Senior Honor Assignments, Fall 2007

Senior HONOR Assignments
Fall 2007/Winter 2008

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Friday, January 18th, 2008: 1. AP Lit. Exam Review: Review of the reasoning regarding the answers found in the AP Lit. questions.

2. Paper instructions and VETY work--use Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.

Students will evaluate exemplary writing and work on reading comprehension analysis and question reasoning on the AP Exam. Due January 30th:
  • Write a revision of the Compare/Contrast Paper (returned today), implementing the teacher's suggestions/edits.
  • Obtain copy of Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Read by January 30th (first day of 2nd semester).
  • Kite Runner Paper: Paper Topic (taken from the 2007 AP English Literature Exam)--In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present actions, attitudes, or values of a character. Focus on Kite Runner in which a character in the novel must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Write a short essay (2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading) in which you show how a character's relationship to the past contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not summarize the plot. Use literary elements throughout your writing (e.g. characterization, setting, dialogue, flashback, conflict, etc.). Do not use direct quotes; instead, paraphrase in your own words. Grading: To earn a 90% or better, you should offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how a character's relationship to the past affects the character's actions, attitudes, or values, Using apt and specific textual support, your essay should fully explore that relationship and demonstrate what it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Your essay should make a strong case for your interpretation and discuss Kite Runner with significant insight and understanding. You should reveal more sophisticated analysis and effective control of language. Use this AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC for the paper. A 9/10 is a 90-100%, the 8 is an 80-89%, 6/7 is a 65-79%.
  • Begin your VETY flashcards (there's no minimum requirement; instead, just show you've begin some flashcards). Use this VETY link. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.
  • Thursday, January 17th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Analysis of the Compare/Contrast Paper (on Hamlet and Henry IV Part I), which is returned today. Analysis of an exemplary paper . What did he/she do well? Use this exemplary paper to guide you in your revisions and future papers.

    2. AP Lit. Exam Review: Review of the reasoning regarding the answers found in the AP Lit. questions.

    Students will evaluate exemplary writing and work on reading comprehension analysis and question reasoning on the AP Exam. Due January 30th:
  • Write a revision of the Compare/Contrast Paper (returned today), implementing the teacher's suggestions/edits.
  • Obtain copy of Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Read by January 30th (first day of 2nd semester). Paper TBA.
  • Wednesday, January 16th, 2008: AP Lit. Exam Review: Review of the reasoning regarding the answers found in the AP Lit. questions. Students will work on reading comprehension analysis and question reasoning on the AP Exam. Due January 30th:
  • Obtain copy of Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Read by January 30th (first day of 2nd semester). Paper TBA.
  • Tuesday, January 15th, 2008: AP Lit. Exam Review: Review the question types in the AP Lit. Exam. Students will work on reading comprehension analysis and question reasoning on the AP Exam. Due January 30th:
  • Obtain copy of Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Bring in to class. Read by January 30th (first day of 2nd semester). Paper TBA.
  • Monday, January 14th, 2008: Work Period: Work on the HW due TOMORROW (reasoning for the answers for each question on the AP English lit. packet). Students will work on reading comprehension analysis and question reasoning on the AP Exam. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, January 15th:
  • Determine question types for each question in the AP English Lit. packet.
  • Write an explanation (one paragraph--minimum of 2-3 sentences) for each correct answer in the AP English lit. packet.
  • Friday, January 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Work on part of the HW due Tuesday (question types for each question on the AP English lit. packet).

    2. AP English Lit. Question Review: Finish reviewing the answers. Discuss the two wrong answers determined from each question.

    3. AP Practice Question Analysis for AP English Language: Finish review of the question types for the AP English Language Exam.

    4. Work Period: Work on the HW due Tues.

    Students will work on reading comprehension analysis and question types on the AP Exam. Due Tuesday, January 15th:
  • Determine question types for each question in the AP English Lit. packet.
  • Write an explanation (one paragraph--minimum of 2-3 sentences) for each correct answer in the AP English lit. packet.
  • Thursday, January 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Eliminate two wrong answers (or more) from each question in the AP English Lit. packet. Write the greatest obstacle to overcome on the top of your packet.

    2. AP English Lit. Question Review: Review the answers.

    Students will work on reading comprehension analysis and question types on the AP Exam. Due TOMORROW, Friday, January 11th:
  • Circle the unknown words in the AP English Lit. question packet and the AP English Language packet. Define all of the words in the margins.
  • Wednesday, January 9th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish circling the unknown words in the packet. Define these unknown words in the margins of the text.

    2. AP Practice Question Analysis and Answer Review: Review the question types and identify where the answers can be found in the text.

    3. Introduce the Practice Questions Packet from the AP English Literature Exam.

    Students will work on reading comprehension analysis and question types on the AP Exam. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, January 10th:
  • Answer the multiple choice questions for the AP English Lit. Packet (received in class only).
  • Tuesday, January 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: What were the challenges of AP Practice Questions from the AP English Language and Composition Exam? Identify at least three challenges. Circle the unknown words in the reading passages and questions.

    2. AP Practice Question Analysis and Answer Review: Review the answers for the HW questions. Students will analyze question types and identify where answers can be found.

    Students will work on reading comprehension analysis and question types on the AP Exam. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, January 9th:
  • Finish identifying question types and analysis of the answers (see classwork).
  • Monday, January 7th, 2008: 1. Book Club Discussion Review: Reflections shared with whole class regarding the small group book clubs. Discuss the usefulness and interest of both the General Book Club Discussion Questions and the 10 narrow/focused discussion questions that were created by the group members.

    2. Work Period: Work on the AP Practice Questions Packet, which is due tomorrow.

    Students will apply metacognitive reflections in discussion. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, January 8th:
  • AP Practice Questions Packet for the AP English Language and Composition Exam (this was received in class only; pages 12-20, excluding page 18, which is missing from the packet). Just answer the multiple choice questions.
  • Friday, January 4th, 2008: 1. Book Club Discussion: Finish discussion on the 10 narrow/focused discussion questions that are both applicable and interesting to the group members. The questions should be more specific questions that fall in the general categories listed above. They should be specific in that they make references to particular text and should warrant discussion on signficance to the chosen topic, the novel as a whole, and universality. Be prepared to answer one random question from the questions composed within your group.

    2. Random Answer Write-Up: Students will receive a random question from their list of questions to answer and turn in for credit.

    Students will discuss in Book Club Groups, engaging in analytical discussion and composition of discussion questions. Due Tuesday, January 8th:
  • AP Practice Questions Packet for the AP English Language and Composition Exam (this was received in class only; pages 12-20, excluding page 18, which is missing from the packet). Just answer the multiple choice questions.
  • Thursday, January 3rd, 2008: Book Club Discussion: Discuss the General Book Club Discussion Questions and the 10 narrow/focused discussion questions that are both applicable and interesting to the group members. The questions should be more specific questions that fall in the general categories listed above. They should be specific in that they make references to particular text and should warrant discussion on signficance to the chosen topic, the novel as a whole, and universality. Students will discuss in Book Club Groups, engaging in analytical discussion and composition of discussion questions. Due TOMORROW, Friday, January 4th:
  • Find appropriate page # references for your group's ten specific discussion questions. They should be specific in that they make references to particular text and should warrant discussion on signficance to the chosen topic, the novel as a whole, and universality. Make sure you are comfortable with the questions and familiar with the answers.
  • Continue to prepare for the in-class discussion of the General Book Club Discussion Questions.
  • Wednesday, January 2nd, 2008: 1. As You Like It Scene Performance Awards: Presentation of Awards!

    2. Book Club Discussion Requirements: Examine the General Book Club Discussion Questions.

    3. Book Club Discussion Group Work: In your Book Club Groups, begin to create 10 narrow/focused discussion questions that are both applicable and interesting to the group members. The questions should be more specific questions that fall in the general categories listed above. They should be specific in that they make references to particular text and should warrant discussion on signficance to the chosen topic, the novel as a whole, and universality.

    Students will work in Book Club Groups, engaging in analytical discussion and composition of discussion questions. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, January 3rd: You MUST read the book for your book discussion group by TOMORROW and be ready to engage in both general and specific discussion Q & A. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion tomorrow. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.
  • Finish today's classwork. Using the General Book Club Discussion Questions, finish composing the specific discussion questions for your chosen Book Club novel. Create 10 narrow/focused discussion questions that are both applicable and interesting to the group members. The questions should be more specific questions that fall in the general categories listed in the link above. They should be specific in that they make references to particular text and should warrant discussion on signficance to the chosen topic, the novel as a whole, and universality.
  • Friday, December 21st, 2007: As You Like It Scene Performances: Finish the remaining performances. Class evaluations will be offered and discussed. Students will present their interpretive performances of As You Like It, offering visual and oral presentation. Due Thursday, January 3rd: You MUST read the book for your book discussion group by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion upon returning from Winter Vacation. Discussion questions will be provided at that time. Read and discuss with your group mates over the vacation, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.
    Thursday, December 20th, 2007: As You Like It Scene Performances: Acts I, II, III and IV will perform today. Class evaluations will be offered and discussed. Students will present their interpretive performances of As You Like It, offering visual and oral presentation. Due TOMORROW, Friday, 12/20:
  • All remaining performances of scenes from As You Like It will be presented. Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Due Thursday, January 3rd: You MUST read the book for your book discussion group by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion upon returning from Winter Vacation. Discussion questions will be provided at that time. Read and discuss with your group mates over the vacation, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Wednesday, December 19th, 2007: As You Like It Scene Performances: Acts I, II and III will perform today. Class evaluations will be offered and discussed. Students will present their interpretive performances of As You Like It, offering visual and oral presentation. Due Thursday (12/20):
  • Performances of Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother) will perform TOMORROW. Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Due January 3rd: You MUST read the book for your book discussion group by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion upon returning from Winter Vacation. Discussion questions will be provided at that time. Read and discuss with your group mates over the vacation, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Tuesday, December 18th, 2007: As You Like It Scene Work Period: Work on the Scene assignment HW--see details in the homework section to the right(Due TOMORROW and THURS.). Students will work on scene preparation--character assignments, read-through, and sharpening performance work. Due Tomorrow (Wed. 12/19) and Thursday (12/20):
  • Arrange in your own groups (according to the following scenes), though girls must play female roles and boys must play male roles. Here are the scene choices: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It, which will perform their assigned scene on Wednesday. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother) will perform on Thursday. Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Due January 3rd: You MUST read the book for your book discussion group by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion upon returning from Winter Vacation. Discussion questions will be provided at that time. Read and discuss with your group mates over the vacation, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Monday, December 17th, 2007: As You Like It Scene Instructions and Work Period: Work on the Scene assignment HW (Due THIS Wed. and Thurs.) found here--Arrange in your own groups (according to the following scenes). Here are the scene choices: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It, which will perform their assigned scene on Wednesday. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother) will perform on Thursday. Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Students will work on scene preparation--character assignments, read-through, and beginning performance work.

    Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, December 18th: Bring in the novel/title which you will be reading with a group of 4-6 of your classmates. Remember, the novel should be chosen from one of the following links in which you will read in a small book discussion group. You MUST read the book by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Here are the links which you can choose from: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion upon returning from Winter Vacation. Discussion questions will be provided at that time. Read and discuss with your group mates over the vacation, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

    Due Wednesday (12/19) and Thursday (12/20):

  • Arrange in your own groups (according to the following scenes), though girls must play female roles and boys must play male roles. Here are the scene choices: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It, which will perform their assigned scene on Wednesday. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother) will perform on Thursday. Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.
  • Friday, December 14th, 2007: Work Period: Work on HW due next week. Students will work on scene preparation--character assignments, read-through, and beginning performance work.

    Due Monday, December 17th. With a group of 4-6 of your classmates, choose a novel from one of the following links in which you will read in a small book discussion group. You and your group mates will need to have the book approved by the date listed here. You MUST read the book by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Here are the links which you can choose from: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion upon returning from Winter Vacation. Discussion questions will be provided at that time. Read and discuss with your group mates over the vacation, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

    Due Wednesday (12/19) and Thursday (12/20):

  • Arrange in your own groups (according to the following scenes), though girls must play female roles and boys must play male roles. Here are the scene choices: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It, which will perform their assigned scene on Wednesday. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother) will perform on Thursday. Scene performances should include the following: Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.
  • Thursday, December 13th, 2007: NO CLASS DUE TO TRANSFER TO NEWCOMERS HIGH SCHOOL. Students will work on final paper on their own time. Due TOMORROW--Friday, December 14th--The Final Shakespeare Paper MUST be e-mailed to me at hconn28@yahoo.com by class time (10:40-11:25am):
  • Final Shakespeare Paper--reflect on all three Shakespearean plays studied in this course. In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze how William Shakespeare's plays, specifically Hamlet, Henry IV Part I, and As You Like It, reveal significant commonalities that convey the human experience. The human experience may include, though is not limited to, male/female portrayals, familial relationships, or stages of life. Include generous references to all three plays in which you explain how the evidence of human experience contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Analyze how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points.

    Works Cited information for As You Like It:
    Use the following information below, though indent (5 spaces) on the 2nd and 3rd lines. Also, use these brackets <> around the link below.

    The Literature Network. 2000-2007. As You Like It by William Shakespeare. Date you accessed the site. http://www.online-literature.com/shakespeare/youlike/.

    Due Monday, December 17th. With a group of 4-6 of your classmates, choose a novel from one of the following links in which you will read in a small book discussion group. You and your group mates will need to have the book approved by the date listed here. You MUST read the book by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Here are the links which you can choose from: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion upon returning from Winter Vacation. Discussion questions will be provided at that time. Read and discuss with your group mates over the vacation, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

    Due Wednesday (12/19) and Thursday (12/20):

  • Arrange in your own groups (according to the following scenes), though girls must play female roles and boys must play male roles. Here are the scene choices: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It, which will perform their assigned scene on Wednesday. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother) will perform on Thursday. Scene performances should include the following: Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.
  • Wednesday, December 12th, 2007: NO CLASS DUE TO EMERGENCY EVACUATION/GAS LEAK. Students will work on final paper. Due THIS Friday, December 14th--The Final Shakespeare Paper MUST be e-mailed to me at hconn28@yahoo.com by class time (10:40-11:25am):
  • Final Shakespeare Paper--reflect on all three Shakespearean plays studied in this course. In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze how William Shakespeare's plays, specifically Hamlet, Henry IV Part I, and As You Like It, reveal significant commonalities that convey the human experience. The human experience may include, though is not limited to, male/female portrayals, familial relationships, or stages of life. Include generous references to all three plays in which you explain how the evidence of human experience contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Analyze how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points.

    Works Cited information for As You Like It:
    Use the following information below, though indent (5 spaces) on the 2nd and 3rd lines. Also, use these brackets <> around the link below.

    The Literature Network. 2000-2007. As You Like It by William Shakespeare. Date you accessed the site. http://www.online-literature.com/shakespeare/youlike/.

    Due Monday, December 17th. With a group of 4-6 of your classmates, choose a novel from one of the following links in which you will read in a small book discussion group. You and your group mates will need to have the book approved by the date listed here. You MUST read the book by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Here are the links which you can choose from: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion upon returning from Winter Vacation. Discussion questions will be provided at that time. Read and discuss with your group mates over the vacation, analyzing themes, character development, conflicts, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Tuesday, December 11th, 2007: 1. Do Now--Discussion on As You Like It: Engage in Thematic Discussion on restriction vs. freedom and other proof of human experience including male/female portrayals, family, friend and enemy relationships, and stages of life--including rebellious youth, parent, and elderly. This discussion should be based on analysis explored in your own journal, As You Like It. Be ready to lead discussion, using your questions, textual evidence from the play and commentary written in your journal.

    2. Introduce HW.

    Students will analyze themes and begin discussion points/questions on As You Like It. Due THIS Friday, December 14th--The Final Shakespeare Paper MUST be e-mailed to me at hconn28@yahoo.com by class time (10:40-11:25am):
  • Final Shakespeare Paper--reflect on all three Shakespearean plays studied in this course. In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze how William Shakespeare's plays, specifically Hamlet, Henry IV Part I, and As You Like It, reveal significant commonalities that convey the human experience. The human experience may include, though is not limited to, male/female portrayals, familial relationships, or stages of life. Include generous references to all three plays in which you explain how the evidence of human experience contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Analyze how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points.

    Works Cited information for As You Like It:
    Use the following information below, though indent (5 spaces) on the 2nd and 3rd lines. Also, use these brackets <> around the link below.

    The Literature Network. 2000-2007. As You Like It by William Shakespeare. Date you accessed the site. http://www.online-literature.com/shakespeare/youlike/.

    Due Monday, December 17th. With a group of 4-6 of your classmates, choose a novel from one of the following links in which you will read in a small book discussion group. You and your group mates will need to have the book approved by the date listed here. You MUST read the book by January 3rd (the day we return from the Winter Vacation). Here are the links which you can choose from: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Monday, December 10th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Discuss Final Paper instructions.

    2. Discussion on As You Like It: Engage in Thematic Discussion on restriction vs. freedom and other proof of human experience including male/female portrayals, familial relationships, and stages of life. Discussion focuses on gender, social class, relationships, and the experiences of the lovers and rebellious youth. This discussion should be based on analysis explored in your own journal, As You Like It. Be ready to lead discussion, using your questions, textual evidence from the play and commentary written in your journal.

    Students will analyze themes and begin discussion points/questions on As You Like It. Due THIS Friday, December 14th--The Final Shakespeare Paper MUST be e-mailed to me at hconn28@yahoo.com by class time (10:40-11:25am):
  • Final Shakespeare Paper--reflect on all three Shakespearean plays studied in this course. In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze how William Shakespeare's plays, specifically Hamlet, Henry IV Part I, and As You Like It, reveal significant commonalities that convey the human experience. The human experience may include, though is not limited to, male/female portrayals, familial relationships, or stages of life. Include generous references to all three plays in which you explain how the evidence of human experience contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Analyze how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points.
  • Friday, December 7th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Review your five discussion questions based on themes presented in your own journal on As You Like It. Be ready to lead discussion, using your questions, textual evidence from the play and commentary written in your journal. Show HW--evaluation of Hamlet writing.

    2. Discuss Writing Analysis: Discuss/Review Hamlet papers, examining grading rubric and teacher edits. What were your strengths and weaknesses?

    3. Thematic Discussion on As You Like It: Discussion ensues regarding theme of restrictions vs. freedom.

    Students will analyze themes and begin discussion points/questions on As You Like It. Due NEXT Friday, December 14th:
  • Final Shakespeare Paper--reflect on all three Shakespearean plays studied in this course. In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze how William Shakespeare's plays, specifically Hamlet, Henry IV Part I, and As You Like It, reveal significant commonalities that convey the human experience. The human experience may include, though is not limited to, male/female portrayals, familial relationships, or stages of life. Include generous references to all three plays in which you explain how the evidence of human experience contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Analyze how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points.
  • Thursday, December 6th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Create five discussion questions based on themes presented in your own journal on As You Like It. This is an individual assignment. Be ready to lead discussion, using your questions, textual evidence from the play and commentary written in your journal.

    2. Compile list of class's 20-word summaries on As You Like It.

    3. Writing Analysis: Analyze your Hamlet papers, examining the grading rubric and teacher edits.

    Students will analyze themes and create discussion points/questions on As You Like It. Due Tomorrow, Friday, December 7th:
  • Compose one-page (minimum), in list format, of your weaknesses/areas needing improvement, as determined from your Hamlet paper. You should refer to the teacher edits and grading rubric. You should include real evidence of your errors. It should be typed, double spaced, with proper heading.
  • Wednesday, December 5th, 2007: 1. Do Now: List #11 Quiz

    2. Share 20-word Summaries of As You Like It: Examine classmates' summaries of the play, identifying the strengths and ambiguities.

    3. Discussion/Sharing/Analysis: Share your succinct summaries of As You Like It. Class decides which summaries most clearly represent the entirety of the play, without ambiguity.

    Students will present their succinct summaries on As You Like It, focusing on the essence of the play. Work on your college applications! My Recommendation--all college applications should be submitted before the Winter Vacation! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Tuesday, December 4th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Finish Visual Poster Project Presentation for As You Like It

    2. Summarize As You Like It: Use the bare minimum (that's 20 words) to summarize the play with a partner. Visually represent the summary.

    3. Discussion/Sharing/Analysis: Share your succinct summaries of As You Like It.

    Students will present their visual representations of each act from As You Like It and provide succinct summaries of the play. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, December 5th:
  • List #11 Quiz
  • Visually represent your 20-word summary of As You Like It.

    Work on your college applications! My Recommendation--all college applications should be submitted before the Winter Vacation! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Monday, December 3rd, 2007: 1. Do Now: Visual Poster Project Presentation for As You Like It

    2. Distribute Vocabulary Quiz #10

    3. Introduce List #11--the final list!

    Students will present their visual representations of each act from As You Like It. Due Wednesday, December 5th:
  • List #11 Quiz

    Work on your college applications! My Recommendation--all college applications should be submitted before the Winter Vacation! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Friday, November 30th, 2007: 1. Do Now:: Instructions provided on Visual Representations on Acts I-V, using the guiding questions.

    2. Work Period--Visual Poster Project for As You Like It

    Students will engage in visual representations of Acts from As You Like It. Due Monday, December 3rd:
  • Finish Visual Poster Presentation of As You Like It.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Thursday, November 29th, 2007: 1. Do Now:: Freewrite 250 WORDS on similarities in Shakespeare's literary style/choices/techniques in all three plays, Hamlet, Henry IV Part I, and As You Like It.

    2. Discuss/Share Shakespeare's literary style/choices/techniques.

    3. Discussion/Analysis of Restrictions and Expectations on Gender: There are descriptions about the nature of women throughout the play spoken by both female and male characters suggesting there is an essential difference between the two genders. Is there an essential difference between men and women? What is the nature of this difference? If there isn't a difference, why is it commonly assumed that there is a difference? Analyze (and discuss later) gender expectations. Why do some expectations emerge? When did the idea emerge that women couldn't work as hard as men? How much work did women do during Shakespeare's times? During modern America? Is there an idea that upper class women and men are less strong than lower class women and men? What do these notions tell us about how social class and concepts of gender are intertwined?

    Students will engage in pre-reading discussion/analysis on topics of class and gender in As You Like It. DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30TH:
  • Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting.
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Wednesday, November 28th, 2007: 1. Do Now:: Vocabulary List #10 Quiz

    2. Discussion on Restrictions and Expectations on Class and Gender: Read the opening lines spoken by Orlando from As You Like It: "...he [Oliver, his older brother] keeps me rustically at home, or, to speak more properly, stays me here at home unkept; for call you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth that differs not from the stalling of an ox? His horses are bred better, for, besides that they are fair with their feeding, they are taught their manage, and to that end riders dearly hired; but I, his brother, gain nothing under him but growth..."(I, i, 6-14).

    Discuss your freewrite on Orlando's complaint. What is he saying? Why is he upset? What expectations does Orlando have about the type of education which he deserves? What does he imply about his nature as a gentleman? What does he think is the difference between himself and men who are not born as gentlemen?

    Discussion/Analysis of Restrictions and Expectations on Gender: There are descriptions about the nature of women throughout the play spoken by both female and male characters suggesting there is an essential difference between the two genders. Is there an essential difference between men and women? What is the nature of this difference? If there isn't a difference, why is it commonly assumed that there is a difference? Analyze (and discuss later) gender expectations. Why do some expectations emerge? When did the idea emerge that women couldn't work as hard as men? How much work did women do during Shakespeare's times? During modern America? Is there an idea that upper class women and men are less strong than lower class women and men? What do these notions tell us about how social class and concepts of gender are intertwined?

    Students will engage in pre-reading discussion/analysis on topics of class and gender in As You Like It. DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30TH:
  • Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting.
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Tuesday, November 27th, 2007: 1. Do Now:: Award Presentations for Best Overall Performance, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Supporting Actor, Best Set Design, Best Costume for the scenes from Henry IV Part I.

    2. Brainstorming/Analysis on Restrictions and Expectations on Class and Gender: Read the opening lines spoken by Orlando from As You Like It: "...he [Oliver, his older brother] keeps me rustically at home, or, to speak more properly, stays me here at home unkept; for call you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth that differs not from the stalling of an ox? His horses are bred better, for, besides that they are fair with their feeding, they are taught their manage, and to that end riders dearly hired; but I, his brother, gain nothing under him but growth..."(I, i, 6-14).

    Write freely about Orlando's complaint. What is he saying? Why is he upset? What expectations does Orlando have about the type of education which he deserves? What does he imply about his nature as a gentleman? What does he think is the difference between himself and men who are not born as gentlemen?

    Analysis of Restrictions and Expectations on Gender: There are descriptions about the nature of women throughout the play spoken by both female and male characters suggesting there is an essential difference between the two genders. Is there an essential difference between men and women? What is the nature of this difference? If there isn't a difference, why is it commonly assumed that there is a difference? Analyze (and discuss later) gender expectations. Why do some expectations emerge? When did the idea emerge that women couldn't work as hard as men? How much work did women do during Shakespeare's times? During modern America? Is there an idea that upper class women and men are less strong than lower class women and men? What do these notions tell us about how social class and concepts of gender are intertwined?

    Students will engage in pre-reading for As You Like It. DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30TH:
  • Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting.
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Monday, November 26th, 2007: Scene Performances--Continued!: In your scene performances, the following answers to the questions should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    2. Voting: Class will vote for Best Overall Performance, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Supporting Actor, Best Set Design, Best Costume!

    Students will engage in scene performances for Henry IV Part I. Due THIS Wednesday, November 28th:
  • Vocabulary List #10 Quiz

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30TH:

  • Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting.
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Wednesday, November 21st, 2007: Scene Performances: In your scene performances, the following answers to the questions should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Students will work on scene performance preparation for Henry IV Part I. Due Wednesday, November 28th:
  • Vocabulary List #10 Quiz

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30TH:

  • Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting.
  • Dialectical Journal for As You Like It. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Tuesday, November 20, 2007: Scene Performances: In your scene performances, the following answers to the questions should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Students will work on scene performance preparation for Henry IV Part I.
  • DUE TOMORROW--WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST: Continue Scene Performances for Henry IV Part I. In your scene, the following should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene. Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Monday, November 19, 2007: Scene Preparation: In scene groups, work on scene performances. Since answering the HW questions on your scene, you should now collaborate with your scene group members. Make sure everyone is on the same page. In your scene, the following answers to the questions should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Students will work on scene performance preparation for Henry IV Part I.
  • DUE TOMORROW--TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST: Scene Performances for Henry IV Part I. In your scene, the following should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene. Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Friday, November 16, 2007: Scene Preparation: In scene groups, work on scene performances. Since answering the HW questions on your scene, you should now collaborate with your scene group members. Make sure everyone is on the same page. In your scene, the following answers to the questions should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Students will work on scene performance preparation for Henry IV Part I. Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH:

  • Compare/Contrast Essay on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower. Use the following Comparison/Contrast writing resource:LITERACY EDUCATION ONLINE.

  • Date Change--DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST: Scene Performances for Henry IV Part I. In your scene, the following should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene. Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.
  • Thursday, November 15, 2007: 1. Do Now: Class Discussion: Finish thematic discussions; groups will lead whole class discussion on their designated themes, using specific evidence from Henry IV Part I. Class will take notes. Discussion points will also connect to the overall human experience that Shakespeare reveals in the text, as well as connections identified with Hamlet.

    2. Scene Preparation: In scene groups, work on scene performances.

    Students will analyze thematic points and overall lessons about the human experience in Henry IV Part I. Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH:

  • Compare/Contrast Essay on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower. Use the following Comparison/Contrast writing resource:LITERACY EDUCATION ONLINE.

  • Date Change--DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH/WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST: Scene Performances for Henry IV Part I. In your scene, the following should be apparent--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices (levels, spatial relationships) will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene. Think about furniture, background and props. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.
  • Wednesday, November 14, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #9 Quiz

    2. Class Discussion: Continue with one more thematic discussion; groups will lead whole class discussion on their designated themes, using specific evidence from Henry IV Part I. Class will take notes. Discussion points will also connect to the overall human experience that Shakespeare reveals in the text, as well as connections identified with Hamlet.

    Students will analyze thematic points and overall lessons about the human experience in Henry IV Part I. Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due Monday, November 19th:

  • Compare/Contrast Essay on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower. Use the following Comparison/Contrast writing resource:LITERACY EDUCATION ONLINE.

  • Scene Performances for Henry IV Part I--Tuesday, November 20-Wednesday, November 21st
  • Tuesday, November 13, 2007: 1. Do Now: Class Discussion: Continue with one more thematic discussion; groups will lead whole class discussion on their designated themes, using specific evidence from Henry IV Part I. Class will take notes. Discussion points will also connect to the overall human experience that Shakespeare reveals in the text, as well as connections identified with Hamlet.

    2. Scene Analysis for Henry IV Part I: Groups will organize and prepare their scenes, analyze their scene designs and work on edits.

    Students will analyze thematic points and overall lessons about the human experience in Henry IV Part I. Due TOMORROW--Wednesday, November 14th: List #9 Quiz.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due Monday, November 19th:

  • Compare/Contrast Essay on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower. Use the following Comparison/Contrast writing resource:LITERACY EDUCATION ONLINE.

  • Scene Performances for Henry IV Part I--Monday, November 19-Tuesday, November 20th
  • Friday, November 9, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce Scenes for Henry IV Part I--see HW.

    2. Class Discussion: Continue with two more thematic discussion groups will lead whole class discussion on their designated themes, using specific evidence from Henry IV Part I. Class will take notes. Discussion points will also connect to the overall human experience that Shakespeare reveals in the text, as well as connections identified with Hamlet.

    Students will analyze thematic points and overall lessons about the human experience in Henry IV Part I. Scene Assignments for Henry IV Part I:
  • Scene groups will organize according to the Elements of Astrological Signs. The Elements and their corresponding Signs are Fire (Aries, Leo and Sagittarius), Earth (Taurus, Virgo and Capricorn), Air (Gemini, Libra and Aquarius) and Water (Cancer, Scorpio, and Pisces).
  • Scene Groups are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters)
  • Due Tuesday, November 13th: 1.) Character Journal: For your specific character--this should be 250 words, typed, double-spaced, appropriate heading. This journal should be in first person. This journal is similar to a diary entry, sharing thoughts/feelings, events, and opinions regarding your scene ONLY. 2.) Scene Design: Answer the following questions for your scene--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Draw a picture or write a description of your costume. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene. Think about furniture, background and props. Draw a picture or write a description of the set. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. Draw a picture or write a description of your lighting design. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Write a description of your sound design. 3.) Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due Wednesday, November 14th: List #9 Quiz.

    Due Monday, November 19th:

  • Compare/Contrast Essay on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower. Use the following Comparison/Contrast writing resource:LITERACY EDUCATION ONLINE.
  • Thursday, November 8, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce Comparison/Contrast Paper (see HW).

    2. Class Discussion: Two more thematic discussion groups will lead whole class discussion on their designated themes, using specific evidence from Henry IV Part I. Class will take notes. Discussion points will also connect to the overall human experience that Shakespeare reveals in the text, as well as connections identified with Hamlet.

    Students will analyze thematic points and overall lessons about the human experience in Henry IV Part I. Scene Assignments for Henry IV Part I:
  • Scene groups will organize according to the Elements of Astrological Signs. The Elements and their corresponding Signs are Fire (Aries, Leo and Sagittarius), Earth (Taurus, Virgo and Capricorn), Air (Gemini, Libra and Aquarius) and Water (Cancer, Scorpio, and Pisces).
  • Scene Groups are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters)
  • Due Tuesday, November 13th: 1.) Character Journal: For your specific character--this should be 250 words, typed, double-spaced, appropriate heading. This journal should be in first person. This journal is similar to a diary entry, sharing thoughts/feelings, events, and opinions regarding your scene ONLY. 2.) Scene Design: Answer the following questions for your scene--What's the main conflict in your scene? What actions is your character playing? What physical choices will you use to convey the emotions and conflict in your scene? What costumes will you use to reflect your character's personality? How will your constume reflect the theme and mood of your scene? Make choices about color, style, and fabric. Draw a picture or write a description of your costume. Where does the scene take place? How will the set reflect the theme and the mood of the scene. Think about furniture, background and props. Draw a picture or write a description of the set. How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? How does the light reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about these lighting choices--color and brightness. Draw a picture or write a description of your lighting design. How will music and sound help to tell the story of the scene? How will the music and sound reflect the theme and the mood of the scene? Think about choices in music, sound effects and volume. Write a description of your sound design. 3.) Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Read for pleasure. I recommend a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due Wednesday, November 14th: List #9 Quiz.

    Due Monday, November 19th:

  • Compare/Contrast Essay on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower. Use the following Comparison/Contrast writing resource:LITERACY EDUCATION ONLINE.
  • Wednesday, November 7, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #8 Quiz

    2. Class Discussion: Two more thematic discussion groups will lead whole class discussion on their designated themes, using specific evidence from Henry IV Part I. Class will take notes. Discussion points will also connect to the overall human experience that Shakespeare reveals in the text, as well as connections identified with Hamlet.

    Students will analyze thematic points and overall lessons about the human experience in Henry IV Part I. Work on your college applications! If you need assistance, please ask.

    Due Monday, November 19th:

  • Compare/Contrast Essay on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower. Use the following Comparison/Contrast writing resource:LITERACY EDUCATION ONLINE.
  • Tuesday, November 6, 2007: NO SCHOOL-ELECTION DAY NO SCHOOL-ELECTION DAY
  • Vocabulary List #8 Quiz--TOMORROW: Wednesday.
  • Monday, November 5, 2007: 1. Do Now: In your thematic discussion groups, finetune your HW questions for the chosen themes in Henry IV Part I. Be prepared to share with the class. Any revelations? What does Shakespeare teach his readers/audience about the human experience from Henry IV Part I? Refer to specific evidence in the play to support your answers. While class prepares discussion points, teacher will check persuasive paper due today.

    2. Class Discussion: One thematic discussion group will lead whole class discussion on their designated theme, using specific evidence from Henry IV Part I. Class will take notes. Discussion points will also connect to the overall human experience that Shakespeare reveals in the text, as well as connections identified with Hamlet.

    3. Introduce List #8: Introduce analysis and pronunciation of List #8.

    Students will analyze thematic points and overall lessons about the human experience in Henry IV Part I.
  • Vocabulary List #8 Quiz--Wednesday.
  • Friday, November 2, 2007: 1. Do Now: In your thematic discussion groups, share and discuss your HW questions for the chosen themes in Henry IV Part I. Be prepared to share with the class. Any revelations? What does Shakespeare teach his readers/audience about the human experience from Henry IV Part I? Refer to specific evidence in the play to support your answers.

    2. Introduce HW: Introduce paper due Monday.

    Students will analyze thematic points and overall lessons about the human experience in Henry IV Part I.
  • DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH: Persuasive paper on "The Human Experience and Hamlet and Henry IV Part I".
    --Requirements: Two-pages, typed (double spaced, 12 point font, appropriate heading--your name and date on the right hand side AND my name and course/period on the left hand side); Explain why Shakespeare should be read by everyone and why his texts reflect the human experience. Use the texts, Hamlet and Henry IV Part I, to support your arguments.


  • Vocabulary List #8 Quiz--Wednesday.
  • Thursday, November 1, 2007: 1. Do Now: Share themes and 20-word summaries of Henry IV Part I.

    2. Group Discussions and Analysis: Organize groups according to similar themes in Henry IV Part I. Each thematic group will brainstorm five discussion questions, with textual evidence to spark discussion for each question. Suggested question types: For a theme on family as an important role: How is King Henry like or unlike your own fathers? For a theme on successful leaders as role models: What is Shakespeare trying to tell us about what it takes to be a successful politician in his era?

    3. Introduce HW.

    Students will analyze character portrayals, themes and plot summary of Henry IV Part I.
  • DUE TOMORROW: Finish classwork (see classwork section to the left)--FIVE Thematic Discussion Questions with your group--each question should be able to lead a discussion, while also providing textual evidence to prompt discussion.
  • DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH: Persuasive paper on "The Human Experience and Hamlet and Henry IV Part I".
    --Requirements: Two-pages, typed (double spaced, 12 point font, appropriate heading--your name and date on the right hand side AND my name and course/period on the left hand side); Explain why Shakespeare should be read by everyone and why his texts reflect the human experience. Use the texts, Hamlet and Henry IV Part I, to support your arguments.
  • Wednesday, October 31, 2007--Happy Halloween: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #7 Quiz

    2. Character Analysis: Sharing of characters, roles, and objects that each character can metaphorically act as in Henry IV Part I.

    3. Identify similar themes in both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I. Write the plot of Henry IV Part I in exactly 20 words.

    Students will analyze character portrayals, and themes and from Henry IV Part I through literary analysis. Finish classwork--bring in TOMORROW, Thursday, November 1st!
    Tuesday, October 30, 2007: 1. Do Now: Finish Group Presentations/Discussions of Hamlet Famous Quotes: Each previously assigned group will present and discuss their famous Hamlet quotes found HERE. They will share character identities, conflicts and themes/messages offered from these very famous quotes that define Hamlet.

    2. Character Analysis: For each student's chosen character, identify the following--three character traits that the character possesses to play his/her role in the play AND five objects that your character can become and why (examples: song, animal, fruit, article of clothing, website, movie, book, food). Be prepared to share.

    Students will analyze character portrayals, conflicts and revealing themes in famous quotes taken from Hamlet through literary analysis. Vocabulary List #7 Quiz TOMORROW, Wednesday, October 31st
    Monday, October 29, 2007: 1. Do Now: Finish Group Presentations/Discussions of Hamlet Famous Quotes: Each previously assigned group will present and discuss their famous Hamlet quotes found HERE. They will share character identities, conflicts and themes/messages offered from these very famous quotes that define Hamlet. Students will analyze character portrayals, conflicts and revealing themes in famous quotes taken from Hamlet through literary analysis. DATE CHANGE--Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, October 30th:
  • Henry IV Part I--read (copies of the novel are available in class) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    Vocabulary List #7 Quiz on Wednesday, October 31st

  • Friday, October 26, 2007: NO CLASS/PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES NO CLASS DATE CHANGE--Due Tuesday, October 30th:
  • Henry IV Part I--read (copies of the novel are available in class) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    Vocabulary List #7 Quiz on Wednesday, October 31st

  • Thursday, October 25, 2007: 1. Do Now: Group Presentations/Discussions of Hamlet Famous Quotes: Each previously assigned group will present and discuss their famous Hamlet quotes found HERE. They will share character identities, conflicts and themes/messages offered from these very famous quotes that define Hamlet. Students will analyze character portrayals, conflicts and revealing themes in famous quotes taken from Hamlet through literary analysis. DATE CHANGE--Due Tuesday, October 30th:
  • Henry IV Part I--read (copies of the novel are available in class) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    Vocabulary List #7 Quiz on Wednesday, October 31st

  • Wednesday, October 24, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    2. Group Presentations/Discussions of Hamlet Famous Quotes: Each previously assigned group will present and discuss their famous Hamlet quotes found HERE. They will share character identities, conflicts and themes/messages offered from these very famous quotes that define Hamlet.

    Students will analyze character portrayals, conflicts and revealing themes in famous quotes taken from Hamlet through literary analysis. Due Monday, October 29th:
  • Henry IV Part I--read (copies of the novel are available in class) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.
  • Tuesday, October 23, 2007: 1. Do Now--Group discussions of Hamlet Famous Quotes: Each previously assigned group will discuss their famous Hamlet quotes found HERE. They will share character identities, conflicts and themes/messages offered from these very famous quotes that define Hamlet.

    2. Award Presentation for Hamlet Performances

    Students will analyze character portrayals, conflicts and revealing themes in Hamlet through literary analysis. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, October 24th: List #6 Quiz.

    Due Monday, October 29th:

  • Henry IV Part I--read (copies of the novel are available in class) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.
  • Monday, October 22, 2007: 1. Do Now: Literary Analysis of Hamlet Famous Quotes: In groups of four, analyze the most famous Hamlet quotes found HERE. Determine character identities, conflicts and themes/messages offered from these very famous quotes that define Hamlet.

    2. Vocabulary List #6 introduction.

    Students will analyze character portrayals, conflicts and revealing themes in Hamlet through literary analysis. Due Wednesday, October 24th: List #6 Quiz.

    Due Monday, October 29th:

  • Henry IV Part I--read (copies of the novel are available in class) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.
  • Friday, October 19, 2007: 1. Do Now: Finish Scene Performance of Hamlet--Act V Scene ii.

    2. Vote for Scene Awards in Hamlet: Best Director, Best Overall Performance, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Set Design, Best Costume

    3. Literary Analysis of Hamlet Famous Quotes: In groups of four, analyze the most famous Hamlet quotes found HERE. Determine character portrayals and themes/messages offered from these very famous quotes that define Hamlet.

    4. HW reminder.

    Students will examine and perform scenes, offering original character portrayals and revealing themes in Hamlet through performance and literary analysis.

    Due MONDAY, October 22:

  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published!

    Due Wednesday, October 24th: List #6 Quiz.

    Due Monday, October 29th:

  • Henry IV Part I--read (copies of the novel are available in class) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.
  • Thursday, October 18, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocab. List #5 Quiz 2. Finish Scene Performances: Hamlet scene groups will perform and share director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Students will have the opportunity to win the following awards: Best Director, Best Overall Performance, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Set Design, Best Costume. Students will analyze and perform scenes, offering original character portrayals and revealing themes in Hamlet through performance presentation.

    Due TOMORROW, Friday, October 19:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Wednesday, October 17, 2007: NO CLASS due to the 10th and 11th grade PSAT. No class.
  • TOMORROW--the remaining Hamlet scenes will perform. Remember, the bar has been raised very high from our first three scene groups. Make your scenes the best they can be with the following: high familiarity/comfort level with lines, spatial choices, lighting, music, levels, costume choices, editing, props, and overall character choices (emotional and physical portrayals).
  • NOTE DATE CHANGE: Vocab. List #5 Quiz--TOMORROW (Thursday)!

    DATE CHANGE--Due Friday, October 19:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Tuesday, October 16, 2007: 1. Scene Performances: Hamlet scene groups will perform and share director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Students will have the opportunity to win the following awards: Best Director, Best Overall Performance, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Set Design, Best Costume. Students will analyze and perform scenes, offering original character portrayals and revealing themes in Hamlet through performance presentation.
  • NOTE DATE CHANGE: Vocab. List #5 Quiz--Thursday!

    DATE CHANGE--Due October 19:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Monday, October 15, 2007: 1. Scene Work: Hamlet scene groups will get together and determine director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices. Students will analyze and organize scenes, examining character portrayals and revealing themes in Hamlet through performance presentation. Due TOMORROW--Tuesday, October 16th:
  • Edit (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) and perform one of the five scenes assigned--1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.


  • Vocab. List #5 Quiz--Wednesday!

    DATE CHANGE--Due October 19:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Friday, October 12, 2007: 1. Do Now: Teacher instructions for scenes. Quick reflections on Hamlet paper.

    2. Scene Work: Hamlet scene groups will get together and determine director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices.

    3. Discussion/Sharing of Director's Visions and Character Portrayals: Groups will share and offer each other suggestions.

    Students will analyze and organize scenes, examining character portrayals and revealing themes in Hamlet through performance presentation. Due Tuesday, October 16th:
  • Edit (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) and perform one of the five scenes assigned--1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DATE CHANGE--Due October 19:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Thursday, October 11, 2007: 1. Do Now: List #5 introduced.

    2. Scene Work: Students will finish the tableaus of Ten Scenes from Hamlet.

    3. Literary Analysis of the Accoutrements (elements) of the Revenger's Tragedy: Why is Hamlet considered a tragedy? Victim, Hero, Evil-doer, Conflict--internal and external, Power Struggle, Conspiracy, Omens, Ghosts, Vengeance, Insanity, Graveyards, Body Parts

    4. Discussion on the Omniscient Audience: How is the audience in "the know"? Metatheatricality, Multi-layered language (i.e. Act III, Scene iv, Gertrude's line--"I have no life to breathe")

    5. Q & A for Hamlet Paper, which is due TOMORROW!

    6. Acting Scenes introduced: Five Scenes assigned--Act I Scene v (4 characters); Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene i (7 characters); Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters)

    Students will physically enact the major characters and scenes in Hamlet to better analyze emotional states of characters. Due Tuesday, October 16th:
  • Edit (what can be excluded? What MUST be included?) and perform one of the five scenes assigned--Act I Scene v (4 characters); Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene i (7 characters); Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    Due Fri., October 12th:

  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    DATE CHANGE--Due October 19:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Wednesday, October 10, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocab. Quiz #4

    2. Scene Work: Students will finish the tableaus of Ten Scenes from Hamlet.

    3. Literary Analysis of the Accoutrements (elements) of the Revenger's Tragedy: Why is Hamlet considered a tragedy?

    Students will physically enact the major characters and scenes in Hamlet to better analyze emotional states of characters.

    Due Fri., October 12th:

  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Tuesday, October 9, 2007: 1. Do Now--Tableaus: Statues (acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet). Statues will include archetypes in literature (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, valiant knight) and characters as animals in Hamlet.

    2. Scene Work: Students will embody Ten Scenes from Hamlet.

    3. Dialectical Journal Grading Analysis: How were they graded? How can they be improved for the next Shakespearean play?

    Students will physically enact the major characters and scenes in Hamlet to better analyze emotional states of characters.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz--TOMORROW, Wednesday, October 10th.

    Due Fri., October 12th:

  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Friday, October 5, 2007: 1. Do Now--Analyze and discuss the Sonnet HW: Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Analyze the poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times.

    2. Tableaus: Statues (acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet). Statues will include emotional reactions to the following statements--you forgot your homework, you won the lottery.

    Determine the poetic devices, themes and religious influences of Shakespearean Sonnets.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz--Wednesday, October 10th.

    Due Fri., October 12th:

  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Thursday, October 4, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocab. List #4.

    2. Introduce Hamlet paper guidelines (see HW).

    3. Status Exercise (continued): Inner Status vs. Outer Status

    4. Sonnet HW discussion.

    Determine the origin, influence and composition of the Shakespearean Sonnet.

    Due Fri., October 12th:

  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Wednesday, October 3, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocab. Quiz #3.

    2.) Review, Discussion and Analysis of Sonnet HW: The Shakespearean Sonnet--The Origin and Development. Share the FIVE discussion points (in the form of question/statement) that focus on main ideas that can lead class discussion. Be prepared to share with class tomorrow.

    3. Introduce HW.

    Determine the origin, influence and composition of the Shakespearean Sonnet.

    Due Fri., October 12th:

  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Tuesday, October 2, 2007: 1. Do Now: How does the world view American teenagers? What is our country's status in the world? How do we express status? How do we view ourselves (our inward status)? Identify the status of the characters in Hamlet. How do they express their status? What about their inner status?

    2.) Status Exercise: First, volunteer student actors are assigned status numbers. The actor students will not know their own status, but they will know the status of the other students. Each actor will communicate with each other, with body and voice, how they view each other. Second, we will have new volunteers assigned status numbers and they are the only ones who will know their status. Each student-actor will communicate their inner status to other characters. The class will observe how status affects the behavior of the actors.

    3. Introduce HW.

    Determine the importance and conflict between outer and inner status of characters in Hamlet and in modern life today.

    Due TOMORROW--Wednesday, October 3rd:

  • The Shakespearean Sonnet--The Origin and Development. Compose FIVE discussion points (in the form of question/statement) that focus on main ideas that can lead class discussion. Be prepared to share with class tomorrow.
  • Read and analyze Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Identify poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times. Be ready to discuss on Wednesday.
  • List #3 Quiz

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Monday, October 1, 2007: 1. Do Now: Continue last week's small discussion groups, making textual reference to your discussion points from the assigned and chosen three questions of the following list:
    1.) How does Shakespeare reveal the influences of religion and the faiths of characters in Hamlet?
    2.) How are class divisions revealed (upper, middle, lower) in Hamlet?
    3.) What conflicts exist in Hamlet?
    4.) What omens are revealed and what do they foreshadow?
    5.) How do language choices depict character portrayals?
    6.) What themes are revealed in Hamlet?
    7.) What literary elements/techniques are employed and what effects do they have on characterizations and author's tone?
    8.) Choose three characters to discuss and analyze. Examine their purposes in the play.
    9.) Identify examples of historical references and Shakespeare's play references. How can audience viewers be in "the know"?
    Be prepared to share in a whole class discussion.

    2.) Introduce HW.

    Determine significant literary choices made by William Shakespeare in Hamlet that reflect his own personal and societal influences.

    Due Wednesday, October 3rd:

  • Read and analyze Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Identify poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times. Be ready to discuss on Wednesday.
  • List #3 Quiz

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Friday, September 28, 2007: 1. Do Now: In yesterday's small discussion groups, review your discussion points from the assigned and chosen three questions of the following list:
    1.) How does Shakespeare reveal the influences of religion and the faiths of characters in Hamlet?
    2.) How are class divisions revealed (upper, middle, lower) in Hamlet?
    3.) What conflicts exist in Hamlet?
    4.) What omens are revealed and what do they foreshadow?
    5.) How do language choices depict character portrayals?
    6.) What themes are revealed in Hamlet?
    7.) What literary elements/techniques are employed and what effects do they have on characterizations and author's tone?
    8.) Choose three characters to discuss and analyze. Examine their purposes in the play.
    9.) Identify examples of historical references and Shakespeare's play references. How can audience viewers be in "the know"?
    Be prepared to share in a whole class discussion.

    2.) Discussion and sharing opinions on text-based evidence from Hamlet (specifically Acts I and II) for each question.

    Determine significant literary choices made by William Shakespeare in Hamlet that reflect his own personal and societal influences.

    Due THIS Monday, October 1st:

  • Finish reading Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Annotations on post-its are highly recommended to assist you in the journal writing.
  • A completed Dialectical Journal

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--you should have already asked your teachers! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Thursday, September 27, 2007: 1. Do Now: Review/Analyze the new vocabulary list--Vocab. List #3. Show HW journal entries for Acts I and II in Hamlet

    2. In small discussion groups, students will be assigned one question and choose two questions of the following list:
    1.) How does Shakespeare reveal the influences of religion and the faiths of characters in Hamlet?
    2.) How are class divisions revealed (upper, middle, lower) in Hamlet?
    3.) What conflicts exist in Hamlet?
    4.) What omens are revealed and what do they foreshadow?
    5.) How do language choices depict character portrayals?
    6.) What themes are revealed in Hamlet?
    7.) What literary elements/techniques are employed and what effects do they have on characterizations and author's tone?
    8.) Choose three characters to discuss and analyze. Examine their purposes in the play.
    9.) Identify examples of historical references and Shakespeare's play references. How can audience viewers be in "the know"?
    Be prepared to share in a whole class discussion.

    Students will engage in small discussion and determine significant literary choices made by William Shakespeare in Hamlet that reflect his own personal and societal influences.

    Due Monday, October 1st:

  • Finish reading Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Annotations on post-its are highly recommended to assist you in the journal writing.
  • A completed Dialectical Journal

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Wednesday, September 26, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocab. List #2 Quiz.

    2. Finish discussion on Shakespeare and His England and the influences on Shakespeare's texts.

    3. Discussion/Sharing on significant interpretations and Shakespearean text and family/historical connections in the introductory scenes of Hamlet.

    Students will recognize literary allusions to Shakespeare's historical and family background and literary techniques/elements. Due TOMORROW--Thursday, September 27th:
  • Bring in a work-in-progress Dialectical Journal which includes Acts I and II of Hamlet.

    Due Monday, October 1st:

  • Finish reading Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Annotations on post-its are highly recommended to assist you in the journal writing.
  • A completed Dialectical Journal

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Tuesday, September 25, 2007: 1. Do Now: Prepare for Vocab. List #2 Quiz.

    2. Discuss Shakespeare and His England and the influences on Shakespeare's texts. Main Discussion Point: Why is the Elizabethan Era relevant in our studies of Shakespeare's Hamlet?

    Students will learn Elizabethan Era history and apply their knowledge to Shakespearean texts. Due TOMORROW--Wednesday, September 26th:
  • List #2 Quiz.

    Due Monday, October 1st:

  • Finish reading Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Annotations on post-its are highly recommended to assist you in the journal writing.
  • A completed Dialectical Journal

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Monday, September 24, 2007: 1. Do Now: Exchange and review a classmate's work-in-progress Dialectical Journal. With a neighboring classmate, discuss the opening scenes of Hamlet. Show HW work-in-progress Dialectical Journals.

    2. Resume and Vocab. List #1 Quiz distribution and review.

    Students will engage in text-based discussion, note-taking and examination analysis. Due TOMORROW--Tuesday, September 25th:
  • Resume rewrite (applying teacher corrections)

    Due Wednesday, September 26th:

  • List #2 Quiz.

    Due Monday, October 1st:

  • Finish reading Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Annotations on post-its are highly recommended to assist you in the journal writing.
  • A completed Dialectical Journal

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Friday, September 21, 2007: 1. Do Now: Intro. and discussion on Poetry and Rhythm Handout.

    2. Introduce HW.

    Students will engage in text-based discussion and note-taking. Due Monday, September 24th:
  • Begin reading Hamlet by William Shakespeare, and begin the Dialectical Journal. Bring in a work-in-progress on Monday. Your Dialectical Journal should follow the requirements and suggested ideas to look for in the text, including Shakespeare's life/background, times, and influences. Also, the Dialectical Journal may focus on the topic themes of authority and power struggle.

    Due Wednesday, September 26th:

  • List #2 Quiz.

    Due Monday, October 1st:

  • Finish reading Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Annotations on post-its are highly recommended to assist you in the journal writing.
  • A completed Dialectical Journal

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Thursday, September 20, 2007: 1. Do Now: Read Vocabulary List #2 and HW packet distribution.

    2. Text-based Discussion on the Introduction to Hamlet and Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language. Discussion Questions for Intro. to Hamlet: Why is "To be or not to be?" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques does the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? How is Hamlet, the man, characterized in the text? What are Hamlet's desires throughout the play? What themes are revealed in Hamlet? What motifs are present in Hamlet? What play on words (double entendre) is used?

    Discussion Questions for Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language: Why are Shakespeare's words difficult to understand to modern readers? Were they difficult to understand for Shakespeare's contemporaries? Why do Shakespeare's words "do a lot"? What are his words used for besides conveying meaning (think about the deeper layers of words)? How is the verse of his poetry usually patterned? What is the purpose of the unstress, stress pattern? Why would a line NOT follow iambic pentameter? What would be Shakespeare's motive? What would be Shakespeare's purpose for prose?

    Students will engage in text-based discussion and note-taking. Due TOMORROW, Friday, September 21st:
  • The reading packet, Shakespeare and England--annotations required.

    Due Wednesday, September 26th:

  • List #2 Quiz.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Wednesday, September 19, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #1 Quiz.

    2. Analysis of Map of London Theaters, City Buildings and Churches in 1600: Analysis of the positions/locations, theater names and purposes, city buildings and churches

    3. Text-based Discussion on the Introduction to Hamlet and Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language. Discussion Questions for Intro. to Hamlet: Why is "To be or not to be?" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques does the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? How is Hamlet, the man, characterized in the text? What are Hamlet's desires throughout the play? What themes are revealed in Hamlet? What motifs are present in Hamlet? What play on words (double entendre) is used?

    Discussion Questions for Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language: Why are Shakespeare's words difficult to understand to modern readers? Were they difficult to understand for Shakespeare's contemporaries? Why do Shakespeare's words "do a lot"? What are his words used for besides conveying meaning (think about the deeper layers of words)? How is the verse of his poetry usually patterned? What is the purpose of the unstress, stress pattern? Why would a line NOT follow iambic pentameter? What would be Shakespeare's motive? What would be Shakespeare's purpose for prose?

    Students will engage in text-based discussion and note-taking. Due Wednesday, September 26th:
  • List #2 Quiz.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Tuesday, September 18, 2007: 1. Do Now: Finish remaining Shakespeare Research Presentations.

    2. Text-based Discussion on the Introduction to Hamlet and Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language. Discussion Questions for Intro. to Hamlet: Why is "To be or not to be?" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques does the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? How is Hamlet, the man, characterized in the text? What are Hamlet's desires throughout the play? What themes are revealed in Hamlet? What motifs are present in Hamlet? What play on words (double entendre) is used?

    Discussion Questions for Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language: Why are Shakespeare's words difficult to understand to modern readers? Were they difficult to understand for Shakespeare's contemporaries? Why do Shakespeare's words "do a lot"? What are his words used for besides conveying meaning (think about the deeper layers of words)? How is the verse of his poetry usually patterned? What is the purpose of the unstress, stress pattern? Why would a line NOT follow iambic pentameter? What would be Shakespeare's motive? What would be Shakespeare's purpose for prose?

    Students will present research. Students will work on listening skills and note-taking. Due TOMORROW, Wed. (9/19):
  • SAT Vocab. List #1 Quiz. Learn the pronunciations, parts of speech, and definitions. Also, learn how to use the vocabulary words in a sentence. Suggestion: Create flashcards.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Monday, September 17, 2007: 1. Do Now: Turn in Discipline Code Booklet Handouts.

    2. Shakespeare Research Presentations: Continue (and hopefully finish) Research Presentations, while students take notes, as the research information will be used in the near future.

    Students will present research. Students will work on listening skills and note-taking. Due Tomorrow (Tues. 9/18) and Wed. (9/19):
  • Due Tomorrow: If not done so already, read and annotate (write margin notes, including summary, personal commentary and questions) the packet handout--Introduction to Hamlet and Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language, excerpts taken from the Barnes and Noble version of Hamlet.

  • Due Wednesday, September 19th: SAT Vocab. List #1 Quiz. Learn the pronunciations, parts of speech, and definitions. Also, learn how to use the vocabulary words in a sentence. Suggestion: Create flashcards.

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Wednesday, September 12, 2007: 1. Do Now: Read over SAT Vocab. List #1. Identify any words that have difficult pronunciations or other concerns. Quiz on Wednesday, Sep. 19th.

    2. Introduction of Discipline Code Booklet/Handouts--MUST be turned in on Monday, September 17th.

    3. Lit. Terms Quiz

    4. Presentations: Continue presentations of Shakespearean research. Take notes on classmates' presentations.

    Students will present research and work on note-taking. Students will be assessed on basic literary terms. Due Monday, September 17th:

  • Discipline Code Booklet/Handouts
  • Handout Readings on Shakespearean Language and Introduction to Hamlet
  • Finish preparing Shakespearean presentations (this only applies to the remaining groups who have not presented yet)

    Due Wednesday, September 19th:

  • SAT Vocab. List #1 Quiz

    Due October 15th:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations--start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation when asking your teachers and when reminding them of the due date.
  • Tuesday, September 11, 2007: 1. Do Now: Q & A on presentations and 9/11 mygooddeed.org

    2. Presentations: Begin presentations of Shakespearean research. Take notes on classmates' presentations.

    Students will present research and work on note-taking. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, September 12th:

  • Lit. Terms Quiz--Retake for a grade! Study the Literary Terms Quiz for the correct answers. Know the definitions well; this quiz will NOT be multiple choice. Suggestion--make flashcards and examples for each definition.
  • Continue to practice and prepare your presentations.

  • Monday, September 10, 2007: 1. Do Now--Examine Literary Terms Quiz: Analyze the answers and begin to study unknown/unfamiliar questions.

    2. Discussion/Review of Lit. Terms Quiz: Q & A on Lit. Terms Quiz

    3. HW Requirements: Begin presentations. Teacher sharing of mygooddeed.org for 9/11.

    4. Research Presentations: Begin to present and take notes on student presentations (will be tested on information).

    Students will present research and work on note-taking. Due Wednesday, September 12th:

  • Lit. Terms Quiz--Retake for a grade! Study the Literary Terms Quiz for the correct answers. Know the definitions well; this quiz will NOT be multiple choice. Suggestion--make flashcards and examples for each definition.

  • Friday, September 7, 2007: 1. Do Now--Literary Terms Quiz: Take an assessment (no preparation required) on your knowledge of literary terms. These terms are basic facts learned in previous years in high school English courses.

    2. Discussion: Share and discuss any remaining questions/concerns regarding Resumes, College Essays and Research/presentation assignments due Monday.

    Students will be assessed on prior knowledge. Due Monday, September 10th:
  • Professional Resume due; use these sample resumes and resume tips as models.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above.
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on your assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You are expected to compose 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced and 250-word minimum), and present your findings to the class. You are expected to work with your group members, but compose separate papers that reflect thoughtful research and analysis. This means that each paper should have different research and impressions of the research. You may answer the same questions BUT they should not be the same answers. There are different sides to the same questions. OR you may choose to have different members of the group answer a different question. The point is NO group member has the same research paper as another group member, only the same topic. You should NOT copy from the internet. You MUST write in your own words. In your paper, you should answer at least three of the following five questions: How did your topic influence or shape Shakespeare? How did your topic influence or shape the average person living during his time period? Is/Are your individual(s) typical of the average citizen of the 16th century England? Explain. What are the similarities between Shakespeare's life and times and your own life and modern times? How is your topic relevant and useful in better comprehending Shakespeare's plays? Remember, you were given one of the following topics and assigned with the following people: Shakespeare's wealth and social status--during his lifetime (Wojciech, Ada, Raul and Ishmet), Records/Documents of William Shakespeare and Shakespeare's immediate family--parents, wife, and children (Leonard, Angela, Geo, and Haris), Shakespeare's education and education for people of his setting (Faye, Kyle, Andrew, Aleeya, and Sonia), Shakespeare's mother and father (Anissia, Lillian, Partha and Raquel), Religion during the Elizabethan Era--the time in which he lived (Jessica, Arthur, Armen, and Thomas), Religion for Shakespeare and his family (Catherine, Hilda, Anais, and Dylan), Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime (Amid, Linda D., Sofana, and Jonathan), Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime (Chris B., Maria V., Geordy, and Raza), Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era (Anthony, Jenna, Melanie, and Talha), Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship (Courtney, German, Kalena, and Stephanie P.), Shakespeare's children (Jackie R., Ashfrida, Tania and Dani).

    Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title
    
  • Thursday, September 6, 2007: 1. Do Now--Brainstorming and Reading: Quick-write questions on resume writing, read expert advice on writing the college essay, and compose any questions on writing college essay.

    2. Discussion: Share and discuss any questions/concerns regarding resumes and college essays. Discuss course expectations.

    3. Research/Presentation Topic and Objectives: Teacher disseminates assigned topics for research and presentation on Shakespeare's life and times. Teacher shares the objectives for the research and presentation.

    4. Literary Terms Quiz: Begin to take an assessment (no preparation required) on your knowledge of literary terms. These terms are basic facts learned in previous years in high school English courses.

    Students will engage in brainstorming and reading of professional advice. Students will read for understanding and application, and students will write informal note-taking. Due Monday, September 10th:
  • Professional Resume due; use these sample resumes and resume tips as models.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above.
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on your assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You are expected to compose 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced and 250-word minimum), and present your findings to the class. You are expected to work with your group members, but compose separate papers that reflect thoughtful research and analysis. You should NOT copy from the internet. You MUST write in your own words. In your paper, you should answer at least three of the following five questions: How did your topic influence or shape Shakespeare? How did your topic influence or shape the average person living during his time period? Is/Are your individual(s) typical of the average citizen of the 16th century England? Explain. What are the similarities between Shakespeare's life and times and your own life and modern times? How is your topic relevant and useful in better comprehending Shakespeare's plays? Remember, you were given one of the following topics and assigned with the following people: Shakespeare's wealth and social status--during his lifetime (Wojciech, Ada, Raul and Ishmet), Records/Documents of William Shakespeare and Shakespeare's immediate family--parents, wife, and children (Leonard, Angela, and Geo), Shakespeare's education and education for people of his setting (Faye, Kyle, Andrew, Aleeya, and Sonia), Shakespeare's mother and father (Anissia, Lillian, Partha and Raquel), Religion during the Elizabethan Era--the time in which he lived (Jessica, Arthur, Armen, and Thomas), Religion for Shakespeare and his family (Catherine, Hilda, Anais, and Dylan), Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime Amid, Linda D., Sofana, and Jonathan), Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime (Chris B., Maria V., Geordy, and Raza), Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era (Anthony, Jenna, Melanie, and Talha), Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship (Courtney, German, Kalena, and Stephanie P.), Shakespeare's children (Jackie R., Ashfrida, and Tania).

    Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title
    
  • Wednesday, September 5, 2007: 1. Do Now--Reading of Resume-Writing 101: Class individually reads resume writing tips, followed by discussion/analysis. While reading, students will examine the list of Shakespeare's Life & Times topics, and choose their top three choices and turn in.

    2. Brainstorming on Resume Components: Individuals/Pairs brainstorm components of a resume. Suggested questions to answer: What should be included, in order of importance? What should NOT be included in your resume?

    3. Class Sharing of Resume Components: Class shares brainstorming and students add to their list.

    Students will engage in brainstorming and reading of professional advice. Students will read for understanding and application, and students will write informal note-taking. Due Monday, September 10th:
  • Professional Resume due; use these sample resumes and resume tips as models.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above.
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to compose 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced and 250-word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows: Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.
  • Tuesday, September 4, 2007: 1. Emergency cards

    2. Syllabus introduced.

    3. HW assignments

    Students will learn course expectations and course outline. Due Monday, September 10th:
  • Professional Resume due; use these sample resumes and resume tips as models.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above.

    Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title
    

  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250 word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows: Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.