.) If time permits, review/Discuss the literary element vocabulary (Antagonist, characterization, climax, conflict, figurative language, foreshadowing, irony, mood, plot (events of the plot=initial incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution), point of view, protagonist, setting, symbolism, theme, tone, and tragic flaw) and examples in To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • To determine the key components necessary in order to understand the theme of "acting responsibly."
  • To introduce the characters' behaviors in chapter three in To Kill a Mockingbird and present evidence that supports the theme of "acting responsibly."

  • Look up the definitions for the 30 unknown words you have found in To Kill a Mockingbird--10 words from each chapter. You may want to use Online Dictionary or Merriam-Webster Dictionary. If you don't finish tonight, it's OK. Though, you will be overwhelmed in the near future so I suggest you get working on this vocabulary homework in a timely fashion.
  • Wednesday March 15 1.)Do Now: Silently finish reading chapter 1 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

    2.) Review/Summarize the intro. of chapter 1.

    3.) Read aloud chapter 2 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

    4.) Discuss and write with a partner: Who can people trust in Maycomb, Alabama? Think of your impressions of Dill, Calpurnia, Jem, the narrator, Atticus, the Radleys, Miss Stephanie Crawford, and Miss Caroline Fisher.


  • What behaviors are acceptable in the community? What behaviors are not acceptable in the community?
    *The questions above should be answered with real evidence from chapters 1 and 2.

  • To determine the key components necessary in order to understand the theme of "acting responsibly."
  • To introduce the initial incident of the novel To Kill a Mockingbird and present evidence that supports the theme of "acting responsibly."

  • Look up the definitions for the 10 unknown words you identified in Chapter One and the 10 unknown words you identified in Chapter Two. You may want to use Online Dictionary or Merriam-Webster Dictionary.
  • Finish answering the following questions: Who can people trust in Maycomb, Alabama? Examine why or why not the following people are likable and trustworthy. Dill, Calpurnia, Jem, the narrator, Atticus, the Radleys, Miss Stephanie Crawford, and Miss Caroline Fisher. What behaviors are acceptable in the Maycomb community, like in the Maycomb neighborhoods and schools? What behaviors are not acceptable in the community?

    *You may expect to see these questions on an upcoming pop quiz.

  • Tuesday March 14 1.)Do Now: In chapter 1, scan for unknown words and look up their definitions. Keep a vocabulary section for To Kill a Mockingbird.

    2.) Review/Summarize the intro. of chapter 1.

    3.) Read aloud chapter 1 and chapter 2 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Who can people trust in Maycomb, Alabama? Think of your impressions of Dill, Calpurnia, Jem, the narrator, Atticus, the Radleys, Miss Stephanie Crawford, and Miss Caroline Fisher.

  • What behaviors are acceptable in the community? What behaviors are not acceptable in the community?
    *The questions above will be answered with real evidence from chapters 1 and 2.

  • To determine the key components necessary in order to understand the theme of "acting responsibly."
  • To introduce the initial incident of the novel To Kill a Mockingbird and present evidence that supports the theme.

  • Finish answering in-class questions. You may expect to see these questions on an upcoming pop quiz.
  • Monday March 13 1.)Do Now: What does it mean to "act responsibly?" Explain what a person needs to do in order to "act responsibly" in the 1930's in Maycomb, Alabama. Discuss with a neighbor and write down your answers. Show your Literary Elements flashcards while you're working.

    2.) Discuss the questions above.

    3.) Read aloud chapter 1 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • What should people know before they can "act responsibly" in a society?
  • What are some essential family values and family history that have shaped the people in this community?
  • What behaviors are acceptable in the community? What behaviors are not acceptable in the community?
    *The questions above will be answered with real evidence from chapter 1.

    4.) If time permits, review literary elements flashcard homework.

  • To determine the key components necessary in order to understand the theme of "acting responsibly."
  • To introduce the initial incident of the novel To Kill a Mockingbird and present evidence that supports the theme.

  • Provide additional information and examples to your flashcards for the following literary elements discussed in class on Friday, March 10: Antagonist, characterization, climax, conflict, figurative language, foreshadowing, irony, mood, plot (events of the plot=initial incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution), point of view, protagonist, setting, symbolism, theme, tone, and tragic flaw. Use this LITERARY ELEMENT LINK. You must follow these directions for flashcards: On the front (unlined), write the word, part of speech and create a picture that reminds you of the word. On the back, you must write the definition in your own words and identify an example from a novel.
  • Friday March 10 1.)Do Now: Interview of a Novel= Interview the front cover, back cover, and introductory pages, and then answer the questions below (answer each question in a complete sentence).
  • Look at the cover of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee--What do you notice? What can you predict about the plot, characters, setting, and any other details about the book from the detailed illustration, the color choices, the title, etc.? What do you think of when you see or hear the word "mockingbird?" How do you define it? What do you visualize? What do you feel about the word? What do you associate or connect with the word?
  • Examine the text: Scan the text in the book and look at the size of the print, font, and story length. Are there any difficult words in this book? If so, what are they? Write your initial thoughts of the book's text.
  • First Impressions: What are your first impressions of this book--do you think you'll like it? Why/Why not?

    2.) Discussion of the Interview Process: Let's discuss the Interview of To Kill a Mockingbird. What predictions can you make about the text?

    3.) Introduction of Literary Elements: Introduce these literary terms' definitions and discuss examples=antagonist, characterization, climax, conflict, figurative language, foreshadowing, irony, mood, plot (events of the plot=initial incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution), point of view, protagonist, setting, symbolism, theme, tone, and tragic flaw.

  • To determine literary techniques and elements an author implements to express his/her message of the story.

  • Create flashcards for the chosen literary elements discussed in class today--use this LITERARY ELEMENT LINK. You must follow these directions for flashcards: On the front (unlined), write the word, part of speech and create a picture that reminds you of the word. On the back, you must write the definition in your own words and identify an example from a novel.
  • If you owe any homework (journal entries, post-its, index cards, book review), you must turn it in this week! If you still need to make up the vocabulary quiz, you must do so this week!
  • Thursday March 9 1.)Do Now: Finish Speech Presentations
    2.) Journal Entry #5: My Favorite Time in History. Describe your favorite time in history and explain why you prefer this time. Discuss with class.
    3.) When finished, complete the calculation of your Book Review Presentation grade, based on the class evaluations.
    To explore both oral and written expression.
    To reflect on personal opinions about history.

  • Read about the author HARPER LEE--the author of our upcoming novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Identify THREE important facts that are essential to know about this author before reading her book.
  • Return your historical novels to the in-class library.
  • If you owe any homework (journal entries, post-its, index cards, book review), you must turn it in this week! If you still need to make up the vocabulary quiz, you must do so this week!
  • Wednesday March 8 1.)Do Now: Finish Speech Presentations
    2.) Pop Quiz on Class Notes contained in binder and journal entries
    3.) Calculate your Book Review Presentation grade, based on the class evaluations
    To assess presentations of book reviews.
    To explore both oral and written expression.
    To reflect on personal opinions about history.

  • Return historical novels to in-class library.
  • If you owe any homework (journal entries, post-its, index cards, book review), you must turn it in this week! If you still need to make up the vocabulary quiz, you must do so this week!
  • Tuesday March 7 1.) Do Now: Review Speech Evaluation Criteria
    2.) Speech Presentations
    3.) Reflections and Evaluations
    To assess presentations of book reviews.
    To explore both oral and written expression.
  • For those who have not yet presented, practice your Book Review speeches.
  • Return historical novels to in-class library.
  • If you owe any homework (journal entries, post-its, index cards, book review), you must turn it in this week! If you still need to make up the vocabulary quiz, you must do so this week!
  • Monday March 6 1.) Do Now: Review Speech Evaluation Criteria
    2.) Speech Presentations
    3.) Reflections and Evaluations
    To assess presentations of book reviews.
    To explore both oral and written expression.
  • For those who have not yet presented, practice your Book Review speeches.
  • Return historical novels to in-class library.
  • If you owe any homework (journal entries, post-its, index cards, book review), you must turn it in this week! If you still need to make up the vocabulary quiz, you must do so this week!