Freshman English Assignments, Fall-Winter Semester, 2017-2018

Freshman English Assignments
Fall-Winter Semester, 2017-2018

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Friday, January 19th, 2018: 1. Do Now: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer.

2. Reflections: What did you learn about Odysseus from The Odyssey? Refer to Odysseus' character traits and evidence from the film. How are his character traits comparable and contrasting to the protagonist in your independent novel?

Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we identify the characterization of Odysseus as a hero on his journey in the film Odyssey? Good luck on any Regents Exams! I hope you improved your reading, writing and vocabulary skills, and I hope you achieved your goals this semester! In the week ahead, when you have free time, read a good book, newspapers, magazines, online news (www.nytimes.com, www.cnn.com, www.wsj.com, and more), and exercise your mind and body. Stretch your limits! See you next semester!
    Thursday, January 18th, 2018: 1. Do Now: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer.

    2. Reflections: What did you learn about Odysseus from The Odyssey? Refer to Odysseus' character traits and evidence from the film. How are his character traits comparable and contrasting to the protagonist in your independent novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we identify the characterization of Odysseus as a hero on his journey in the film Odyssey? Good luck on any Regents Exams! I hope you improved your reading, writing and vocabulary skills, and I hope you achieved your goals this semester! In the week ahead, when you have free time, read a good book, newspapers, magazines, online news (www.nytimes.com, www.cnn.com, www.wsj.com, and more), and exercise your mind and body. Stretch your limits! See you next semester!
    Wednesday, January 17th, 2018: 1. Do Now: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer. (If there are students who still need to finish the FINAL EXAM, then they will do so at this time.

    2. Work Period: Fill out the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' characterization, which includes his Speech, Thoughts, Effects on others, Actions and Looks (STEAL=mnemonic device (method of memorizing)) that make him a hero. This is due by the end of class today!

    3. Reflections: What did you learn about Odysseus from The Odyssey? Refer to Odysseus' character traits and evidence from the film. How are his character traits comparable and contrasting to the protagonist in your independent novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we identify the characterization of Odysseus as a hero on his journey in the film Odyssey? Good luck on any Regents Exams! I hope you improved your reading, writing and vocabulary skills, and I hope you achieved your goals this semester! In the week ahead, when you have free time, read a good book, newspapers, magazines, online news (www.nytimes.com, www.cnn.com, www.wsj.com, and more), and exercise your mind and body. Stretch your limits! See you next semester!
    Tuesday, January 16th, 2018: 1. Do Now: View the film version of "The Odyssey" by Homer. (If there are students who still need to finish the FINAL EXAM, then they will do so in another classroom)

    2. Work Period: Fill out the Character Map for Odysseus, the hero of this Epic Poem from Ancient Greece (around 1200 B.C.E.). Focus on finding evidence to support Odysseus' characterization, which includes his Speech, Thoughts, Effects on others, Actions and Looks (STEAL=mnemonic device (method of memorizing)) that make him a hero. This is due by the end of class tomorrow.

    3. Reflections: What did you learn about Odysseus from The Odyssey? Refer to Odysseus' character traits and evidence from the film. How are his character traits comparable and contrasting to the protagonist in your independent novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we identify the characterization of Odysseus as a hero on his journey in the film Odyssey? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17th:
  • MAKE UP ALL OWED WORK! It's the last day of the semester, so all owed work must be turned in by 3pm, TOMORROW, Wednesday, January 17th (no exceptions!).
  • Friday, January 12th, 2018: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Literary Terms (10 minutes)

    2. FINISH FINAL EXAM (reading passages, answering multiple-choice questions and finish writing the argumentative essay)

    3. Make up owed work.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we finish writing an argumentative essay on the FINAL EXAM and assess our literary term skills? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17th:
  • MAKE UP ALL OWED WORK! It's the last day of the semester, so all owed work must be turned in by 3pm on Wednesday, January 17th (no exceptions!).
  • Thursday, January 11th, 2018: 1. Do Now: Final Exam reminder instructions and distribution

    Show HW: Show the rewrite of a journey paper (highlight corrections and provide the original paper, edited by the teacher)

    2. FINAL EXAM (reading passages, answering multiple-choice questions and continuing to write the argumentative essay)

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we read passages, answer multiple-choice questions and continue writing an argumentative essay on the FINAL EXAM? FINAL EXAM will finish TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12th: Review the strategies below. It will include reading comprehension passages, multiple-choice questions, and an argumentative essay. You just have to put forth your best effort. This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. REVIEW THE ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY OUTLINE

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12th:


  • ESSENTIAL LITERARY TERMS QUIZ. STUDY the definitions and examples. It will be multiple-choice. Bring a #2 pencil. This will be 20% of the 3rd marking period. Here's a review puzzle for tomorrow's quiz (just for fun!).
  • Wednesday, January 10th, 2018: 1. Do Now: Final Exam reminder instructions and distribution

    2. FINAL EXAM (reading passages, answering multiple-choice questions and continuing to write the argumentative essay)

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we read passages, answer multiple-choice questions and continue writing an argumentative essay on the FINAL EXAM? FINAL EXAM will finish TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 10th: Review the strategies below. It will include reading comprehension passages, multiple-choice questions, and an essay. You just have to put forth your best effort. This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. Here are strategies for success:
    Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:

    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages.
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Argumentative Essay:

  • ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY OUTLINE

    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 11th:

  • REWRITE a journey response paper. You must correct the teacher's edits. You must bring in the original paper (with the teacher's edits) and the rewrite. You must highlight (underline or bold in a different color) the corrections.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 12th:


  • ESSENTIAL LITERARY TERMS QUIZ. Know the definitions and examples. This will be 20% of the 3rd marking period.
  • Tuesday, January 9th, 2018: 1. Do Now: Final Exam instructions and distribution

    2. FINAL EXAM (reading passages, preparing to write the argumentative essay, and beginning to write the argumentative essay)

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we read passages and begin writing an argumentative essay on the FINAL EXAM? FINAL EXAM will continue TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10th: Review the strategies below. It will include reading comprehension passages, multiple-choice questions, and an essay. You just have to put forth your best effort. This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. Here are strategies for success:
    Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:

    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages.
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Argumentative Essay:

    1.) Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2.) Read the passages, focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3.) Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from the passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4.) Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 11th:

  • REWRITE a journey response paper. You must correct the teacher's edits. You must bring in the original paper (with the teacher's edits) and the rewrite. You must highlight (underline or bold in a different color) the corrections.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 12th:


  • ESSENTIAL LITERARY TERMS QUIZ. Know the definitions and examples. This will be 20% of the 3rd marking period.
  • Monday, January 8th, 2018: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer.
  • Do you believe that a person is more influenced by their own experiences or by other people's opinions? Explain.
  • How is a person influenced by their own experiences?
  • How is a person influenced by other people's opinions?

    Show HW: flashcards for Essential Literary Terms

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now. New captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Discuss and take notes on strategies for success on an argumentative essay, reading passages, and multiple-choice questions. Provide a review sheet for the Final Exam.

    3. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners , building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare for reading passages, answering multiple-choice questions and writing an argumentative essay on tomorrow's FINAL EXAM? FINAL EXAM will be TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9th-WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10th: You do not need to study for this exam. It will include reading comprehension passages, multiple-choice questions, and an essay. You just have to put forth your best effort. This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. Here are strategies for success:
    Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:

    1.) Preview the questions AND circle/underline key words in the questions before reading the passages.
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Argumentative Essay:

    1.) Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2.) Read the passages, focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3.) Create a formal/informal outline of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) for your essay that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from the passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement.
    4.) Write your essay of 5 paragraphs that focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Follow and expand on #3 above. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 11th:

  • REWRITE a journey response paper. You must correct the teacher's edits. You must bring in the original paper (with the teacher's edits) and the rewrite. You must highlight (underline or bold in a different color) the corrections.

    DATE CHANGE: THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 12th:


  • ESSENTIAL LITERARY TERMS QUIZ. Know the definitions and examples. This will be 20% of the 3rd marking period.
  • Friday, January 5th, 2018: 1. Do Now: Using the Essential Literary Terms Handout, answer one of the following questions.
  • In all your years (at least 9 years!) of reading, which literary term has the most influence in literature (books, short stories, etc.) and why?
  • Which literary term has the most influence in your novel and why?

    Turn in HW: Journey Response Paper #3 (for your independent novel)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Read aloud Essential Literary Terms Handout.

    3. Work Period: Make up owed HW.

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners , building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively understand essential literary terms and apply them to literature? IF YOU CAN'T COME TO SCHOOL BECAUSE OF THE WEATHER CONDITIONS, YOU NEED TO E-MAIL ME THE ASSIGNMENT BY THE TIME OF YOUR ENGLISH CLASS PERIOD (for example; the Journey Response Paper #3 is due today, Friday, January 5th; so if you want to earn on-time credit, you MUST e-mail me on time). MY E-MAIL IS HCONN@SCHOOLS.NYC.GOV.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, JANUARY 8th:

  • Compose flashcards for Essential Literary Terms. Write each literary term on the front of each card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list) on the back of each card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    FINAL EXAM will be on TUESDAY, JANUARY 9th-WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10th: You do not need to study for this exam. It will include reading comprehension passages, multiple-choice questions, and an essay. You just have to put forth your best effort. Strategies for success will be provided in class on Monday. This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period.

    DATE CHANGE: NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 12th:


  • ESSENTIAL LITERARY TERMS QUIZ. Know the definitions and examples. This will be 20% of the 3rd marking period.
  • Wednesday, January 3rd, 2018: 1. Do Now: Using the Five Criteria for Creating a Mission Statement, Google's Mission Statement, Facebook's Mission Statement, and Starbucks' Mission Statement as guides, answer one of the following questions.
  • What is your personal mission statement for your life?
  • If you were to create a company, what would it be and what would be the mission statement?

    Turn in HW: Journey Response Paper #2 (for your independent novel)

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period/Book Club: Arrange in your book club with classmates who have chosen the same novel. Answer the following questions as a group. Finish all of the questions today and turn in for classwork credit! Book Club Roles: Recorder, Discussion Leader, and Researcher(s). You will answer the following questions in your Book Club. Cite textual evidence (page numbers and quotes) to support each question.
    1.) What do you believe is your novel's mission statement? Create it. Use Google's Mission Statement, Facebook's Mission Statement, and Starbucks' Mission Statement as guides.
    2.) What do you believe is one character's mission statement in your novel? Consider the character's speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and/or looks.
    3.) What is another character's mission statement? Consider the character's speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and/or looks.

    4. Reflections: Why are mission statements necessary? What did we achieve by examining mission statements and creating them for our novels and for ourselves?

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners , building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we create mission statements for our independent novels and for ourselves? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 5th, 2018:
  • FINISH your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #3: IF YOU CAN'T COME TO SCHOOL BECAUSE OF THE WEATHER CONDITIONS, YOU NEED TO E-MAIL ME THE ASSIGNMENT BY THE TIME OF YOUR ENGLISH CLASS PERIOD. MY E-MAIL IS HCONN@SCHOOLS.NYC.GOV. Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey resolved in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are resolved that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY resolved in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you've finished the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey resolved at the end of the novel.

    DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 8th:

  • Compose flashcards for Essential Literary Terms. Write each literary term on the front of each card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list) on the back of each card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    FINAL EXAM IS TUESDAY, JANUARY 9th-WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10th: You do not need to study for this exam. It will include reading comprehension passages, multiple-choice questions, and an essay. You just have to put forth your best effort. Strategies for success will be provided in class on Monday. This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period.

    DATE CHANGE: NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 12th:


  • ESSENTIAL LITERARY TERMS QUIZ. Know the definitions and examples. This will be 20% of the 3rd marking period.
  • Tuesday, January 2nd, 2018: 1. Do Now: Read Five Criteria for Creating a Mission Statement. Choose one of the questions to answer.
  • What is Google's Mission Statement and do you think Google achieves its mission? Explain.
  • What is Facebook's Mission Statement and do you think Facebook achieves its mission? Explain.
  • What is Starbucks' Mission Statement and do you think Starbucks achieves its mission? Explain.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now. New captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class. Consider these questions: What do the Google, Facebook and Starbucks mission statements have in common? What are contrasts among these mission statements?

    3. Work Period/Book Club: Arrange in your book club with classmates who have chosen the same novel. Answer the following questions as a group. Begin today and turn it in tomorrow for classwork credit! Book Club Roles: Recorder, Discussion Leader, and Researcher(s). You will answer the following questions in your Book Club. Cite textual evidence (page numbers and quotes) to support each question.
    1.) What do you believe is your novel's mission statement? Create it. Use Google's Mission Statement, Facebook's Mission Statement, and Starbucks' Mission Statement as guides.
    2.) What do you believe is one character's mission statement in your novel? Consider the character's speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and/or looks.
    3.) What is another character's mission statement? Consider the character's speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and/or looks.

    4. Reflections: Why are mission statements necessary? What did we achieve by examining mission statements and creating them for our novels?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners , building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we analyze companies' mission statements and create mission statements for our independent novels? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2018:
  • Read a minimum of 100 pages in your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #2: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey developed in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are developed that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY developed in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey being developed throughout the novel.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 5th, 2018:

  • FINISH your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #3: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey resolved in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are resolved that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY resolved in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey resolved at the end of the novel.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, JANUARY 8th: Essential Literary Terms Quiz. Know the definitions and examples. This will be 20% of the 3rd marking period.

    Final Exam (the week of January 8th-12th): This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. More details coming soon!

  • Friday, December 22nd, 2017: 1. Do Now: What is the author's lesson to the readers in your novel?

    Turn in owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now. New captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period/Book Club: Arrange in yesterday's book club with classmates who have chosen the same novel. Answer the following questions as a group. Finish today and turn in for classwork credit! Book Club Roles: Recorder, Discussion Leader, and Researcher(s). You will answer the following questions in your Book Club. Cite textual evidence (page numbers and quotes) for each question.
    1.) How are you experiencing the novel? Are you engaged (enjoying/interested) in the novel? Explain. How do you feel reading the novel--amused, sad, disturbed, confused, bored, or another feeling?
    2.) Describe the characterization of the main characters--speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and looks (mnemonic device=STEAL). Why do the characters do what they do? Describe the interactions between characters (in families and friendship). Do you admire or disapprove of the characters? Do they remind you of people you know?
    3.) Discuss the plot--main events of the story. Are the events engaging (interesting)? Is the novel a page-turner? Are you surprised by any of the events? Explain. Do you find the plot predictable? Explain.
    4.) What passages strike you as insightful (thoughtful)? Are there any powerful passages that make you think about your own life?
    5.) Has the novel changed you or taught you anything new? Have you been exposed to different ideas about people or a certain part of the world?

    4. If there's time, we will do the Acts of Kindness Activity.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners , building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we analyze literary devices and plot development in the introductory pages of a novel? Happy Holidays! Enjoy vacation, and we'll see each other next year--2018!

    DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2018:

  • Read a minimum of 100 pages in your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #2: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey developed in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are developed that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY developed in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey being developed throughout the novel.

    DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 5th, 2018:

  • FINISH your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #3: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey resolved in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are resolved that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY resolved in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey resolved at the end of the novel.

    Final Exam (the week of January 8th-12th): This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. More details coming soon!

  • Thursday, December 21st, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the questions to answer.
  • DOK 2: How would you classify (categorize, put in a genre) your novel?
  • DOK 3: How would you elaborate (explain in detail) the reason that the author wrote your novel?
  • DOK 4: What would you want to research from your novel and why? You should consider the historical background, setting, or the author's other choices.

    Turn in today's HW: Journey Response Paper #1

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now. New captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period/Book Club: Arrange in a book club with classmates who have chosen the same novel. Answer the following questions as a group. Choose a Recorder, Discussion Leader, and Researcher(s). You will answer the following questions in your Book Club. Cite textual evidence (page numbers and quotes) for each question.
    1.) How are you experiencing the novel? Are you engaged (enjoying/interested) in the novel? Explain. How do you feel reading the novel--amused, sad, disturbed, confused, bored, or another feeling?
    2.) Describe the characterization of the main characters--speech, traits, thoughts, effects on others, actions, and looks (mnemonic device=STEAL). Why do the characters do what they do? Describe the interactions between characters (in families and friendship). Do you admire or disapprove of the characters? Do they remind you of people you know?
    3.) Discuss the plot--main events of the story. Are the events engaging (interesting)? Is the novel a page-turner? Are you surprised by any of the events? Explain. Do you find the plot predictable? Explain.
    4.) What passages strike you as insightful (thoughtful)? Are there any powerful passages that make you think about your own life?
    5.) Has the novel changed you or taught you anything new? Have you been exposed to different ideas about people or a certain part of the world?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners , building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we analyze literary devices and plot development in the introductory pages of a novel? DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2018:
  • Read a minimum of 100 pages in your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #2: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey developed in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are developed that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY developed in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey being developed throughout the novel.

    DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 5th, 2018:

  • FINISH your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #3: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey resolved in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are resolved that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY resolved in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey resolved at the end of the novel.

    Final Exam (the week of January 8th-12th): This exam will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. More details coming soon!

  • Wednesday, December 20th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read the Author Research Handout. Access your designated computer.

    Turn in owed HW.

    2.Work Period: Complete the Author Research Handout. Turn it in. If you're done early, work on HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.5: Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text.
  • RI.9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details.
  • How can we conduct online research on the authors of our independent novels? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
  • Read a minimum of 30 pages in your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #1: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey introduced in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are introduced that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY introduced in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey being introduced in the novel.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2018:

  • Read a minimum of 100 pages in your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #2: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey developed in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are developed that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY developed in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey being developed throughout the novel.

    DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 5th, 2018:

  • Finish your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #3: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey resolved in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are resolved that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY resolved in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey resolved at the end of the novel.
  • Tuesday, December 19th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the questions to answer.
  • What kind of journey have you taken in the past or hope to take in the future?
  • How can a journey transform you?

    Pick up your chosen book, taken from these selections:

  • Night
  • Enrique's Journey
  • Finding Miracles
  • Chinese Cinderella

    Turn in owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now. New captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Arrange in a book club with classmates who have chosen the same novel. Answer the following questions as a group. Everyone needs to write the answers. You may need to read the first page of the novel.
    1.) Characterization: How is the protagonist characterized (describe at least two of the following: his/her appearance, actions, thoughts, feelings, personality traits, and other people's opinions)?
    2.) Conflict: What conflicts may arise? Will there be internal conflicts (man vs. self) and external conflicts (man vs. man, man vs. group, man vs. nature)?
    3.) Setting: What is the setting (time period and location)? Will there be multiple settings?
    4.) Symbolism: Are there any objects that represent something else that's important?
    5.) Author's tone: What's the author's tone (positive or negative feeling) toward the characters, plot, or setting?
    6.) Central Idea of Journey: What kind of journey do you believe the protagonist will be experiencing--a physical journey or a spiritual journey? What leads you to this answer? How do you predict the protagonist will transform from this journey?

    4. Work Period Discussion: Volunteers from each book club will share their answers.

    5. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • How can we analyze literary devices in the introductory pages of a novel? DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
  • Read a minimum of 30 pages in your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #1: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey introduced in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are introduced that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY introduced in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey being introduced in the novel.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2018:

  • Read a minimum of 100 pages in your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #2: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey developed in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are developed that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY developed in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey being developed throughout the novel.

    DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 5th, 2018:

  • Finish your independent novel.
  • Journey Response Paper #3: Write a one-page, typed (double-spaced) paper OR a two-page, handwritten (single-spaced) paper on the following Essential Question: What is the journey resolved in your novel? Include at least some answers to Supporting Questions, which include the following: Is it a physical journey or spiritual journey? Which characters are on this journey and how are they characterized? What conflicts are resolved that may challenge the journey? How does the setting influence the journey? Are there objects or people that symbolize (or represent) something important on the journey? What's the author's tone (positive or negative feelings) toward the journey? You may add additional insights, reflections, opinions, quotes from the novel (a maximum of two sentences, with page numbers), and more, as long as you FOCUS ON THE JOURNEY resolved in the novel. You may write in first person. Your job is to prove that you're reading the novel and connecting to the main idea of journey resolved at the end of the novel.
  • Monday, December 18th, 2017: 1. Do Now: How do you rank the following independent novel choices and why?
  • Night
  • Enrique's Journey
  • Finding Miracles
  • Chinese Cinderella

    *Turn it in!

    Turn in HW: "Humans of New York" Handout (which was provided in class)

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now. New captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: How can you predict the central idea of journey will be revealed in each of the novels (see the Do Now)? How can you define these Frequently Used Literary Devices? Write the answers in your LA section.

  • Characterization
  • Conflict
  • Setting
  • Symbolism
  • Author's tone

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • How can we choose an independent novel and prepare to analyze the central idea of journey throughout a novel? Make up owed HW: See previous days' assignments.
    Friday, December 15th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read the News Analysis Handout (you will need to go to "ABC News"). Access your designated computer.

    Show HW: well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the journey you've created for the subject of your picture.

    2. Work Period: Complete the News Analysis Handout. Turn it in for classwork credit. Work on HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, determining which details are emphasized in each account.
  • W.9-10.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • RI.9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we analyze news stories and people in NY around the world overcoming adversities? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 18th:
  • Complete the "Humans of New York" Handout (which was provided in class). You will need to go to "Humans of New York" Webpage.
  • Thursday, December 14th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer.
  • Why do you believe the "Humans of New York" project (which features street portraits and interviews on the streets of NY) has been so popular for the past 7 years?
  • What do you believe is the purpose of "Humans of New York" project (which features street portraits and interviews on the streets of NY)?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review the answers to "A Quilt of a Country" Exam.

    3. Work Period: Choose one of the "Humans of New York" pics, and write the person's story in a well-developed paragraph (a minimum of 10-12 sentences). Answer these questions in your story: What's this person's journey? What are their motives for going on a journey? What's their setting (time period and home residence)? What conflicts/struggles are they experiencing on this journey? What do they want to learn or need to learn on this journey? What are their observations and experiences on this journey? What's the climax (turning point) on their journey? How does this person's journey end? Are there lessons learned and goals achieved?

    4. Work Period Sharing: Volunteers will share their "Humans of New York" stories.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, determining which details are emphasized in each account.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we begin our journey unit by writing creative stories based off of "Humans of New York"? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15th: Take a candid (honest, not posed) photo of someone on the subway/bus. Use the "Humans of New York" as a guide. Write a well-developed paragraph (a minimum of 10-12 sentences) about this person's journey. Answer these questions in your story: What's this person's journey? What are their motives for going on a journey? What's their setting (time period and home residence)? What conflicts/struggles are they experiencing on this journey? What do they want to learn or need to learn on this journey? What are their observations and experiences on this journey? What's the climax (turning point) on their journey? How does this person's journey end? Are there lessons learned and goals achieved? Use one of these sentence starters:
  • It all started with...
  • Sometimes it's hard not to...
  • When I came home...
  • The Queen has arrived..
  • My journey began when...
  • Wednesday, December 13th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following quotes. Interpret it in your own words. Explain why you agree or disagree.
  • "Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome." --Arthur Ashe
  • ďThe only journey is the one within.Ē --Rainer Maria Rilke

    Show HW: 10 questions/answers on the "Journey" unit

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Share the answers to the HW questions:
    1.) What is a journey? Look up the definition using an electronic device.
    2.) What kind of people go on journeys?
    3.) What is achieved on a journey?
    4.) What are motivations for a journey?
    5.) What are observations and experiences on a journey?
    6.) What are personal reflections/insights on a journey?
    7.) Compare/Contrast a spiritual journey and a physical journey.
    8.) What is an example of a literary journey from a novel?
    9.) What are potential adversities (struggles/challenges) on a journey?
    10.) Who are three people that you know (relatives, friends, celebrities, characters in a movie or a novel) that have experienced a journey? Explain their journeys (one sentence per person).

    3. Work Period: In your new groups for today, answer the following questions in your LA section. Here are some Images from "Humans of New York". What is the journey of one of these people? Discuss at the table. Write a long, sophisticated quote (like the first quote from the Do Now) of 15 words or more for each image. Include vocabulary from "The Gettysburg Address" Vocab. List, Academic Vocabulary, and Seedfolks Vocabulary. Here are some sentence starters:

  • It all started with...
  • Sometimes it's hard not to...
  • When I came home...
  • The Queen has arrived..
  • My journey began when...

    4. Work Period Sharing: Each group will share their creative journey quotes.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, determining which details are emphasized in each account.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we begin our journey unit by examining personal questions, quotes and images from "Humans of New York"? Make up owed HW: see previous days' assignments.
    Tuesday, December 12th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Puzzle on "A Quilt of a Country"

    2. Exam on "A Quilt of a Country"

    3. Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, determining which details are emphasized in each account.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we be assessed on "A Quilt of a Country" and prepare for our journey unit? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13th:
    We are beginning a JOURNEY UNIT. Answer the following questions in complete sentences:
    1.) What is a journey? Look up the definition using an electronic device.
    2.) What kind of people go on journeys?
    3.) What is achieved on a journey?
    4.) What are motivations for a journey?
    5.) What are observations and experiences on a journey?
    6.) What are personal reflections/insights on a journey?
    7.) Compare/Contrast a spiritual journey and a physical journey.
    8.) What is an example of a literary journey from a novel?
    9.) What are potential adversities (struggles/challenges) on a journey?
    10.) Who are three people that you know (relatives, friends, celebrities, characters in a movie or a novel) that have experienced a journey? Explain their journeys (one sentence per person).
    Monday, December 11th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Fill out the Goal Sheet for the 3rd marking period. (Be ready to share your #1 goal that you want to work on achieving for this final marking period of the 1st semester)

    2. Discuss/Share: New captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Puzzle on "A Quilt of a Country"

    4. Review puzzle answers

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, determining which details are emphasized in each account.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we set goals for the 3rd marking period and prepare for an exam on "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
  • EXAM on "A Quilt of a Country" (page 3 in the textbook). It will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. You can use this Review Sheet to guide you. It will be multiple-choice questions. Bring your own #2 pencil.
  • Friday, December 8th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the questions to answer. (1-2 sentences per answer)
  • What was an interesting or surprising fact that you discovered on yesterday's newspaper front pages?
  • Besides times of tragedy, when do people unite with others and why?

    Show HW: Argumentative Essay Rewrite

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Compose TWO multiple-choice questions for "A Quilt of a Country" (pp. 3-8 in Collections textbook). Each question must have 4 answer choices. Circle the correct answer. Turn it in for classwork credit.

    4. Human Bingo

    5. Lottery for Homework Passes

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, determining which details are emphasized in each account.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we find worldly and personal connections to "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
  • EXAM on "A Quilt of a Country" (page 3 in the textbook). It will be about 20% of the 3rd marking period. You can use this Review Sheet to guide you. It will be multiple-choice questions. Bring your own #2 pencil.
  • Thursday, December 7th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read the Current Events Handout (you will need to go to the Newseum's Front Pages. Access your designated computer. Access a copy of a Map of the Regions of the U.S. to guide you in today's assignment.

    2. Work Period: Complete the Current Events Handout. Turn it in for classwork credit.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, determining which details are emphasized in each account.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we connect "A Quilt of a Country" to today's current events around the U.S.? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • REWRITE the Argumentative Essay. You must make the corrections that I included on your essay. You must highlight the corrections (underline or highlight in a different color). You must bring in the original essay and the rewrite to earn credit. You may show your rewrite on an electronic device in class or e-mail the rewrite, though you MUST have the original essay (with the teacher's edits) in class to earn credit.
  • Wednesday, December 6th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the questions to answer. (1-2 sentences per answer)
  • If you were going to create a quilt of your neighborhood, what would you include and why?
  • Why do you believe this article is called "Quilt of a Country"?

    Show owed HW: today is the last day of the 2nd marking period

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    2. Work Period:
    In your new groups, turn to the questions for "A Quilt of a Country" (page 7 in the textbook). Fill in the blanks.
    1.) What is Anna Quindlen's (the author) claim in "A Quilt of a Country"? Anna Quindlen claims that the U.S. is an idea/concept that __________despite the fact that it ______________. It is unique because the U.S. ________________even though other countries with similar challenges _________________.
    2.) In lines 7-8, what does Anna Quindlen mean when she describes America as being "like the crazy quilts that have been one of its great folk-art forms"? She states that America is made up of different pieces that do not ______________ each other, yet are stitched together to make a ________________.
    3.) What counterclaim does Quindlen offer in paragraph 3? Her counterclaim is that the U.S. ____________ more than it _________________.
    4.) In paragraph 4, Quindlen uses parallelism and repetition. What words does she repeat? What is the effect of this repetition? What is the _________of...? The effect of this repetition is the power of cultural ______________ and the ______________America faces when trying to create a unified country.
    5.) What specific words and phrases does Quindlen repeat in the introduction and conclusion? How do these words and phrases support her argument? She repeats the phrases _____________nation and ________________ idea. She supports her argument that America includes ____________people and manages to ___________alongside each other.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Review the work period answers. Copy the answers in your LA section.

    4. Argumentative Essay returns

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the author's argument in "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • REWRITE the Argumentative Essay. You must make the corrections that I included on your essay. You must highlight the corrections (underline or highlight in a different color). You must bring in the original essay and the rewrite to earn credit.
  • Tuesday, December 5th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the questions to answer. (1-2 sentences per answer)
  • Do you believe America would be better if we divided into separate nations (like the north and the south)? Explain your answer
  • What's another tragic/challenging time in history (like 9/11) when diverse people have united against an enemy?

    Show HW: Show your photo essay HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    2. Read-Aloud/Take Notes in the LA section:

  • Continue reading (read-aloud as a class) the news article, "A Quilt of a Country" (page 3 in the textbook).
  • Take summary notes (fill in the blank). Arrange into table groups based on the popsicle sticks.
    Paragraph 7: Today's immigrants are not so ________________ from the immigrants of the past because all of them worked hard and their kids are successful. The only thing that has changed is their _____________________.
    Paragraph 8: During tragic times, like 9/11, people tend to have a sense of national pride, which is called____________________. Even though America was an improbable idea, it has become a __________________.

    3. Review the answers to "The Gettysburg Address" Exam.

    4. HW Reminder.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively summarize the concluding paragraphs of "A Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed HW (the LAST day of the 2nd marking period is TOMORROW, Wednesday, December 6th during class period only)
    Monday, December 4th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the questions to answer.
  • What do you believe is great about America?
  • How are Americans alike and different?

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    2. Read-Aloud/Take Notes in the LA section:

  • Continue reading (read-aloud as a class) the news article, "A Quilt of a Country" (page 3 in the textbook).
  • Take summary notes (fill in the blank). Arrange into table groups based on the popsicle sticks.
    Paragraph 5: Diverse people have united against ________________ during devastating times. Though there's been concern that individuals' race/ethnicity would surpass ___________________.
    Paragraph 6: The U.S. is _________________because it embraces _________________ people.

    3. HW Reminder. See student sample.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively summarize each paragraph of "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5th:
    PHOTO ESSAY (Value: THREE Homework Assignments). You will take photos, and use those photos to substitute for words.
    1.) Take 7 photographs of your neighborhood (you may include people, like your family and friends, stores, landmarks, and anything that represents your neighborhood). One photo should be negative (which will represent your counterclaim), and all the other photos will be positive.
    2.) First Photo (Introduction): This will be considered your introduction photo. You must include a thesis statement (THIS IS THE ONLY SENTENCE YOU WILL WRITE) about your neighborhood and three reasons to support your thesis. You MUST write it. For example, if you are talking about the food in your neighborhood, your thesis could be the following: Everyone should try the food in Flushing because there are so many diverse options, it's affordable and you can find stores everywhere.
    3.) Second Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #1): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the first reason supporting your thesis.
    4.) Third Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #2): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the second reason supporting your thesis.
    5.) Fourth Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #3): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the third reason supporting your thesis.
    6.) Fifth and Sixth Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #4): This photo is the counterclaim and rebuttal. This photo will show a negative stereotype about your neighborhood. You will then explain why this counterclaim is false with a rebuttal photo (which is positive).
    7.) Seventh Photo (Conclusion): What is the final thought and connection back to your thesis? Prove it with a photo that captures your neighborhood. How does your neighborhood fit into a quilt of NYC?

    *See an exemplary classmate's photo essay: Thesis statement: Everyone should come to Astoria because there are good transportation opportunities like bike paths, buses, and ferry services.

  • Photo #1
  • Photo #2
  • Photo #3
  • Photo #4
  • Photo #5
  • Photo #6
  • Photo #7

    Make up owed HW (the LAST day of the 2nd marking period is THIS Wednesday, December 6th)

  • Friday, December 1st, 2017: 1. Do Now: What is your interpretation of the following statement: "all men are created equal, though everyone knows that most men consider themselves better than someone" (Anna Quindlen)? Explain in your own words. (This quote was taken from the first paragraph of "Quilt of a Country")

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    2. Read-Aloud/Take Notes in the LA section:

  • Continue reading (read-aloud as a class) the news article, "A Quilt of a Country".
  • Take summary notes (fill in the blank):
    Paragraph 1: America shouldn't _________because we have____________. America is created like a __________.
    Paragraph 2: America has many stories of ______________against ________________, so it's shocking that we can create ___________________.
    Paragraph 3: America has conflict between _____________________and ___________________. People segregate themselves based on ___________________.
    Paragraph 4: Even though we have conflict based on ___________ and _______________, we stay _______________.

    3. Introduce HW. What main idea/theme could you focus on for your neighborhood? Some suggestions are the following: food, sports, music, games, etc.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively identify the key elements of "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE THIS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5th:
    PHOTO ESSAY (Value: THREE Homework Assignments). You will take photos, and use those photos to substitute for words.
    1.) Take 7 photographs of your neighborhood (you may include people, like your family and friends, stores, landmarks, and anything that represents your neighborhood). One photo should be negative (which will represent your counterclaim), and all the other photos will be positive.
    2.) First Photo (Introduction): This will be considered your introduction photo. You must include a thesis statement (THIS IS THE ONLY SENTENCE YOU WILL WRITE) about your neighborhood and three reasons to support your thesis. You MUST write it. For example, if you are talking about the food in your neighborhood, your thesis could be the following: Everyone should try the food in Flushing because there are so many diverse options, it's affordable and you can find stores everywhere.
    3.) Second Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #1): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the first reason supporting your thesis.
    4.) Third Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #2): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the second reason supporting your thesis.
    5.) Fourth Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #3): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the third reason supporting your thesis.
    6.) Fifth and Sixth Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #4): This photo is the counterclaim and rebuttal. This photo will show a negative stereotype about your neighborhood. You will then explain why this counterclaim is false with a rebuttal photo (which is positive).
    7.) Seventh Photo (Conclusion): What is the final thought and connection back to your thesis? Prove it with a photo that captures your neighborhood. How does your neighborhood fit into a quilt of NYC?

    *See an exemplary classmate's photo essay: Thesis statement: Everyone should come to Astoria because there are good transportation opportunities like bike paths, buses, and ferry services.

  • Photo #1
  • Photo #2
  • Photo #3
  • Photo #4
  • Photo #5
  • Photo #6
  • Photo #7

    Make up owed HW (the LAST day of the 2nd marking period is Wednesday, December 6th)

  • Thursday, November 30th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read the Photo Analysis Handout. Access your designated computer.

    2. Work Period:

  • Go to the Collections at the Museum of the City of New York and search for Mel Rosenthal. Complete the Photo Analysis Handout. Turn it in for classwork credit.
  • If you're done with the handout, then do the following: write an argumentative essay question about the photo you analyzed today. Begin your question with "Should." Here's an example: Should a man be judged by the content of his old childhood bedroom?

    3. Introduce HW. What main idea/theme could you focus on for your neighborhood? Some suggestions are the following: food, sports, music, games, etc.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we analyze the significance of photos that represent a quilt of NYC? DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5th:
    PHOTO ESSAY (Value: THREE Homework Assignments):
    1.) Take 7 photographs of your neighborhood (you may include people, like your family and friends, stores, landmarks, and anything that represents your neighborhood). One photo should be negative (which will represent your counterclaim), and all the other photos will be positive.
    2.) First Photo (Introduction): This will be considered your introduction photo. You must include a thesis statement about your neighborhood and three reasons to support your thesis. You MUST write it. For example, if you are talking about the food in your neighborhood, your thesis could be the following: Everyone should try the food in Flushing because there are so many diverse options, it's affordable and you can find stores everywhere.
    3.) Second Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #1): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the first reason supporting your thesis.
    4.) Third Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #2): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the second reason supporting your thesis.
    5.) Fourth Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #3): This photo should elaborate (explain in detail) the third reason supporting your thesis.
    6.) Fifth and Sixth Photo (equivalent to Body Paragraph #4): This photo is the counterclaim and rebuttal. This photo will show a negative stereotype about your neighborhood. You will then explain why this counterclaim is false with a rebuttal photo (which is positive).
    7.) Seventh Photo (Conclusion): What is the final thought and connection back to your thesis? Prove it with a photo that captures your neighborhood. How does your neighborhood fit into a quilt of NYC?

    Make up owed HW (the LAST day of the 2nd marking period is Wednesday, December 6th)

    Wednesday, November 29th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Fill out the scantron for "The Gettysburg Address" Exam.

    Show owed HW

    2. Work Period:

  • "The Gettysburg Address" Exam
  • In your LA section, write "Quilt of a Country" by Anna Quindlen. Then write the following questions and answer them.
    A.) Briefly explain the meaning of QUILT. (You may use an electronic device or your prior knowledge to define the word.)
    B.) What do you think the title, "QUILT OF A COUNTRY", means?
    C.) What can you predict about a news article with that title that is dated September 26, 2001?
    D.) Begin reading the first paragraph of "Quilt of a Country". What are active reading strategies that good readers do when encountering this kind of challenging text?

    3. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates, discussing one of the questions above (A, B, or C). Captains will share their answers with the whole class.

    4. Whole-Class Discussion: Read the first paragraph of "Quilt of a Country". Annotate, identify and define vocabulary, and understand the author's purpose.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we be assessed on "The Gettysburg Address" and begin to infer the content of the article, "Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed HW
    Tuesday, November 28th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer.
  • What do you believe is another important message that Lincoln should have added to "The Gettysburg Address"?
  • What kind of address should an orator deliver today in 2017?

    Show HW: Vocabulary Story on Unity/Isolation

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and share with your table mates. Captains will check to see that their table mates have completed the Do Now. Captains from each table will report their table mates' answers to the whole class.
  • Volunteers may share excerpts from their vocabulary stories.

    3. Work Period:
    "The Gettysburg Address" Review Puzzle

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" in history and prepare for our exam? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:
    EXAM on "The Gettysburg Address": The exam will be about 20% of your 2nd marking period grade and it will only have multiple-choice questions (bring in your own #2 pencil). It will test you on the following:
  • "The Gettysburg Address" (its 154th anniversary was recently) HISTORY, especially the states that were supporting or negating (going against) slavery, the number of lives lost during the Civil War, and the 13th Amendment to the U.S. constitution (that followed "The Gettysburg Address" a few years later).
  • Purposes of the speech (as a eulogy to the victims at the Battle of Gettysburg and restoring the nation after war)
  • Historical background (the Civil War)
  • Lincoln's brief message (which was not the keynote, or main, address)
  • Speech's American ideals (equality among people, unity, sacrifice, and liberty)
  • Meaning of "Four score and seven years ago" (the number of years and the significance of the historical time period)
  • Date of the speech (when it was delivered)
  • Use of parallelism ("we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow" and "of the people, by the people and for the people")
  • Monday, November 27th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer.
  • Why would teenagers in the 1860's (from Lincoln's time period) wish to trade places with you?
  • How can you simplify Lincoln's "The Gettysburg Address" in 20 words or less?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and share with your table mates. Captains will check to see that their table mates have completed the Do Now. Captains from each table will report their table mates' answers to the whole class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Create two multiple-choice questions for "The Gettysburg Address" Exam (each question should have four answer choices; circle the correct answer; explain your reason for the correct answer and include textual evidence). Turn the questions and answers in for classwork credit. You will earn 5 extra credit points on your test if your questions are chosen for the test.
  • Begin HW.

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" in history and prepare for our exam? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY on the following question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You can choose to write a non-fiction or creative story on the question above. Your story must include 10 of the words taken from the Vocabulary from "The Gettysburg Address". You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story on how and why people unite or isolate themselves (you can refer to the texts we've studied in class so far--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," and Seedfolks). You may want to write a non-fiction story about your friends, family or teenagers (in general) uniting or isolating themselves. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about unity or isolation of characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you can e-mail me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov before class time on Tuesday, November 28th to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                              Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                                    Date
    Assignment: Vocabulary Story
          
                       Should People Unite or Isolate Themselves? 
    
    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:
    EXAM on "The Gettysburg Address": The exam will be about 20% of your 2nd marking period grade and it will only have multiple-choice questions (bring in your own #2 pencil). It will test you on the following:
  • "The Gettysburg Address" (its 154th anniversary was recently) HISTORY, especially the states that were supporting or negating (going against) slavery, the number of lives lost during the Civil War, and the 13th Amendment to the U.S. constitution (that followed "The Gettysburg Address" a few years later).
  • Purposes of the speech (as a eulogy to the victims at the Battle of Gettysburg and restoring the nation after war)
  • Historical background (the Civil War)
  • Lincoln's brief message (which was not the keynote, or main, address)
  • Speech's American ideals (equality among people, unity, sacrifice, and liberty)
  • Meaning of "Four score and seven years ago" (the number of years and the significance of the historical time period)
  • Date of the speech (when it was delivered)
  • Use of parallelism ("we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow" and "of the people, by the people and for the people")
  • Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer.
  • What do you believe Abraham Lincoln would be grateful for at the time of "The Gettysburg Address"?
  • Why are you grateful that you live in your time period and location (as opposed to Lincoln's)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will check to see that their table mates have completed the Do Now. Captains from each table will report their table mates' answers to the whole class.

    3. Mini-Lesson: Finish writing annotations for "The Gettysburg Address" in your LA section of your notebook. Your annotations will be summarizing notes (connect the notes to each paragraph).

    4. Question & Answer Review: Discuss and take notes (in your LA section) on the questions on p. 30 in the The Collections Textbook.

    5. Lottery for Free Homework Passes

    6. HW Reminder

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.3: Evaluate a speakerís point of view, reasoning and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
  • How can we understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" in history and within the context of our semester's theme of common ground? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY on the following question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You can choose to write a non-fiction or creative story on the question above. Your story must include 10 of the words taken from the Vocabulary from "The Gettysburg Address". You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story on how and why people unite or isolate themselves (you can refer to the texts we've studied in class so far--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," and Seedfolks). You may want to write a non-fiction story about your friends, family or teenagers (in general) uniting or isolating themselves. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about unity or isolation of characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you can e-mail me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov before class time on Tuesday, November 28th to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                              Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                                    Date
    Assignment: Vocabulary Story
          
                       Should People Unite or Isolate Themselves? 
    

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:
    EXAM on "The Gettysburg Address": The exam will be about 20% of the 2nd marking period grade and it will have multiple-choice questions (bring in your own #2 pencil). It will test you on the following:

  • "The Gettysburg Address" (its 154th anniversary was recently) HISTORY, especially the states that were supporting and negating (going against) slavery, the number of lives lost during the Civil War, and the 13th Amendment to the U.S. constitution (that followed "The Gettysburg Address" a few years later).
  • Purposes of the speech (as a eulogy to the victims at the Battle of Gettysburg and restoring the nation after war)
  • Historical background (the Civil War)
  • Lincoln's brief message (which was not the keynote, or main, address)
  • Speech's American ideals (equality among people, unity, sacrifice, and liberty)
  • Meaning of "Four score and seven years ago" (the number of years and the significance of the historical time period)
  • Date of the speech (when it was delivered)
  • Use of parallelism ("we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow" and "of the people, by the people and for the people")
  • Tuesday, November 21st, 2017: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary from "The Gettysburg Address"

    2. Work Period: Begin reading "The Gettysburg Address" on p. 27 in the Collections textbook and begin answering the questions following the speech on p. 30.

    3. Reading/Listening of "The Gettysburg Address": It can be found on (pp. 27-28 in Collections Textbook) and audio version of "The Gettysburg Address" (on teacher tube). What are your first impressions of this speech? Why do you think this speech goes down as Lincoln's most important speech and one of the most famous American speeches?

    4. Mini-Lesson: Annotate "The Gettysburg Address" in your LA section of your notebook. Your annotations will be summarizing notes (connect the notes to each paragraph).

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.3: Evaluate a speakerís point of view, reasoning and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
  • How can we understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" in history and within the context of our semester's theme of common ground? DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY on the following question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You can choose to write a non-fiction or creative story on the question above. Your story must include 10 of the words taken from the Vocabulary from "The Gettysburg Address". You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story on how and why people unite or isolate themselves (you can refer to the texts we've studied in class so far--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," and Seedfolks). You may want to write a non-fiction story about your friends, family or teenagers (in general) uniting or isolating themselves. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about unity or isolation of characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you can e-mail me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov before class time on Tuesday, November 28th to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                              Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                                    Date
    Assignment: Vocabulary Story
          
                       Should People Unite or Isolate Themselves? 
    
  • Monday, November 20th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe speeches can be so powerful?

    Show HW: Vocabulary Flashcards

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will check to see that their table mates have completed the Do Now. Captains from each table will report to the class that their table mates have completed the Do Now task.

    3. Mini-Lesson: Share the history of "The Gettysburg Address" (its 154th anniversary was yesterday), which can be found here. Focus on the following:

  • the purpose of the speech (as a eulogy to the victims at the Battle of Gettysburg)
  • the historical background (the Civil War had just ended)
  • Lincoln's brief message (which was not the keynote address)
  • the speech's American ideals (equality among people, sacrifice, and liberty)

    4. Reading/Listening of "The Gettysburg Address": It can be found on (pp. 27-28 in Collections Textbook) and audio version of "The Gettysburg Address" (on teacher tube). What are your first impressions of this speech? Why do you think this speech goes down as Lincoln's most important speech and one of the most famous American speeches?

    5. Work Period: Begin the textbook questions following the speech on p. 30 in the Collections textbook.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.3: Evaluate a speakerís point of view, reasoning and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
  • How can we understand the significance of "The Gettysburg Address" in history and within the context of our semester's theme of common ground? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary from "The Gettysburg Address". You MUST know the definitions for each vocabulary word and how to compose each word in a sentence. This quiz grade will be 10% of the 2nd marking period.
  • Friday, November 17th, 2017: 1. Do Now: What are the thesis statements for todayís presenters? (See the chalkboard and copy the thesis statements in your Argumentative Speech Evaluation)

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will check to see that their table mates have completed the Do Now. Captains from each table will report to the class that their table mates have completed the Do Now task.

    3. Public Speaking Presentations: All remaining speakers MUST present today. All essays must be turned in today!

    4. Introduce Vocabulary HW

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.3: Evaluate a speakerís point of view, reasoning and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
  • How can we present our argumentative essays and evaluate our peers on content analysis, textual evidence and delivery? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • Compose flashcards for Vocabulary from "The Gettysburg Address". Create on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary from "The Gettysburg Address". You MUST know the definitions for each vocabulary word and how to compose each word in a sentence. This quiz grade will be 10% of the 2nd marking period.
  • Thursday, November 16th, 2017: 1. Do Now: What are the thesis statements for todayís presenters? (See the chalkboard and copy the thesis statements in your Argumentative Speech Evaluation)

    2. Discuss/Share: Captains will check to see that their table mates have completed the Do Now. Captains from each table will report to the class that their table mates have completed the Do Now task.

    3. Public Speaking Presentations: Speakers scheduled for today will present. Any students who owe presentations will present if time remains.

    4. Exit Ticket: Did any content (information) from the argumentative speeches change your opinion? Explain your answer. Provide textual evidence, and analyze that textual evidence in connection to the answer.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.3: Evaluate a speakerís point of view, reasoning and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
  • How can we present our argumentative essays and evaluate our peers on content analysis, textual evidence and delivery? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17th: If you have not presented your speech yet, will have one last opportunity to present your Argumentative Essay/Speech. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Checklist Rubric for 10% of your 2nd marking period grade and Speech Delivery Rubric for another 10% of your 2nd marking period grade. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Ms. Sarlin, English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary from Academic Vocabulary and Seedfolks Vocabulary. THE LAST DAY YOU CAN PRESENT AND TURN IN YOUR ESSAY WILL BE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17th (with deducted points)!
    Wednesday, November 15th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Fill out the thesis statements for the presenters in the Argumentative Speech Evaluation.

    2. Public Speaking Presentations: Speakers scheduled for today will present. Extra credit for presenters who will present early.

    3. Reflections: Q & A: After speech presentations, student volunteers will have the opportunity to ask questions to the student speakers. Volunteers will use the DOK question stems to ask questions, with a focus on DOK 2 and DOK 3. Suggested questions include the following: How would these speeches help other people? How would you apply what you learned in these speeches to your life? How would you describe the importance of speech delivery? What would happen if you presented your speech to other people?

    4. Work Period: Make up owed HW, show owed HW and practice for upcoming presentations.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task. SL.9-10.6.Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we effectively present our argumentative essay and public speaking skills? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16th: This is 20% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay/Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E; Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Checklist Rubric for 10% and Speech Delivery Rubric for 10%. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Ms. Sarlin, English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary from Academic Vocabulary and Seedfolks Vocabulary. If you don't present on your assigned date, you will earn -10 points off for each day late. THE LAST DAY YOU CAN PRESENT AND TURN IN YOUR ESSAY WILL BE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17th (with deducted points)! EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: If you present your speech early (not the day you're required), then you can earn +10 points on your speech presentation grade (if time allows!).
    Tuesday, November 14th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Fill out the thesis statements for the presenters in the Argumentative Speech Evaluation.

    2. Public Speaking Presentations: Speakers scheduled for today will present. Extra credit for presenters who will present early.

    3. Reflections: Q & A: After speech presentations, student volunteers will have the opportunity to ask questions to the student speakers. Volunteers will use the DOK question stems to ask questions, with a focus on DOK 2 and DOK 3. Suggested questions include the following: How would you summarize your speech's message? How would you apply what you learned in writing this argumentative speech to another writing assignment? How would you describe the sequence (order) of your writing process? What would happen if you wrote another argumentative speech?

    4. Work Period: Make up owed HW, show owed HW and practice for upcoming presentations.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task. SL.9-10.6.Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we effectively present our argumentative essay and public speaking skills? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15th/THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16th: This is 20% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay/Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E; Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Checklist Rubric for 10% and Speech Delivery Rubric for 10%. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Ms. Sarlin, English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary from Academic Vocabulary and Seedfolks Vocabulary. If you don't present on your assigned date, you will earn -10 points off for each day late. THE LAST DAY YOU CAN PRESENT AND TURN IN YOUR ESSAY WILL BE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17th (with deducted points)! EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: If you present your speech early (not the day you're required), then you can earn +10 points on your speech presentation grade (if time allows!).
    Monday, November 13th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Take out your argumentative essay and the two rubrics. Which components (parts) of the rubrics do you need to work on the most and why?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Share answers with a new captain. Captain will share answers with the entire class.

    3. Public Speaking Practice: Read the body paragraph to your table mates. Make sure that everyone gets a turn. Work on eye contact, volume, pitch (vary your voice), gestures, and composure. Give each other warm (positive) and cool (negative, but be nice!) feedback.

    4. Reflections: How did the public speaking practice go today? Are you ready for presentations this week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task. SL.9-10.6.Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we improve our argumentative essay and public speaking skills? Make up owed HW

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15th/THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16th: This is 20% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay/Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E; Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Checklist Rubric for 10% and Speech Delivery Rubric for 10%. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Ms. Sarlin, English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary from Academic Vocabulary and Seedfolks Vocabulary. If you don't present on your assigned date, you will earn -10 points off for each day late. THE LAST DAY YOU CAN PRESENT AND TURN IN YOUR ESSAY WILL BE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17th (with deducted points)! EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: If you present your speech early (not the day you're required), then you can earn +10 points on your speech presentation grade (if time allows!).

    Friday, November 10th, 2017: PERIODS 1, 2 and 6 WILL ONLY MEET TODAY:

    1. Do Now: Take out your argumentative essay (rewrite it, if necessary). Go through the Writing Checklist Rubric to see that you're fulfilling all of the requirements.

    2. Review the Speech Delivery Rubric.

    3. Public Speaking Practice: Read the introductory paragraph to your table mates. Make sure that everyone gets a turn. Work on eye contact, volume, pitch (vary your voice), gestures, and composure. Give each other warm (positive) and cool (negative, but be nice!) feedback.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and task. SL.9-10.6.Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we improve our argumentative essay and public speaking skills? Make up owed HW

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15th/THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16th: This is 20% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E; Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Checklist Rubric for 10% and Speech Delivery Rubric for 10%. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Ms. Sarlin, English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary from Academic Vocabulary and Seedfolks Vocabulary. If you don't present on your assigned date, you will earn -10 points off for each day late. THE LAST DAY YOU CAN PRESENT AND TURN IN YOUR ESSAY WILL BE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17th (with deducted points)!

    Thursday, November 9th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Finish the Diagnostic Exam

    2. Read the Class Participation Rubric

    3. Read the Writing Checklist Rubric for 10% (2nd marking period) and Speech Delivery Rubric for 10% (2nd marking period).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we assess (evaluate) our writing skills in a multiple-choice diagnostic exam? Make up owed HW

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15th/THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16th: This is 20% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Speech on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Tuesday: Last names beginning with A-E; Wednesday: Last names beginning with F-M, Thursday: Last names beginning with N-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Writing Checklist Rubric for 10% and Speech Delivery Rubric for 10%. You may handwrite it or type (double-spaced). You must include the following in the heading: your full name, the date, Ms. Conn and Ms. Sarlin, English, Period ______, and an original title. Include sophisticated vocabulary from Academic Vocabulary and Seedfolks Vocabulary.

    Wednesday, November 8th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Listen to instructions for Diagnostic Exam

    Show owed HW.

    2. Work Period: Work on the Diagnostic Exam.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we assess (evaluate) our writing skills in a multiple-choice diagnostic exam? Make up owed HW

    TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:

  • FINISH TAKING THE DIAGNOSTIC EXAM FOR 2ND MARKING PERIOD (multiple-choice questions on writing skills). You do not need to study for this exam. Just eat a good breakfast and bring a #2 pencil. It will be 10% of the 2nd marking period.
  • Monday, November 6th, 2017: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary

    Show HW: images for the argumentative essay outline and owed HW (including the body paragraph and conclusion paragraph in your argumentative essay)

    2. Work Period: Work on the Goal Sheet for the 2nd marking period.

    3. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates about your #1 goals for the 2nd marking period. New captains will share with the class.

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content.
  • How can we prove our academic vocabulary skills and set goals for the future? Make up owed HW

    WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8th-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:

  • DIAGNOSTIC EXAM FOR 2ND MARKING PERIOD (multiple-choice questions on writing skills). You do not need to study for this exam. Just eat a good breakfast and bring a #2 pencil.
  • Friday, November 3rd, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read the handout provided. Access a computer.

    2. Work Period: Work on the Researching Images for Your Argumentative Essay. You need to follow this Outline for a 3-paragraph Argumentative Essay in order to effectively research and arrange images.

    Show HW: Body Paragraph and Conclusion Paragraph that follows the Outline for a 3-paragraph Argumentative Essay.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we create a digital presentation of our argumentative speeches? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:
  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know how to use each word in a sentence and know the definitions for each word. This will be 10% of the 2nd marking period.
  • Finish today's classwork: Complete and show an electronic copy of Researching Images for Your Argumentative Essay. You may e-mail Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. You MUST have a minimum of 12 images (4 images for the introduction, 5 images for the body paragraph, and 3 images for the conclusion).
  • Thursday, November 2nd, 2017: 1. Do Now: What is an essential component (part) of a body paragraph? What is an essential component of a conclusion?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Mini-Lesson on the Body Paragraph and Conclusion of an Argumentative Essay: Introduce the Outline for a 3-paragraph Argumentative Essay

    4. Work Period: Work on composing your body paragraph (10-12 sentences( and conclusion paragraph (4-6 sentences) for your argumentative essay.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we compose an effective body paragraph and conclusion in an argumentative speech? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd:
  • Finish today's classwork: compose the body paragraph and conclusion paragraph of your argumentative essay. Follow the Outline for a 3-paragraph Argumentative Essay. You MUST use two quotes of textual evidence from "Making the Future Better Together".

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:

  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know how to use each word in a sentence and know the definitions for each word. This will be 10% of the 2nd marking period.
  • Wednesday, November 1st, 2017: 1. Do Now: Why is the process of writing and delivering an argumentative essay/speech a useful skill in high school?

    Show owed HW! It's the last day of the 1st marking period.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. New captains will gather their table mates' answers from the Do Now. Captains will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Finish evaluating three of your classmates' introduction paragraphs, using the iintro. paragraph evaluation table (provided) in class. THIS MUST BE TURNED IN BY THE END OF CLASS TODAY (it's classwork credit).

    4. Reflections: What was the significance in evaluating your classmates' intro. paragraphs?

    ***ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THE END OF CLASS TODAY.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we understand the significance in writing an argumentative speech? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:
  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know how to use each word in a sentence and know the definitions for each word. This will be 10% of the 2nd marking period.
  • Tuesday, October 31st, 2017: 1. Do Now:Finish MIDTERM EXAM

    2. Work Period:
    Make up owed homework

  • Study the spelling of the following words: Seedfolks Vocabulary and Academic Vocabulary

    3. Spelling Bee!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we be prove our knowledge of the standards learned and apply them in reading passages and multiple-choice questions? Make up owed HW MUST be turned in by TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1st (the last day of the 1st marking period), by the end of the school day

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:

  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know how to use each word in a sentence and know the definitions for each word. This will be 10% of the 2nd marking period.
  • Tuesday, October 31st, 2017: 1. Do Now:Finish MIDTERM EXAM

    2. Work Period:
    Make up owed homework

  • Study the spelling of the following words: Seedfolks Vocabulary and Academic Vocabulary

    3. Spelling Bee!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we be prove our knowledge of the standards learned and apply them in reading passages and multiple-choice questions? Make up owed HW MUST be turned in by TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1st (the last day of the 1st marking period), by the end of the school day

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:

  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know how to use each word in a sentence and know the definitions for each word. This will be 10% of the 2nd marking period.
  • Monday, October 30th, 2017: MIDTERM EXAM

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we be prove our knowledge of the standards learned and apply them in reading passages and multiple-choice questions? MIDTERM CONTINUES TOMORROW (if necessary), TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31st: MIDTERM EXAM: It will be a multiple-choice question exam. You will be tested on understanding how to summarize passages, understanding the speaker's points of view, identifying the theme (main idea), characterizing (describing) characters, understanding characters' attitudes/tones (feelings), setting, flashback (a scene set in a time earlier than the main story), resolution (the ending of a conflict), inference (assumption based on evidence) and author's purpose (why he/she wrote the passage). This grade will be 10% of the 1st marking period.

    Make up owed HW MUST be turned in by THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1st (the last day of the 1st marking period), by the end of the school day

    Friday, October 27th, 2017: MIDTERM EXAM

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we be prove our knowledge of the standards learned and apply them in reading passages and multiple-choice questions? MIDTERM CONTINUES ON MONDAY, OCTOBER 30th: MIDTERM EXAM: It will be a multiple-choice question exam. You will be tested on understanding how to summarize passages, understanding the speaker's points of view, identifying the theme (main idea), characterizing (describing) characters, understanding characters' attitudes/tones (feelings), setting, flashback (a scene set in a time earlier than the main story), resolution (the ending of a conflict), inference (assumption based on evidence) and author's purpose (why he/she wrote the passage). This grade will be 10% of the 1st marking period.

    Make up owed HW MUST be turned in by WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1st (the last day of the 1st marking period), by the end of the school day

    Thursday, October 26th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read Researching Argumentative Essay Research handout. Access your assigned computer.

    Show owed HW.

    2. Work Period:

  • Complete your Researching Argumentative Essay Research handout. Turn it in for classwork credit.
  • Make up owed HW.
  • Continue evaluating three of your classmates' introduction paragraphs, using the intro. paragraph evaluation table (provided) in class.

    3. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we gather research to prepare for our argumentative essays? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th:
  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You MUST do 2 hours of community service (where you are not getting paid), log your hours (including adult supervision and signature), and write a minimum of 10-12 sentences (1/2 page typed or 1 handwritten page; include a proper heading of your name, the teachers' names, the date, the class period, and the title of the assignment). You will be required to do the following: Here are community service suggestions: you may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), your middle school (or another neighborhood school), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT (log of the hours AND the reflection paper of a minimum of 10-12 sentences).

    TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th-MONDAY, OCTOBER 30th: MIDTERM EXAM: It will be a multiple-choice question exam. You will be tested on understanding how to summarize passages, understanding the speaker's points of view, identifying the theme (main idea), characterizing (describing) characters, understanding characters' attitudes/tones (feelings), setting, flashback (a scene set in a time earlier than the main story), resolution (the ending of a conflict), inference (assumption based on evidence) and author's purpose (why he/she wrote the passage). This grade will be 10% of the 1st marking period.

    Make up owed HW by WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1st (the last day of the 1st marking period), by the end of the school day

  • Wednesday, October 25th, 2017: 1. Do Now: What are your strengths and weaknesses in composing the introductory paragraph? How can you improve your intro. paragraph?

    Show yesterday's classwork intro. paragraph (including the attention grabber, interpretation, thesis and preview) and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with your table mates. Captains will share their tablemates' answers with the whole class.

    3. Work Period: Evaluate three of your classmates' introduction paragraphs, using the intro. paragraph evaluation table (provided) in class.

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we understand the components of an effective introduction? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th:
  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You MUST do 2 hours of community service (where you are not getting paid), log your hours (including adult supervision and signature), and write a minimum of 10-12 sentences (1/2 page typed or 1 handwritten page; include a proper heading of your name, the teachers' names, the date, the class period, and the title of the assignment). You will be required to do the following: Here are community service suggestions: you may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT (log of the hours AND the reflection paper of a minimum of 10-12 sentences).

    THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th-MONDAY, OCTOBER 30th: MIDTERM EXAM: It will be a multiple-choice question exam. You will be tested on understanding how to summarize passages, understanding the speaker's points of view, identifying the theme (main idea), characterizing (describing) characters, understanding characters' attitudes/tones (feelings), setting, flashback (a scene set in a time earlier than the main story), resolution (the ending of a conflict), inference (assumption based on evidence) and author's purpose (why he/she wrote the passage). This grade will be 10% of the 1st marking period.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, October 24th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Which attention grabber/hook do you like the most and why)?
    A.) General Statement: Building bridges between people with diverse social backgrounds becomes increasingly important as our society becomes more diverse and socially stratified.
    B.) Quote: "A true community is not just about being geographically close to someone or part of the same social web network. It's about feeling connected and responsible for what happens. Humanity is our ultimate community, and everyone plays a crucial role."--Yehuda Berg
    C.) Statistic: America's diversity remains on the rise, the U.S. Census Bureau says in a new snapshot of the national population.
    D.) Question: Is the level of discrimination in the world rising or dropping?

    Show yesterday's classwork one, full handwritten page of brainstorming on your chosen argumentative question.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with your table mates. New captains will share their tablemates' answers with the whole class.

    3. Mini Lesson: Here are the components of an introduction paragraph.
    Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)

  • Attention Grabber (general statement, statistic, quote or question)
  • Interpretation of Attention Grabber and Connection to Thesis
  • Thesis (your claim and answer to the argumentative question)
  • Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    Sample Introductory Paragraph: America's diversity remains on the rise, the U.S. Census Bureau says in a new snapshot of the national population. This fact is very important, and it affects how people in America interact with each other. The U.S. does value diversity because it embraces people of all different backgrounds, as can be seen by this statistic. There are three main points that support this claim, and they are that people of different races and religions live together, work together and learn in schools together.

    4. Work Period: Write your own Introductory Paragraph (following the mini-lesson format).

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we choose an attention grabber and compose an effective introduction? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25th:
  • Finish today's classwork: Write your own Introductory Paragraph (following the in-class, mini-lesson format). Here are the components of an introduction paragraph.
    Introductory Paragraph (4-6 sentences)
  • Attention Grabber (general statement, statistic, quote or question)
  • Interpretation of Attention Grabber and Connection to Thesis
  • Thesis (your claim and answer to your chosen argumentative question)
  • Preview (briefly state your main points that support your thesis)

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th:

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You MUST do 2 hours of community service (where you are not getting paid), log your hours (including adult supervision and signature), and write a minimum of 10-12 sentences (1/2 page typed or 1 handwritten page; include a proper heading of your name, the teachers' names, the date, the class period, and the title of the assignment). You will be required to do the following: Here are community service suggestions: you may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT (log of the hours AND the reflection paper of a minimum of 10-12 sentences).

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 30TH: QUIZ ON ACADEMIC VOCABULARY. You MUST know the definitions for each vocabulary word and how to compose each word in a sentence. This quiz grade will be 10% of the 1st marking period.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Monday, October 23rd, 2017: 1. Do Now: Which argumentative question do you like the most and why (each question is connected to "Making the Future Better Together" essay)?
    A.) Is it beneficial for people to build bridges with others from different backgrounds?
    B.) Should people be required to do community service?
    C.) Does the U.S. value diversity?
    D.) Should the government intervene in people's lives to stop discrimination?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with your table mates. New captains will share their tablemates' answers with the whole class.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, brainstorm on your chosen Do Now question. Write at least ONE full, handwritten page in which you answer the question, give at least 2-3 reasons why your answer is valid (accurate), and write anything that comes to mind regarding the question.

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we choose an argumentative speech question that appeals to our interests and class texts? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24th:
    Finish today's classwork: In your LA section, brainstorm on your chosen Do Now question.
    A.) Is it beneficial for people to build bridges with others from different backgrounds?
    B.) Should people be required to do community service?
    C.) Does the U.S. value diversity?
    D.) Should the government intervene in people's lives to stop discrimination?

    *Write ONE full, handwritten page in which you answer the question, give at least 2-3 reasons why your answer is valid (accurate), and write anything that comes to mind regarding the question.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th:

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You MUST do 2 hours of community service (where you are not getting paid), log your hours (including adult supervision and signature), and write a minimum of 10-12 sentences (1/2 page typed or 1 handwritten page; include a proper heading of your name, the teachers' names, the date, the class period, and the title of the assignment). You will be required to do the following: Here are community service suggestions: you may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT (log of the hours AND the reflection paper of a minimum of 10-12 sentences).

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 30TH: QUIZ ON ACADEMIC VOCABULARY. You MUST know the definitions for each vocabulary word and how to compose each word in a sentence. This quiz grade will be 10% of the 1st marking period.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Friday, October 20th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Why would Patel and Fleischman be very pleased that you're going to engage in community service? You may choose one of the author's opinions/reactions.

    Show yesterday's Classwork: Show Researching Community Service handout and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with your table mates. Captains will share their tablemates' answers with the whole class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Analysis: Review the questions and answers for the Seedfolks Exam.

    4. Review HW requirements for community service. Volunteers share community service ideas.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we understand the importance and value of community service? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th:
  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You MUST do 2 hours of community service (where you are not getting paid), log your hours (including adult supervision and signature), and write a minimum of 10-12 sentences (1/2 page typed or 1 handwritten page; include a proper heading of your name, the teachers' names, the date, the class period, and the title of the assignment). You will be required to do the following: Here are community service suggestions: you may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT (log of the hours AND the reflection paper of a minimum of 10-12 sentences).

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 30TH: QUIZ ON ACADEMIC VOCABULARY. You MUST know the definitions for each vocabulary word and how to compose each word in a sentence. This quiz grade will be 10% of the 1st marking period.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Thursday, October 19th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read Researching Community Service handout. Access your assigned computer.

    Show yesterday's Classwork: annotations summarizing each paragraph in Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together".

    2. Work Period: Complete your Researching Community Service handout. Turn it in for classwork credit.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1
  • W.9-10.6
  • How can we understand the importance and value of community service? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20th:
  • Complete your Researching Community Service handout. Turn it in for classwork credit.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th:

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), your middle school (or another neighborhood school), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, October 18th, 2017: 1. Do Now: What can you personally do to make the future better together? (Examples include stop polluting, help the homeless, not use too much water, build a community center for adults of different races and religions, etc.)

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates, and share with your captain (this person was captain on Wednesday of last week and will be captain this week). Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share their answers.

    3. Read-Aloud/Annotate: Finish reading aloud Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together".

  • Annotate in the margins, providing succinct (brief) summaries of each paragraph.
  • Review the answers to the 10 questions (HW). Students will correct their answers, if necessary.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we improve our annotation and summarizing skills? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • Show the classwork (today's and yesterday's class notes): summarizing annotations in the packet, Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together".

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, October 17th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer.
  • Why do people discriminate against others?
  • What is an example of discrimination that you've personally witnessed, and how did you react?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates, and share with your captain (this person was captain on Wednesday of last week and will be captain this week). Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share their answers.

    3. Read-Aloud/Annotate: Continue reading aloud Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together".

  • Annotate in the margins, providing succinct (brief) summaries of each paragraph.
  • Review the answers to the 10 questions (HW). Students will correct their answers, if necessary.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we improve our annotation and summarizing skills? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Monday, October 16th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following options:
  • What was one intriguing (interesting) fact in Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together" packet?
  • How can you summarize Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together" packet in 20 words or less?

    Show HW: well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences), 10 questions answered in the "Making the Future Better Together" packet and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates, and share with your captain (this person was captain on Wednesday of last week and will be captain this week). Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share their answers.

    3. Read-Aloud/Annotate: Read aloud Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together". Review the answers to the 10 questions (HW). Students will correct their answers, if necessary.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we improve our annotation and summarizing skills? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Thursday-Friday, October 12th-13th, 2017: Work Period: Work on the HW due on Monday and owed work. Here are the assignments due on Monday:

    1.) Write a WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (10-12 sentences) on the following question: Should Americans be required (by the local or federal government) to make their communities better? In the paragraph, you must include the following:

  • Establish your claim (answer the question clearly) whether or not Americans should make their communities better.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from SEEDFOLKS to support your claim.
  • Present the opposing claim (counterclaim) and briefly explain why the counterclaim is not effective or appropriate.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive (organized) and coherent (clearly expressed) manner. Use transition words like the following: in addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, and consequently)
  • Follow the conventions of standard English (use proper grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization).


    2.) READ AND ANSWER THE 10 QUESTIONS IN THE PACKET RECEIVED IN CLASS: Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together". ANSWER the questions that follow. Fill in all the blank spaces and provide textual evidence when required to do so.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of Seedfolks?

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 16th (EACH ASSIGNMENT WILL HAVE CLASSWORK AND HOMEWORK CREDIT, SO THAT'S DOUBLE CREDIT!:
    1.) Write a WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (10-12 sentences) on the following question: Should Americans be required (by the local or federal government) to make their communities better? In the paragraph, you must include the following:

  • Establish your claim (answer the question clearly) whether or not Americans should make their communities better.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from SEEDFOLKS to support your claim.
  • Present the opposing claim (counterclaim) and briefly explain why the counterclaim is not effective or appropriate.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive (organized) and coherent (clearly expressed) manner. Use transition words like the following: in addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, and consequently)
  • Follow the conventions of standard English (use proper grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization).


    2.) READ AND ANSWER THE 10 QUESTIONS IN THE PACKET RECEIVED IN CLASS: Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together". ANSWER the questions that follow. Fill in all the blank spaces and provide textual evidence when required to do so.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, October 11th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Exam on Seedfolks (no notes or electronic devices are allowed during this exam; a #2 pencil is required)

    Turn in HW: Turn in "Researching Diverse Backgrounds" handout and any owed HW.

    2. Work Period: Write this in your LA section. In Seedfolks, people chose to create a garden to make their community better; they were not forced to do so. Should Americans be required (by the local or federal government) to make their communities better? Explain your answer briefly in 2-3 sentences.

    3. Discuss/Share: Choose a new captain (this person will be captain this week and next week). Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share their answers.

    4. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of Seedfolks?

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 16th (EACH ASSIGNMENT WILL HAVE CLASSWORK AND HOMEWORK CREDIT, SO THAT'S DOUBLE CREDIT!:
    1.) Write a WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (10-12 sentences) on the following question: Should Americans be required (by the local or federal government) to make their communities better? In the paragraph, you must include the following:

  • Establish your claim (answer the question clearly) whether or not Americans should make their communities better.
  • Use specific and relevant evidence from SEEDFOLKS to support your claim.
  • Present the opposing claim (counterclaim) and briefly explain why the counterclaim is not effective or appropriate.
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive (organized) and coherent (clearly expressed) manner. Use transition words like the following: in addition, therefore, however, as a result, on the other hand, finally, and consequently)
  • Follow the conventions of standard English (use proper grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization).


    2.) READ Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together" and ANSWER the questions that follow. Fill in all the blank spaces and provide textual evidence when required to do so.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, October 10th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read "Researching Diverse Backgrounds" handout. Access your assigned computer.

    Show HW: Academic Vocabulary Story, Images for Study Guide Questions and any owed HW.

    2. Work Period: Conduct Internet Research and complete the "Researching Diverse Backgrounds" handout BASED ON YOUR ASSIGNED PEOPLE. Turn it in for classwork credit.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • How can we research diverse backgrounds that are based on the characters in Seedfolks?

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11th:

  • Turn in today's classwork, if necessary. Here it is: conduct Internet Research and complete the "Researching Diverse Backgrounds" handout BASED ON YOUR ASSIGNED PEOPLE (you will be assigned in class; if you're absent from class, you can choose one group of people from the list on the handout).
  • EXAM (50% of your 1st marking period grade) on Seedfolks. Make sure that you review your Do Now's and all the answers to the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS (which compiles all the homework questions). Bring in a #2 pencil (you will not be provided with one). The exam will only include multiple-choice questions. You cannot use any notes or electronic devices.

    EXTRA CREDIT DONATION for PUERTO RICO: DONATE something to help Puerto Rico after the devastating hurricane. You can donate anything, but we PREFER to collect the following items (since they greatly need these items): canned food, feminine hygiene products, baby food, baby formula, baby wipes, pampers, batteries, rice, over the counter medicine (like tylenol, aspirin, medicine creams, etc.), tape, gauze, adult diapers, and desitin cream. You can earn ONE FREE HOMEWORK CREDIT (value=10 points) for your donation(s). If you want to donate more out of the goodness of your heart, you can give to Room 137, Mr. Giambalvo or Mr. Cordero. You will earn a ticket and a chance to earn prizes. Thank you!!

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Thursday and Friday, October 5th-6th, 2017: Work Period:
    1.) Work on owed HW (make sure that you have no zeroes on jupitergrades)
    2.) Work on HW due next Tuesday:
  • Create (with your own drawings OR find on google) Images for the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS: You will create (or google search) an image for each answer to the questions on the Study Guide. Since most of us are visual learners, this is a great study tool for the Exam we will be having on Wednesday, October 11th. In order to earn full credit for this assignment turned in on time, you will need to show an image for each study guide answer.
  • Vocabulary Story about "My Neighborhood": You will write a creative story on the topic of "My Neighborhood." Your story must include 20 of the words taken from Academic Vocabulary. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "My Neighborhood" You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about your neighborhood (you may want to use the History of Your Neighborhood handout. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story between characters in a fantasy neighborhood in another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Tuesday, October 10th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                    Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                            Date
    Assignment: Academic Vocabulary Story
          
                       Original Title
    


  • PREPARE for the EXAM (50% of your 1st marking period grade) on Seedfolks NEXT WEDNESDAY, October 12th. Make sure that you review your Do Now's and all the answers to the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS (which compiles all the homework questions). Bring in a #2 pencil (you will not be provided with one). The exam will only include multiple-choice questions. You cannot use any notes or electronic devices.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • How can we understand the value in this novel's purpose and improve our academic vocabulary skills? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:
  • Images for the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS: You will create (or google search) an image for each answer to the questions on the Study Guide. Since most of us are visual learners, this is a great study tool for the Exam we will be having on Wednesday, October 11th. In order to earn full credit for this assignment turned in on time, you will need to show an image for each study guide answer.
  • Vocabulary Story about "My Neighborhood": You will write a creative story on the topic of "My Neighborhood." Your story must include 20 of the words taken from Academic Vocabulary. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "My Neighborhood" You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about your neighborhood (you may want to use the History of Your Neighborhood handout. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story between characters in a fantasy neighborhood in another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Tuesday, October 10th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                    Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                            Date
    Assignment: Academic Vocabulary Story
          
                       Original Title
    

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11th:

  • EXAM (50% of your 1st marking period grade) on Seedfolks. Make sure that you review your Do Now's and all the answers to the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS (which compiles all the homework questions). Bring in a #2 pencil (you will not be provided with one). The exam will only include multiple-choice questions. You cannot use any notes or electronic devices.

    EXTRA CREDIT DONATION for PUERTO RICO: DONATE something to help Puerto Rico after the devastating hurricane. You can donate anything, but we PREFER to collect the following items (since they greatly need these items): canned food, feminine hygiene products, baby food, baby formula, baby wipes, pampers, batteries, rice, over the counter medicine (like tylenol, aspirin, medicine creams, etc.), tape, gauze, adult diapers, and desitin cream. You can earn ONE FREE HOMEWORK CREDIT (value=10 points) for your donation(s). If you want to donate more out of the goodness of your heart, you can give to Room 137, Mr. Giambalvo or Mr. Cordero. You will earn a ticket and a chance to earn prizes. Thank you!!

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, October 4th, 2017: 1. Do Now: What do you believe is the author's purpose in writing Seedfolks?

    Show HW: Academic Vocabulary Flashcards and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share answers with the class.
  • Review all remaining answers to questions on Chapters 9-13 in Seedfolks Study Guide.

    3. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • How can we understand the value in this novel's purpose and improve our academic vocabulary skills? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:
  • Images for the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS: You will create (or google search) an image for each answer to the questions on the Study Guide. Since most of us are visual learners, this is a great study tool for the Exam we will be having on Wednesday, October 11th. In order to earn full credit for this assignment turned in on time, you will need to show an image for each study guide answer.
  • Vocabulary Story about "My Neighborhood": You will write a creative story on the topic of "My Neighborhood." Your story must include 20 of the words taken from Academic Vocabulary. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "My Neighborhood" You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about your neighborhood (you may want to use the History of Your Neighborhood handout. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story between characters in a fantasy neighborhood in another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Tuesday, October 10th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                    Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                            Date
    Assignment: Academic Vocabulary Story
          
                       Original Title
    

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11th:

  • EXAM (50% of your 1st marking period grade) on Seedfolks. Make sure that you review your Do Now's and all the answers to the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS (which compiles all the homework questions). Bring in a #2 pencil (you will not be provided with one). The exam will only include multiple-choice questions. You cannot use any notes or electronic devices.

    EXTRA CREDIT DONATION for PUERTO RICO: DONATE something to help Puerto Rico after the devastating hurricane. You can donate anything, but we PREFER to collect the following items (since they greatly need these items): canned food, feminine hygiene products, baby food, baby formula, baby wipes, pampers, batteries, rice, over the counter medicine (like tylenol, aspirin, medicine creams, etc.), tape, gauze, adult diapers, and desitin cream. You can earn ONE FREE HOMEWORK CREDIT (value=10 points) for your donation(s). If you want to donate more out of the goodness of your heart, you can give to Room 137, Mr. Giambalvo or Mr. Cordero. You will earn a ticket and a chance to earn prizes. Thank you!!

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the questions below to answer.
  • According to The Christian Science Monitor, why is this novel a "profound message of hope"?
  • According to the ALA Booklist, why is this novel "engaging and entertaining"?

    Show HW: Questions and answers for Chapters 12 and 13 in Seedfolks and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. New captains will share answers with the class.
  • Introduce Academic Vocabulary and HW due tomorrow.
  • Review answers to Chapters 7-13 in Seedfolks Study Guide.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • How can we understand the value in this novel and improve our academic vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • Academic Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for Academic Vocabulary on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    EXTRA CREDIT DONATION for PUERTO RICO: DONATE something to help Puerto Rico after the devastating hurricane. You can donate anything, but we PREFER to collect the following items (since they greatly need these items): feminine hygiene products, baby food, baby formula, baby wipes, pampers, batteries, rice, over the counter medicine (like tylenol, aspirin, medicine creams, etc.), tape, gauze, adult diapers, and desitin cream. You can earn ONE FREE HOMEWORK CREDIT (value=10 points) for your donation(s). If you want to donate more out of the goodness of your heart, you can give to Room 137, Mr. Giambalvo or Mr. Cordero. You will earn a ticket and a chance to earn prizes. Thank you!!

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Monday, October 2nd, 2017: 1. Do Now: What is a fascinating fact from your research on the History of Your Neighborhood?

    Show HW: Turn in two handouts (History of your Neighborhood and Exit Slip) and show Questions and answers for Chapters 9, 10 and 11 in Seedfolks

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. New captains will share answers with the class.
  • Review answers to Chapters 6-11 in Seedfolks Study Guide.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • How can we find value in internet research on the history of our neighborhood ? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:
  • Read and answer the Questions for Chapter 12 (Amir) and Chapter 13 (Florence) in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4th:

  • Academic Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for Academic Vocabulary on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    EXTRA CREDIT DONATION for PUERTO RICO: DONATE something to help Puerto Rico after the devastating hurricane. You can donate anything, but we PREFER to collect the following items (since they greatly need these items): feminine hygiene products, baby food, baby formula, baby wipes, pampers, batteries, rice, over the counter medicine (like tylenol, aspirin, medicine creams, etc.), tape, gauze, adult diapers, and desitin cream. You can earn ONE FREE HOMEWORK CREDIT (value=10 points) for your donation(s). If you want to donate more out of the goodness of your heart, you can give to Room 137, Mr. Giambalvo or Mr. Cordero. You will earn a ticket and a chance to earn prizes. Thank you!!

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Friday, September 29th, 2017: 1. Do Now: Read History of Your Neighborhood handout. Access your assigned computer.

    Show HW: Questions and answers for Chapters 6, 7 and 8 in Seedfolks

    2.Work Period: Conduct Internet Research and complete the History of Your Neighborhood handout. Turn it in for classwork credit.

    3. Exit Slip (turn it in for classwork credit!)

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • How can we conduct internet research on the history of our neighborhood and integrate the information into clear, believable and accurate responses? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 2nd:
  • Finish today's classwork: History of Your Neighborhood handout and Exit Slip. You will be graded for completed handouts!
  • Read and answer the Questions for Chapter 9 (Curtis), Chapter 10 (Nora) and 11 (Maricella) in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).

    DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:

  • Read and answer the Questions for Chapter 12 (Amir) and Chapter 13 (Florence) in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Thursday, September 28th, 2017: 1. Do Now: How can you help to create a "paradise" in your neighborhood/school/family? Recall how the characters in Seedfolks positively influenced other people and their neighborhood: Gonzalo took care of Tio Juan and Leona brought her neighborhood's trash to the Public Health Department.

    Show owed HW.

    2.Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. New captains will share answers with the class.

    3. Seedfolks Review of Chapters 1-5: Volunteers will share answers (and class will take notes) on chapters 1-5 in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer.

    4. Work on owed HW or begin working on HW due tomorrow and next week.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understanding the significance (meaning) of the characters' actions in chapters 1-5 in Seedfolks? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:
  • Read and answer the Questions for Chapter 6 (Sam), Chapter 7 (Virgil) and 8 (Sae Young) in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 2nd:

  • Read and answer the Questions for Chapter 9 (Curtis), Chapter 10 (Nora) and 11 (Maricella) in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).

    DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:

  • Read and answer the Questions for Chapter 12 (Amir) and Chapter 13 (Florence) in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, September 27th, 2017: 1. Do Now: What gives people meaning (fulfillment, purpose) in their lives? For example, what gives you, your friends or your parents meaning in their lives?

    Show HW: Chapters 4 and 5 questions for Seedfolks (you MUST have citations, which include a quote and paragraph number for each answer)

    2.Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. New captains will share answers with the class.

    3. Seedfolks Review of Chapters 1-5: Volunteers will share answers (and class will take notes) on chapters 1-5 in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer.

    4. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understanding the significance (meaning) of the characters' actions in chapters 1-5 in Seedfolks? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:
  • Questions for Chapter 6 (Sam), Chapter 7 (Virgil) and 8 (Sae Young) in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, September 26th, 2017: 1. FINISH WRITING PORTION OF DIAGNOSTIC EXAM

    Show owed HW: Chapters 1, 2 and 3 questions for Seedfolks (you MUST have citations, which include a quote and paragraph number for each answer)

    2. Begin HW due tomorrow.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our writing composition skills? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:
  • Chapters 4 (Gonzalo) and 5 (Leona) questions in the Study Guide in SEEDFOLKS. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The common ground that the characters share is...Textual evidence that supports the common ground includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Monday, September 25th, 2017: BEGIN WRITING PORTION OF DIAGNOSTIC EXAM

    Show HW: Chapters 1, 2 and 3 questions for Seedfolks (you MUST have citations, which include a quote and paragraph number for each answer)

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our writing composition skills? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Wednesday, September 20th, 2017: 1. DO NOW: FINISH DIAGNOSTIC EXAM

    2. Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our skills in reading comprehension and multiple-choice questions? Make up owed HW

    DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Read Chapter 1 (Kim), Chapter 2 (Ana) and Chapter 3 (Wendell) in SEEDFOLKS. Answer the corresponding chapter questions for chapters 1-3 found in the SEEDFOLKS STUDY GUIDE. Answer your questions in the LA section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The common ground that the characters share is...Textual evidence that supports the common ground includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).
  • Tuesday, September 19th, 2017: FINISH DIAGNOSTIC EXAM

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our skills in reading comprehension and multiple-choice questions? Make up owed HW

    TOMORROW, WE WILL FINISH THE DIAGNOSTIC EXAM (reading passages and answering multiple-choice questions)

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Read Chapter 1 (Kim), Chapter 2 (Ana) and Chapter 3 (Wendell) in SEEDFOLKS. Answer the corresponding chapter questions for chapters 1-3 found in the SEEDFOLKS STUDY GUIDE. Answer your questions in the LA section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The common ground that the characters share is...Textual evidence that supports the common ground includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).
  • Monday, September 18th, 2017:
    1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz on Seedfolks Vocabulary List

    SHOW HW: vocabulary flashcards and any owed HW

    2. Work Period: In your LA section, write the following title: Strategies for Reading Passages and Answering Multiple-Choice Questions. Determine at least FIVE strategies for success in reading passages and answering multiple-choice questions.

    3. Discuss/Share:

  • Finish reviewing the annotations for the article, "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks. For each paragraph, share an annotation mark from the Annotation Bookmark. With the annotation mark, you MUST share notes in the margin for each paragraph.
  • Share answers for Strategies for Reading Passages and Answering Multiple-Choice Questions

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we improve our annotation, reading and multiple-choice question skills? Make up owed HW

    TOMORROW, WE WILL HAVE A DIAGNOSTIC EXAM (reading passages and answering multiple-choice questions)

    Friday, September 15th, 2017:
    1. Do Now: What were your strengths and weaknesses in annotating the article and composing the vocabulary story?

    SHOW HW: article with annotations and the vocabulary story

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captain will share answers with the class.

    3. Read Analysis Mini-Lesson: Review the annotations for the article, "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks. For each paragraph, share an annotation mark from the Annotation Bookmark. With the annotation mark, you MUST share notes in the margin for each paragraph.

    4. Vocabulary Story Sharing: Volunteers will share excerpts from their vocabulary stories.

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we improve our annotation skills, creative writing and language skills? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:
  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Thursday, September 14th, 2017:
    1. Do Now: Describe your neighborhood. Choose TWO of the following questions to answer:
  • What does it mean to be neighbors?
  • What are your relationships with your neighbors?
  • What are some things that could potentially turn a neighborhood into a community?
  • Do you think your neighbors would welcome the opportunity to get to know you better? Explain.

    SHOW owed HW: Goal Sheet, binder/notebook with labeled sections, syllabus handout and Good Deed paragraph.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captain will share answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks. For each paragraph, identify an annotation mark from the Annotation Bookmark. With the annotation mark, you MUST write notes in the margin for each paragraph. Be ready to share in class tomorrow.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Seedfolks, a novel on finding common ground? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK: See previous days' assignments. You will earn half-credit for late work.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th:

  • FINISH TODAY'S CLASSWORK: Read "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks. For each paragraph, identify an annotation mark from the Annotation Bookmark. With the annotation mark, you MUST write notes in the margin for each paragraph. Be ready to show in class tomorrow.
  • Vocabulary Story about "Common Ground": You will write a creative story on the topic of "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). Your story must include 10 of the words taken from Seedfolks Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Common Ground." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Friday, September 15th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                    Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                            Date
    Assignment: Seedfolks Vocabulary Story
          
                       Original Title
    
    

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Wednesday, September 13th, 2017:
    1. Do Now: Use your electronic device or access your assigned laptop. Go to this Seedfolks Anticipation Survey.

    2. Work Period: Complete the Seedfolks Anticipation Survey. First, WRITE YOUR FULL NAME AND CLASS PERIOD in the #1 box. Then, answer question #1 and all of the questions in the corresponding boxes. Answer in complete sentences. Write YES or NO and your reason in 1-2 sentences per question.

    SHOW owed HW: binder/notebook with labeled sections, syllabus handout and Good Deed paragraph.

    3. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates about the following question: In your LA section, answer the following question: What conclusions could you draw about the novel, Seedfolks, from the questions and your answers? Captain will share answers with the class.

    4. Work Period: Fill out the Goal Sheet. Turn it in.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Seedfolks, a novel on finding common ground? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK: See previous days' assignments. You will earn half-credit for late work.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th:

  • Vocabulary Story about "Common Ground": You will write a creative story on the topic of "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). Your story must include 10 of the words taken from Seedfolks Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Common Ground." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Friday, September 15th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                    Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                            Date
    Assignment: Seedfolks Vocabulary Story
          
                       Original Title
    
    

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Tuesday, September 12th, 2017:
    1. Do Now: What do you believe are the habits of good readers in high school? Make a "Top Ten" list.

    *If you're done early, read the Seedfolks Vocabulary List and begin writing a non-fiction or fiction story on "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). You may write about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. You MUST include 10 of the vocabulary words from the list in the story you write.

    SHOW HW: binder/notebook with labeled sections, syllabus handout and Good Deed paragraph.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates. Captain will share answers with the class.

    3. Introduce Seedfolks Vocabulary List and HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Seedfolks, a novel on finding common ground? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK: See previous days' assignments. You will earn half-credit for late work.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th:

  • Vocabulary Story about "Common Ground": You will write a creative story on the topic of "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). Your story must include 10 of the words taken from Seedfolks Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Common Ground." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Friday, September 15th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:
    Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin                                                    Your Name
    Elements of Literacy, Period                                            Date
    Assignment: Seedfolks Vocabulary Story
          
                       Original Title
    
    

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be 10% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Monday, September 11th, 2017:
    1. Do Now: Think of three good deeds that you can do in your free time (each one should not take more than an hour; suggestions: tutor a child, go grocery shopping for an elderly person, serve food at a homeless shelter, etc.; remember, no money is given in exchange for a good deed).

    2. Work Period: Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you write about a GOOD DEED that you will do today to honor the tragedy of 9/11. Good can counteract evil, and that's why you will write about a good deed that you can do today to counter the evil that happened on 9/11. You should write about an action that you can do that takes one hour. You should include the following in your well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences):

  • A clear and detailed description of the good deed (suggestions include: tutoring, grocery shopping, serving food to someone in need, etc.; no exchange of money is allowed)
  • Reason(s) you chose this good deed
  • How the good deed may influence others
  • How the good deed may make you feel
  • How the good deed may make the world a better place

    *You may want to use this Volunteer Match to find volunteer opportunities near you!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • How can we effectively determine a good deed to enact today to honor 9/11? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12th, 2017:
  • Fill out the syllabus handout and turn it in.
  • Bring in the binder/notebook with the appropriately labeled sections (they must be labeled and shown during the "Do Now" time).
  • TURN IN today's classwork: Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) in which you write about a GOOD DEED that you will do today to honor the tragedy of 9/11. Good can counteract evil, and that's why you will write about a good deed that you can do today to counter the evil that happened on 9/11. You should write about an action that you can do that takes about one hour. You should include the following in your well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences):
  • A clear and detailed description of the good deed (suggestions include: tutoring, grocery shopping, serving food to someone in need, etc.; no exchange of money is allowed)
  • Reason(s) you chose this good deed
  • How the good deed may influence others
  • How the good deed may make you feel
  • How the good deed may make the world a better place

    *You may want to use this Volunteer Match to find volunteer opportunities near you!

  • Friday, September 8th, 2017:
    1. Do Now: Find your assigned seat. What "common ground" do you have with your table mates? (You must determine a similar activity, personality trait, or cultural background similarity)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with a chosen captain.
  • Each captain will share their table's "common ground" with the entire class.

    3. Classroom Rules: Teachers will introduce emergency procedures and Essential Classroom Rules.

    4. HW Reminders: Syllabus and supplies required

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • How can we understand our class expectations? DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12th, 2017:
  • Fill out the syllabus handout and turn it in.
  • Bring in the binder/notebook with the appropriately labeled sections (they must be labeled and shown during the "Do Now" time).
  • Thursday, September 7th, 2017:
    1. Do Now: Access a computer and go to my website. Then, complete the Learning Style Inventory. On the index card provided, write down answers to the following: What's your full name and name you want me to call you (in parentheses)? What type of learner best defines you (according to the learning style inventory)? What are the ways you learn and process information best (see the description provided on the inventory)? Do you believe it's accurate? Why or why not?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. What's their learning style? Do they believe it's accurate? Why or why not? Be ready to introduce your neighbor's first name and their answers. Each student will introduce their neighbor.

    3. Classroom Evaluation: How can you evaluate the classroom based on the visuals? Student volunteers will share their evaluations of visuals.

    4. HW introduced: Syllabus and supplies required

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • How can we understand our learning styles and class expectations? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th, 2017:
  • Fill out the syllabus handout and turn it in.
  • Bring in the binder/notebook with the appropriately labeled sections (they must be labeled and shown during the "Do Now" time).