Senior HONOR Assignments
Winter/Spring 2008

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Reflective discussion

2. Film Viewing

Students will engage in reflective discussions.
  • See you at Graduation!!
  • Friday, June 13th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Share speeches--excerpts or entire speeches (student choice) with the class.

    2. Film Viewing and High School Reflections

    Students will work on reading and reciting graduation speeches and reflective discussions.
  • Return all borrowed books by MONDAY, June 16th!!!
  • Thursday, June 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Share speeches--excerpts or entire speeches (student choice) with the class.

    2. HW Evaluations: Show all remaining HW (including extra credit) to be evaluated by teacher.

    Students will work on reading and reciting graduation speeches.
  • Return all borrowed books by MONDAY, June 16th!!!
  • Wednesday, June 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Exchange graduation speeches--reading and commenting on your classmates' speeches. Comments may include answers to the following: What do you agree with? What made you smile? What was a strength of the speech? What new information did you learn about your classmate? When done analyzing classmates' speeches, work on HW owed (tomorrow's the last day to turn in ALL HW). Show speech and extra credit.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share speeches--excerpts or entire speeches (student choice) with the class.

    Students will work on reading and reciting graduation speeches. DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JUNE 12th:
  • Extra HW Credit: Senior Will--What would you leave your family, friends, school (this may include the teachers, staff, the underclassmen--all students younger than you), and anyone else upon your graduation? See a sample HERE. Write a full page, beginning with: "I, YOUR NAME, being of ________mind and __________body, do hereby bequeath the following on this 9th day of June, 2008:"
  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so BY TOMORROW. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Bring in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and any other borrowed books.
  • Tuesday, June 10th, 2008: Film Viewing: Viewing and analysis of "The Godfather" Students will analyze the classic film "The Godfather" in terms of popular culture, cultural and literary value, and critical recognition. DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=FIVE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.
  • Extra HW Credit: Create a visual (a graph of graduation statistics, a collage, an artistic representation) to complement your Graduation Speech. This MUST be brought in on Wednesday, June 11th to receive extra credit.
  • Extra HW Credit: Senior Will--What would you leave your family, friends, school (this may include the teachers, staff, the underclassmen--all students younger than you), and anyone else upon your graduation? See a sample HERE. Write a full page, beginning with: "I, YOUR NAME, being of ________mind and __________body, do hereby bequeath the following on this 9th day of June, 2008:"


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so BY THURSDAY. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Bring in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and any other borrowed books.
  • Monday, June 9th, 2008: Film Viewing: Viewing and analysis of "The Godfather" Students will analyze the classic film "The Godfather" in terms of popular culture, cultural and literary value, and critical recognition. DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=FIVE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.
  • Extra HW Credit: Create a visual (a graph of graduation statistics, a collage, an artistic representation) to complement your Graduation Speech. This MUST be brought in on Wednesday, June 11th to receive extra credit.
  • Extra HW Credit: Senior Will--What would you leave your family, friends, school (this may include the teachers, staff, the underclassmen--all students younger than you), and anyone else upon your graduation? See a sample HERE. Write a full page, beginning with: "I, YOUR NAME, being of ________mind and __________body, do hereby bequeath the following on this 9th day of June, 2008:"


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Bring in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and any other borrowed books.
  • Friday, June 6th, 2008: Film Viewing: Viewing and analysis of "The Godfather" Students will analyze the classic film "The Godfather" in terms of popular culture, cultural and literary value, and critical recognition. DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=FIVE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.
  • Extra HW Credit: Create a visual (a graph of graduation statistics, a collage, an artistic representation) to complement your Graduation Speech. This MUST be brought in on Wednesday, June 11th to receive extra credit.


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Bring in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and any other borrowed books.
  • Wednesday, June 4th, 2008: Work Period: Work on the Graduation Speech and HW owed. Students will read, write and discuss for understanding and information. DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=FIVE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Bring in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and any other borrowed books.
  • Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Exchange paper abstracts. Read and share your impressions. Does your classmate's abstract include the following--the title and author of the novel, a brief description of the novel, their purpose in writing the paper, and conclusions that were drawn from writing the paper?

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the outcome of student papers. Discussion questions may include the following--Were you satisfied with the final product? What are your strengths? What did you struggle with in the composition of your paper? What makes you most proud in the paper? Did you have any epiphanies during or after writing the paper? What do you think you will most remember about One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest? What do you think Ken Kesey wants you to most remember? What was valuable in reading the novel and viewing the film? What was most valuable to you in writing the comparison/contrast paper?

    3. Introduce HW.

    Students will read, write and discuss for understanding and information. Students will engage in metacognitive strategies. DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=FIVE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Bring in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and any other borrowed books.
  • Monday, June 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Write an abstract of your paper. Read about abstracts HERE. Turn in Final Paper, which is due today.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the outcome of student papers. Discussion questions may include the following--Were you satisfied with the final product? What are your strengths? What did you struggle with in the composition of your paper? What makes you most proud in the paper? Did you have any epiphanies during or after writing the paper?

    Students will read, write and discuss for understanding and information. Students will engage in metacognitive strategies.
  • Finish the abstract (about 200 words) classwork and turn in typed tomorrow. Read about abstracts HERE.
  • If today's Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Bring in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest tomorrow and any other borrowed books.
  • Friday, May 30th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Textual Analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Examine the following direct quotes from the novel--"The nurse was biding her time till another idea come to her that would put her on top again. She knew she'd lost one big round and was losing another, but she wasn't in any hurry. For one thing, she wasn't about to recommend release; the fight could go on as long as she wanted, till he made a mistake or till he just gave out, or until she could come up with some new tactic that would put her back on top in everybody's eyes" (Kesey, 174). How does the narrative point of view affect the reader's perspective on the characters? How does the absence of the narrative role in the film affect the viewer's perspective on the characters? "He (McMurphy) was in his chair in the corner, resting a second before he came out for the next round--in a long line of next rounds. The thing he was fighting, you couldn't whip it for good. All you could do was keep on whipping it, till you couldn't come out any more and somebody else had to take your place" (Kesey, 265). What is Kesey's greater message to his readers, a message that addresses the world outside the ward? Why do you think that Kesey was unhappy with the film version of his novel? Think about what the film doesn't offer that the novel does offer its readers. Find other direct quotes from the novel that address the topics identified in the paper question--popular culture, critical recognition, historical significance, literary and cultural value.

    2. Discussion: Discuss and analyze the Do Now and other direct quotes from the novel that address the Final Paper.

    Students will engage in literary analysis and film analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
  • Due Monday, June 2nd: Final Paper (5-7 pp. or 10 pp. for extra credit) on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest--the novel and the film. Review the PAPER REQUIREMENTS. Paper Question: From the novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey and film version of the novel, directed by Milos Forman, analyze characters and scenes that show how the film relates to popular culture, offers critical recognition, explores historical significance, and/or reveals literary and cultural value. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those characters or scenes, showing real evidence from both the novel and film. Also, explain how those characters and events contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Thursday, May 29th, 2008: 1. Film Viewing of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Analysis

    2. Discussion: Discuss and analyze the following topics:

  • The Influence of the Setting
  • Stereotypes
  • The Presence of a Narrative Role vs. the Absence of a Narrative Role
  • Ken Kesey's Resolution
  • Other topics of interest
  • Students will engage in literary analysis and film analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
  • Due Monday, June 2nd: Final Paper (5-7 pp. or 10 pp. for extra credit) on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest--the novel and the film. Review the PAPER REQUIREMENTS. Paper Question: From the novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey and film version of the novel, directed by Milos Forman, analyze characters and scenes that show how the film relates to popular culture, offers critical recognition, explores historical significance, and/or reveals literary and cultural value. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those characters or scenes, showing real evidence from both the novel and film. Also, explain how those characters and events contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Wednesday, May 28th, 2008: Film Viewing of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Analysis Students will engage in literary analysis and film analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
  • Due Monday, June 2nd: Final Paper (5-7 pp. or 10 pp. for extra credit) on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest--the novel and the film. Review the PAPER REQUIREMENTS. Paper Question: From the novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey and film version of the novel, directed by Milos Forman, analyze characters and scenes that show how the film relates to popular culture, offers critical recognition, explores historical significance, and/or reveals literary and cultural value. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those characters or scenes, showing real evidence from both the novel and film. Also, explain how those characters and events contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Tuesday, May 27th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduction of Final Paper (5-7 pp. or 10 pp. for extra credit) on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest--the novel and the film. Review the PAPER REQUIREMENTS. Paper Question: From the novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey and film version of the novel, directed by Milos Forman, analyze characters and scenes that show how the film relates to popular culture, offers critical recognition, explores historical significance, and/or reveals literary and cultural value. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those characters or scenes, showing real evidence from both the novel and film. Also, explain how those characters and events contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.

    2. Film Viewing and Analysis

    Students will engage in literary analysis and film analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
  • Due Monday, June 2nd: Final Paper (5-7 pp. or 10 pp. for extra credit) on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest--the novel and the film. Review the PAPER REQUIREMENTS. Paper Question: From the novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey and film version of the novel, directed by Milos Forman, analyze characters and scenes that show how the film relates to popular culture, offers critical recognition, explores historical significance, and/or reveals literary and cultural value. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those characters or scenes, showing real evidence from both the novel and film. Also, explain how those characters and events contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Friday, May 23rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions and prepare to discuss with class--based on the pp. 100-128 (end of Part I), why is One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest considered a classic, must-read novel? How is the storyline relevant for all time? Why is this novel considered controversial? What do you think the novel offers readers that a film version cannot offer a viewing audience? What does Big Chief's narration offer in the novel that he doesn't offer in the film? It is recommended that you refer to page #s to assist in answering the questions more effectively. If anyone has questions to add, please do so at this time.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the Do Now questions and analyze pp. 100-128.

    3. Analysis of the Author: Read and analyze the obituary and biography of Ken Kesey.

    Students will engage in literary analysis and author analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
  • Due Tuesday, May 27th: Finish One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey. Be prepared to discuss and analyze the scenes, author's purpose, character development and film expectations and similarities/differences.
  • Thursday, May 22nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: What can you anticipate in the film version One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest?

    2. Film Viewing: View and take notes on the film version of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, analyzing directorial choices vs. author choices.

    Students will engage in literary analysis and film analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
  • Due Tuesday, May 27th: Finish One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey. Be prepared to discuss and analyze the scenes, author's purpose, character development and film expectations and similarities/differences.
  • Wednesday, May 21st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions and discuss with class--based on the pp. 9-101, why is One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest considered a classic, must-read novel? What's the author's purpose in making the Big Chief the narrator? How is the storyline relevant for all time? Why is this novel considered controversial? Why is the title significant? What do you think the novel offers readers that a film version cannot offer a viewing audience? Why does the author create a power play between McMurphy and Big Nurse? Who's winning the battle between these two characters and why? It is recommended that you refer to page #s to assist in answering the questions more effectively. If anyone has questions to add, please do so at this time.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the questions in the Do Now.

    Students will engage in literary analysis of the beginning pages of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
  • Due Tomorrow (Thursday, May 22): Read pages 102-128 in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (novel provided in class). Be prepared to discuss and analyze the scenes, author's purpose, character development and film expectations.
  • Due Tuesday, May 27th: Finish One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey.
  • Tuesday, May 20th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions and discuss with a neighbor--based on the beginning pages, pp. 9-69, why is One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest considered a classic, must-read novel? What's the author's purpose in making the Big Chief the narrator? How is the storyline relevant for all time? Why is this novel considered controversial? Why is the title significant? What do you think the novel offers readers that a film version cannot offer a viewing audience? It is recommended that you refer to page #s to assist in answering the questions more effectively. If anyone has questions to add, please do so at this time.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the questions in the Do Now.

    Students will engage in literary analysis of the beginning pages of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
  • Due Tomorrow (Wednesday, May 21): Read pages 70-103 in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (novel provided in class). Be prepared to discuss and analyze the scenes, author's purpose, character development and film expectations.
  • Monday, May 19th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and analyzing the "What is an academic paper?" by Dartmouth Writing Program. Apply these college level writing techniques to our upcoming analysis of films One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Psycho, and The Godfather.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss chosen current news articles (within the past six months) that refer to the films, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Psycho, or The Godfather. Class will address how the films relate to popular culture, offer critical recognition, explore historical significance, and/or reveal literary and cultural value. Reflect on the news articles.

    Students will engage in reading, analysis and discussion on writing skills for college and award-winning films in the context of popular culture, historical relevance and literary/cultural value.
  • Due Tomorrow (Tuesday, May 20): Read pages 9-69 in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (novel provided in class). Be prepared to discuss and be ready to analyze the scenes and signficant characters.
  • Friday, May 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read the "What is an academic paper?" by Dartmouth Writing Program. Apply these college level writing techniques to our upcoming analysis of films One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Psycho, and The Godfather.

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    Students will engage in reading, analysis and discussion on writing skills for college. Make up any HW owed.
    Thursday, May 15th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm at least three (per movie) literary, cultural and/or critical questions that can be answered when viewing the films One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Psycho, and The Godfather.

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    Students will also engage in discussion and debate on the critical recognition, historical significance and cultural impacts of top films.
  • Finish today's classwork, which included three literary, cultural and/or critical questions for each film (that's a total of nine questions): One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Psycho, and The Godfather.
  • Find a current news article (within the past six months) that refers to one of the films, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Psycho, or The Godfather. The article should explain how the film relates to popular culture, offers critical recognition, explores historical significance, and/or reveals literary and cultural value. Write one full page, typed, double-spaced, 12-pt. font reflection on the article. Bring in the article or the link to the article tomorrow. Be ready to share in class tomorrow.
  • Wednesday, May 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read and discuss Wikipedia as a teaching tool.

    2. Begin the Discussion/Debate on the 100 Greatest Movies of All Time by AFI. Students will argue, using their write-up HW, for their film of choice based on critical recognition, historical significance, and cultural impact. See this Evaluation of Top Films as a helpful guide. At the conclusion of the debate, the class will vote on three films to view, using the debate/discussion to guide their decision making.

    Students will analyze the evolution of the dictionary and the everpresent use of Wikipedia. Students will also engage in discussion and debate on the critical recognition, historical significance and cultural impacts of top films. N/A
    Tuesday, May 13th, 2008: Read and discuss the evolution of the dictionary HERE. Read about Wikipedia as a teaching tool. Students will analyze the evolution of the dictionary and the everpresent use of Wikipedia. If time allows, students will also engage in discussion and debate on the critical recognition, historical significance and cultural impacts of top films.
  • Prepare for film debate tomorrow! For those students taking the AP Biology exam yesterday, make sure to turn in yesterday's HW tomorrow.
  • Monday, May 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Evaluate the AP Exam. What were your strengths? Weaknesses? Did it meet your expectations? Were you prepared? Why or why not?

    2. Examine the 100 Greatest Movies of All Time by AFI and determine your top three choices based on critical recognition, historical significance, and cultural impact. See this Evaluation of Top Films.

    3. Discuss top films and brainstorm skills to learn in order to prepare for college demands.

    Students will discuss and evaluate their own college needs.
  • One full page typed write-up for the film of your choice taken from the 100 Greatest Movies of All Time by AFI. Include the critical recognition, historical signficance, cultural impact and literary value.
  • Friday, May 9th, 2008: Senior Barbecue--No class in session. N/A Rest, relax and recuperate. :)
    Thursday, May 8th, 2008: AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM--8AM in Room 217. Students will be assessed on the AP English literature exam. Rest, relax and recuperate. :)
    Wednesday, May 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now--Discussion Study Group: In small groups (numbered 1-8), discuss the following questions--What are the skills we should know and apply for tomorrow's AP exam? What types of questions can we anticipate? How can we tackle the difficult questions and texts on the exam? Why are we prepared for this exam? This discussion sharing will capitalize on the positives in terms of preparation and knowledge that will lead to a passing AP score! :)

    2. Whole Class Discussion: Share the positive output from the Discussion Study Groups. Remaining questions and concerns that students want addressed before the exam.

    3. AP Exam Reminders: The AP Exam begins at 8am in Room 217. Exam Day Info--MUST READ, AP English Lit. Exam Grade Distribution, Exam Security Policies and Procedures

    Students will review and discuss exam strategies for understanding and information, particularly the strategies used for the components of the AP English literature exam. IN PREPARATION FOR TOMORROW, Thursday, May 8th--the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM DAY (Come to my classroom at 7am to fill out the bubble sheets and have bagels and juice)!:
  • Come to MY ROOM AT 7AM TO FILL OUT THE BUBBLE SHEETS AND HAVE BAGELS AND JUICE--this is not optional! The exam begins at 8am sharp in Room 217.
  • Get your watch ready for tomorrow! Eat a hearty, nutritious meal (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Tomorrow, eat breakfast and arrive to school early with plenty of pens, pencils and all electronic devices in the 'off' position! Remember, the exam begins at 8am!!
  • Review the 2-3 novels/plays that you will be ready to use (of course, you are only writing about ONE) for the Free-Response Essay. Review literary devices, characters, author's tone/attitude toward the text, plot and previously written papers on the novel/play.
  • Review the Class-Compiled AP Exam Strategies, the Multiple Choice Question Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide, Free Response Essay Study Guide, Poetry Essay Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide #2. Of course, you may also want to look over all packets, notes, journals, and other preparatory materials.
  • DO NOT STRESS. ALL OF YOU HAVE PREPARED THOROUGHLY. BE CONFIDENT AND YOU WILL SUCCEED! :)

  • Tuesday, May 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Exam Day Info [discuss Exam Day Info--MUST READ, AP English Lit. Exam Grade Distribution, Exam Security Policies and Procedures] and Exam Scoring

    2. Practice Exam #2 Essay Questions 1, 2 and 3 Analysis: Analyze the essays, examining the textual annotations and interpretations, pre-writing steps and exemplary essays.

    3. Multiple Choice Questions Analysis and Concerns: Students will share their concerns regarding difficult questions and analyze how to determine the answers more effectively.

    Students will read and present exam strategies for understanding and information, particularly the strategies used for the components of the AP English literature exam. HW every night until May 8th--the AP Exam Day:
  • Check out Exam Day Info--MUST READ, AP English Lit. Exam Grade Distribution, Exam Security Policies and Procedures
  • Study the Class-Compiled AP Exam Strategies, the Multiple Choice Question Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide, Free Response Essay Study Guide, Poetry Essay Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide #2.
  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Monday, May 5th, 2008: 1. Study Guide Presentations: Poetry Essay Study Guide

    2. Practice Exam #1 Essay Questions 1 and 3 Analysis: Analyze the essays, examining the textual annotations and interpretations, pre-writing steps and exemplary essays.

    Students will read and present exam strategies for understanding and information, particularly the strategies used for the components of the AP English literature exam. HW every night until May 8th--the AP Exam Day:
  • Check out Exam Day Info--MUST READ, AP English Lit. Exam Grade Distribution, Exam Security Policies and Procedures
  • Study the Class-Compiled AP Exam Strategies, the Multiple Choice Question Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide, Free Response Essay Study Guide, Poetry Essay Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide #2.
  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Friday, May 2nd, 2008: 1. Study Guide Presentations: Free Response Essay Study Guide, Poetry Essay Study Guide, Multiple Choice Questions Study Guide, and Prose Passage Essay Study Guide.

    2. Practice Exam #1 Essay Question 2: Analyze the poetry response essay, examining the textual annotations and interpretations, pre-writing steps and exemplary essays.

    Students will read and present exam strategies for understanding and information, particularly the strategies used for the components of the AP English literature exam. HW every night until May 8th--the AP Exam Day:
  • Study the Class-Compiled AP Exam Strategies, the Multiple Choice Question Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide, Free Response Essay Study Guide, Poetry Essay Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide #2 and MORE TO COME!
  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Thursday, May 1st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's Poetry Read-Aloud of "Sonnet 98" by William Shakespeare to end the poetry month. Interpret and analyze literary devices.

    2.Holocaust Remembrance Day: Today, May 1st, is Holocaust Remembrance Day, and it's important to remember the victims and survivors of this tragic time in history. It's a day to remember the suffering that all had to endure at the hands of the Nazis. It's also a day to pay attention to the world around us, and not be bystanders while evil acts go on in front of us. This is what Elie Wiesel, author of Night and Nobel Peace Prize winner, said when he share his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech that can be read HERE. An especially profound excerpt from his speech is the following: "There is so much to be done, there is so much that can be done. One person ó a Raoul Wallenberg, an Albert Schweitzer, Martin Luther King, Jr. ó one person of integrity, can make a difference, a difference of life and death. As long as one dissident is in prison, our freedom will not be true. As long as one child is hungry, our life will be filled with anguish and shame. What all these victims need above all is to know that they are not alone; that we are not forgetting them, that when their voices are stifled we shall lend them ours, that while their freedom depends on ours, the quality of our freedom depends on theirs...Our lives no longer belong to us alone; they belong to all those who need us desperately."

    3. Study Guide Presentations: The Multiple Choice Question Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide, and MORE TO COME!

    4. Practice Exam #1 Essay Question #2: Analyze the poem and the question prompt. Begin to share an exemplary essay.

    Students will read and present exam strategies for understanding and information, particularly the strategies used for the components of the AP English literature exam. HW every night until May 8th--the AP Exam Day:
  • Study the Class-Compiled AP Exam Strategies, the Multiple Choice Question Study Guide, Prose Passage Essay Study Guide, and MORE TO COME!
  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Wednesday, April 30th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read and discuss the Class-Compiled AP Exam Strategies. These strategies may not be used in your study guides.

    2. Work Period: Work with your study group to arrange the study guide due tomorrow.

    3. Poetry Reading: Poetry Read-Aloud of "Sonnet 98" by William Shakespeare to end the poetry month. Interpret and analyze literary devices.

    Students will read for understanding and information, particularly the strategies used for the components of the AP English literature exam. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, May 1st:
  • Study Guide (with your group members) for your assigned section that incorporates all of the essential strategies learned from the 5 Steps to a Five packets as well as other teacher-approved strategies. The study guide MUST be TWO full pages and printed out (36 copies) or transferred to electronic form for each member of the class. Though, you MUST have teacher approval before giving out study guides to the class. The Class-Compiled AP Exam Strategies may not be used in your study guides. Don't forget to give credit to sources, such as 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature (2007), McGraw-Hill Edition by Estelle Rankin and Barbara Murphy.

    Daily HW:

  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Tuesday, April 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Conduct information and Practice Exams #1 and #2 multiple choice answers.

    2. Independent Note-Taking on Literary Devices: For the practice exams, take copious notes in the margins of the texts.

    3. Group Work: Work with study groups.

    Students will read for understanding and information, particularly the use, application and significance of literary devices in poetry. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, April 30th:
  • Finish today's classwork--note-taking in the margins and identifying literary devices in ALL of the text of the Practice Exams #1 and #2.

    Due Thursday, May 1st:

  • Study Guide (with your group members) for your assigned section that incorporates all of the essential strategies learned from the 5 Steps to a Five packets as well as other teacher-approved strategies. The study guide MUST be TWO full pages and printed out for each member of the class (that's 36 copies!). Though, you MUST have teacher approval before giving out copies to the class.

    Daily HW:

  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Monday, April 28th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read/Review Literary Terms exam, paying close attention to the poetry writing component of the exam.

    2. Read, Analyze and Discuss: Student Essay Comparison/Contrast of "London, 1802" and "Douglass"

    3. Organization of AP Exam Study Groups: Organize into study groups--multiple choice questions section, poetry essay question, literary excerpt essay question, and independent novel essay question. While doing this, show the Practice Tests 1 and 2 completed for HW.

    Students will read for understanding and information, particularly the use, application and significance of literary devices in poetry. Due Thursday, May 1st:
  • Study Guide (with your group members) for your assigned section that incorporates all of the essential strategies learned from the 5 Steps to a Five packets as well as other teacher-approved strategies. The study guide MUST be TWO full pages and printed out for each member of the class (that's 36 copies!). Though, you MUST have teacher approval before giving out copies to the class.

    Daily HW:

  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Friday, April 18th, 2008: Film viewing of "The Bucket List" N/A Due Monday, April 28th:
  • Practice Tests 1 and 2 must be completed and turned in. Time yourself according to the required time constraints. Apply the strategies you brainstormed in class. Treat these exams like the real thing!

    Daily HW:

  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Thursday, April 17th, 2008: Film viewing of "The Bucket List" N/A Due Monday, April 28th:
  • Practice Tests 1 and 2 must be completed. Time yourself according to the required time constraints. Apply the strategies you brainstormed in class. Treat these exams like the real thing!

    Daily HW:

  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Wednesday, April 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Compile the AP Practice Exams 1 and 2.

    2. Determine all reading and writing strategies that can be applied on the AP English Literature Exam while perusing the practice exams. Fill at least one full page.

    3. Discuss essential strategies and share personal reflections on the AP Exam.

    Students will assess and discuss their personal knowledge of reading and writing strategies that can be used for the AP exam. Due Monday, April 28th:
  • Practice Tests 1 and 2 must be completed. Time yourself according to the required time constraints. Apply the strategies you brainstormed in class. Treat these exams like the real thing!

    Daily HW:

  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

  • Tuesday, April 15th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Grade VETY #15 Quiz (see answers on the overhead). Show multiple choice questions test with your partner and turn in the answer sheets.

    2. Take the multiple choice questions test for your novel.

    3. Check the test answers.

    Students will understand the AP exam-makers' philosophy in constructing the multiple choice questions component through their own composition of multiple choice questions. Daily HW:
  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

    Due Monday, April 28th:

  • Practice Tests 1 and 2 must be completed.
  • Monday, April 14th, 2008: Work Period: Work on the HW due tomorrow--reading of the classic novel and the corresponding composition of twenty multiple choice questions and five answer choices. Students will understand the AP exam-makers' philosophy in constructing the multiple choice questions component through their own composition of multiple choice questions. Daily HW:
  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

    Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, April 15th:

  • Finish reading your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. Read background information on the novels you read--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • CREATE A MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTION TEST: Compose 20 multiple choice questions (5 factual, 5 technical, 5 analytical, and 5 inferential--refer to p. 39 in your Multiple Choice Questions packet) for your independent novel. DO NOT work with your partner when composing these questions. Provide an answer sheet.
  • Friday, April 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Identify strengths in the Free Response Sample Essay that scored a "9"--the highest score on an AP essay. Provide real examples.

    2. Review HW requirements.

    Students will identify techniques, language and other details that appear in a high-quality free-response essay from the AP English Literature exam. Daily HW:
  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

    Due THIS Tuesday, April 15th:

  • Finish reading your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. Read background information on the novels you read--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • CREATE A MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTION TEST: Compose 20 multiple choice questions (5 factual, 5 technical, 5 analytical, and 5 inferential--refer to p. 39 in your Multiple Choice Questions packet) for your independent novel. DO NOT work with your partner when composing these questions. Provide an answer sheet.
  • Thursday, April 10th, 2008: Discussion in the Courtyard: Discussion questions include, but are not limited to, the following--What are your concerns for the AP English Literature exam? What are your strengths? Weaknesses? What needs do you want me, your teacher, to address in the last month before the AP exam? Students will discuss and address concerns for the AP English Literature exam. Daily HW:
  • Use this AP English Literature Exam Resource List to review and analyze previous years' exams, scoring guidelines, exemplary essays, etc.

    Due next Tuesday, April 15th:

  • Read your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th! READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE NOVELS YOU READ--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • Wednesday, April 9th, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY #15 quiz. Show outline HW.

    2. Work on an outline for the following exemplary essay (the first essay--labeled "N" at the top) found HERE.

    Students will be learning about and applying outlining to assist in AP Lit. preparation. Due next Tuesday, April 15th:
  • Read your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th! READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE NOVELS YOU READ--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • Tuesday, April 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm the sample essay question on your novel.

    2. Work on the outline HW due tomorrow. Use this sample exemplary essay (the first essay--labeled "N" at the top) found HERE.

    Students will be learning about and applying outlining to assist in AP Lit. preparation. Due tomorrow, Wednesday, April 9th:
  • Write an outline (follow the Sample Outline Resource) for the Free Response Question found HERE on p. 4. You should use your current novel to write the outline for this question. Use this sample exemplary essay (the first essay--labeled "N" at the top) found HERE to guide you in writing your outline.
  • VETY#15 quiz. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for this final VETY quiz.

    Due next Tuesday, April 15th:

  • Read your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th! READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE NOVELS YOU READ--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • Monday, April 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Share your outlines with a neighbor--comparing and contrasting the formats.

    2. Review Outline HW.

    Students will be learning about and applying outlining to assist in AP Lit. preparation. Due Tomorrow, Tuesday, April 8th:
  • Revisions of the three outlines that were due today. Revisions should reflect in-class discussion and one-on-one direction from teacher.

    Due this Wednesday, April 9th:

  • VETY#15 quiz. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for this final VETY quiz.

    Due next Tuesday, April 15th:

  • Read your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th! READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE NOVELS YOU READ--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • Friday, April 4th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Poetry Reading and Analysis--Finish poetry analysis of "To Daffodils" and "To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time" by Robert Herrick. Share your analysis of the literary terms and their signficance to the poems as a whole. Think of the "So What?" factor and the significant insight into human experience. Examine imagery, rhyme scheme, syntax, structure, and diction. Read aloud and share analysis as a class and then listen to the podcast!

    2. Introduce HW, including Sample Outline Resources.

    3. Begin HW--outlines for Student Essay A and Student Essay B and outline for the Poetry Essay (for the poems above).

    Students will be learning about and applying outlining to assist in AP Lit. preparation. Due Monday, April 7th:
  • Poetry Essay Outline--1.) Compose outlines for Student Essay A and Student Essay B on pages 96-98. 2.) Write an essay question (see p. 85 in the Poetry Essay packet handed out in recent weeks) and an outline (using roman numerals, A/B/C, 1/2/3) of an essay you would write on the two poems--"To Daffodils" and "To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time" by Robert Herrick. Look at the sample essays on pages 96-98 as models. Use Sample Outline Resources.

    Due April 15th:

  • Read your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th! READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE NOVELS YOU READ--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • Thursday, April 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Department of Education Survey!

    2. Grade VETY#13 and #14 Quizzes.

    3. Poetry Reading and Analysis: April is Poetry Month! Poetry analysis of "To Daffodils" and "To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time" by Robert Herrick. Share your analysis of the literary terms and their signficance to the poems as a whole. Think of the "So What?" factor and the significant insight into human experience. Examine imagery, rhyme scheme, syntax, structure, and diction. Read aloud and share analysis as a class and then listen to the podcast!

    Students will be analyzing literary terms and writing tools to assist in AP Lit. preparation. Due Monday, April 7th:
  • Poetry Essay Outline--Details TBD (stay tuned!)

    Due April 15th:

  • Read your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th! READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE NOVELS YOU READ--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • Wednesday, April 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY#13 and #14 Quizzes. Show new classic novels and identify partners.

    2. Poetry Reading and Analysis: April is Poetry Month! Poetry reading--"To Daffodils" and "To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time" by Robert Herrick. Analyze literary terms and their signficance to the poems as a whole. Think of the "So What?" factor and the significant insight into human experience. Examine imagery, rhyme scheme, syntax, structure, and diction. Read aloud and share analysis as a class and then listen to the podcast!

    3. Finish reading and analysis of the Essay on AP Essay Writing.

    Students will be analyzing literary terms and writing tools to assist in AP Lit. preparation.
  • Read your new novel, which was chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Pay close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th! READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE NOVELS YOU READ--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • Tuesday, April 1st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review Literary Terms Exam multiple choice questions and answers.

    2. Writing tools disseminated and discussed, including the Essay on AP Essay Writing and a Visual Guide to AP Essays.

    Students will be analyzing literary terms and writing tools to assist in AP Lit. preparation. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, April 2nd:
  • VETY#13 and #14 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.
  • Find and bring in a new novel to read with a partner, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Begin reading, paying close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th! READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE NOVELS YOU READ--author biographies, historical background, social context, philosophical interpretations. Check out this link HERE.
  • Monday, March 31st, 2008: Free Response Essay Test: Students will write an essay (graded as an exam) on their most recent novel. The essay question is taken from the 2001 AP English Literature exam. Students will be assessed on their chosen classic novel in a free-response essay form. Due THIS Wednesday, April 2nd:
  • VETY#13 and #14 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.
  • Find and bring in a new novel to read with a partner, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Begin reading, paying close attention to literary devices, their significance in the novel and how they contribute to the novel as a whole. This novel must be read by April 15th!
  • Friday, March 28th, 2008: Work Period: Begin preparing for next week's VETY #13 and #14 Quizzes. Work on finishing your novel and prepare for the AP free-response essay to be written on Monday. Students will prepare for vocabulary assessment and free-response essay. Due THIS Monday, March 31st:
  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on MONDAY, in class.
  • Review strategies for writing an AP-style freewrite response essay on a novel. Review the strengths and weaknesses in your writing, as well as the rubric provided for The Kite Runner. Identify literary elements/devices that are addressed in your novel that would help you write the essay on Monday.

    Due Wednesday, April 2nd:

  • VETY#13 and #14 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.
  • Thursday, March 27th, 2008: 1. Do Now--Poetry Analysis: Continue with discussion/read-aloud/analysis of the Poetry Review packet from the AP prep book.

    2. Review/Grade VETY#11 and #12 Quizzes

    Students will review the analysis of poetry, literary devices and significance for those devices. Due THIS Monday, March 31st:
  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on MONDAY, in class.
  • Review strategies for writing an AP-style freewrite response essay on a novel. Review the strengths and weaknesses in your writing, as well as the rubric provided for The Kite Runner. Identify literary elements/devices that are addressed in your novel that would help you write the essay on Monday.

    Due Wednesday, April 2nd:

  • VETY#13 and #14 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.
  • Wednesday, March 26th, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY#11 and #12 Quizzes

    2. Poetry Analysis: Continue with discussion/read-aloud/analysis of the Poetry Review packet from the AP prep book.

    Students will review the analysis of poetry, literary devices and significance for those devices. Due THIS Friday, March 28th:
  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on MONDAY, in class.

    Due THIS Monday, March 31st:

  • Review strategies for writing an AP-style freewrite response essay on a novel. Review the strengths and weaknesses in your writing, as well as the rubric provided for The Kite Runner. Identify literary elements/devices that are addressed in your novel that would help you write the essay on Monday.

    Due Wednesday, April 2nd:

  • VETY#13 and #14 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.
  • Tuesday, March 25th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Continue with discussion/read-aloud/analysis of the Poetry Review packet from the AP prep book.

    2. Paper analysis.

    Students will be review the analysis of poetry, literary devices and significance for those devices. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, March 26th:
  • VETY#11 and #12 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.

    Due THIS Friday, March 28th:

  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.
  • Monday, March 24th, 2008: Literary Terms Test Students will be assessed on the analysis of poetry, literary devices and significance for those devices. Due THIS Wednesday, March 26th:
  • VETY#11 and #12 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.

    Due THIS Friday, March 28th:

  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.
  • Thursday, March 20th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Continue with discussion/read-aloud/analysis of the Poetry Review packet from the AP prep book. Turn in the FIVE Multiple Choice Questions (with five answer choices) for the Literary Terms Test. The more challenging your questions and answers, the more likely they will be chosen for the Literary Terms Test on Monday.

    2. Grading/Analysis: Grade the VETY #9 and #10 Quizzes.

    Students will analyze poetry, identify literary devices and determine significance for those devices. Enjoy the Easter holiday weekend!

    Due THIS Monday, March 24th:

  • Literary Terms Test (refer to packet received in class OR this link to the Literary Terms Glossary)--worth 3x value of a quiz.

    Due Wednesday, March 26th:

  • VETY#11 and #12 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.

    Due Friday, March 28th:

  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.
  • Wednesday, March 19th, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY #9 and #10 Quizzes. When finished, work on the HW.

    2. Discussion/Read-Aloud: Continue with discussion/read-aloud/analysis of the Poetry Review packet from the AP prep book.

    Students will analyze poetry, identify literary devices and determine significance for those devices. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, March 20th:
  • Create 5 Multiple Choice Questions (with five answer choices) for the Literary Terms Test. The more challenging your questions and answers, the more likely they will be chosen for the Literary Terms Test on Monday.

    Due Monday, March 24th:

  • Literary Terms Test (refer to packet received in class)--worth 3x value of a quiz.

    Due Wednesday, March 26th:

  • VETY#11 and #12 Quizzes. Use the following link to VETY ANSWERS to prepare for the remaining VETY quizzes.

    Due Friday, March 28th:

  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.
  • Tuesday, March 18th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Continue with discussion/read-aloud/analysis of the Poetry Review packet.

    2.Analysis of Poetic Terms and Application of those Terms: Using the Poetry Review packet, analyze poems by Robert Burns, D.H. Lawrence, William Blake, Lord Byron and William Shakespeare.

    Students will analyze definitions and applications of literary terms. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, March 19th:
  • VETY#9 and #10 Quizzes

    Due Thursday, March 20th:

  • Create 5 Multiple Choice Questions (with five answer choices) for the Literary Terms Test. The more challenging your questions and answers, the more likely they will be chosen for the Literary Terms Test on Monday.

    Due Monday, March 24th:

  • Literary Terms Test (refer to packet received in class today)--worth 3x value of a quiz.

    Due Friday, March 28th:

  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.
  • Monday, March 17th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Read-Aloud/Analyze the Poetry Review packet.

    2.Analysis of Poetic Terms and Application of those Terms: Using the Poetry Review packet, analyze poems by Robert Burns, D.H. Lawrence, William Blake, Lord Byron and William Shakespeare.

    Students will analyze definitions and applications of literary terms. Due Wednesday, March 19th:
  • VETY#9 and #10 Quizzes

    Due Monday, March 24th:

  • Literary Terms Test (refer to packet received in class today)--worth 3x value of a quiz.

    Due Friday, March 28th:

  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.
  • Friday, March 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Pick up the Literary Terms Glossary packet.

    2. Independent Reading/Analysis: Read the Literary Terms independently. Read your new novel.

    Students will analyze definitions and applications of literary terms. Due Monday, March 24th:
  • Literary Terms Test (refer to packet received in class today)--worth 3x value of a quiz.

    Due Friday, March 28th:

  • Finish your new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.
  • Thursday, March 13th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the Poetry Essay strategies.

    2. Grade/Review VETY#7 and #8 Quizzes.

    3. Introduce VETY #9 and #10: In lieu of researching VETY, we will go over the answers for VETY #9 and #10.

    Students will analyze the Poetry strategies while examining their own writing choices. Due TOMORROW, Friday, March 14th:
  • With a new partner, bring in a new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?

    Due Monday, March 24th:

  • Literary Terms Test (refer to packet received in class)--worth 3x value of a quiz.
  • Wednesday, March 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY#7 and #8 Quizzes. Show the FIVE poetry essay questions, choosing from the 10 poems you found (see the Feb. 14th HW assignment).

    2. Discussion/Review: Continue reviewing the Poetry Essay strategies.

    Students will analyze the Poetry strategies while examining their own writing choices. Due Friday, March 14th:
  • VETY#9 and #10 flashcards.
  • With a new partner, bring in a new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Tuesday, March 11th, 2008: Discussion/Review: Continue reviewing the Poetry Essay strategies. Students will analyze the Poetry strategies while examining their own writing choices. Due TOMORROW, Wed, March 12th:
  • VETY#7 and #8 Quiz
  • Write FIVE poetry essay questions, choosing from the 10 poems you found (see the Feb. 14th HW assignment). Use p. 85 in the Poetry Essay packet to guide you in the composition of these FIVE poetry essay questions.

    Due Friday, March 14th:

  • With a new partner, bring in a new novel, chosen from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Monday, March 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer new questions for the partner novel Q & A quiz. Show VETY#7 and #8 Flashcards.

    2. Review VETY#7 and #8

    3. Introduce HW.

    Students will be assessed on their own chosen novels, with a focus on the AP style questions. Students will also analyze the Poetry strategies while examining their own writing choices. Due Wed, March 12th:
  • VETY#7 and #8 Quiz
  • Write FIVE poetry essay questions, choosing from the 10 poems you found (see the Feb. 14th HW assignment). Use p. 85 in the Poetry Essay packet to guide you in the composition of these FIVE poetry essay questions.
  • Friday, March 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Partner novel Q & A quiz.

    2.Discussion/Review: Continue reviewing the Poetry Essay strategies.

    Students will be assessed on their own chosen novels, with a focus on the AP style questions. Students will also analyze the Poetry strategies while examining their own writing choices. Due Monday, March 10th:
  • Rewrite questions to help your partner earn a higher score on the novel Q & A quiz. Bring on Monday (with separate answer sheet).
  • VETY#7 and #8 Flashcards

    Due Wed, March 12th:

  • VETY#7 and #8 Quiz
  • Thursday, March 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Grade the VETY #5 and #6 Quizzes

    2.Discussion/Review: Review the Prose Passage Essay strategies. Begin the Poetry Essay strategies.

    Students will read and analyze the AP Prose Passage and Poetry strategies while analyzing their own writing choices. Due TOMORROW, Friday, March 7th:
  • Finish your chosen partner novel. Consider why your novel has literary value. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Compose 20 multiple choice questions (5 factual, 5 technical, 5 analytical, and 5 inferential--refer to p. 39 in your Multiple Choice Questions packet) for your independent novel. DO NOT work with your partner when composing these questions. Provide an answer sheet. Refer a few questions to the topic and supporting questions above.

    Due Monday, March 10th:

  • VETY#7 and #8 Flashcards

    Due Wed, March 12th:

  • VETY#7 and #8 Quiz
  • Wednesday, March 5th, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY #5 and #6 Quiz

    2.Discussion/Review: Review the Prose Passage Essay strategies.

    Students will read and analyze the AP Prose Passage strategies while analyzing their own writing choices. Due THIS Friday, March 7th:
  • Finish your chosen partner novel. Consider why your novel has literary value. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Compose 20 multiple choice questions (5 factual, 5 technical, 5 analytical, and 5 inferential--refer to p. 39 in your Multiple Choice Questions packet) for your independent novel. DO NOT work with your partner when composing these questions. Provide an answer sheet. Refer a few questions to the topic and supporting questions above.

    Due Monday, March 10th:

  • VETY#7 and #8 Flashcards

    Due Wed, March 12th:

  • VETY#7 and #8 Quiz
  • Tuesday, March 4th, 2008: Discussion/Review: Review the Prose Passage Essay strategies. Students will read and analyze the AP Prose Passage strategies while analyzing their own writing choices. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, March 5th:
  • VETY#5 and #6 Quiz

    Due THIS Friday, March 7th:

  • Finish your chosen partner novel. Consider why your novel has literary value. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Compose 20 multiple choice questions (5 factual, 5 technical, 5 analytical, and 5 inferential--refer to p. 39 in your Multiple Choice Questions packet) for your independent novel. DO NOT work with your partner when composing these questions. Provide an answer sheet. Refer a few questions to the topic and supporting questions above.
  • Monday, March 3rd, 2008: Discussion/Review: Review the Prose Passage Essay strategies. Show the Poetry and Free Response Essays (HW). Students will read and analyze the AP Prose Passage strategies while analyzing their own writing choices. Due THIS Wednesday, March 5th:
  • VETY#5 and #6 Quiz

    Due THIS Friday, March 7th:

  • Finish your chosen partner novel. Consider why your novel has literary value. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Compose 20 multiple choice questions (5 factual, 5 technical, 5 analytical, and 5 inferential--refer to p. 39 in your Multiple Choice Questions packet) for your independent novel. DO NOT work with your partner when composing these questions. Refer a few questions to the topic and supporting questions above.
  • Friday, February 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Compile the Prose Passage Essay packet of strategies.

    2.Discussion/Review: Review the Prose Passage strategies

    Students will read and analyze the AP Prose Passage strategies while analyzing their own writing choices. Due Monday, March 3rd:
  • Poetry Passage Essay and Free Response Essay (make sure you time yourself for 40 minutes each.

    Due Wednesday, March 5th:

  • VETY#5 and #6 Quiz

    Due NEXT Friday, March 7th:

  • Finish your chosen partner novel. Consider why your novel has literary value. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Thursday, February 28th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Go over VETY #5 and #6.

    2.Discussion/Review: Finish reviewing the AP Exam packet multiple choice questions, answers, and rationales.

    Students will read and analyze AP exam question types, especially author's purpose and application of literary devices. Due TOMORROW, Friday, February 29th:
  • Compose the Prose Passage Essay in the 40 minute time frame (handwritten only!). Follow the directions very closely. Write an organized, coherent, sophisticated piece of writing.

    Due NEXT Wednesday, March 5th:

  • VETY#5 and #6 Quiz

    Due NEXT Friday, March 7th:

  • Finish your chosen partner novel. Consider why your novel has literary value. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Wednesday, February 27th, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY #3 and #4 Quiz. Show your chosen partner novels. Sign the reading list.

    2.Discussion/Review: Continue reviewing the AP Exam packet multiple choice questions, answers, and rationales. Also, read the poetry and short story excerpts aloud.

    Students will read and analyze AP exam question types, especially author's purpose and application of literary devices. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, February 28th:
  • VETY#5 and #6 flashcards.
  • Read at least 50 pages in your chosen partner novel. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Tuesday, February 26th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish working in groups of 4, providing rationales for each of the multiple choice questions in the AP Exam packet (pp. 50-57)--that's about 12 questions per person. Show your HW--the Multiple Choice Questions Packet from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.

    2. Discussion/Review: Review the AP Exam packet multiple choice questions, answers, and rationales. Also, read the poetry and short story excerpts aloud.

    Students will read and analyze AP exam question types, especially author's purpose and application of literary devices. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, February 27th:
  • VETY#3 and #4 Quiz.
  • With a partner, choose a novel from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Bring in TOMORROW. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Monday, February 25th, 2008: 1. Do Now: In groups of 4, provide rationales for each of the multiple choice questions in the AP Exam packet (pp. 50-57)--that's about 12 questions per person. Show your HW--the Multiple Choice Questions Packet from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature. Show the sample questions (include answers and rationales) for the Huckleberry Finn excerpt and the Emily Dickinson poem. Show the Poetry Assignment--the paraphrases of each stanza and the four questions for each poem. The questions should be one of each of the following types: factual, technical, analytical, inferential. Show the answers and rationales for each of the questions (refer to pp. 46-47 for models). Show the VETY #4 flaschards.

    2. Discussion/Review: Review the VETY #4 answers.

    3. Introduce HW.

    Students will read and analyze AP exam question types, especially author's purpose and application of literary devices. Due Wednesday, February 27th:
  • VETY#3 and #4 Quiz.
  • With a partner, choose a novel from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature reading list (hard copy provided in class only)--access the novel at our school library or your community library. Bring in on Wednesday. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individualís purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life?
  • Friday, February 15th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Do pp. 44-48 questions, answers and rationale for the short story excerpt and poem. Show your VETY #3 flashcard answers.Finish showing your answers and the corresponding questions for the AP-style Kite Runner.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Review VETY #3 flashcard answers. Continue reading and analyzing the Multiple Choice Questions Strategies (pp. 34-48) from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.

    3. Introduce HW.

    Students will read and analyze for reading comprehension and application. Due Monday, February 25th:
  • AP Exam (time yourself: 1 hour) in the Multiple Choice Questions Packet (given in class) from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature. Also, finish the sample questions (include answers and rationales) for the Huckleberry Finn excerpt and the Emily Dickinson poem.

  • Poetry Assignment--Choose 10 poets on p. 46. Find a poem written by each of the poets. Print the poems. Read them several times. Paraphrase each stanza. Create four questions for each poem. The questions should be one of each of the following types: factual, technical, analytical, inferential. See p. 39 for key words and phrases in composing these questions. Use pp. 46-47 to help guide you in this process. Provide answers and rationales for each of the questions (refer to pp. 46-47 for models).
  • Make VETY #4 flashcards. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.

    Due Wednesday, February 27th:

  • VETY#3 and #4 Quiz.

    *Read a novel ALWAYS. Good readers are always reading works of literature. Reading classics is recommended. If you need lists of classics, check out these: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Connís Favorite Classics.

  • Thursday, February 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read and analyze the Multiple Choice Questions Strategies (pp. 34-48) from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature. Be ready for Q & A discussion. Finish showing your answers and the corresponding questions for the AP-style Kite Runner.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Read and analyze the packet on Multiple Choice Questions Strategies from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.

    Students will read and analyze for reading comprehension and application. Due TOMORROW, Friday, February 15th:
  • VETY #3 flashcards. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.

    Due Monday, February 25th:

  • AP Exam (time yourself: 1 hour) in the Multiple Choice Questions Packet (given in class) from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.
  • Poetry Assignment--Choose 10 poets on p. 46. Find a poem written by each of the poets. Print the poems. Read them several times. Paraphrase each stanza. Create four questions for each poem. The questions should be one of each of the following types: factual, technical, analytical, inferential. See p. 39 for key words and phrases in composing these questions. Use pp. 46-47 to help guide you in this process. Provide answers and rationales for each of the questions (refer to pp. 46-47 for models).
  • Wednesday, February 13th, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY #2 quiz. Show your answers and the corresponding questions for the AP-style Kite Runner.

    2. Reading/Analysis: Read and analyze the Multiple Choice Questions Strategies from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.

    3. Discussion: Discuss and analyze the Multiple Choice Questions Strategies from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.

    Students will read and analyze for reading comprehension and application. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, Feb. 14th:
  • Read pp. 34-38 in the Packet (given in class) from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.

    Due Friday, February 15th:

  • VETY #3. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.

    Due Monday, February 25th:

  • Strategies and AP Exam in the Multiple Choice Questions Packet (given in class) from the 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.
  • Poetry Assignment--TBA.
  • Tuesday, February 12th, 2008: 1. Work Period: Exchange The Kite Runner questions with another pair of classmates. Work on answering their AP-style questions. You may use the novel, if you so choose. If completed, work on preparing for tomorrow's VETY #2 quiz. Students will read and analyze for reading comprehension, including literary term, author's purpose/tone, and vocabulary analysis. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, February 13th:
  • VETY #2 Quiz
  • Finish the classwork--answers for the Kite Runner AP questions. Be able to verbally explain your answers tomorrow to obtain full credit.
  • Monday, February 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Evaluate the question-making process. What was easy? What was challenging? Do you think this was a helpful assignment? Why/Why not? Write and share.

    2. Work Period: Exchange The Kite Runner questions with another pair of classmates. Begin answering their AP-style questions. You may use the novel, if you so choose.

    Students will self-evaluate the question-composing process. Students will exchange with a pair of classmates and answer the text-based questions for reading comprehension and higher-level analysis. Due Wednesday, February 13th:
  • VETY #2 Quiz
  • Friday, February 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review VETY #2 answers.

    2. Work Period: Work with your partner on the HW due Monday. Peer review and teacher review, if students choose.

    Students will compose AP Literature-style questions and answers on literary terms, structure, author's tone, inference, main idea and vocabulary in The Kite Runner. Students will learn the test-makers' strategies in creating challenging and complex questions and answers, which will help prepare the students for the AP exam. Due Monday, February 11th:
  • Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers. Question types include the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types.

    Due Wednesday, February 13th:

  • VETY #2 Quiz
  • Thursday, February 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review VETY #1 Quiz answers.

    2. Work Period: Work with your partner on the HW due Monday.

    Students will compose AP Literature-style questions and answers on literary terms, structure, author's tone, inference, main idea and vocabulary in The Kite Runner. Students will learn the test-makers' strategies in creating challenging and complex questions and answers, which will help prepare the students for the AP exam. Due TOMORROW, Friday, February 8th:
  • VETY #2 flashcards. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.

    Due Monday, February 11th:

  • Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers. Question types include the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types.
  • Wednesday, February 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: VETY #1 Quiz

    2. Freewrite: How do people today seek redemption for their sins? Are these forms of redemption helpful in cleansing people's guilt for their sins? How do the characters in The Kite Runner seek redemption for their sins? Think about Amir and Baba, in particular. Refer to pp. 226-227 for an example of Amir's redemption. Refer to p. 169 for an example of Baba's redemption.

    3. Discussion: Discuss forms of redemption in today's society and in The Kite Runner.

    Students will explore the theme of redemption in The Kite Runner and how people in the modern day U.S. seek redemption to cleanse their sins. Students will read and write for understanding and information. Due Friday, February 8th:
  • VETY #2 flashcards. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.

    Due Monday, February 11th:

  • Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers. Question types include the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types.
  • Tuesday, February 5th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review VETY #1 answers.

    2. Finish yesterday's discussion on status and social class: Status and social class deeply affect and drive the plot of The Kite Runner. Find examples in the text that support the influence of status and social class. Brainstorm your opinions on the following questions: Why must society exist with different classes of people? Can a society exist with one class? What determines status and class today in the U.S.?

    3. Introduce HW: With a partner, create 46 multiple choice questions and answers for The Kite Runner that model the AP English Literature Exam questions and answers. Question types include the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types.

    Students will engage in discussion on the themes of status and social class in The Kite Runner, topics that affect modern day U.S. Students will read and write for understanding and information. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, February 6th:
  • VETY #1 Quiz--Know all of the root meanings for #1. You do not need to know the derivation, just the meanings. For example, semi=half.

    Due Monday, February 11th:

  • Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers. Question types include the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types.
  • Monday, February 4th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Status and social class deeply affect and drive the plot of The Kite Runner. Find examples in the text that support the influence of status and social class. Brainstorm your opinions on the following questions: Why must society exist with different classes of people? Can a society exist with one class? What determines status and class today in the U.S.? Turn in both the rough draft and final draft of The Kite Runner paper. Show VETY #1 flashcards.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share thoughts on the Do Now.

    3. Begin HW.

    Students will engage in discussion and informal writing on themes in The Kite Runner, topics that affect modern day U.S. Students will read and write for understanding and information. Due Wednesday, February 6th:
  • VETY #1 Quiz--Know all of the root meanings for #1. You do not need to know the derivation, just the meanings. For example, semi=half.

    Due Monday, February 11th:

  • Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers.
  • Friday, February 1st, 2008: 1. Do Now--Peer Review: Using the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC, discuss the analysis of a trustworthy classmate's Kite Runner paper. Did your classmate fulfill the paper requirements? Did they show how a character's relationship to the past contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole? Did they use literary elements throughout their writing (e.g. characterization, setting, dialogue, flashback, conflict, etc.)? Did they offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how a character's relationship to the past affects the character's actions, attitudes, or values? Share any direct quotes from your classmates' papers that clearly reveal literary elements illustrating how a character's relationship to the past contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.

    2. Analysis of VETY samples.

    3. Discussion/Sharing: Reflections on the paper assignment. Did you enjoy composing the paper? What were the pros and cons? Why was this paper topic a good choice for Kite Runner? What were the challenges of the paper? Was your paper similar or different than your classmate's?

    4. If time remains, prepare for the VETY #1 Quiz.

    Students will engage in discussion of peer review. Students will read for understanding and information. Due Monday, February 4th:
  • Final Draft of Kite Runner Paper: Use this AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC for the paper. A 9/10 is a 90-100%, the 8 is an 80-89%, 6/7 is a 65-79%. For the final draft, you MAY choose to include direct quotes from the novel. Remember, use citations appropriately. For example: "I can still see Hassan up on that tree, sunlight flickering through the leaves on his almost perfectly round face"(Hosseini, 3).
  • Bring in and attach the rough draft with your final draft of the Kite Runner Paper. Make sure to turn both of these copies. Your rough draft should be edited by a classmate or friend/family member--someone you trust who can offer you some good criticism.
  • Compose #1 VETY flashcards. Use this VETY link. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.
  • Bring in the following on Monday: Your copy of Kite Runner and the AP literature question packet.

    Due Wednesday, February 6th:

  • VETY #1 Quiz--Know all of the root meanings for #1. You do not need to know the derivation, just the meanings. For example, semi=half.
  • Thursday, January 31st, 2008: 1. Do Now--Peer Review: Using the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC, analyze a trustworthy classmate's Kite Runner paper. Does your classmate fulfill the following paper requirements? Paper Topic (taken from the 2007 AP English Literature Exam)--In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present actions, attitudes, or values of a character. Focus on Kite Runner in which a character in the novel must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Write a short essay (2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading) in which you show how a character's relationship to the past contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not summarize the plot. Use literary elements throughout your writing (e.g. characterization, setting, dialogue, flashback, conflict, etc.). Do not use direct quotes; instead, paraphrase in your own words. Grading: To earn a 90% or better, you should offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how a character's relationship to the past affects the character's actions, attitudes, or values, Using apt and specific textual support, your essay should fully explore that relationship and demonstrate what it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Your essay should make a strong case for your interpretation and discuss Kite Runner with significant insight and understanding. You should reveal more sophisticated analysis and effective control of language.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share any direct quotes from your classmates' papers that clearly reveal literary elements illustrating how a character's relationship to the past contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.

    3.Analysis of VETY samples.

    Students will engage in peer review of writing. Students will read for understanding and information. Due Monday, February 4th:
  • Final Draft of Kite Runner Paper: Use this AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC for the paper. A 9/10 is a 90-100%, the 8 is an 80-89%, 6/7 is a 65-79%.
  • Compose #1 VETY flashcards. Use this VETY link. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.
  • Wednesday, January 30th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Welcome back! Review of Syllabus Requirements.

    2. Peer Review: Using the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC, analyze a trustworthy classmate's Kite Runner paper. Does your classmate fulfill the following paper requirements? Paper Topic (taken from the 2007 AP English Literature Exam)--In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present actions, attitudes, or values of a character. Focus on Kite Runner in which a character in the novel must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Write a short essay (2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading) in which you show how a character's relationship to the past contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not summarize the plot. Use literary elements throughout your writing (e.g. characterization, setting, dialogue, flashback, conflict, etc.). Do not use direct quotes; instead, paraphrase in your own words. Grading: To earn a 90% or better, you should offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how a character's relationship to the past affects the character's actions, attitudes, or values, Using apt and specific textual support, your essay should fully explore that relationship and demonstrate what it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Your essay should make a strong case for your interpretation and discuss Kite Runner with significant insight and understanding. You should reveal more sophisticated analysis and effective control of language.

    Students will review class requirements and engage in peer review of writing. Students will read for understanding and information. Due Monday, February 4th:
  • Final Draft of Kite Runner Paper: Use this AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC for the paper. A 9/10 is a 90-100%, the 8 is an 80-89%, 6/7 is a 65-79%.
  • Compose #1 VETY flashcards. Use this VETY link. Use the Etymology Online Dictionary to assist you in finding words to match the roots in VETY.