Junior Assignments, Fall 2009

Junior Assignments
Fall 2009

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 25th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review grades, teacher comments and helpful strategies for ALL essays.

2. Regents Strategies Review!

How can we become successful on the English Regents? Best of luck, everyone! It was a pleasure to teach you.

Review ALL Regents materials provided this semester! Use these Essay Outlines to guide you in your writing and to understand the structure/format for each essay on the Regents--Task I Essay Outline, Task II Essay Outline, Task III essay outline, Task IV Critical Lens Essay Outline.

Prepare for the Regents. Review all notes, exams and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TOMORROW (TUES.) AT 12:15PM AND WEDNESDAY AT 12:15PM (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! REMEMBER, THIS IS A TWO-DAY EXAM. BOTH DAYS BEGIN AT 12:15PM. BRING PLENTY OF PENS. WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR EACH ESSAY, AND 6-8 SENTENCES PER PARAGRAPH. THERE ARE FOUR ESSAYS (TOTAL). If you have any questions, email me at hconn28@yahoo.com. THIS MONDAY WILL BE MORE REVIEW, SO MAKE SURE YOU ATTEND CLASS.

Friday, January 22nd, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

1. Do Now: Review grades, teacher comments and helpful strategies for Task I and Task II essays.

2. Work Period: Take two crosswords created by your classmates and see if you can provide the correct answers!

How can we become successful on the English Regents? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

Review ALL Regents materials provided this semester! Use these Essay Outlines to guide you in your writing and to understand the structure/format for each essay on the Regents--Task I Essay Outline, Task II Essay Outline, Task III essay outline, Task IV Critical Lens Essay Outline.

Prepare for the Regents. Review all notes, exams and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS ON TUESDAY AT 12:15PM AND WEDNESDAY AT 12:15PM (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! REMEMBER, THIS IS A TWO-DAY EXAM. BOTH DAYS BEGIN AT 12:15PM. BRING PLENTY OF PENS. WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR EACH ESSAY, AND 6-8 SENTENCES PER PARAGRAPH. THERE ARE FOUR ESSAYS (TOTAL). If you have any questions, email me at hconn28@yahoo.com. THIS MONDAY WILL BE MORE REVIEW, SO MAKE SURE YOU ATTEND CLASS.

Thursday, January 21st, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

1. Do Now: Vocabulary Skill Building--if necessary, finish creating your vocabulary crossword puzzle.

2. Work Period: Create an English Regents Review Crossword Puzzle! When completed, exchange with classmates and see if you can provide the correct answers!

3. Discuss/Share: Review the Task II essays, grading rubric and teacher comments.

How can we become successful on the English Regents? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

ALL OWED HW DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY: MAKE UP ALL HW OWED (including the Story Map, Tasks I, II, III and IV essays--these are all GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENTS!).

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

1. Do Now: Vocabulary Skill Building--create a vocabulary crossword puzzle.

2. Work Period: Create an English Regents Review Crossword Puzzle!

How can we become successful on the English Regents? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

ALL OWED HW DUE THIS FRIDAY: MAKE UP ALL HW OWED (including the Story Map, Tasks I, II, III and IV essays--these are all GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENTS!).

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

1. Do Now: In your group, share your Top Ten List for the task you are assigned (Task I, II, III or IV of the Regents!). Take notes on each Top Ten List.

2. Work Period: Vocabulary Skill Building--add to the word wall and review vocabulary learned.

How can we become successful on the English Regents? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map, Tasks I, II, III and IV essays--these are all GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENTS!).

Friday, January 15th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

1. Do Now: Get into groups (numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4) of four-five people. In your group, you will write a Top Ten list for the task you are assigned (Task I, II, III or IV of the Regents!).

2. Discuss/Share: Share your Top Ten List!

How can we become successful on the English Regents? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map, Tasks I, II, III and IV essays--these are all GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENTS!).

Thursday, January 14th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

Work Period: FInish writing the Task I essay; use the Task I Essay Outline as a guide. Make sure you stay focused on the task! Don't include extraneous information (details that aren't relevant to the task).

How can we become successful on Task I? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map, Tasks II, III and IV essays--these are all GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENTS!).

Wednesday, January 13th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

1. Do Now: Task I Essay Outline introduced. 3. Work Period: Write the Task I Essay. Use the outline (above), your abundant notes and the multiple-choice questions and answers to help you write the essay that addresses the task.

How can we become successful on Task I? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map, Tasks II, III and IV essays--these are all GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENTS!).

Tuesday, January 12th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

1. Do Now: Task I Instructions/Note-Taking

2. Task I Listening and Note-Taking

3. Work Period: Work on the multiple-choice questions.

4. Discuss/Analyze: Analyze the answers.

How can we become successful on Task I? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map, Tasks II, III and IV essays--these are all GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENTS!).

Monday, January 11th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

1. Do Now: Turn in your Task II Essay HW. Listen to a review/reflection of your Task III essays (in general, students need to work on maintaining focus on the controlling idea throughout their essays, connecting the literary elements and narrator's tone to the controlling idea at all times and including more evidence from the passages in your essays).

2. Peer Review: Review classmates' story maps and calculate scores.

3. HW Reminders.

How can we become successful on Tasks II and III? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map, Tasks II, III and IV essays--these are all GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENTS!).

Friday, January 8th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

Work Period: Using the Task II Essay Outline, write your Task II Essay.

How can we become successful on Task II? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

Due THIS Monday, January 11th:

  • Finish the Task II Essay and use the Task II Essay Outline to guide you in your writing. Each paragraph MUST be 6-8 sentences (at the minimum). You MUST use direct quotes from the passage and the table. You MUST stay focused on the task throughout your essay. This will be GRADED!!!

    MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map; remember, it's -10 points each day it's late).

  • Thursday, January 7th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Review the Task II passages, summary notes and multiple-choice answers.

    2. Discuss/Share: Introduce the Task II Essay Outline.

    3. Work Period: Begin working on the Task II essay.

    How can we become successful on Task II? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map; remember, it's -10 points each day it's late).

    Wednesday, January 6th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Continue the summary notes for Task II. Answer the multiple-choice questions.

    2. Discuss/Share: Review the summary notes and multiple-choice answers.

    How can we become successful on Task II? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map; remember, it's -10 points each day it's late).

    Tuesday, January 5th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Reading Quiz on your independent novel. Turn in your Story Map when called to see Ms. Conn.

    2. Begin the introduction to Task II. Introduce the following:

  • Task II is the nonfiction passage and graphic.
  • Reading of the instructions and identifying the task (which is repeated three times on the instructions page).
  • Write down the who, what, when, where, why and how. These 5 Ws and the 1 H are essential when understanding factual information.
  • Begin writing summary notes, while keeping the task in mind while taking notes.
  • Underlining facts that address the who, what, when, where, why and how.
  • How can we become successful on the Story Map (which will enable our success on Task IV)? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    MAKE UP ANY HW OWED (including the Story Map; remember, it's -10 points each day it's late).

    Monday, January 4th, 2010: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE Welcome back and welcome to a new decade!

    1. Do Now: Review the contents of the Story Map requirements. Reminders: Story Map due tomorrow! Reading quiz on your independent reading novel TOMORROW.

    2. Work Period: Complete the finishing touches and proofreading of the Task III essay (due today!). Refer to the Task III Essay Outline. Turn in your completed Task III essay (remember, the essay using the controlling idea on lessons learned, in which you compare the two passages).

    How can we become successful on the Task III essay and the Story Map (which will enable our success on Task IV)? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    Due TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:

  • Finish the reading of your independent reading novel (chosen in class or independently, which MUST be approved by the teacher). Reading Quiz!
  • STORY MAP! Follow this GUIDE TO WRITE THE STORY MAP. You can write the Story Map on your independent novel or Julius Caesar.
  • Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Finish writing the Task III Essay, if necessary (which will be graded!). Begin reading your chosen, independent reading novel for vacation HW.

    2. Gift-giving activity! We will give each other gifts of flattery!

    How can we become successful on the Task III essay? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    Have a wonderful holiday and restful vacation!

    Due MONDAY, JANUARY 4th:

  • TURN IN YOUR COMPLETED TASK III ESSAY (using the fable on the stone and passage on lessons from Vietnam; remember, the controlling idea is lessons learned)

    Due TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:

  • Read your independent reading novel (chosen in class or independently, which MUST be approved by the teacher). Take notes as you read to prepare you for the Story Map and for the reading quiz you will be given!
  • STORY MAP! Follow this GUIDE TO WRITE THE STORY MAP. You can write the Story Map on your independent novel or Julius Caesar.
  • Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Reflect on your Task III Essay. What are your strengths? What areas of writing this essay do you need to work on?

    2. Discuss/Share: What was easy in writing this essay and what was challenging? What do you need to work on to ensure success on Task III?

    3. Work Period: Make up any owed HW, including the Task III Essay (which will be graded!). Choose an independent reading novel for vacation HW.

    How can we become successful on the Task III essay? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    Due TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:

  • Read your independent reading novel (chosen in class or independently, which MUST be approved by the teacher). Take notes as you read to prepare you for the Story Map and for the reading quiz you will be given!
  • STORY MAP! Follow this GUIDE TO WRITE THE STORY MAP. You can write the Story Map on your independent novel or Julius Caesar.
  • Monday, December 21st, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Review Passage II, adding summary notes in the margin and identifying literary elements that support the controlling idea. Review the multiple-choice answers for Passage II.

    2. Discuss/Share: Introduce the Task III Essay Outline.

    3. Work Period: Begin the Task III Essay.

    How can we better apply strategies for success on Task III? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    Due TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22nd:

  • Write the Task III Essay, using the summary notes, literary elements identified and the Task III Essay Outline to guide you. Remember, stay focused on the controlling idea (in this essay, it's lessons learned) throughout your essay.
  • Friday, December 18th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Compare and contrast your HW (summary note-taking) with your neighbor. Work on making up the HW, if necessary. Show your HW to Ms. Conn!

    2. Discuss/Share: Review Passage I for Task III, writing notes or adding more summary and literary element notes that support the controlling idea. Review the multiple-choice answers for Passage I. Begin reviewing Passage II.

    How can we better apply strategies for success on Task III? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    Due Monday, December 21st:

  • Make up HW, especially reading, summary notes, identification of literary elements and support for the controlling idea for the Task III passages.
  • Thursday, December 17th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Explain the meaning of the word ‘unified’. List any other words with the prefix ‘uni-‘ that have a similar meaning. Teacher can compile list on the board, with the goal of explaining how many of those words have a meaning of ‘sameness’ or ‘bring together’. unify, unified, uniformity, unison, unisex, united.

    2. Discuss/Share: Note-Taking on Task III of the English Regents – The Unified Essay

  • Key terms: Unify (bring together), Controlling idea
  • Components of Task III: Task III is the first part of Session Two of the test. You will read two separate passages, usually an excerpt from a book or article, and a poem. The two passages are written by different authors, and have different meanings, tone, point of view, etc, BUT, the two do have similar overall themes. Your task is to write an essay which UNIFIES the two passages. Using a CONTROLLING IDEA – a thesis about the main theme which constantly holds your essay together – you will write an essay highlighting the individual aspects of each passage, as well as the similarities between the two. Like the Critical Lens essay, you need to use the literary devices (elements from each passage) to show your understanding of the meaning.
  • Strategies: Take notes in the margin as you read, which will summarize each paragraph and give yourself reminders of important facts and circle literary devices (characterization-characters' personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view, setting, similes, personification, foreshadowing, etc.). Write next to the literary devices how they support the controlling idea. Create a Venn Diagram to help you prepare to write the essay which identifies similarities and differences.

    3. Work Period: Begin working on the June 2007 Task III passages. Passage I is shorter and can be used in class. Practice the strategies for this one passage – notes in margin, circling literary devices, etc. For HW, and complete the strategy exercises for both passages and answer the multiple-choice questions.

  • How can we compose a successful Task III Unified Essay? PERIOD 6 HW CAN BE FOUND HERE

    Due TOMORROW, Friday, December 18th:

  • Finish reading the in-class Task III passages. You should read both Passages I and II. You MUST practice the strategies for both passages – summary notes in margin, circling literary devices, and answering the multiple choice questions.
  • Wednesday, December 16th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    CRITICAL LENS ESSAY EXAM

    How can we compose a successful Critical Lens Essay? PERIOD 6 LESSONS and HOMEWORK CAN BE FOUND HERE

    Make up any owed HW! See previous days for HW assignments.

    Tuesday, December 15th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Review the components of the Critical Lens Rubric (Here are the different level score equivalents--1=50 and under, 2=51-59, 3=60-69, 4=70-79, 5=80-90, 6=91-99) and the Level 6 essay). Underline the key words in each level.

    2. Discuss/Share: Finish reviewing the Level 6 essay. What are the components of a successful critical lens essay?

    3. Discussion/Analysis: Review the Critical Lens Essay outline (see handout). Exam reminders.

    4. Work Period: Make up any HW owed. Prepare for tomorrow's critical lens essay exam.

    How can we compose a successful Critical Lens Essay? PERIOD 6 LESSONS and HOMEWORK CAN BE FOUND HERE
    Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, December 16th:
    CRITICAL LENS ESSAY EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR By William Shakespeare and "THE GIFT OF THE MAGI" by O. Henry. You should follow the Critical Lens Essay Outline (the 5-paragraph version was provided in class; you should follow that version), and the Critical Lens Essay Scoring Rubric (provided in class). You should make sure that essay addresses the critical lens quote throughout your essay, provides A LOT of evidence that supports your opinion of the critical lens quote (do not summarize the plot), organizes ideas clearly (one paragraph should clearly flow to the next, and each idea within paragraphs should connect to the next), and uses sophisticated vocabulary and complex sentences. Refer to your notes on both Julius Caesar and "The Gift of the Magi" to prepare for this exam. You MUST write your essay on those two works of literature ONLY. This exam will be worth 15% of your grade. It can GREATLY affect your grade!

    Make up any owed HW! See previous days for HW assignments.

    Monday, December 14th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Read the Critical Lens Rubric (Here are the different level score equivalents--1=50 and under, 2=51-59, 3=60-69, 4=70-79, 5=80-90, 6=91-99) and the Level 6 essay). Underline the literary elements and key words from the quote throughout the Level 6 essay. Show your HW: introductory paragraphs for each of these quotes:

  • "To gain that which is worth having, it may be necessary to lose everything else."--Bernadette Devlin
  • "For what does it mean to be a hero? It requires you to be prepared to deal with forces larger than yourself."--Norman Mailer
  • "Greatness lies not in being strong, but in the right using of strength."--Henry Ward Beecher.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Review the Critical Lens Rubric, strengths (interpretation of the Critical Lens quote, knowledge of Julius Caesar and "The Gift of the Magi") and weaknesses (plot summary, disorganization, lack of focus on the Critical Lens quote, minimal evidence from the two works of literature, lack of sophisticated language) in your Critical Lens essays, and review of the Level 6 essay. Review the Critical Lens Essay outline (see handout).

    3. HW/Exam Prep: Introduce the upcoming exam requirements (see today's HW section).

  • How can we understand the components of the Critical Lens Essay? PERIOD 6 LESSONS and HOMEWORK CAN BE FOUND HERE
    Due THIS Wednesday, December 16th:
    CRITICAL LENS ESSAY EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR By William Shakespeare and "THE GIFT OF THE MAGI" by O. Henry. You should follow the Critical Lens Essay Outline (the 5-paragraph version was provided in class; you should follow that version), and the Critical Lens Essay Scoring Rubric (provided in class). You should make sure that essay addresses the critical lens quote throughout your essay, provides A LOT of evidence that supports your opinion of the critical lens quote (do not summarize the plot), organizes ideas clearly (one paragraph should clearly flow to the next, and each idea within paragraphs should connect to the next), and uses sophisticated vocabulary and complex sentences. Refer to your notes on both Julius Caesar and "The Gift of the Magi" to prepare for this exam. You MUST write your essay on those two works of literature ONLY. This exam will be worth 15% of your grade. It can GREATLY affect your grade!

    Make up any owed HW! See previous days for HW assignments.

    Friday, December 11th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Review the B-REAL formula. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the following quote that relates to you and people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.

    2. Work Period: Write an introductory paragraph that incorporates the B-REAL requirements. Use the following quote: "It is the human lot to try and fail..."--David Mamet.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share successful introductory paragraphs with a partner and with the whole class.

    4. Work Period: Begin HW.

    How can we effectively compose an introduction for the Critical Lens Essay? PERIOD 6 LESSONS and HOMEWORK CAN BE FOUND HERE
    DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
    Write (handwritten) three separate, introductory paragraphs (in which you incorporate the B-REAL formula: B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the following quote that relates to you and people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature (you can use "The Gift of the Magi" and Julius Caesar or any other two works of literature that you know well) and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. Here are the three quotes:
  • "To gain that which is worth having, it may be necessary to lose everything else."--Bernadette Devlin
  • "For what does it mean to be a hero? It requires you to be prepared to deal with forces larger than yourself."--Norman Mailer
  • "Greatness lies not in being strong, but in the right using of strength."--Henry Ward Beecher
  • Thursday, December 10th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Work Period: Finish the Critical Lens Essay (August 2009)--"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly..." by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Use two works of literature--"The Gift of the Magi" and Julius Caesar to support your opinion of the quote. Do not summarize plot. Only use literary elements (characterization, theme, setting, etc.).

    2. Make up any owed HW.

    How can we effectively practice our Critical Lens Essay Writing? PERIOD 6 LESSONS and HOMEWORK CAN BE FOUND HERE
    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
  • Make up any HW owed (including the news article/written response, vocabulary story, recitation and journals #1 and #2 for "The Gift of the Magi")!
  • Wednesday, December 9th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Critical Lens Essay Instructions

    2. Work Period: Work on the Critical Lens Essay (August 2009)--"It is only with the hear that one can see rightly..." by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Use two works of literature--"The Gift of the Magi" and Julius Caesar to support your opinion of the quote. Do not summarize plot. Only use literary elements (characterization, theme, setting, etc.).

    How can we effectively practice our Critical Lens Essay Writing? PERIOD 6 LESSONS and HOMEWORK CAN BE FOUND HERE
    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10th:
  • Make up any HW owed (including the news article/written response, vocabulary story, recitation and journals #1 and #2 for "The Gift of the Magi")!
  • Tuesday, December 8th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Finish reading and analyzing "The Gift of the Magi" by O. Henry. Identify and understand the significance of the imagery, symbolism, characterization of both Della and Jim, alliteration, suspense-building, irony, conflicts and resolution.

    4. Work Period: Work on Journal #2 (due tomorrow) and any owed HW. Show your HW due today (Journal #1).

    How can we apply our knowledge of literary elements by reading and analyzing the end of "The Gift of the Magi"? PERIOD 6 LESSONS and HOMEWORK CAN BE FOUND HERE
    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9th:
  • Journal #2 for "The Gift of the Magi" by O. Henry. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in "The Gift of the Magi." A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 full, typed page). Use the proper heading (your name and date in the right-hand corner and my name and the course name (E5 Period ___) in the left-hand corner). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Della's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You may use direct quotes to add more depth to your journal entry.
  • Make up any HW owed (including the news article/written response, vocabulary story, recitation and journal #1 for "The Gift of the Magi")!
  • Monday, December 7th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Make a prediction regarding how "The Gift of the Magi" will end. When completed with your prediction, create two multiple choice questions, with four challenging answers (create two answers that are easier and two answers that are more difficult). Your questions should be focused on literary elements, such as: characterization, setting, mood, conflict, repetition, simile, imagery, alliteration, and other literary elements.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss your Do Now predictions.

    3. Read-Aloud/Analysis: Read aloud and analyze the Youngs' economic situation and their most valued possessions, Della's internal conflict, unknown vocabulary and other literary elements revealed in the short story, "The Gift of the Magi" by O. Henry.

    4. HW introduced.

    How can we apply our knowledge of literary elements by reading and analyzing "The Gift of the Magi"? PERIOD 6 LESSONS and HOMEWORK CAN BE FOUND HERE
    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • Journal #1 for "The Gift of the Magi" by O. Henry. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in "The Gift of the Magi." A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 full, typed page). Use the proper heading (your name and date in the right-hand corner and my name and the course name (E5 Period ___) in the left-hand corner). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Della's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You may use direct quotes to add more depth to your journal entry.
  • Make up any HW owed (including the news article/written response, vocabulary story and recitation)!
  • Friday, December 4th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: How can you make a personal, worldly, and textual connection to "The Gift of the Magi"? Give an example of each.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss your Do Now answers.

    4. Read-Aloud/Analysis: Read aloud and analyze the Youngs' economic situation and their most valued possessions, Della's internal conflict, unknown vocabulary and other literary elements revealed in the first page of "The Gift of the Magi" by O. Henry.

    5. HW introduced.

    How can we strengthen recognition of literary elements by reading "The Gift of the Magi"? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Find and read an article that connects to "The Gift of the Magi" (suggested connections: economic hardship/recession, job loss, the rush of Christmas time, internal conflict, etc.) from The New York Times (login username: msconn06 password: power) or Newsday. Write a one-page (typed) or two full pages handwritten in which you summarize the article and explain how it connects to "The Gift of the Magi." Be sure to provide a link to the news article or print it out.
  • Make up any HW owed (including vocabulary story and recitation)!
  • Thursday, December 3rd, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE

    1. Do Now: Students will discuss and decide if they'd be willing to make the sacrifice necessary in the given situations involving sacrifices discussed yesterday. Discuss how they felt and ideally reach the conclusion that sacrifice is related to 'internal conflict.'

    2. Work Period: What pseudonym would you use to hide your true identity as an author? Explain why you chose that name. (Bonus points to anyone who knows the meaning of pseudonym) Why would someone use a pseudonym?

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your pseudonym answers aloud, and be sure to explain your reasons for your choices.

    4. Read-Aloud/Analysis: Introduce the author, O. Henry (September 11, 1862 – June 5, 1910), and why he used a pseudonym (his real name was William Sidney Porter)--he was found guilty of embezzlement of funds when working at a bank and sentenced to prison, where he wrote and published many stories under various pseudonyms. Read aloud and analyze the first four paragraphs of "The Gift of the Magi" by O. Henry. Examine the literary elements (characterization of Della, setting, mood, and imagery) and unknown vocabulary.

    How can we practice recognition of literary elements by reading "The Gift of the Magi"?
  • Make up any HW owed (including vocabulary story and recitation)!
  • Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE.

    1. Do Now: Group presentations of the "B-REAL" activity work. Each group will share their agreed-upon answers and illustrations based on one of the following:

  • B: Write a big statement about the topics revealed in these quotes that relate to you and people in society today--"In this world goodness is destined to be defeated"--Walker Percy; "All conflict in literature, is in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil"; "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." --George Orwell; J.F. Clarke wrote, “The bravest of individuals is the one who obeys his or her conscience.”
  • R: Restate the quotes and identify key words in the quotes. Be ready to explain why you identified those key words.
  • E: Explain the quotes in your own words.
  • A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) and explain why.
  • L: Literature and Literary Elements (explain why two literary elements from Julius Caesar support your opinion of the quote)

    2. Reflections: Why was this activity helpful for the Task IV (Critical Lens) of the Regents? What are our next steps in achieving success on the Regents?

    3. Discuss/Share: What does the word 'sacrifice' mean? Students will offer answers, leading to an interactive class discussion. Class will also provide examples of different sacrifices and discuss. What kind of connotation does 'sacrifice' have? Definition of the verb form (www.m-w.com): to suffer loss of, give up, renounce, injure or destroy, especially for an ideal, belief or end.

    4. Work Period: Table Groups--randomly given one of the following questions, which present the subject with a difficult decision (the goal is for the group to discuss and decide if they'd be willing to make the sacrifice necessary in the given situation):
    1.) Would you donate a kidney to a loved one, even if it was not guaranteed they would survive the procedure?
    2.) Would you give away your pet to another owner if it meant you'd get to go out with your dream guy/girl?
    3.) Would you be willing to live as a homeless person (think about food, money, cleanliness, health, safety) for one year, if at the end of that year you were guaranteed infinite wealth?
    4.) Would you rob a bank of $1 million if you knew you wouldn't be caught for five years? Basically, would you be willing to live the life for five years before getting caught?
    5.) Would you give up your dreams if it meant the person you loved would achieve their dream?
    6.) Would you give your life to save the life of the person you love most?

    5. Discuss/Share: Students will discuss and decide if they'd be willing to make the sacrifice necessary in the given situation (see work period). Discuss how they felt and ideally reach the conclusion that sacrifice is related to 'internal conflict.'

  • How can the B-REAL activity help ensure success on Task IV (Critical Lens) of the Regents? MAKE UP HOMEWORK OWED:
  • PERIOD 6 HW IS FOUND HERE.
  • Make up any owed HW (including the recitation and vocabulary story!).
  • Tuesday, December 1st, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE.

    1. Do Now: Julius Caesar Vocabulary Quiz

    2. Work Period: Arrange into assigned groups. Finish your "B-REAL" activity work. Each group will have a task (depending on the colored paper given). Each group will have a recorder, an illustrator, and 1-2 speakers. tasks include the following=

  • B: Write a big statement about the topics revealed in these quotes that relate to you and people in society today--"In this world goodness is destined to be defeated"--Walker Percy; "All conflict in literature, is in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil"; "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." --George Orwell; J.F. Clarke wrote, “The bravest of individuals is the one who obeys his or her conscience.”
  • R: Restate the quotes and identify key words in the quotes. Be ready to explain why you identified those key words.
  • E: Explain the quotes in your own words.
  • A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) and explain why.
  • L: Literature and Literary Elements (explain why two literary elements from Julius Caesar support your opinion of the quote)

    3. Discuss/Share: Groups demonstrate their accomplished work.

    4. Reflections: Why was this activity helpful for the Task IV (Critical Lens) of the Regents? What are our next steps in achieving success on the Regents?

  • How can the B-REAL activity help ensure success on Task IV (Critical Lens) of the Regents? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2nd:
  • Make up any owed HW (including the recitation and vocabulary story!).
  • Monday, November 30th, 2009: PERIOD 6 LESSONS CAN BE FOUND HERE.

    1. Do Now: Arrange into assigned groups. Write down the "B-REAL" formula for the introductory paragraph of the Critical Lens (Task IV) essay:
    B = big statement about topic revealed in the quote, R - restate the quote; E = explain the quote in your own words, A = agree or disagree and explain why, L = two works of literature. It's a formula, but it works.

    2. Group Activity Instructions: Each group will have a task (depending on the colored paper given). Each group will have a recorder, an illustrator, and 1-2 speakers. tasks include the following=

  • B: Write a big statement about the topics revealed in these quotes that relate to you and people in society today--"In this world goodness is destined to be defeated"--Walker Percy; "All conflict in literature, is in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil"; "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." --George Orwell; J.F. Clarke wrote, “The bravest of individuals is the one who obeys his or her conscience.”
  • R: Restate the quotes and identify key words in the quotes. Be ready to explain why you identified those key words.
  • E: Explain the quotes in your own words.
  • A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) and explain why.
  • L: Literature and Literary Elements (explain why two literary elements from Julius Caesar support your opinion of the quote)

    3. Discuss/Share: Groups demonstrate their accomplished work.

    4. Reflections: Why was this activity helpful for the Task IV (Critical Lens) of the Regents? What are our next steps in achieving success on the Regents?

  • How can the B-REAL activity help ensure success on Task IV (Critical Lens) of the Regents? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
  • Vocabulary Quiz on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List!

    Make up any owed HW (including the recitation and vocabulary story!).

  • Wednesday, November 25th, 2009: Work Period:
  • Work on the vocabulary story (due at the end of class TODAY--turn it in!) for the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. Vocabulary Story topic suggestions: Julius Caesar, What Happens After Julius Caesar, Life at ITHS, A Day in My Life, or a topic of your choice.
  • Practice your recitation (if you still need to present it!) in which you memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's "Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears, I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (see page 46 in your book or HERE). You can recite Antony's speech on the Monday after Thanksgiving.
  • How can we improve our lexicon (vocabulary knowledge) through a creative writing piece? Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st (the Tuesday after Thanksgiving):

  • Vocabulary Quiz on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List!

    Find an independent choice book and read for pleasure! Come back after Thanksgiving and share what you've been reading! Remember, reading expands the mind and helps you achieve success throughout your life.

  • Tuesday, November 24th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Recitations!

    2. Work Period: Work on the vocabulary story (due at the end of class tomorrow) for the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. Vocabulary Story topic suggestions: Julius Caesar, What Happens After Julius Caesar, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice.

    3. Discussion/Sharing: Share excerpts from your vocabulary stories!

    How are we assessed on our study of Julius Caesar? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st (the Tuesday after Thanksgiving):
  • Vocabulary Quiz on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List!

    Find an independent choice book and read for pleasure! Come back after Thanksgiving and share what you've been reading! Remember, reading expands the mind and helps you achieve success throughout your life.

  • Monday, November 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review Julius Caesar Exam answers.

    2. Work Period: Prepare for the recitation HW (due tomorrow). Work on the vocabulary story (due at the end of class tomorrow) for the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. Vocabulary Story topic suggestions: Julius Caesar, What Happens After Julius Caesar, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice.

    * Grade distribution today.

    How are we assessed on our study of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24th:
  • Recitation HW--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (see page 46 in your book or HERE).

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st (the Tuesday after Thanksgiving):

  • Vocabulary Quiz on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List!
  • Friday, November 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce Julius Caesar Vocabulary List.

    2. Introduce the Recitation HW (Antony's famous lines: "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him...")

    *Show ALL owed HW (all assignments must be turned in today).

    How are we assessed on our study of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24th:
  • Recitation HW--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (see page 46 in your book or HERE).

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st (the Tuesday after Thanksgiving):

  • Vocabulary Quiz on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List!
  • Thursday, November 19th, 2009: Julius Caesar EXAM

    *Show HW due today: Acts IV and V Journals and Acts IV and V 20-word summaries.

    How are we assessed on our study of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:
  • ALL owed HW. It's the LAST day of 2nd marking period!
  • Wednesday, November 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish analyzing the end of Julius Caesar, if necessary.

    2. Review the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet.

    3. Final Q & A for Exam.

    4. Work Period: Work on HW due tomorrow and any owed HW.

    How do we effectively analyze the resolution and exam review on the play, Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Act IV Journal (only one journal!), Act IV 20-word summary, Act V Journal (only one journal!), Act V 20-word summary
  • Julius Caesar EXAM (expect to be tested on class notes taken during the readings in class, characterization of characters--refer to your journals and class notes, literary elements--including, but not limited to, foreshadowing/omens, alliteration, personification, symbolism, conflicts, irony, repetition, similes, metaphors, etc.). Use the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet to guide your study.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • ALL owed HW. It's the LAST day of 2nd marking period!
  • Tuesday, November 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read-aloud Act V Scene III, Act V Scene IV, and Act V Scene V.

    2. Analysis: Analyze the conspirators' deaths and Antony's final speech/final lines of the play.

    How do we effectively analyze the resolution of the play, Julius Caesar? DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Act IV Journal (only one journal!), Act IV 20-word summary, Act V Journal (only one journal!), Act V 20-word summary
  • Julius Caesar EXAM (expect to be tested on class notes taken during the readings in class, characterization of characters--refer to your journals and class notes, literary elements--including, but not limited to, foreshadowing/omens, alliteration, personification, symbolism, conflicts, irony, repetition, similes, metaphors, etc.). Use the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • ALL owed HW. It's the LAST day of 2nd marking period!
  • Monday, November 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read-aloud Act V Scene I and Act V Scene II.

    2. Analysis: Analyze the opposing forces' interactions.

    3. Introduce the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet.

    How do we effectively prepare for an assessment on the play, Julius Caesar? DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Act IV Journal (only one journal!), Act IV 20-word summary, Act V Journal (only one journal!), Act V 20-word summary
  • Julius Caesar EXAM (expect to be tested on class notes taken during the readings in class, characterization of characters--refer to your journals and class notes, literary elements--including, but not limited to, foreshadowing/omens, alliteration, personification, symbolism, conflicts, irony, repetition, similes, metaphors, etc.). Use the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • ALL owed HW. It's the LAST day of 2nd marking period!
  • Friday, November 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act IV Scene III.

    2. Analysis: Analyze the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and the significance of Caesar's ghost.

    How does Shakespeare reveal the tragic downfall of Brutus, after Caesar's assassination, in Julius Caesar? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Act IV Journal (only one journal!), Act IV 20-word summary, Act V Journal (only one journal!), Act V 20-word summary
  • Julius Caesar EXAM (expect to be tested on class notes taken during the readings in class, characterization of characters--refer to your journals and class notes, literary elements--including, but not limited to, foreshadowing/omens, alliteration, personification, symbolism, conflicts, irony, repetition, similes, metaphors, etc.)

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • ALL owed HW. It's the LAST day of 2nd marking period!
  • Thursday, November 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: ACUITY EXAM (Regents' Predictive Exam)--Part II. Show any owed HW.

    2. Read-Aloud/Analysis: Read aloud Act IV Scene I and Act IV Scene II. Analyze the plotting of Antony, Octavius and Lepidus (the new triumvirate) and the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius.

    How can students prove their competence on the Acuity Exam? Make up any HW owed!
    Tuesday, November 10th, 2009: ACUITY EXAM (Regents' Predictive Exam)--Part I (Part II will finish on Thursday). Show Act III 20-word summary and Act III Journal #2 due today! How can students prove their competence on the Acuity Exam? Make up any HW owed!
    Monday, November 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish Act III Scene II and Act III Scene III in Julius Caesar. Examine the various reactions to Caesar's death (especially the citizens' reactions), including Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)? Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet?

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss your personal and textual responses to the Opinionnaire on Politics, Patriotism and Protest.

    3. Work Period: If time allows, work on tonight's HW (Act III 20-word summary and Act III Journal #2).

    How can students effectively identify and analyze characters' reactions and events that follow Caesar's assassination in Act III Scenes II and III of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10TH:
  • Act III 20-word summary
  • Act III Journal #2=A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act III of Julius Caesar. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 full, typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III of Julius Caesar. You may use direct quotes to add more depth to your journal entry.
  • Friday, November 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Fill out the Opinionnaire on Politics, Patriotism and Protest. Write if you agree or disagree. On the back, write at least two sentences supporting your opinion. Include a reference to current events and Julius Caesar. Show Act III Journal #1 HW.

    2. Reading/Analysis: Continue Act III Scene II in Julius Caesar. Examine the various reactions to Caesar's death, including Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?

    How can students effectively identify and analyze characters' reactions and events that follow Caesar's assassination in Act III Scene II of Julius Caesar?
  • Make up any HW owed (see previous days' assignments for all HW).
  • Thursday, November 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue reading aloud and analyzing Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar. How do the characters react to Caesar's death? How do their reactions differ? What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after his death?

    2. Work Period: Work on journals owed and Act III journal #1 due TOMORROW.

    How can students effectively identify and analyze characters' reactions and events that follow Caesar's assassination in Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar?
  • Act III Journal #1 DUE TOMORROW (Friday)! A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act III of Julius Caesar. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 full, typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III of Julius Caesar.
  • Wednesday, November 4th, 2009: Reading/Analysis/Discussion: Continue reading aloud and analyzing Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine the events and Caesar's choices that lead up to his assassination. How could his murder have been prevented? How do the characters react to his death? How do their reactions differ? What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after his death? How can students effectively identify and analyze characters' choices and events that lead to Caesar's assassination in Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar?
  • Act III Journal #1 DUE THIS FRIDAY! A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act III of Julius Caesar. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 full, typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III of Julius Caesar.
  • Monday, November 2nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: With a partner, choose a character from Julius Caesar. Identify three character traits that your chosen character (suggestions: Brutus, Caesar, Cassius, Portia, Calpurnia) possesses to play his/her role in the play. Also, identify five objects your character can be personified and why (for example: a song, an animal, website, weather, etc.). Be prepared to share. While the class is completing the Do Now assignment, students will be called up to show HW--Act II Journal #2 for Julius Caesar. 2. Begin reading aloud and analyzing Act III Scene I. Examine the events and Caesar's choices that lead up to his assassination. How could his murder have been prevented? How do the characters react to his death? What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after his death? How can students identify characters' choices that contribute to plot events in Acts II and III of Julius Caesar?
  • MAKE UP ANY HOMEWORK OWED!
  • Friday, October 30th, 2009 (Period 3 ONLY due to the 1/2 day for Parent-Teacher Conference): 1. Do Now: Finish the 20-word summary for Act II. When finished, begin the Work Period activities.

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share 20-word summary for Act II with the whole class. Which summaries are more effective? What constitutes an effective summary?

    3. Work Period: With an assigned partner, choose and complete one of the following activities--

  • Identify the most suitable leader to lead the assassination of Caesar. Choose between Cassius and Brutus. Identify three examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.
  • Should Caesar live or die? Identify three reasons and supporting examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your decision.
  • Write five multiple-choice questions for a test on Julius Caesar. Refer to our class notes. Each question must have four answer choices. Two of the answer choices must be more challenging than the others.
  • Choose your favorite wife--Portia or Calpurnia. Identify three examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.

    4. Discuss/Share: Students share their work period activities with the class.

  • How can students identify textual evidence and engage in critical analysis of Acts I and II of Julius Caesar? Students will address Standard 2 (Language for Literary Response and Expression), Standard 3 (Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation) and Standard 4 (Language for Social Interaction). DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2ND:
    Act II Journal Entry #2 for Act II of Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (II, I, 1).
  • MAKE UP ANY HOMEWORK OWED!
  • Thursday, October 29th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue reading Act II Scenes III and IV of Julius Caesar. Finish analyzing Act II and taking notes. Examine the omens/foreshadowing and the characterization of Portia, Brutus' wife.

    2. Work Period: Work on Act II Journal Entry #2. Show Act II Journal #1 and other owed HW.

    How is characterization of Portia and other minor characters revealed as foreshadowing in Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2ND:
    Act II Journal Entry #2 for Act II of Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (II, I, 1).
  • MAKE UP ANY HOMEWORK OWED!
  • Wednesday, October 28th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue reading Act II Scene i of Julius Caesar. Examine the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia and the relationship between Brutus and Portia. Begin Act II Scene II of Julius Caesar. Examine the conspirators' assassination plan--the method to bring Caesar to the Capitol, Calpurnia's superstitions (foreshadowing/omens), and Caesar's arrogance/invincibility and ego.

    2. Work Period: Work on Act II Journal Entry #1

    How is characterization of the major characters (Caesar and Cassius) and new minor characters (the wives, Portia and Calpurnia) revealed, relationships introduced and literary elements identified in Act II Scenes I and II of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
    Act II Journal Entry #1 for Act II of Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (II, I, 1).
    Tuesday, October 27th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue reading Act II Scene i of Julius Caesar. Examine Brutus' characterization of Caesar, the characterization of Brutus, reasons the conspirators will kill Caesar, Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar, the conspirators' assassination plan--the method to bring Caesar to the Capitol, literary elements (including irony and alliteration), the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia and the relationship between Brutus and Portia.

    2. Work Period: Work on Act II Journal Entry #1

    How is characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar) revealed, relationships introduced and literary elements identified in Act II of Julius Caesar? Make up any HW owed. See previous days for homework needed.

    DUE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
    One journal entry for Act II Scene I of Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (II, I, 1).

    Monday, October 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read your neighbor's 20-word summary. How is it different or similar to yours? Did you leave out any essential information in the summary in Act I? Show your HW--20-word summary and your Act I journal entry #2.

    2. Discuss/Share the Do Now.

    3. Begin reading Act II Scene i of Julius Caesar. Examine Brutus' characterization of Caesar, the characterization of Brutus, reasons the conspirators will kill Caesar, Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar, the conspirators' assassination plan--the method to bring Caesar to the Capitol, literary elements (including irony and alliteration), the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia and the relationship between Brutus and Portia.

    How is characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar) revealed, relationships introduced and literary elements identified in Act II of Julius Caesar? Make up any HW owed. See previous days for homework needed.
    Friday, October 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read Act I Scene III of Julius Caesar.

    2. Write a 20-word summary of Act I.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your 20-word summary with the class.

    4. Work Period: If time allows, begin Act I journal entry #2.

    How is characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar) revealed and conflicts introduced in Act I of Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • Finish the 20-word summary for Act I. Make every word count!
  • Act I journal entry #2. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act I of Julius Caesar. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). You should put your journal entries in the literary analysis section of your binder. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (I, I, 1).
  • Thursday, October 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue reading aloud Act I Scene ii. What conflicts are introduced? How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar? How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous? What are Caesar's weaknesses?

    2. Work Period: Read your neighbor's Act I journal entry #1. How is it similar and different from your journal entry? Show your Act I journal entry #1.

    3. Review Story Map grades and grading process.

    How is characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar) revealed and conflicts introduced in Act I of Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • Act I journal entry #2. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act I of Julius Caesar. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). You should put your journal entries in the literary analysis section of your binder. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (I, i, 1).
  • Wednesday, October 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue to read aloud Act I Scene ii. Characterize Julius Caesar, Brutus, and Cassius. What conflicts are introduced? How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar? How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous? What are Caesar's weaknesses? Analyze the language choices of William Shakespeare and the differences between prose and poetry.

    2. Work Period: Work on Act I journal entry #1 due tomorrow.

    How is characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar) revealed and conflicts introduced in Act I of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22nd:
  • Act I journal entry #1. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act I of Julius Caesar. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). You should put your journal entries in the literary analysis section of your binder. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (I, i, 1).
  • Tuesday, October 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Compile a list of important facts on Julius Caesar and make predictions about what William Shakespeare included in his play, Julius Caesar.

    2. Discuss Do Now.

    3. Read aloud Act I Scene i of Julius Caesar. Examine the double entendre/puns, dialect, and plot development. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar? How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (i.e. Flavius)?

    4. Discuss/Share: Read aloud Act I Scene ii. Characterize Julius Caesar, Brutus, and Cassius. What conflicts are introduced? Analyze the language choices of William Shakespeare and the differences between prose and poetry.

    5. Introduce HW.

    How will students effectively analyze the opening scenes of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22nd:
  • Act I journal entry #1 due. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act I of Julius Caesar. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). You should put your journal entries in the literary analysis section of your binder. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (I, i, 1).
  • Monday, October 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read a neighbor's "Sonnet 18" analysis. What did you learn from your neighbor regarding their literary element analysis? Was it similar or different to yours? Be ready to explain. Show your HW: "Sonnet 18" paragraphs/analysis of literary elements and Julius Caesar facts.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share Do Now (peer review of "Sonnet 18" analysis). Share Julius Caesar facts and compile a class list.

    3. Work Period: Make predictions (at least 5) about the play, Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare. Refer to your Julius Caesar internet research and newly acquired knowledge on Shakespeare.

    How will students effectively analyze "Sonnet 18" and prepare to study William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? MAKE UP HOMEWORK (THIS WAS DUE TODAY; YOU CAN EARN 1/2 CREDIT IF TURNED IN LATE; BETTER LATE THAN NEVER!):
  • Research the man, Julius Caesar, on the internet. You may only use websites that end with .org, .edu, and/or .gov. Do NOT use wikipedia. Find 10 interesting facts (and bring this in!) that you think are important to know before reading William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar play. Identify the website(s) used.
  • If you didn't finish today's classwork, finish it at home and bring it in on Monday. Here it is: Writing/Poetry Analysis--identify THREE literary elements in "Sonnet 18" and then write THREE paragraphs (one paragraph for each literary element) in which you describe the importance of the literary element and the connection to the narrator's tone toward the subject (the beloved person of the narrator). Each paragraph should be 4-6 long sentences. Use direct quotes in your paragraphs to show evidence from the sonnet.
  • Friday, October 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: In discussion/analysis, summarize "Sonnet 18" and identify literary elements (including repetition, metaphor, personification, and imagery). Identify the rhyme scheme (ababcdcdefefgg).

    2. Work Period: Writing/Poetry Analysis--identify THREE literary elements in "Sonnet 18" and then write THREE paragraphs (one paragraph for each literary element) in which you describe the importance of the literary element and the connection to the narrator's tone toward the subject (the beloved person of the narrator). Each paragraph should be 4-6 long sentences. Use direct quotes in your paragraphs to show evidence from the sonnet.

    How will students effectively analyze Sonnet 18 in both written and oral expression? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • Research the man, Julius Caesar, on the internet. You may only use websites that end with .org, .edu, and/or .gov. Do NOT use wikipedia. Find 10 interesting facts (and bring this in!) that you think are important to know before reading William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar play. Identify the website(s) used.
  • If you didn't finish today's classwork, finish it at home and bring it in on Monday. Here it is: Writing/Poetry Analysis--identify THREE literary elements in "Sonnet 18" and then write THREE paragraphs (one paragraph for each literary element) in which you describe the importance of the literary element and the connection to the narrator's tone toward the subject (the beloved person of the narrator). Each paragraph should be 4-6 long sentences. Use direct quotes in your paragraphs to show evidence from the sonnet.
  • Thursday, October 15th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish Mini-Lecture on Shakespeare--his life, time period and works. Shakespearean patterns in poetry and plays=Iambic Pentameter. See Shakespeare's background information. Note-taking is required.

    2. Introduce "Sonnet 18". Examine the subject of the sonnet, the narrator's tone toward the subject, rhyme scheme and other literary elements (including the following: personification, metaphor, symbolism, repetition, alliteration, imagery). Note-taking is required. How will the analysis of "Sonnet 18" help prepare us to study Julius Caesar and other Shakespearean poetry?

    How will students effectively prepare for their upcoming study of Julius Caesar? Make up any HW owed. ALL HW MUST BE TURNED IN BY TOMORROW (the last day in the 1st marking period).
    Wednesday, October 14th, 2009: NO CLASS DUE TO THE PSAT. How will students effectively prepare for their upcoming PSAT and study of Julius Caesar? Make up any HW owed.
    Tuesday, October 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz #2

    2. Mini-Lecture on PSAT Strategies and Shakespeare--his life, time period and works. See Shakespeare's background information. Note-taking is required.

    How will students effectively prepare for their upcoming PSAT and study of Julius Caesar? Make up any HW owed.
    Friday, October 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Peer Review of Vocabulary Story #2. Read your partner's story. Identify vocabulary word misused. Show your partner successful strategies to improve his/her writing. Some examples include the following: substitute the definition for the vocabulary word to ensure the proper use of the word, organize ideas more clearly (separate new ideas into different paragraphs), and develop ideas with more depth (use more details to add substance to the story). Show your Vocabulary Story #2 HW. Keep your story to help your vocabulary quiz study.

    2. Discuss/Review: Reflect on the composition of the vocabulary story and the peer review.

    3. Mini-Lecture on Shakespeare--his life, time period and works. See Shakespeare's background information.

    How will students effectively prepare for their upcoming vocabulary assessment and language development? Vocabulary Quiz on Regents Vocabulary List #2--THIS Tuesday, October 13th!
    Thursday, October 8th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Brainstorming--K/W/L on Shakespeare's life and times. What do you know about William Shakespeare--his life, times, and works? What do you want to know? What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his plays and poetry?

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the student brainstorming from the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Work on the Vocabulary Story (see HW details) due tomorrow!

    How will students effectively prepare for the study of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? Due TOMORROW, Friday, October 9th:
  • Compose a Vocabulary Story (a creatively written story on any topic, using all vocabulary words correctly from Regents Vocabulary List #2. Typed or handwritten is acceptable. This must be written on your own, not with a partner.No minimum paper length. Just make sure that the words are used correctly in a story that makes sense. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, or a topic of your choice.

    Vocabulary Quiz on Regents Vocabulary List #2--THIS Tuesday, October 13th!

  • Wednesday, October 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Turn in Story Map due today. Finish the Acuity Exam, if necessary. Are you satisfied with your Story Map? Describe the process of composing the Story Map and explain difficulties and challenges. How did you overcome those difficulties and challenges?

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss Do Now questions.

    3. Introduce Regents Vocabulary List #2.

    How will students engage in metacognitive strategies (reflection on their thinking and writing)? IF YOU DID NOT TURN IN YOUR STORY MAP, WHICH WAS DUE TODAY, YOU WILL HAVE -10 POINTS DEDUCTED EACH DAY IT'S LATE. REMEMBER, IT'S 50% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE!

    Due This Friday, October 9th:

  • Compose a Vocabulary Story (a creatively written story on any topic, using all vocabulary words correctly from Regents Vocabulary List #2. Typed or handwritten is acceptable. This must be written on your own, not with a partner.No minimum paper length. Just make sure that the words are used correctly in a story that makes sense. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, or a topic of your choice.

    Vocabulary Quiz on Regents Vocabulary List #2--Next Tuesday, October 13th!

  • Tuesday, October 6th, 2009: ACUITY EXAM How will students effectively prepare for their Story Map? MAJOR GRADE (50% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE)=STORY MAP DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7TH.
    Monday, October 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish analysis of the Story Map. How's the Story Map proceeding? What are your questions/concerns?

    2. Work Period: Work on Story Map preparation. Show your Story Map draft.

    How will students effectively prepare for their Story Map project? MAJOR GRADE (50% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE)=STORY MAP DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7TH.
    Friday, October 2nd, 2009: Work Period: Prepare for Story Map. You should be able to write the characterization, setting, vocabulary, plot, conflicts and quotation sections. Work on any HW owed. How will students prepare the story map effectively? DUE MONDAY: Bring in a draft of your story map. Show what you've accomplished thus far, in Ms. Conn's absence. Show the best of who you are.

    MAJOR GRADE (50%)=FINAL DRAFT OFSTORY MAP EXTENDED TO THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7TH.

    Make up any owed HW, such as 15 post-its, vocabulary story, etc.

    Thursday, October 1st, 2009: Work Period: Prepare for Story Map. You should be able to write the characterization, setting, vocabulary, plot, conflicts and quotation sections. How will students prepare the story map effectively? MAJOR GRADE=STORY MAP DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 5TH.
    Wednesday, September 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Create portfolio folders and arrange Sessions 1 and 2 in folders. Preview the STORY MAP. Show your 15 post-its.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Analyze the STORY MAP.

    How will students effectively prepare for the Critical Lens by creating a story map? MAJOR GRADE=STORY MAP DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 5TH.
    Tuesday, September 29th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz #1

    2.Work Period: Finish Tasks III and IV. If/When finished, read your independent novel.

    How will students effectively work on Session Two of the Regents? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, September 30th:
  • Finish your independent reading novel. Five more literary element post-its are due. You MUST have a total of 15 post-its in your novel.

    MAJOR GRADE=STORY MAP DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 5TH. Details will be discussed tomorrow.

  • Friday, September 25th, 2009: Work Period: Complete Tasks III and IV. Turn in the vocabulary story HW. How will students effectively work on Session Two of the Regents? Read your independent reading novel. Make up any HW owed (10 post-its, binder with divided sections, etc.).

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH:

  • Quiz on Regents Vocabulary List #1.

    Due THIS Wednesday, September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel. Create 5 more post-its (that makes a total of 15 post-its) of literary elements identified and explained in your novel. Literary elements include characterization (description of a character's personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, background, role in the story), setting, conflicts, flashback, foreshadowing, point of view, symbolism, and more.
  • Thursday, September 24th, 2009: Work Period: Work on completing Tasks III and IV. How will students effectively work on Session Two of the Regents? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25TH:
  • With a partner or individually, compose the Vocabulary Story (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Regents Vocabulary List #1. Typed or handwritten is acceptable. No minimum paper length. Just make sure that the words are used correctly in a story that makes sense. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, or a topic of your choice.

    Read your independent reading novel.

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH:

  • Quiz on Regents Vocabulary List #1.

    Due Wednesday, September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel.
  • Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Quick Task III Strategies Review.

    2. Work Period: Task III.

    How will students effectively work on Session Two, Task III, of the Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25TH:
  • With a partner or individually, compose the Vocabulary Story (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Regents Vocabulary List #1. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, or a topic of your choice.

    Read your independent reading novel.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH:

  • Quiz on Regents Vocabulary List #1.

    Due NEXT Wednesday, September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel.
  • Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Session Two Mini-Lecture/Note-Taking, which will include identifying the following for Task III (the short story and the poem):
  • Literary devices (What do they know? Let's make a list!)
  • Main ideas (summary notes in the margins to help students better understand the storyline and the controlling idea)
  • Inferences (what's implied in the reading? How do these implications support the controlling idea?
  • Narrator's tone in Task III (the narrator's feelings toward the subject; are they positive or negative? How do you know?)
  • Examine characterization (the easiest literary device, which includes appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, personality traits, and other people's points of view)
  • A great mnemonic device: LMCVIN=Larry, Moe, and Curly Vote In New York (Literary Devices, Main ideas, Characterization, Inferences, Narrator's Tone)
  • Identify/circle literary elements in the passages
  • Create a Venn Diagram to find both similarities and differences between the two passages (with a focus on the controlling idea)
  • Answer the multiple choice questions by covering up the answer choices and writing your own answer in the margin, then do Process of Elimination and finally a 50/50 (eliminate two clearly wrong answers

    Also, introduce strategies for Task IV (Critical Lens), which include the following:

  • Provide a valid interpretation of the quote
  • Agree or disagree with the quote as you have interpreted it
  • Support your opinion of the quote using TWO specific references to literary elements from two works of literature--book/story/play.

    2. Work Period: With a partner, begin the Vocabulary Story HW (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Regents Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--typed or handwritten, about two pages). Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, or a topic of your choice.

  • How will students expand their vocabulary and prepare for Session Two of the Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25TH:
  • With a partner, compose the Vocabulary Story (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Regents Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--typed or handwritten, about two pages). Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, or a topic of your choice.

    Read your independent reading novel.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH:

  • Quiz on Regents Vocabulary List #1.

    Due Next Wednesday, September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel. Five more literary element post-its are due. That makes a total of 15 post-its for this novel.
  • Monday, September 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce Regents Vocabulary List #1.

    2. Independent Reading/Work Period:

  • Work on Discipline Code paperwork.
  • Read and make up post-it HW, if necessary (you should have 10 complete post-its by today). Show your post-it HW due today and find out about any missing HW.
  • How will students expand their vocabulary and prepare for Session Two of the Regents? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Discipline Code Paperwork.
  • Read your independent reading novel. Make up any HW owed.

    Due next Tuesday, September 29th:

  • Quiz on Regents Vocabulary List #1.

    Due next Wednesday, September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel. Five more literary element post-its are due. That makes a total of 15 post-its for this novel.
  • Friday, September 18th, 2009: Work Period: Complete Task II multiple-choice questions and essay. Turn in completed booklet with multiple-choice questions and essay booklet with completed essays. How will students prepare to excel on the Task II section? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • Read your independent reading novel. Identify literary elements (such as: characterization, setting, conflicts, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.) in your reading and describe these literary elements in the five post-its provided. Fill the post-its completely with detail.
  • Bring in your independent reading novel on Monday!

    Due September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel.
  • Thursday, September 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the Task I listening essay.

    2. Task II introduced. Task II strategies offered (take notes in the Regents Reading Strategies section of your binder!): take summary/main idea notes in the margin. These notes should support the task and address problems and solutions. Underline key words and phrases in the passage that support the task. Underline numbers and proper nouns (capitalized names of people, places and things) and circle unknown words.

    3. Work to complete Task II multiple-choice questions and essay.

    How will students prepare to excel on the Task II section? Read your independent reading novel.

    Due September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel.
  • Wednesday, September 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Task I Listening passage read to students for a second time. Practice the listening strategies offered yesterday.

    2. Answer multiple-choice questions and write the Task I essay.

    How will students prepare to excel on the Task I listening section? Read your independent reading novel.

    Due September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel.
  • Tuesday, September 15th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the Listening Strategies to prepare for today's Task I listening passage (from August 2008). Show your HW=5 post-its in your independent novel.

    2. Task I Listening passage read to students. Practice the listening strategies offered in the Do Now.

    3. If time allows, begin to answer multiple-choice questions and write Task I essay.

    How will students prepare to excel on the Task I listening section? Read your independent reading novel.

    Due September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel.
  • Monday, September 14th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Independent Reading HW questionnaire to assess the reading of 25 pages. Questionnaire will include the following questions: What are the title and author of your chosen independent reading novel? What are two reasons for your selection? Who is the protagonist? Provide a brief description of the protagonist? What's the setting (time and place)? Show the class binder with the appropriate sections.

    2. Discuss/Share the Do Now.

    3. Brainstorm a minimum of five effective strategies to implement when listening to a passage being read to you.

    4. HW introduced.

    5. If time allows, introduce Listening Strategies to prepare for tomorrow's Task I listening passage.

    How will students prepare to excel on the Task I listening section? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th:
  • Read your independent reading novel, using the five post-its to take notes on the protagonist, setting and other literary elements that appear significant.

    Due September 30th:

  • Finish your independent reading novel.
  • Friday, September 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's freewrite (if necessary) on the most recent novel you have read. Include as many details about the novel as possible. Write at least one full page. Turn in this freewrite.

    2. English Regents Exam introduced. Examine a sample Regents and learn the components of the exam.

    3. HW reminders, including independent reading selections.

    How will students understand the basic components of the English Regents? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:
  • Bring in binder with appropriate sections (see the Junior Syllabus).
  • Bring in and start reading an independent novel (taken from the classroom bookcase or selected independently; appropriateness will be determined on Monday). You should read at least 25 pages by Monday, and be expected to share how the novel begins. You may also choose a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Thursday, September 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish filling out the index card (if your class didn't meet yesterday). If your class did meet yesterday, take out a piece of loose leaf paper and write a full page on what you read last night for homework (whether it was a book, magazine, news article, or any piece of literature). If you didn't read anything yesterday, write about the most recent text you read and include when you read the text. Turn in this freewrite.

    2. Junior Syllabus introduced.

    3. HW reminders.

    How will students introduce themselves and understand class curriculum, rules and expectations? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • E-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Introduce yourself. What should I know about you? Put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."
  • Have your parent/guardian e-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Your parent/guardian can just say a brief hello and explain how he/she is related (father, mother, guardian, aunt, uncle, etc.). Please have him/her put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • Bring in binder with appropriate sections (see the Junior Syllabus).
  • Bring in and start reading an independent novel (taken from classroom or selected independently; teacher approval is required). You may also choose a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Wednesday, September 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and fill out the index card, answering the following in complete sentences (when appropriate):
  • your full name (in parentheses, write your first name, which you want to be called in class)
  • Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
  • What did you read this summer? Provide titles of books, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • What do you know about the English Regents? Think about the components of the exam. Do you know what to expect? Have you heard what's on the exam? Have your previous English teachers told you about the exam? If so, explain.
  • What knowledge do you hope to acquire in this English course?
  • What can you contribute to this English course?
  • What are you looking forward to this school year?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share responses.

    3. Class expectations and curriculum preview.

  • How will students introduce themselves, with reference to recent literary practice and personal and academic goals? Due TOMORROW:
  • Read something (a news article, book, magazine, etc.) tonight and be prepared to share tomorrow.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:

  • E-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Introduce yourself. What should I know about you? Put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."
  • Have your parent/guardian e-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Your parent/guardian can just say a brief hello and explain how he/she is related (father, mother, guardian, aunt, uncle, etc.). Please have him/her put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."