Freshman English Assignments, Fall Semester, 2018

Freshman English Assignments
Fall Semester, 2018

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Wednesday, December 12th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we make predictions about novels based on themes and titles? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13th:
  • Finish the News Analysis Handout.

    Make up owed work (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, December 11th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See News Analysis Handout.
  • How can we examine how people today experience journeys in their lives? DUE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13th:
  • Finish today's classwork: News Analysis Handout.

    Make up owed work (see previous days' assignments)

  • Monday, December 10th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we examine how people today experience journeys in their lives? Make up owed work (see previous days' assignments)
    Friday, December 7th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we examine how people today experience journeys in their lives? DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:
    A PERSONAL JOURNEY (fiction or non-fiction): Write a well-developed paragraph (a minimum of 10-12 sentences) about a personal journey. Answer these questions in your story: What's a journey you've experienced? What are your motives for going on a journey? What's the setting (time period and home residence)? What conflicts/struggles have you experienced on this journey? What did you learn or need to learn on this journey? What are your observations and experiences on this journey? What's the climax (turning point) on your journey? How does your journey end? Are there lessons learned and goals achieved? Use one of these sentence starters:
  • It all started with...
  • Sometimes it's hard not to...
  • When I came home...
  • My journey began when...

    Make up owed work (see previous days' assignments)

  • Thursday, December 6th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we interpret the structure and central ideas in "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • We are beginning a JOURNEY UNIT. Answer the following questions in 2-3 complete sentences:
    1.) What is a journey? Look up the definition using an electronic device.
    2.) What kind of people go on journeys?
    3.) What is achieved on a journey?
    4.) What are motivations for a journey?
    5.) What are observations and experiences on a journey?
    6.) What are personal reflections/insights on a journey?
    7.) Compare/Contrast a spiritual journey and a physical journey.
    8.) What is an example of a literary journey from a novel?
    9.) What are potential adversities (struggles/challenges) on a journey?
    10.) Who are three people that you know (relatives, friends, celebrities, characters in a movie or a novel) that have experienced a journey? Explain their journeys (one sentence per person).

    Make up owed work (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, December 5th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See the "Quilt of a Country" Review Questions and Madlib Summary Notes.
  • See the "Quilt of a Country" Puzzle.
  • How can we identify and analyze the structure and central ideas in "A Quilt of a Country"? EXAM on "Quilt of a Country" TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6th: You will need to study "Quilt of a Country" Review Questions and Madlib Summary Notes. The test will only include multiple-choice questions. The test will be about 15% of the 3rd marking period grade.

    Make up owed work (see previous days' assignments)

    Tuesday, December 4th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See the "Quilt of a Country" Review Questions and Madlib Summary Notes.
  • How can we annotate and analyze "A Quilt of a Country"? EXAM on "Quilt of a Country" on THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6th: You will need to study "Quilt of a Country" Review Questions and Madlib Summary Notes. The test will only include multiple-choice questions. The test will be about 15% of the 3rd marking period grade.

    Make up owed work (see previous days' assignments)

    Monday, December 3rd, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we annotate and analyze "A Quilt of a Country"? Make up owed work (see previous days' assignments)
    Friday, November 30th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we annotate and analyze "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 3rd
  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY (highlight/underline your corrections and bring in the original).
  • Thursday, November 29th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we annotate and identify key points in "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 3rd
  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY (highlight/underline your corrections and bring in the original).
  • Thursday, November 29th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we annotate and identify key points in "A Quilt of a Country"? DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 3rd
  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY (highlight/underline your corrections and bring in the original).
  • Wednesday, November 28th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • How can we identify and explain key points of "The Gettysburg Address"? Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Tuesday, November 27th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See Review for Exam on "The Gettysburg Address".

  • How can we identify and explain key points of "The Gettysburg Address"? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th:
  • EXAM on "The Gettysburg Address", Brief Overview of "The Gettysburg Address", "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List and the answers to the Research on "The Gettysburg Address" Handout (which we reviewed on Monday, November 26th). The exam will be 25% of the 3rd marking period grade. You will need to know the following:
  • The important details (reviewed in class) of the Brief Overview of "The Gettysburg Address", "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List and the answers to the Research on "The Gettysburg Address" Handout
  • The states that were supporting and negating (going against) slavery
  • The number of lives lost during the Civil War
  • The 13th Amendment to the U.S. constitution (that followed "The Gettysburg Address" a few years later).
  • Purposes of the speech (as a eulogy to the victims at the Battle of Gettysburg and restoring the nation after war)
  • Historical background (the Civil War)
  • Lincoln's brief message (which was not the keynote, or main, address)
  • The speech's American ideals (equality among people, unity, sacrifice, and liberty)
  • The meaning of "Four score and seven years ago" (the number of years and the significance of the historical time period)
  • Date of the speech (when it was delivered)
  • The use of parallelism ("we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow" and "of the people, by the people and for the people")
  • Monday, November 26th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See Review for Exam on "The Gettysburg Address".

  • How can we identify key points of "The Gettysburg Address"? DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28th:
  • EXAM on "The Gettysburg Address", Brief Overview of "The Gettysburg Address", "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List and the answers to the Research on "The Gettysburg Address" Handout (which we will review today, Monday, November 26th). The exam will be 25% of the 3rd marking period grade. You will need to know the following:
  • The important details (reviewed in class) of the Brief Overview of "The Gettysburg Address", "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List and the answers to the Research on "The Gettysburg Address" Handout
  • The states that were supporting and negating (going against) slavery
  • The number of lives lost during the Civil War
  • The 13th Amendment to the U.S. constitution (that followed "The Gettysburg Address" a few years later).
  • Purposes of the speech (as a eulogy to the victims at the Battle of Gettysburg and restoring the nation after war)
  • Historical background (the Civil War)
  • Lincoln's brief message (which was not the keynote, or main, address)
  • The speech's American ideals (equality among people, unity, sacrifice, and liberty)
  • The meaning of "Four score and seven years ago" (the number of years and the significance of the historical time period)
  • Date of the speech (when it was delivered)
  • The use of parallelism ("we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow" and "of the people, by the people and for the people")
  • Wednesday, November 21st, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See Research on "The Gettysburg Address" Handout

  • How can we identify historical context of "The Gettysburg Address"? Looking Ahead: DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:
  • EXAM on "The Gettysburg Address", Brief Overview of "The Gettysburg Address", "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List and the answers to the Research on "The Gettysburg Address" Handout (which we will review on Monday, November 27th). The exam will be 25% of the 3rd marking period grade. You will need to know the following:
  • The important details (reviewed in class) of the Brief Overview of "The Gettysburg Address", "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List and the answers to the Research on "The Gettysburg Address" Handout
  • The states that were supporting and negating (going against) slavery
  • The number of lives lost during the Civil War
  • The 13th Amendment to the U.S. constitution (that followed "The Gettysburg Address" a few years later).
  • Purposes of the speech (as a eulogy to the victims at the Battle of Gettysburg and restoring the nation after war)
  • Historical background (the Civil War)
  • Lincoln's brief message (which was not the keynote, or main, address)
  • The speech's American ideals (equality among people, unity, sacrifice, and liberty)
  • The meaning of "Four score and seven years ago" (the number of years and the significance of the historical time period)
  • Date of the speech (when it was delivered)
  • The use of parallelism ("we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow" and "of the people, by the people and for the people")
  • Tuesday, November 20th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See the Academic Language Script
  • See "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List

  • How can we critique each other's writing? N/A
    Monday, November 19th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See the reading of "The Gettysburg Address" (audio)
  • See "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List

  • How can we understand the significance for reading "The Gettysburg Address"? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY (using "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List on the following question: SHOULD PEOPLE UNITE OR ISOLATE THEMSELVES? You can choose to write a non-fiction or creative story on the question above. Your story must include 10 of the words taken from "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story on how and why people unite or isolate themselves (you can refer to the texts we've studied in class so far--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," and Seedfolks). You may want to write a non-fiction story about your friends, family or teenagers (in general) uniting or isolating themselves. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about unity or isolation of characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you can e-mail me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov before class time on Tuesday, November 20th to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Your heading must include your name (at the top), date, my name, Elements of Literacy, Period 3, and the assignment title.
  • Friday, November 16th, 2018: See ELEVATE PRESENTATION ON NOTE-TAKING SKILLS

    How can we improve our note-taking skills? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Compose VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS for "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List. Create on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:

  • VOCABULARY STORY (using "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List on the following question: SHOULD PEOPLE UNITE OR ISOLATE THEMSELVES? You can choose to write a non-fiction or creative story on the question above. Your story must include 10 of the words taken from "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story on how and why people unite or isolate themselves (you can refer to the texts we've studied in class so far--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," and Seedfolks). You may want to write a non-fiction story about your friends, family or teenagers (in general) uniting or isolating themselves. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about unity or isolation of characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you can e-mail me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov before class time on Tuesday, November 20th to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Your heading must include your name (at the top), date, my name, Elements of Literacy, Period 3, and the assignment title.
  • Thursday, November 15th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See the reading of "The Gettysburg Address" (audio)
  • See "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List

  • How can we understand the significance for reading "The Gettysburg Address"? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Compose VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS for "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List. Create on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:

  • VOCABULARY STORY (using "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List on the following question: SHOULD PEOPLE UNITE OR ISOLATE THEMSELVES? You can choose to write a non-fiction or creative story on the question above. Your story must include 10 of the words taken from "The Gettysburg Address" Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the question: Should people unite or isolate themselves? You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story on how and why people unite or isolate themselves (you can refer to the texts we've studied in class so far--"Gettysburg Address," "Making the Future Better Together," and Seedfolks). You may want to write a non-fiction story about your friends, family or teenagers (in general) uniting or isolating themselves. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about unity or isolation of characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you can e-mail me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov before class time on Tuesday, November 20th to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Your heading must include your name (at the top), date, my name, Elements of Literacy, Period 3, and the assignment title.
  • Wednesday, November 14th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Brief Overview of the Gettysburg Address. Why do you think this speech goes down as Lincoln's most important speech and one of the most famous American speeches?

  • How can we evaluate the content and delivery of effective speeches? N/A
    Tuesday, November 13th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • TURN IN YOUR EVALUATION HANDOUTS (for classwork credit).

  • How can we present our argumentative writing in a speech format and evaluate others' speeches? Make up all owed HW BY TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th (in class only! This is the last day of the 2nd marking period!)
    Friday, November 9th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA

  • How can we use the reading inventory to maximize our learning? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th (see your assigned date below):
  • ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Wednesday (11/7): Last names beginning with A-I; Thursday (11/8): Last names beginning with L-R, Monday (11/12): Last names beginning with S-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric andPublic Speaking Rubric
  • EVALUATION HANDOUT: By the end of class on Tuesday, November 13th, turn in the Evaluation of Speeches Handout. This is a class participation grade.

    Make up all owed HW BY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th (in class only! This is the last day of the 2nd marking period!)

  • Thursday, November 8th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • SHOW ANY OWED HW.
  • Reminders about Evaluation of Speeches Handout. Everyone must complete the handout (average of three students per day).
  • See the Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric
  • See the Public Speaking Rubric
  • See the 10 Tips for Giving a Great Speech

  • How can we effectively present and evaluate argumentative writing in a speech format? DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th (see your assigned date below):
  • ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Wednesday (11/7): Last names beginning with A-I; Thursday (11/8): Last names beginning with L-R, Monday (11/12): Last names beginning with S-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric andPublic Speaking Rubric
  • EVALUATION HANDOUT: By the end of class on Tuesday, November 13th, turn in the Evaluation of Speeches Handout. This is a class participation grade.

    Make up all owed HW BY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th (in class only! This is the last day of the 2nd marking period!)

  • Wednesday, November 7th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • SHOW ANY OWED HW.
  • Introduce Evaluation of Speeches Handout. Everyone must complete the handout (at least three students per day).
  • See the Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric
  • See the Public Speaking Rubric
  • See the 10 Tips for Giving a Great Speech

  • How can we effectively present and evaluate argumentative writing in a speech format? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8th, or TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th (see your assigned date below):
  • ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Wednesday (11/7): Last names beginning with A-I; Thursday (11/8): Last names beginning with L-R, Monday (11/12): Last names beginning with S-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric andPublic Speaking Rubric Make up owed HW
  • Monday, November 5th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • SHOW HW: ARGUMENTATIVE REWRITE (also show the original writing with the teacher's edits)
  • See the Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric
  • See the Public Speaking Rubric
  • See the 10 Tips for Giving a Great Speech

  • How can we prepare to present our argumentative writing in a speech format? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8th, or TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th (see your assigned date below):
  • ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Wednesday (11/7): Last names beginning with A-I; Thursday (11/8): Last names beginning with L-R, Monday (11/12): Last names beginning with S-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric andPublic Speaking Rubric Make up owed HW
  • Friday, November 2nd, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See the Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric
  • See the Public Speaking Rubric

  • How can we prepare to present our argumentative writing in a speech format?

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:

  • REWRITE the Argumentative Essay (see the Argumentative Essay Outline, Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric and the teacher's corrections to guide you). Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story). Highlight/Underline the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original essay as well. Please TYPE the REWRITE. Double, space, write in 12 point font (Times New Roman font), and include the following components (parts) of the heading: your name, my name, the date, the name of the class, the class period, and the assignment title.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8th, or TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:

  • ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH: This is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will present your Argumentative Essay on one of these days, based on alphabetical assignment: Wednesday (11/7): Last names beginning with A-I; Thursday (11/8): Last names beginning with L-R, Monday (11/12): Last names beginning with S-Z. You will be graded on the following rubrics: Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric andPublic Speaking Rubric Make up owed HW
  • Thursday, November 1st, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • See the Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric

  • How can we prove our reading skills and test-taking strategies on the Midterm?

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:

  • REWRITE the Argumentative Essay (see the Argumentative Essay Outline, Argumentative Writing Checklist Rubric and the teacher's corrections to guide you). Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story). Highlight/Underline the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original essay as well. Please TYPE the REWRITE. Double, space, write in 12 point font (Times New Roman font), and include the following components (parts) of the heading: your name, my name, the date, the name of the class, the class period, and the assignment title.

    Make up owed HW

  • Wednesday, October 31st, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA

  • How can we prove our reading skills and test-taking strategies on the Midterm?

    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:

  • FINISH THE MIDTERM EXAM (Here are important strategies reviewed in class today): 1.) Preview questions before reading passages, 2.) Circle key words in questions to help lead you to answers in the reading passages, 3.) Underline line #s in the reading passages (the line #s referred to in the questions), 4.) Annotate reading passages (write summary notes in the margins) and include annotation symbols (from the Elevate packet), 5.) Cover up the answer choices with the hand you don't write with when answering the multiple-choice questions, 6.) POE (process of elimination) when getting rid of wrong answers, and 7.) "Which of the following..." questions are the hardest and take the longest. These questions require you to examine all the answer choices. Leave these questions at the end.

    Make up owed HW

  • Tuesday, October 30th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA

  • How can we prove our reading skills on the Midterm?

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31st:

  • CONTINUE THE MIDTERM EXAM (Here are important strategies reviewed in class today): 1.) Preview questions before reading passages, 2.) Circle key words in questions to help lead you to answers in the reading passages, 3.) Underline line #s in the reading passages (the line #s referred to in the questions), 4.) Annotate reading passages (write summary notes in the margins) and include annotation symbols (from the Elevate packet), 5.) Cover up the answer choices with the hand you don't write with when answering the multiple-choice questions, 6.) POE (process of elimination) when getting rid of wrong answers, and 7.) "Which of the following..." questions are the hardest and take the longest. These questions require you to examine all the answer choices. Leave these questions at the end.

    Make up owed HW

  • Monday, October 29th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Refer to this Argumentative Essay Outline as your guide.
  • Sentence Starters for Evidence: In "Making the Future Better Together," by Eboo Patel, evidence to support the thesis is..., Textual evidence to support the main point includes...
  • Sentence Starters for Analysis: This evidence can be analyzed to mean that..., People can interpret this evidence to mean..., This evidence can be understood to mean...
  • Use this Graphic Organizer for Argumentative Essay.

  • How can we prepare for the midterm?

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (Here are important strategies reviewed in class today): 1.) Preview questions before reading passages, 2.) Circle key words in questions to help lead you to answers in the reading passages, 3.) Underline line #s in the reading passages (the line #s referred to in the questions), 4.) Annotate reading passages (write summary notes in the margins) and include annotation symbols (from the Elevate packet), 5.) Cover up the answer choices with the hand you don't write with when answering the multiple-choice questions, 6.) POE (process of elimination) when getting rid of wrong answers, and 7.) "Which of the following..." questions are the hardest and take the longest. These questions require you to examine all the answer choices. Leave these questions at the end.
  • COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), your middle school (or another neighborhood school), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT.

    Make up owed HW

  • Friday, October 26th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Refer to this Argumentative Essay Outline as your guide.
  • Sentence Starters for Evidence: In "Making the Future Better Together," by Eboo Patel, evidence to support the thesis is..., Textual evidence to support the main point includes...
  • Sentence Starters for Analysis: This evidence can be analyzed to mean that..., People can interpret this evidence to mean..., This evidence can be understood to mean...
  • Use this Graphic Organizer for Argumentative Essay.

  • How can we continue writing an argumentative speech, focusing on body paragraphs? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Finish writing your Argumentative Speech. Use the Argumentative Essay Outline as your guide.
  • Sentence Starters for Evidence: In "Making the Future Better Together," by Eboo Patel, evidence to support the thesis is..., Textual evidence to support the main point includes...
  • Sentence Starters for Analysis: This evidence can be analyzed to mean that..., People can interpret this evidence to mean..., This evidence can be understood to mean...

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30th:

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), your middle school (or another neighborhood school), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT.

    Make up owed HW

  • Thursday, October 25th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Refer to this Argumentative Essay Outline as your guide.
  • Sentence Starters for Evidence: In "Making the Future Better Together," by Eboo Patel, evidence to support the thesis is..., Textual evidence to support the main point includes...
  • Sentence Starters for Analysis: This evidence can be analyzed to mean that..., People can interpret this evidence to mean..., This evidence can be understood to mean...

  • How can we continue writing an argumentative speech, focusing on introduction and body paragraphs? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Finish writing your Argumentative Speech. Use the Argumentative Essay Outline as your guide.
  • Sentence Starters for Evidence: In "Making the Future Better Together," by Eboo Patel, evidence to support the thesis is..., Textual evidence to support the main point includes...
  • Sentence Starters for Analysis: This evidence can be analyzed to mean that..., People can interpret this evidence to mean..., This evidence can be understood to mean...

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30th:

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), your middle school (or another neighborhood school), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT.

    Make up owed HW

  • Wednesday, October 24th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Refer to this Argumentative Essay Outline as your guide.
  • Sentence Starter for Evidence: In "Making the Future Better Together," by Eboo Patel, evidence to support the thesis is...
  • Sentence Starters for Analysis: This evidence can be analyzed to mean that..., People can interpret this evidence to mean..., This evidence can be understood to mean...

  • How can we prepare to write an argumentative speech? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25th:
  • Finish today's classwork: write the introduction paragraph for the Argumentative Speech. Use the Argumentative Essay Outline as your guide.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30th:

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), your middle school (or another neighborhood school), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT.

    Make up owed HW

  • Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show HW: one-page of brainstorming on yesterday's Do Now.

  • How can we prepare to engage in community service? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30th:
  • COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), your middle school (or another neighborhood school), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT.

    Make up owed HW

  • Monday, October 22nd, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show HW: community service handout

  • How can we improve our argumentative skills? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Finish today's ONE PAGE of brainstorming on ONE of the following questions (you can choose ONE):
    A.) Is it beneficial to built bridge with people from different backgrounds?
    B.) Should people be required to do community service?
    C.) Does the U.S. value diversity?
    D) Should the government intervene in people’s lives to stop discrimination?

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30th:

  • COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (value=30 points). You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). You may volunteer at your local library (story time in the children's section!), your middle school (or another neighborhood school), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, or one of the great NYC parks or museums. Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park, Queens. You MUST complete this COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT.

    Make up owed HW

  • Friday, October 19th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show HW: portfolio folder
  • Begin the Researching Community Service Handout.

  • How can we improve our vocabulary and research skills? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd:
  • Finish the Researching Community Service handout. Make up owed HW
  • Thursday, October 18th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show any owed HW.
  • Prepare for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz.

  • How can we read and identify key points in Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together"? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be about 10% of the 2nd marking period grade.
  • BRING IN A PORTFOLIO FOLDER (a folder in which you will store your tests, quizzes, returned papers, goal sheet, etc.). This is a 10-point homework assignment!

    Make up owed HW

  • Wednesday, October 17th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show HW: REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY on "MY NEIGHBORHOOD" (it was due October 4th): Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story). Highlight/Underline the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original story as well.

  • How can we read and identify key points in Eboo Patel's "Making the Future Better Together"? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be about 10% of the 2nd marking period grade.
  • BRING IN A PORTFOLIO FOLDER (a folder in which you will store your tests, quizzes, returned papers, goal sheet, etc.). This is a 10-point homework assignment!

    Make up owed HW

  • Tuesday, October 16th, 2018:
    1. See TODAY'S AGENDA

    How can we identify and apply the significant ideas in the Elevation presentation? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17th:
  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY on "MY NEIGHBORHOOD" (it was due October 4th): Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story). Highlight/Underline the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original story as well.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be about 10% of the 2nd marking period grade.
  • BRING IN A PORTFOLIO FOLDER (a folder in which you will store your tests, quizzes, returned papers, goal sheet, etc.). This is a 10-point homework assignment!

    Make up owed HW

  • Monday, October 15th, 2018:
    1. See TODAY'S AGENDA

    How can we identify and apply the significant ideas in the Elevation presentation? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17th:
  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY on "MY NEIGHBORHOOD" (it was due October 4th): Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story). Highlight/Underline the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original story as well.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be about 10% of the 2nd marking period grade.

    Make up owed HW

  • Friday, October 12th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Listen to the Elevation Presentation

    Show any owed HW:

    2. Review Seedfolks Exam answers (if time allows).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create effects.
  • How can we understand the significant ideas in the Elevation presentation and apply them to our academic subjects? Make up owed HW
    Thursday, October 11th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • Is The New York Times a reliable news source? Explain your answer.
  • How would you review the news article, "Community Gardens Imperiled by New York's Affordable Housing Plans" (The New York Times)?
  • Show HW: Show the two advantages and two disadvantages of cited textual evidence in the news article, "Community Gardens Imperiled by New York's Affordable Housing Plans" (The New York Times)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates, and share with your captain. Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share their Do Now answers.
  • Share the major ISSUES in the news article, which are the advantages and disadvantages of a community garden in NYC. Here's the news article, "Community Gardens Imperiled by New York's Affordable Housing Plans" (The New York Times). Identify textual evidence in the article to support your answers.

    3. Review Seedfolks Exam answers.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create effects.
  • How can we understand the significant ISSUES in a news article from The New York Times? Make up owed HW
    Wednesday, October 10th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: EXAM on SEEDFOLKS

    2. Work Period:

  • Read "Community Gardens Imperiled by New York's Affordable Housing Plans" (The New York Times). What are two advantages (pro's) and two disadvantages (con's) of a community garden in New York City? Identify textual evidence in the article to support your answers. Be ready to share and discuss.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create effects.
  • How can we understand the significant ISSUES and main ideas in Seedfolks ? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11TH:
    Read "Community Gardens Imperiled by New York's Affordable Housing Plans" (The New York Times). What are two advantages (pro's) and two disadvantages (con's) of a community garden in New York City? Identify textual evidence in the article to support your answer. Be ready to share and discuss. This is your first homework assignment for the 2nd marking period!
    Tuesday, October 9th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • What do you believe is the major ISSUE (important topic or problem) in Seedfolks and why?
  • Would you recommend Seedfolks to other high school students? Explain your reasoning.

    Show any owed HW

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates, and share with your captain (this person was captain last week). Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share their Do Now answers.
  • Share any questions or concerns for tomorrow's exam on Seedfolks.

    3. Work Period:

  • Prepare for tomorrow's exam.
  • Make up any owed HW (today is the last day to turn in any owed work!).

    4. Reflections: What are your final impressions of Seedfolks? Did this novel support our theme of "Common Ground"?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create effects.
  • How can we understand the significant ISSUES and main ideas in Seedfolks ? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10TH:
    EXAM (50% of your 1st marking period grade) on Seedfolks. Make sure that you review your Do Now's and all the answers to the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS (which compiles all the homework questions). The exam will only include multiple-choice questions. You cannot use any notes or electronic devices.
    Friday, October 5th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • What do you predict will happen next for the Seedfolks characters after the story's end?
  • Do you believe the garden in Seedfolks could exist in your neighborhood? Explain.

    Show any owed HW

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates, and share with your captain (this person was captain last week). Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share their Do Now answers.
  • Review all remaining answers to questions on Chapters 9-13 in Seedfolks Study Guide.
  • Read the epilogue of Seedfolks and understand the author's purpose for writing the novel.

    3. Reflections: What are your final impressions of Seedfolks? Did this novel support our theme of "Common Ground"? Would you recommend others to read this novel?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.
  • RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create effects.
  • How can we understand the significance of the theme (common ground) and the resolution (ending) in Seedfolks ? TURN IN ALL OWED WORK BY NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9th (DURING CLASS TIME ONLY!):
  • See previous days' assignments for details on owed work. You will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for late work (without a legitimate parent/guardian/doctor's note).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10TH:
    EXAM (50% of your 1st marking period grade) on Seedfolks. Make sure that you review your Do Now's and all the answers to the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS (which compiles all the homework questions). The exam will only include multiple-choice questions. You cannot use any notes or electronic devices.

  • Thursday, October 4th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • Why do people from diverse (different) backgrounds segregate (separate) themselves?
  • Should Americans be required (by the local or federal government) to make their communities better?

    Show HW due today:

  • Turn in the VOCABULARY STORY on "Your Neighborhood", using the Academic Vocabulary
  • Show the Diversity Research handout (yesterday's classwork)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates, and share with your captain (this person was captain last week). Turn and talk with your table mates. Captains will share their Do Now answers.
  • Share your Internet Research on the Diversity Research handout.
  • Review all remaining answers to questions on Chapters 9-13 in Seedfolks Study Guide.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand diverse backgrounds from people around the world, as delineated (portrayed) in Seedfolks ? Make up owed HW:
  • See previous days' assignments for details on owed work. You will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for late work (without a legitimate parent/guardian/doctor's note).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10TH:
    EXAM (50% of your 1st marking period grade) on Seedfolks. Make sure that you review your Do Now's and all the answers to the STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS (which compiles all the homework questions). The exam will only include multiple-choice questions. You cannot use any notes or electronic devices.

  • Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Read Diversity Research handout. Access your assigned computer.

    Show HW due today:

  • Answers to the Questions on Chapters 9-13 in Seedfolks (value=THREE HW assignments (30 points)) and flashcards for Academic Vocabulary.

    2. Work Period: Conduct Internet Research and complete the Diversity Research handout. You will be assigned one character to research his/her background. If you don't finish in class, then finish it for homework.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand diverse backgrounds from people around the world, as delineated (portrayed) in Seedfolks ? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • Vocabulary Story about "My Neighborhood": You will write a creative story on the topic of "My Neighborhood." Your story must include 20 of the words taken from Academic Vocabulary. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "My Neighborhood." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about your neighborhood (you may want to use the History of our Neighborhood handout. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story between characters in a fantasy neighborhood in another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Your heading must include the following (with your name at the top): Your Name, Your Teacher's Name, Date, Elements of Literacy, Period 3, and the Assignment Title.
  • Finish today's classwork: complete the Diversity Research handout: You were assigned one character to research his/her background.

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments for details on owed work. You will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for late work (without a legitimate parent/guardian/doctor's note).
  • Monday, October 1st-Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • What homework do you owe?
  • What homework (due on Wednesday or Thursday) are you going to choose to work on and why?

    2. Work Period:

  • Work on reading Chapters 9-13 in Seedfolks and completing the answers to the Questions on Chapters 9-13 in Seedfolks (value=THREE HW assignments (30 points)). You MUST cite textual evidence to support each answer. Make sure you have the correct answer, as we will be having an exam on the novel soon.
  • Create flashcards for Academic Vocabulary (see details in the HW section).
  • Work on the Vocabulary Story (due Thursday). Details can be found in the HW section.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details.
  • How can we identify textual evidence that supports the theme of common ground in Seedfolks ? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:
  • Read and answer questions for Seedfolks Chapters 9-13 (the rest of the book): Read Seedfolks (packet provided in class) and answer the Study Guide Questions for Chapter 9 (Curtis), Chapter 10 (Nora), Chapter 11 (Maricella), Chapter 12 (Amir) and Chapter 13 (Florence). Seedfolks Online. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph). (value=THREE HW assignments (30 points)).

  • Academic Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for Academic Vocabulary on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4th:

  • Vocabulary Story about "My Neighborhood": You will write a creative story on the topic of "My Neighborhood." Your story must include 20 of the words taken from Academic Vocabulary. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "My Neighborhood." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about your neighborhood (you may want to use the History of our Neighborhood handout. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story between characters in a fantasy neighborhood in another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Your heading must include the following (with your name at the top): Your Name, Your Teacher's Name, Date, Elements of Literacy, Period 3, and the Assignment Title.

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments for details on owed work. You will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for late work (without a legitimate parent/guardian/doctor's note).
  • Friday, September 28th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • How does your neighborhood compare (similar) and contrast (differ) to Cleveland in Seedfolks?
  • According to The Christian Science Monitor, why is this novel a "profound message of hope"?

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with the new captain. Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Mini-Lesson/Review of Chapters 3-8 in Seedfolks: Volunteers will finish sharing answers to the Questions on Chapters 3-8 in Seedfolks (value=THREE HW assignments (30 points)). Volunteers must cite textual evidence to support each answer. Make sure you have the correct answer, as we will be having an exam on the novel soon.

    4. Introduce Academic Vocabulary.

    5. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of our neighborhoods, as connected to the novel, Seedfolks ? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:
  • Read and answer questions for Seedfolks Chapters 9-13 (the rest of the book): Read Seedfolks (packet provided in class) and answer the Study Guide Questions for Chapter 9 (Curtis), Chapter 10 (Nora), Chapter 11 (Maricella), Chapter 12 (Amir) and Chapter 13 (Florence). Seedfolks Online. Answer your questions in the HW section. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The character in the story believes...Textual evidence that supports the event in the story includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph). (value=THREE HW assignments (30 points)).

  • Academic Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for Academic Vocabulary on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4th:

  • Vocabulary Story about "My Neighborhood": You will write a creative story on the topic of "My Neighborhood." Your story must include 20 of the words taken from Academic Vocabulary. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "My Neighborhood." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about your neighborhood (you may want to use the History of our Neighborhood handout. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story between characters in a fantasy neighborhood in another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Your heading must include the following (with your name at the top): Your Name, Your Teacher's Name, Date, Elements of Literacy, Period 3, and the Assignment Title.

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments for details on owed work. You will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for late work (without a legitimate parent/guardian/doctor's note).
  • Thursday, September 27th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • What is a fascinating fact from your research on the History of our Neighborhood Handout?
  • How can you help to create a "paradise" in your neighborhood (where you live or go to school)? Recall how the characters in Seedfolks positively influenced other people and their neighborhood. .

    Show the History of our Neighborhood Handout: This was yesterday's classwork assignment that you had to finish for homework.

    2. Discuss/Share: Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with the new captain. Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Mini-Lesson/Review of Chapters 3-8 in Seedfolks: Volunteers will share answers to the Questions on Chapters 3-8 in Seedfolks (value=THREE HW assignments (30 points)). Volunteers must cite textual evidence to support each answer. Make sure you have the correct answer, as we will be having an exam on the novel soon.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • How can we understand the significance of our neighborhoods, as connected to the novel, Seedfolks ? Make up owed HW:
  • See previous days' assignments for details on owed work. You will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for late work (without a legitimate parent/guardian/doctor's note).
  • Wednesday, September 26th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Read History of our Neighborhood handout. Access your assigned computer.

    Show HW due today:

  • Answers to the Questions on Chapters 3-8 in Seedfolks (value=THREE HW assignments (30 points)).

    2. Work Period: Conduct Internet Research and complete the History of our Neighborhood handout. If you don't finish in class, then finish it for homework.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of our neighborhoods, as connected to the novel, Seedfolks ? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:
  • Finish today's classwork for HW: History of our Neighborhood handout

    Make up owed HW:

  • See previous days' assignments for details on owed work. You will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for late work (without a legitimate parent/guardian/doctor's note).
  • Monday, September 24th-Tuesday, September 25th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Read the article (given out in class or accessible online), "Praying for Common Ground at the Christmas-Dinner Table" (The New York Times). Answer the following questions (be ready to show Ms. Conn on Wednesday). CITE textual evidence to support each answer.
    1.) How do the mother, little sister and middle sister reveal their AVERSION of the others' religious beliefs?
    2.) Why is this author's family a typical, modern American family?
    3.) What do the DISTINCTIVE family members have in common? Share three similarities among them.

    2. Work Period: Work on the HW: Read Chapters 3-8 and answer questions for chapters 3-8 in the Seedfolks Study Guide). You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • ,.RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the theme of "common ground" in Seedfolks and how it's comparable to the real world? Due this coming WEDNESDAY, September 26th:
  • Read Chapter 3 (Wendell), Chapter 4 (Gonzalo), Chapter 5 (Leona), Chapter 6 (Sam), Chapter 7 (Virgil), and Chapter 8 (Sae Young) in Seedfolks (packet was provided in class). Answer the corresponding questions for chapters 3-8 here: Seedfolks Study Guide. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The common ground that the characters share is...Textual evidence that supports the common ground includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph). THESE ASSIGNMENTS ARE WORTH 30 HOMEWORK POINTS (VALUE=THREE HW ASSIGNMENTS).
  • Friday, September 21st, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • What could you do that would bring pride to your family?
  • How can you describe your neighborhood?
  • What do you believe is the author's purpose in beginning the novel with chapters 1 and 2?

    Show HW: Chapters 1 and 2 Questions (from the Seedfolks Study Guide), which must include cited evidence from the text.

    2. Discuss/Share: Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with the captain. Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Seedfolks Review of Chapters 1-2: Volunteers will share answers (and class will take notes) on chapters 1-2 in the Seedfolks Study Guide). Check your answers and add more details, if necessary. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer.

    4. Work Period: Introduce HW. Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • ,.RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we understand the significant developments in chapters 1 and 2 in Seedfolks? Due next WEDNESDAY, September 26th:
  • Read Chapter 3 (Wendell), Chapter 4 (Gonzalo), Chapter 5 (Leona), Chapter 6 (Sam), Chapter 7 (Virgil), and Chapter 8 (Sae Young) in Seedfolks (packet was provided in class). Answer the corresponding questions for chapters 3-8 here: Seedfolks Study Guide. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The common ground that the characters share is...Textual evidence that supports the common ground includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph). THESE ASSIGNMENTS ARE WORTH 30 HOMEWORK POINTS (VALUE=THREE HW ASSIGNMENTS).
  • Thursday, September 20th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List.

    Show owed HW

    2. Work Period:

  • Answer the following Seedfolks Anticipatory Questions in your LA section:
    1.) Does diversity draw people together? Explain.
    2.) What is the best way to preserve your culture?
    3.) Is America a great place for different genders, races, religions, and cultures to interact? Explain.
    4.) What usually results from a person's good deed?
    5.) What are the consequences of stereotypes?


  • Begin working on the HW due Friday.

    3. Discuss/Share Work Period Answers: Share answers to questions and engage in discussion to prepare for reading of Seedfolks.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • ,.RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prepare to read Seedfolks? Due TOMORROW, Friday, September 21st:
  • Read Chapter 1 (Kim) and Chapter 2 (Ana) in Seedfolks (packet will also be provided in class). Answer the corresponding questions for chapters 1 and 2 here: Seedfolks Study Guide. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The common ground that the characters share is...Textual evidence that supports the common ground includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).
  • Tuesday, September 18th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: What are your goals for the 1st marking period in your first high school English class? Fill out the Goal Sheet (handout provided).

    Show HW: Vocabulary Story Rewrite (show the original with the teacher's edits)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with the captain.
  • Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Work Period:

  • With a partner, create and finish the four DOK questions for the article, "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks". You must include four answer choices per question. Circle the correct the answer. You must turn it in today for classwork credit.
  • Sign out a copy of Seedfolks for the HW due Friday.
  • Prepare for Thursday's vocabulary quiz and begin working on the HW due Friday.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • ,.RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we effectively set goals for this English class and create DOK questions? Due this Thursday, September 20th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be about 20% of the 1st marking period grade.

    Due this Friday, September 21st:

  • Read Chapter 1 (Kim) and Chapter 2 (Ana) in Seedfolks (packet will also be provided in class). Answer the corresponding questions for chapters 1 and 2 here: Seedfolks Study Guide. You MUST cite a quote, chapter number and paragraph number to support each answer. For example: The common ground that the characters share is...Textual evidence that supports the common ground includes the following: "It was dawn" (chapter 1, first paragraph).
  • Monday, September 17th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: What were your strengths and weaknesses in reading and annotating the article (HW)?

    Show HW: Annotations of the article, "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks".

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with the new captain.
  • Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Review of HW:

  • Read aloud the article, "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks". Volunteers will share annotations.

    4. Work Period: With a partner, create four DOK questions for the article, "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks". You must include four answer choices per question. Circle the correct the answer. Be ready to turn in for classwork credit.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • ,.RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we improve our annotation skills and reading comprehension? Due tomorrow, Tuesday, September 18th:
  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY on "COMMON GROUND": Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story). Highlight the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original story as well.

    Due this Thursday, September 20th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be about 20% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Friday, September 14th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Describe your neighborhood. Choose TWO of the following questions to answer:
  • What does it mean to be neighbors?
  • What are your relationships with your neighbors?
  • What are some things that could potentially turn a neighborhood into a community?
  • Do you think your neighbors would welcome the opportunity to get to know you better? Explain.

    *Show owed HW to earn late (half) credit.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with the captain. Be sure to COMPARE (find similarities; word of the week) and contrast your answers.
  • Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Finish the diagnostic to the best of your ability.
  • Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • ,.RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our reading skills on the diagnostic? Due THIS Monday, September 17th:
  • Read "Both Community and Garden Grow in Seedfolks". Annotate (take notes in the margins) every paragraph--summarizing key points. Be ready to share and discuss.

    Due Tuesday, September 18th:

  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY on "COMMON GROUND": Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story). Highlight the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original story as well.

    Due next Thursday, September 20th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Seedfolks Vocabulary List. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a sentence. This quiz will be about 20% of the 1st marking period grade.
  • Thursday, September 13th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: What are strategies for success on the diagnostic (reading passages and answering multiple-choice questions)?

    *Show owed HW to earn late (half) credit.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with the captain. Be sure to COMPARE (find similarities; word of the week) and contrast your answers.
  • Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Diagnostic: Work on the diagnostic to the best of your ability.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • ,.RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we prove our reading skills on the diagnostic? Make up HW (these assignments were due yesterday!):
  • VOCABULARY STORY about "COMMON GROUND": You will write a creative story on the topic of "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). Your story must include 10 of the words taken from Seedfolks Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words ACCURATELY (word of the week) and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Common Ground." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Wednesday, September 12th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:

    Your Name
    Ms. Conn
    Elements of Literacy, Period 3
    Assignment: Seedfolks Vocabulary Story
    Date

    Original Title

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for the Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • CLASS SUPPLIES: Bring in a notebook/divider with 4 labeled sections: DNA (Do Nows and Aims), LA (Literary Analysis), LS (Language Skills), and HW (Homework)
  • Wednesday, September 12th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: What were your challenges and successes in completing the homework (vocabulary story, flashcards and class supplies)?

    *SHOW HW to earn on-time credit.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with a chosen captain.
  • Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Diagnostic: Listen to instructions on how to be successful on this diagnostic. Work on the diagnostic to the best of your ability.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • ,.RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • How can we be assessed on our first homework assignments and a diagnostic? Make up HW (these assignments were due today!):
  • VOCABULARY STORY about "COMMON GROUND": You will write a creative story on the topic of "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). Your story must include 10 of the words taken from Seedfolks Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words ACCURATELY (word of the week) and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Common Ground." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Wednesday, September 12th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:

    Your Name
    Ms. Conn
    Elements of Literacy, Period 3
    Assignment: Seedfolks Vocabulary Story
    Date

    Original Title

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for the Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • CLASS SUPPLIES: Bring in a notebook/divider with 4 labeled sections: DNA (Do Nows and Aims), LA (Literary Analysis), LS (Language Skills), and HW (Homework)
  • Friday, September 7th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: What are three good deeds/volunteer activities that you can do in your free time? Suggestions include tutoring a child, childcare, grocery shopping for an elderly person, serving food at a homeless shelter; remember, no money is given in exchange for a good deed. (These are good suggestions to counter the evil acts committed on 9/11.) Check out volunteermatch.org to find opportunities near you!

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with a chosen captain.
  • Each captain will share their table's answers with the entire class.

    3. Mini-Lesson on HW: Read aloud the Seedfolks Vocabulary List and introduce Flashcards and "Common Ground" Creative Story HW. Begin HW if time allows.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • How can we prepare for our first unit on Seedfolks? Due Wednesday, September 12th, 2018:
  • VOCABULARY STORY about "COMMON GROUND": You will write a creative story on the topic of "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). Your story must include 10 of the words taken from Seedfolks Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words ACCURATELY (word of the week) and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Common Ground." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Wednesday, September 12th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:

    Your Name
    Ms. Conn
    Elements of Literacy, Period 3
    Assignment: Seedfolks Vocabulary Story
    Date

    Original Title

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for the Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • CLASS SUPPLIES: Bring in a notebook/divider with 4 labeled sections: DNA (Do Nows and Aims), LA (Literary Analysis), LS (Language Skills), and HW (Homework)
  • Thursday, September 6th, 2018:
    1. Do Now: Find your assigned seat. What "common ground" do you have with your table mates? (You must determine a similar activity, personality trait, or cultural background similarity)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Students will share their Do Now with table mates and with a chosen captain.
  • Each captain will share their table's "common ground" with the entire class.

    3. Mini-Lesson on Classroom Rules: Teacher will introduce emergency procedures and Essential Classroom Rules.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners.
  • How can we understand our class expectations? Due Wednesday, September 12th, 2018:
  • VOCABULARY STORY about "COMMON GROUND"": You will write a creative story on the topic of "Common Ground" (similar interests among people). Your story must include 10 of the words taken from Seedfolks Vocabulary List. You must use 10 of the words ACCURATELY (word of the week) and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Common Ground." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about common ground that you have with your family, friends, neighbors, or members of a sports team. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about common ground between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write two pages handwritten OR one page typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Wednesday, September 12th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 10 chosen vocabulary words correctly in your story. Here's the heading format:

    Your Name
    Ms. Conn
    Elements of Literacy, Period 3
    Assignment: Seedfolks Vocabulary Story
    Date

    Original Title

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for the Seedfolks Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • CLASS SUPPLIES: Bring in a notebook/divider with 4 labeled sections: DNA (Do Nows and Aims), LA (Literary Analysis), LS (Language Skills), and HW (Homework)
  • Wednesday, September 5th, 2018: 1.) Do Now:
  • Number each of your sticky notes (#1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8; keep the numbers small)
  • Write the following sentence starters for each numbered sticky note:
    1. I want to earn my high school diploma because _______________.
    2. The most effective teachers are the ones who ________________.
    3. The most helpful classmates are the ones who _______________.
    4. One of my areas of strength in English class is _______________.
    5. One of my areas of weakness in English class is ______________.
    6. To read and really understand a challenging story or article, I need ______________.
    7. To produce my best writing, I need______________.
    8. By the end of the year, I plan to achieve the following goal: _______________________.

    2. Work Period: Fill in the sentence starters for each numbered sticky note. Listen to instructions on designated teams #1-8 (based on the sticky note sentence starters). Join your designated team at the matching station. Team #1 starts at sentence #1. Team #2 starts at sentence #2.

    3. Discuss/Share:

  • Teams will discuss their answers (Why is that important? What made you say that?) and post their sticky notes.
  • Whole class discussion: What were the three most common responses used to finish your team's sentence starter? Designated team captains will share their answers.
  • Teams will rotate every 2-3 minutes to each sticky note sentence starter station. Then, they'll repeat the same discussion (8x) until they eventually get back to their original station.. They'll get to see more responses from their classmates and they'll get to see themes emerge.
  • Now that they're back at their first station, they will organize the notes (about 34, depending on the number of students in their class) into similar themes or ideas. Example: If eight people said they want to earn their diploma because they want to get a decent job, group those answers together. If six people said they didn't want to disappoint their families, group those answers together. And so on...

    4. Exit Slip:

  • As a team, decide the single most important thing for me, your teacher, to remember about today's discussion (write on an index card). (Have the kids take down the sticky notes to prepare for the next class)
  • Independently, students will turn in a get-to-know-you handout.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1
  • SL.9-10.4
  • How can we understand our learning styles and goals for success this school year?