Junior Assignments, Fall 2010/Winter 2011

Junior Assignments
Fall 2010/Winter 2011

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 24th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Voting on Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Performance

2. Grade and Regents Raw Score disbursement

3. Reflections on the course: what will you most remember? What were some valuable lessons learned in this course?

How can students reflect on the semester, reviewing the most memorable lessons? Congrats on the end of the semester! It was a pleasure teaching you. I wish you the best of luck on your Regents Exams.
Friday, January 21st, 2011: PERFORMANCES OF JULIUS CAESAR SCENES (Arrive on time and ready to perform!!)! You will be graded. Remember to have one group member introduce your scene. Everyone should bow at the end.

*Voting on Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Performance

Turn in all owed HW! Today's the last day of the semester. On Monday, you will receive your semester grade and Regents Raw Score.

How can students effectively perform scenes from Julius Caesar through the incorporation of appropriate theme, levels/spacing, facial expression, body language, vocal projection, costume/prop choices, energy/enthusiasm and teamwork? Congrats on the end of the semester! On Monday, you will receive your final semester grade and English Regents Raw Score.
Thursday, January 20th, 2011: 1. DO NOW: Acting reminders and grading rubric expectations.

2. Work Period: Final Rehearsal of your Julius Caesar scene with your fellow group members. Make sure you fulfill performance requirements during the rehearsal (continue to edit, if necessary). Make sure to incorporate the director's vision of your scene (suggestions: Revenge of the Nerds, Saints and Sinners, Jersey Shore, etc.). Turn in extra credit--business letter rewrite.

How can students effectively interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? All owed HW Due TOMORROW, Friday, January 21st:
  • TOMORROW IS THE END OF THE SEMESTER. All work MUST be turned in!

    DUE TOMORROW FRIDAY, JANUARY 21st:

  • PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS A QUIZ GRADE (10% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW:

  • CHECK SNAPGRADES!!
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Wednesday, January 19th, 2011: 1. DO NOW: Acting reminders and grading rubric expectations.

    2. Work Period: Rehearsal of your Julius Caesar scene with your fellow group members. Make sure you fulfill performance requirements during the rehearsal (continue to edit, if necessary). Make sure to incorporate the director's vision of your scene (suggestions: Revenge of the Nerds, Saints and Sinners, Jersey Shore, etc.).

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? Extra Credit Due TOMORROW, Thursday, January 20th:
  • Rewrite your business letter (provide the original business letter), including the teacher's corrections. This will count as an EXTRA HW! It should be ready to be mailed!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 21st:

  • PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS A QUIZ GRADE (10% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW:

  • CHECK SNAPGRADES!!
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Tuesday, January 18th, 2011: 1. DO NOW: Acting Exercises--character portrayals of archetypes (greedy elf, pretty princess, opera diva, and valiant knight), tableaus (statues) of Cassius/Brutus, Cassius/Caesar, Caesar/Calpurnia, Cassius/Brutus/Caesar, Antony/Caesar, using animated expression and taking up as much room as possible.

    2. Work Period: Read aloud your Julius Caesar scene with your fellow group members and make sure you fulfill performance requirements during the reading/editing. You will have to edit your scene's lines (it's usually best to keep the first sentence and last sentence of character's long speeches). Make sure you determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc. Incorporate the acting exercises--character portrayals, tableaus, levels, voice projection--into your reading/rehearsal.

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? Extra Credit Due Thursday, January 20th:
  • Rewrite your business letter (provide the original business letter), including the teacher's corrections. This will count as an EXTRA HW! It should be ready to be mailed!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 21st:

  • PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS A QUIZ GRADE (10% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW:

  • CHECK SNAPGRADES!!
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Friday, January 14th, 2011: 1. DO NOW: Turn in your business letter (HW).

    2. Continue to introduce the Julius Caesar scene groups and performance requirements. You will have to edit your scene's lines (it's usually best to keep the first sentence and last sentence of character's long speeches). Determine characters assigned for each person in your group. Begin to read aloud your scene to determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc. Introduce the grading rubric.

    3. Acting Exercises (levels and vocal projection of "Beware the Ides of March")

    4. Work Period: Make sure your character roles are assigned, work on determining director's vision and choose three adjectives that best fit your character(s).

    How can students effectively prepare to interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? This weekend: You should work on learning your lines (as close to memorization as possible!)! Also, make sure you understand what's going on in your scene! How would you describe your character (or characters, if you are taking on more than one role)? Think of three adjectives that best describe him/her. What's your scene's interpretation? Think about it. Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Revenge Against the Nerds, 1980's, mafia, high school musical, etc. Begin thinking about costumes and props. Talk to your fellow group members on facebook, e-mail, IM, or use another method of technology (how about the phone? Yes, that counts!).

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 21st:

  • PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS A QUIZ GRADE (10% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW:

  • CHECK SNAPGRADES!!
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Thursday, January 13th, 2011: 1. DO NOW: Introduce (Again! Since so many students were absent yesterday!) the writing of a formal business letter to one of the following people: Mayor Bloomberg (his address can be found HERE or the New York State English Regents Test-Makers (New York State Education Department Address can be found HERE). Follow this SAMPLE MODIFIED BLOCK FORMAT BUSINESS LETTER. Include the following:
  • First Paragraph: Introduce yourself--who you are and your purpose--why you're writing (to the mayor: express your opinions about city concerns, such as the snow clean-up and/or snow-day (or lack of)/to the New York State Education Department: your opinions of the new English Regents, Regents Exams in general or any other concerns about education).
  • Second Paragraph: The problems that are concerning to you
  • Third Paragraph: Suggestions for solutions/improvements
  • Proper Closing (see sample format)

    2. Work Period: Work on the rough draft of your business letter.

    3. Introduce the Julius Caesar scene groups and performance requirements. You will have to edit your scene's lines (it's usually best to keep the first sentence and last sentence of character's long speeches). Determine characters assigned for each person in your group. Begin to read aloud your scene to determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.

  • How can students effectively compose a business letter? FINAL HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT--DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 14TH:
    Turn in your business letter (typed, 12 point font). Write to one of the following people: Mayor Bloomberg (his address can be found HERE or the New York State Education Department (their address can be found HERE). Follow these guidelines:
    Follow this SAMPLE MODIFIED BLOCK FORMAT BUSINESS LETTER. Include the following:
  • First Paragraph: Introduce yourself--who you are and your purpose--why you're writing (to the mayor: express your opinions about city concerns, such as the snow clean-up and/or snow-day (or lack of)/to the New York State Education Department: your opinions of the new English Regents, Regents Exams in general or any other concerns about education).
  • Second Paragraph: The problems that are concerning to you
  • Third Paragraph: Suggestions for solutions/improvements
  • Proper Closing (see sample format)

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 21st:

  • PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS A QUIZ GRADE (10% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW:

  • CHECK SNAPGRADES!!
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Wednesday, January 12th, 2011: 1. DO NOW: Introduce the writing of a formal business letter to one of the following people: Mayor Bloomberg (his address can be found HERE or the New York State English Regents Test-Makers (New York State Education Department Address can be found HERE). Follow this SAMPLE MODIFIED BLOCK FORMAT BUSINESS LETTER. Include the following:
  • First Paragraph: Introduce yourself--who you are and your purpose--why you're writing (to the mayor: express your opinions about city concerns, such as the snow clean-up and/or snow-day (or lack of)/to the New York State Education Department: your opinions of the new English Regents, Regents Exams in general or any other concerns about education).
  • Second Paragraph: The problems that are concerning to you
  • Third Paragraph: Suggestions for solutions/improvements
  • Proper Closing (see sample format)

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your letters with your classmates. Offer insight for improvement

    3. TURN IN YOUR BUSINESS LETTER ON FRIDAY!!!

  • How can students effectively compose a business letter? FINAL HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT--DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 14TH:
    Turn in your business letter (typed, 12 point font). Write to one of the following people: Mayor Bloomberg (his address can be found HERE or the New York State Education Department (their address can be found HERE). Follow these guidelines:
    Follow this SAMPLE MODIFIED BLOCK FORMAT BUSINESS LETTER. Include the following:
  • First Paragraph: Introduce yourself--who you are and your purpose--why you're writing (to the mayor: express your opinions about city concerns, such as the snow clean-up and/or snow-day (or lack of)/to the New York State Education Department: your opinions of the new English Regents, Regents Exams in general or any other concerns about education).
  • Second Paragraph: The problems that are concerning to you
  • Third Paragraph: Suggestions for solutions/improvements
  • Proper Closing (see sample format)

    MAKE UP HW:

  • CHECK SNAPGRADES!!
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Tuesday, January 11th, 2011: ENGLISH REGENTS How can students effectively perform on the new English Regents? MAKE UP HW:
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Monday, January 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review Part 3 Packet and Grading Rubric

    2. Discuss/Share: Review all strategies for success on the English Regents (see HW section)

    How can students effectively prepare for all components of the new English Regents through strategy and component review? PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 11th):
  • Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS THIS TUES., JANUARY 11TH at 7:45am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY AND 6-8 SENTENCES PER PARAGRAPH. FOR PART 3, EACH PARAGRAPH SHOULD BE 6-8 SENTENCES. If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. THIS MONDAY WILL BE MORE REVIEW, SO MAKE SURE YOU ATTEND CLASS.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Underline and write summary notes in the margin. Preview the multiple-choice questions. Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Underline and write summary notes in the margins. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Underline and write summary notes in the margin (for each paragraph and each stanza). Preview multiple-choice questions and two paragraph questions. The same multiple-choice question strategies apply here. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 6-8 sentences (at the minimum) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph, you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify one literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (6-8 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.

    MAKE UP HW:

  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Friday, January 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review Part 4/Critical Lens Papers and Grading Rubric

    2. Work Period: Work on Part 3 packet HW.

    How can students effectively prepare for Part 3 (the two fiction passages--the short story excerpt and the poem and the short answers) and Part 4 (the critical lens essay) on the new English Regents? DUE THIS MONDAY, JANUARY 10th:
  • Part 3 packet (received in class)

    PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THIS TUESDAY, JANUARY 11th):

  • Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS THIS TUES., JANUARY 11TH at 7:45am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY AND 6-8 SENTENCES PER PARAGRAPH. FOR PART 3, EACH PARAGRAPH SHOULD BE 6-8 SENTENCES. If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. THIS MONDAY WILL BE MORE REVIEW, SO MAKE SURE YOU ATTEND CLASS.

    MAKE UP HW:

  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Thursday, January 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the Part 1 Listening Passage Multiple-Choice Questions/Answers

    2. Work Period: Review Part 3 short-answers (turned in before the winter vacation), my teacher comments (including the following: need direct quotes from the passages to support your arguments, include more development with more sentences, and stay focused on the question), and the new grading rubric (score of 0, 1, or 2).

    3. Introduce the HW

    How can students effectively prepare for Part 3 (the two fiction passages--the short story excerpt and the poem) and the short answers that follow on the new English Regents? DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 10th:
  • Part 3 packet (received in class)

    PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 11th):

  • Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TUES., JANUARY 11TH at 7:45am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY AND 6-8 SENTENCES PER PARAGRAPH. FOR PART 3, EACH PARAGRAPH SHOULD BE 6-8 SENTENCES. If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. THIS MONDAY WILL BE MORE REVIEW, SO MAKE SURE YOU ATTEND CLASS.

    MAKE UP HW:

  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Wednesday, January 5th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Turn in your HW: Critical Lens Essay. Review the Part 1 components and strategies.

    2. Work Period: Listening passage is read to you 2x. Take notes both times on the 5 Ws and the 1 H and the author's purpose (WHY DOES HE/SHE INCLUDE THESE DETAILS???). Do the multiple-choice questions.

    How can students effectively prepare for Part 1 (the listening section) on the new English Regents? MAKE UP HOMEWORK AND PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 11th):
  • Any of the 15 post-its for your independent reading book
  • "The Masque of the Red Death" journal
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Read for pleasure and challenge!! Good readers are good writers!!!
  • Review all Regents materials and strategies/notes, your old story map, and notes/exams on Julius Caesar and "The Masque of the Red Death"--this will help you for the English Regents!
  • Tuesday, January 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Receive your introductory paragraph for the critical lens essay (with teacher comments). The paragraph will be corrected in terms of the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.

    2. Work Period: You will finish the critical lens essay. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (6-8 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.

    3. HW introduced.

    How can students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the new English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5th:
    FINISH TODAY'S CRITICAL LENS ESSAY (received in class)
  • *The introductory paragraph must follow the B-REAL formula. B: Write a big statement (attention-grabber) about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.
  • The body paragraphs should include specific details/examples from each work of literature that SUPPORT the quote. DO NOT SUMMARIZE THE PLOT. Only include literary elements (examples: characterization, conflict, dialogue, tone) that support the quote. The first body paragraph should focus on one work of literature (for example: Julius Caesar), the second body paragraph should focus on the second work of literature (for example: "The Masque of the Red Death"), and the third body paragraph should focus on the similarities between both works of literature and how THEY BOTH SUPPORT THE QUOTE!
  • The conclusion paragraph (the fifth paragraph) should summarize all ideas expressed throughout the essay. You should restate your opinion of the quote and restate your reasons that the two works of literature support the quote. End with an interesting final thought!

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK AND PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 11th):

  • Any of the 15 post-its for your independent reading book
  • "The Masque of the Red Death" journal
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Read for pleasure and challenge!! Good readers are good writers!!!
  • Review all Regents materials and strategies/notes, your old story map, and notes/exams on Julius Caesar and "The Masque of the Red Death"--this will help you for the English Regents!
  • Monday, January 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the components/strategies of the New English Regents:
  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Underline and write summary notes in the margin. Preview the multiple-choice questions. Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Underline and write summary notes in the margins. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Underline and write summary notes in the margin (for each paragraph and each stanza). Preview multiple-choice questions and two paragraph questions. The same multiple-choice question strategies apply here. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 6-8 sentences (at the minimum) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph, you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify one literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (6-8 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.

    2. Work Period: With your partner, write down everything discussed about your assigned section (part 1, 2, 3 or 4) of the English Regents. Turn it in.

  • How can students effectively review the components and strategies for the new English Regents? MAKE UP HOMEWORK AND PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 11th):
  • Any of the 15 post-its for your independent reading book
  • "The Masque of the Red Death" journal
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Read for pleasure and challenge!! Good readers are good writers!!!
  • Review all Regents materials and strategies/notes, your old story map, and notes/exams on Julius Caesar and "The Masque of the Red Death"--this will help you for the English Regents!
  • Thursday, December 23rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish the introductory paragraph for the Critical Lens Essay (Part 4). Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.

    2. "Gift of Kindness" Activity

    ***Return any books borrowed and turn in any owed work (like the Story Map!).

    How can students apply the B-REAL formula by composing the introduction of the critical lens essay for the new English Regents? MAKE UP HOMEWORK OVER THE VACATION AND PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 11th):
  • If you owe any of the 15 post-its for your independent reading book, you can work on those over the vacation.
  • If you owe "The Masque of the Red Death" journal, you can compose it over the vacation.
  • STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Read for pleasure and challenge!! Good readers are good writers!!!
  • Review all Regents materials and strategies/notes, your old story map, and notes/exams on Julius Caesar and "The Masque of the Red Death"--this will help you for the English Regents!
  • Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the multiple-choice questions' answers in Part 3.

    2. Introduce Part 4: Introduce the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the following quote that relates to you and people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.

    If time allows, introduce the Critical Lens Essay Outline.

    3. Work Period: Work on the Critical Lens Essay.

    How can students display their effective reading strategies for Part 3 (the poem and the fiction passage) and Part 4 of the new English Regents? ***STORY MAP WAS DUE YESTERDAY--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
    Tuesday, December 21st, 2010: Work Period: Finish working on Part 3 (poem and fiction passage). Write summary notes in the margins. Look for literary terms and author's purpose for each term. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Compose both well-developed paragraphs (one paragraph on the controlling idea and the other paragraph on a literary term in one of the passages).

    *TURN IN YOUR STORY MAP!

    How can students display their effective reading strategies for Part 3 (the poem and the fiction passage) of the new English Regents? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish Part 3 (summary notes, multiple-choice questions, and two well-developed paragraphs)!

    ***STORY MAP WAS DUE TODAY--it's -10 points for each day late (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class. If you owe any post-its, they must be turned in by today!

  • Monday, December 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Strategies for reading/answering multiple-choice questions/writing a controlling idea paragraph/writing a paragraph about a literary term from the passage or poem.

    2. Work Period: Work on Part 3 (poem and fiction passage). Write summary notes in the margins. Look for literary terms and author's purpose for each term. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Begin the paragraph writing.

    3. HW Reminder

    How can students display their effective reading strategies for Part 3 (the poem and the fiction passage) of the new English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
  • STORY MAP (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class. If you owe any post-its, they must be turned in by this day!
  • Friday, December 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the answers to the multiple-choice questions for Part 2 (passage A--the fiction passage--and passage B--the non-fiction passage). If time allows, review the summary notes for each passage, too.

    2. Introduce Part 3. Fiction Passage Strategies (reviewed again!): Write summary notes in the margins. Look for literary terms and author's purpose for each term.

    How can students display their effective reading strategies for the non-fiction and fiction passages of the new English Regents? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
  • STORY MAP (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class. If you owe any post-its, they must be turned in by this day!
  • Thursday, December 16th, 2010: Work Period: Read your independent novel. Show HW (5 new post-its and the Regents Part 2 summary notes/multiple-choice question answers; you should now have a total of 15 post-its!). How can students display their effective reading strategies for the non-fiction and fiction passages of the new English Regents? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
  • STORY MAP (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class. If you owe any post-its, they must be turned in by this day!
  • Wednesday, December 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the reading strategies for non-fiction/fiction passages (including writing summary notes in the margins and identifying literary terms or 5 Ws and 1 H and the author's purpose for including those details).

    2. Work Period: Work on reading the non-fiction and fiction passages and answering the multiple-choice questions that follow. Include summary notes in the margins and underlining/circling words and phrases that support the literary terms or 5 Ws and 1 H.

    How can students prepare for effective reading of the non-fiction and fiction passages of the new English Regents? YOU SHOULD BE READING YOUR NOVEL!!

    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • Finish the classwork (if not finished today!)--the summary notes and multiple-choice questions will be checked tomorrow.
  • Compose 5 more post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    *Continue reading your independent novel (Chosen in class only! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17TH AND HAVE ALL OF YOUR 15 POST-ITS!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:

  • STORY MAP (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class!). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Tuesday, December 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the answers to the listening passage's multiple-choice questions.

    2. Introduce the importance of reading with a purpose (in our case, the multiple-choice questions). What's our purpose when reading a non-fiction passage? 5 Ws and 1 H. In the non-fiction passage, the author will often discuss problems and solutions to a current event issue. Look for details/examples that support the problems and solutions. What's our purpose when reading a fiction passage? Literary terms and why they're important. Summarize each paragraph in the margins. Understand the author's tone (positive or negative) and purpose for writing. In the non-fiction passage, underline key words and phrases in the passages that address the 5 Ws and 1 H and problems and solutions. Also, in the non-fiction passage, underline numbers and proper nouns (capitalized names of people, places and things) and circle unknown words. In the fiction passage, underline key words and phrases that support the literary terms identified in the questions. Determine the question types.

    3. Work Period: Work on reading the non-fiction and fiction passages and answering the multiple-choice questions that follow. Include summary notes in the margins and underlining/circling words and phrases that were discussed today. [SHOW TODAY'S HW: 5 POST-ITS IN YOUR INDEPENDENT READING NOVEL]

    How can students prepare for effective reading of the non-fiction and fiction passages of the new English Regents? YOU SHOULD BE READING YOUR NOVEL!!

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • Compose 5 more post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    *Continue reading your independent novel (Chosen in class only! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17TH AND HAVE ALL OF YOUR 15 POST-ITS!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:

  • STORY MAP (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class!). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Monday, December 13th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Listening strategies--prepare to listen for a purpose (in our case, for the English Regents, you should be listening for the purpose of answering the multiple-choice questions). Always listen for the 5Ws and 1H (who, what, when, where, why and how), which are the basic facts of information to be acquired.

    2. LISTENING PASSAGE AND MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS (Regents practice)

    How can students prepare for the listening component of the new English Regents? YOU SHOULD BE READING YOUR NOVEL!!

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • Compose 5 more post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • Compose 5 more post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    *Continue reading your independent novel (Chosen in class only! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17TH AND HAVE ALL OF YOUR 15 POST-ITS!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:

  • STORY MAP (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class!). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Friday, December 10th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Compose a K/W/L on previous knowledge on the English Regents (both the old and new versions). Include what you want to know about the English Regents. [Show the HW: 5 post-its on your independent reading novel]

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the components of the new English Regents, which include the following:

  • Three-hour Exam
  • 1st section: Listening passage will be read to you two times. You will take notes both times. You will then answer multiple-choice questions on the listening passage.
  • 2nd section: Read a fiction passage and answer multiple-choice questions.
  • 3rd section: Read a non-fiction passage and answer multiple-choice questions.
  • 4th section: Read a poem and fiction passage and answer multiple-choice questions. Then write two well-developed paragraphs (6-8 sentences for each paragraph). The first well-developed paragraph will require you to connect both the poem and the fiction passage to a controlling idea (main idea/theme). You MUST use plenty of details/specific examples from both the poem and the fiction passage to support the controlling idea (main idea/theme). The second well-developed paragraph will require you to choose one literary term (such as: characterization, imagery, symbolism, repetition, conflict, etc.) from the poem OR the fiction passage and explain how that literary term is revealed in that poem OR passage. You MUST use plenty of details/specific examples to support evidence of that literary term.
  • 5th section: Critical Lens Essay--you will be given a famous quote and you will have to do the following: Write a LONG essay (5 paragraphs or more; 2-3 handwritten pages) in which you interpret the quote, agree or disagree with the quote, and explain how two works of literature (books/short stories) support your opinion of the quote. You MUST ONLY include literary terms from those two works of literature to support the quote. DO NOT summarize the works of literature. You MUST use plenty of details/specific examples from both works of literature to support your opinion of the quote.
  • How can students analyze the components of the new English Regents? YOU SHOULD BE READING YOUR NOVEL!!

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • Compose 5 more post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    DUE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • Compose 5 more post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    *Continue reading your independent novel (Chosen in class only! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17TH AND HAVE ALL OF YOUR 15 POST-ITS!

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:

  • STORY MAP (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class!). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We already reviewed the details of this project in class.
  • Thursday, December 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: If necessary, review the Literary Terms Handout. Re-introduce the STORY MAP.

    2. Work Period: Continue reading and composing 5 post-its (HW due tomorrow) based on the literary terms distributed in class.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss your initial thoughts/analysis of your novel thus far. What literary terms did you identify? What was the author's purpose in including those literary terms?

    How can students analyze their new, independent novels, with respect to the literary terms, and prepare for the critical lens essay? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10th:
  • Compose 5 post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • Compose 5 more post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    DUE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16th:

  • Compose 5 more post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    *Continue reading your independent novel (Chosen in class only! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17TH AND HAVE ALL OF YOUR 15 POST-ITS!

    DUE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21st:

  • STORY MAP (50% OF 3rd MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (the novel MUST be chosen from the selections in class!). Use your literary term post-its to help you. Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE (there are also sample story maps in class). We will review the details of this project in class!!!
  • Wednesday, December 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Choose your independent novel (from class only). Begin reading and composing 5 post-its based on the literary terms distributed in class.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss your initial thoughts/analysis of your novel thus far. What literary terms did you identify? What was the author's purpose in including those literary terms?

    How can students analyze their new, independent novels with respect to the literary terms?
  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Start reading your independent novel (Chosen in class only! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17TH!
  • Tuesday, December 7th, 2010: 1. Do Now "The Masque of the Red Death" Super Quiz

    2. Work Period: Work on any owed HW (the journal that was due yesterday) and/or choose an independent novel (from the following selections: Night, Catcher in the Rye, To Kill a Mockingbird, and others in class ONLY)

    How can students analyze The Masque of the Red Death with higher order, critical thinking skills, in preparation for the components on the English Regents?
  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Start reading your independent novel (Chosen in class only! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet).
  • Monday, December 6th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the answers to the analysis questions for "The Masque of the Red Death" (on p. 435, taken from the in-class textbook). (Show the HW: character journal due today!)

    2. Review the literary terms and the Edgar Allan Poe notes (taken in class last week)--these details will be on tomorrow's super quiz!

    How can students analyze The Masque of the Red Death with higher order, critical thinking skills, in preparation for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • SUPER QUIZ (20% of the 3rd marking period) on "The Masque of the Red Death." Study your notes on the story (taken in class), the questions and answers from the textbook (p. 435), the notes on Edgar Allan Poe, and all literary terms revealed in the story and discussed in class (personification, symbolism, repetition, imagery, and characterization; make sure you know the purpose for each literary term! Know WHY the author included each one.).
  • Friday, December 3rd, 2010: WORK PERIOD: Work on the analysis questions for "The Masque of the Red Death" (on p. 435, taken from the in-class textbook). When finished, you should turn in all owed HW (today is the last day of the 2nd marking period!) and/or work on the HW. How can students analyze The Masque of the Red Death with higher order, critical thinking skills, in preparation for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 6th:
  • Character Journal for "The Masque of the Red Death." A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the story (You may choose from any of the following characters/personified objects: Prince Prospero, a reveller (person who enjoys the entertainment) in the castle, the ebony clock, a dream, or the mystery man/Red Death). A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and "The Masque of the Red Death" at the top. You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters, and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens in the short story.

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7th:

  • SUPER QUIZ (20% of the 3rd marking period) on "The Masque of the Red Death." Study your notes on the story (taken in class), the questions and answers from the textbook (p. 435), the notes on Edgar Allan Poe, and all literary terms revealed in the story and discussed in class (personification, symbolism, repetition, imagery, and characterization; make sure you know the purpose for each literary term! Know WHY the author included each one.).
  • Thursday, December 2nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reading of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the in-class textbook).

    2. Work Period: Summarize each paragraph in your notebook (try to write 10 words or less to keep your summaries succinct--short and to the point). Answer the following question for each paragraph: why is this important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline. As we read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, foreshadowing, repetition, characterization, etc.) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices). If time allows, begin the literary analysis questions at the end of the story.

    How can students analyze The Masque of the Red Death with higher order, critical thinking skills? Make up any owed HW. See previous days' assignments and snapgrades. TOMORROW IS THE LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD (ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THE END OF THE SCHOOL DAY!).
    Wednesday, December 1st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue reading of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook).

    2. Work Period: Summarize each paragraph in your notebook (try to write 10 words or less to keep your summaries succinct--short and to the point). Answer the following question for each paragraph: why is this important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline. As we read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, foreshadowing, repetition, characterization, etc.) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices).

    How can students analyze The Masque of the Red Death with higher order, critical thinking skills? Make up any owed HW. See previous days' assignments and snapgrades.
    Tuesday, November 30th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Reading of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook). Summarize each paragraph in your notebook (10 words or less). Answer the following question for each paragraph: why is this important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline. As we read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, foreshadowing, characterization, etc.) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices).

    2. Work Period: If time allows, begin the literary analysis questions on p. 435 in the textbook.

    How can students analyze The Masque of the Red Death with higher order, critical thinking skills? Make up any owed HW.
    Monday, November 29th, 2010: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" (turn in vocabulary story)

    2. Vocabulary Story Sharing

    How can students reveal their vocabulary acquisition in preparation for reading The Masque of the Red Death? Make up any owed HW.
    Wednesday, November 24th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Work on your own, creative, original story incorporating the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death"

    2. Q & A on the Julius Caesar Exam questions and answers.

    How can students improve vocabulary acquisition in preparation for reading The Masque of the Red Death? Enjoy the Thanksgiving Holiday Vacation!

    Make up any owed HW.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Vocabulary Story incorporating the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death". You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: What is your safe place? Is safety an illusion? You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Typed papers are preferred (double spaced); handwritten papers are accepted. Write a minimum of one page typed (two pages handwritten). You must write your OWN story (you may not work with a partner this time).
  • Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Share the K/W/L on students' knowledge of Edgar Allan Poe. Take notes and discuss Edgar Allan Poe's timeline.

    2. Introduce the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death"

    3. Review Julius Caesar Exam questions and answers.

    How can students acquire new knowledge on the author, Edgar Allan Poe, and improved vocabulary in preparation for reading The Masque of the Red Death? Make up any owed HW.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Vocabulary Story incorporating the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death". You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: What is your safe place? Is safety an illusion? You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Typed papers are preferred (double spaced); handwritten papers are accepted. Write a minimum of one page typed (two pages handwritten).
  • Monday, November 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Define safety. Describe a safe place. Use all of the senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, and smell). What are some things we do to feel safe from harm's way? Possible answers: install an alarm in our homes, avoid walking alone at night, and take precautions with our health/friends/activities. Is safety an illusion? Why or why not? Let's prepare arguments for both sides: Safety is NOT an illusion OR safety is an illusion. One argument for safety is NOT an illusion is the following: people can take steps to prevent them from danger, like looking both ways before crossing the street. One argument for safety is an illusion is the following: people can never avoid danger; if it's meant to happen it will.

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Begin a K/W/L for students' knowledge of Edgar Allan Poe, the poet/author. Students will fill in what they know about him, his time period and work. They will then write what they want to know (in question form).

    How can students analyze the theme of safety and the author, Edgar Allan Poe, in preparation for reading The Masque of the Red Death? Make up any owed HW.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Vocabulary Story incorporating the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death". You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: What is your safe place? Is safety an illusion? You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Typed papers are preferred (double spaced); handwritten papers are accepted. Write a minimum of one page typed (two pages handwritten).
  • Monday, November 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Define safety. Describe a safe place. Use all of the senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, and smell). What are some things we do to feel safe from harm's way? Possible answers: install an alarm in our homes, avoid walking alone at night, and take precautions with our health/friends/activities. Is safety an illusion? Why or why not? Let's prepare arguments for both sides: Safety is NOT an illusion OR safety is an illusion. One argument for safety is NOT an illusion is the following: people can take steps to prevent them from danger, like looking both ways before crossing the street. One argument for safety is an illusion is the following: people can never avoid danger; if it's meant to happen it will.

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Begin a K/W/L for students' knowledge of Edgar Allan Poe, the poet/author. Students will fill in what they know about him, his time period and work. They will then write what they want to know (in question form).

    How can students analyze the theme of safety and the author, Edgar Allan Poe, in preparation for reading The Masque of the Red Death? Make up any owed HW.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Vocabulary Story incorporating the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death". You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: What is your safe place? Is safety an illusion? You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Typed papers are preferred (double spaced); handwritten papers are accepted. Write a minimum of one page typed (two pages handwritten).
  • Friday, November 19th, 2010: JULIUS CAESAR EXAM (Show HW: Act IV and V journals and summaries, along with any owed HW) How can students prove their knowledge and prepared study of Julius Caesar in a MAJOR EXAM? None (since we have the exam today!)
    Thursday, November 18th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read-aloud Act V Scene III, Act V Scene IV, and Act V Scene V. How do the conspirators die? Why are their deaths significant? Why does Antony give the final speech/final lines of the play? How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?

    2. Finish review of the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet

    How can students analyze the falling action and resolution in Act V of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Julius Caesar EXAM (50% of 2nd marking period grade; expect to be tested on class notes taken during the readings in class, characterization of characters--refer to your journals and class notes, literary elements--including, but not limited to, foreshadowing/omens, personification, symbolism, conflicts, irony, repetition, similes, metaphors, etc.). Use the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet to guide your study.
  • Act IV Journal (only one journal!), Act IV 20-word summary, Act V Journal (only one journal!), Act V 20-word summary
  • Wednesday, November 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read-aloud Act V Scene I and Act V Scene II. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?

    2. Continue review of the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet

    How can students analyze the falling action in Act V of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Julius Caesar EXAM (50% of 2nd marking period grade; expect to be tested on class notes taken during the readings in class, characterization of characters--refer to your journals and class notes, literary elements--including, but not limited to, foreshadowing/omens, personification, symbolism, conflicts, irony, repetition, similes, metaphors, etc.). Use the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet to guide your study.
  • Act IV Journal (only one journal!), Act IV 20-word summary, Act V Journal (only one journal!), Act V 20-word summary
  • Tuesday, November 16th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act IV Scene III. How is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius significant to the storyline? What happened to Portia? How is her surprising death significant to the storyline? What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?

    2. Introduce the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet

    How can students analyze the changing relationships, Portia's death and Caesar's ghost's appearance in Act IV of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Julius Caesar EXAM (50% of 2nd marking period grade; expect to be tested on class notes taken during the readings in class, characterization of characters--refer to your journals and class notes, literary elements--including, but not limited to, foreshadowing/omens, personification, symbolism, conflicts, irony, repetition, similes, metaphors, etc.). Use the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet to guide your study.
  • Act IV Journal (only one journal!), Act IV 20-word summary, Act V Journal (only one journal!), Act V 20-word summary
  • Monday, November 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act IV Scene II of Julius Caesar. Analyze the plotting of Antony, Octavius and Lepidus (the new triumvirate) and the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius. Discussion questions: What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning? How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius? How are these dialogues significant to the plot of the play?

    2. Read aloud Act IV Scene III. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius? How is this new relationship significant to the storyline? What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?

    How can students analyze the changing relationships in Act IV of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
  • Julius Caesar EXAM (50% of 2nd marking period grade; expect to be tested on class notes taken during the readings in class, characterization of characters--refer to your journals and class notes, literary elements--including, but not limited to, foreshadowing/omens, personification, symbolism, conflicts, irony, repetition, similes, metaphors, etc.). Use the Julius Caesar Exam Review Sheet to guide your study.
  • Act IV Journal (only one journal!), Act IV 20-word summary, Act V Journal (only one journal!), Act V 20-word summary
  • Friday, November 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: ACUITY EXAM (finish today)

    2. Read aloud Act IV Scene I and Act IV Scene II (if time allows) of Julius Caesar. Analyze the plotting of Antony, Octavius and Lepidus (the new triumvirate) and the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius. Discussion questions: What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning? How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius? How are these dialogues significant to the plot of the play?

    **SHOW any owed HW.

    How can students effectively reveal their skills in Regents-style questions on the Acuity Exam? Make up any HW owed (see previous days' assignments for all HW).
    Wednesday, November 10th, 2010: 1. Do Now: ACUITY EXAM

    **SHOW HW: Act III Journal #2 and Act III Summary (20 words exactly)

    How can students effectively reveal their skills in Regents-style questions on the Acuity Exam? Make up any HW owed (see previous days' assignments for all HW).
    Tuesday, November 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish Act III Scene II and Act III Scene III in Julius Caesar. How are the various reactions to Caesar's death (especially the citizens' reactions) significant to the story? Compare/Contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)? How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story? Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet? What does this attack reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Share (with the class) your personal and textual responses to the Opinionnaire on Politics, Patriotism and Protest.

    How can students effectively identify and analyze the significance of characters' choices and events that follow Caesar's assassination in Act III Scenes II and III of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:
  • Act III Journal #2 for Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act III of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal from Act III." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Antony said, "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears. I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him" (III, II).
  • Act III 20-word summary

    Make up any HW owed (see previous days' assignments for all HW).

  • Monday, November 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue reading Act III Scene II in Julius Caesar. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)? How is his funeral speech significant to the story? Take notes.

    2. Discuss/Share: With a neighbor, share your opinions on the Opinionnaire on Politics, Patriotism and Protest. Refer to the evidence you used to support your opinions. Identify the top two statements in which you have strong opinions. Persuade your neighbor that your opinions and evidence are valid. Show your HW: the Opinionnaire with two sentences supporting your opinion of each statement (you should have a total of 20 sentences). Include a reference to current events or Julius Caesar. If time allows, we will discuss our opinions as a class.

    How can students effectively identify and analyze the significance of characters' choices and events that follow Caesar's assassination in Act III Scene II of Julius Caesar? Make up any HW owed (see previous days' assignments for all HW).
    Friday, November 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Fill out the Opinionnaire on Politics, Patriotism and Protest. Write if you agree or disagree. Write at least two sentences supporting your opinion of each statement (you should have a total of 20 sentences). Include a reference to current events or Julius Caesar. Show Act III Journal #1 HW.

    2. Reading/Analysis: Continue Act III Scene II in Julius Caesar. Why are the various reactions to Caesar's death significant to the story? Refer to Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)? Take notes.

    How can students effectively identify and analyze the significance of characters' choices and events that follow Caesar's assassination in Act III Scene II of Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:
  • Finish the Opinionnaire on Politics, Patriotism and Protest. Write if you agree or disagree. Write at least two sentences supporting your opinion of each statement (you should have a total of 20 sentences). Include a reference to current events or Julius Caesar.

    Make up any HW owed (see previous days' assignments for all HW).

  • Thursday, November 4th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reading aloud and analyzing Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine the events that follow Caesar's assassination. How do the characters (like Antony) react to his death? How do their reactions differ? Begin Act III Scene II in Julius Caesar. Examine the various reactions to Caesar's death. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?

    2. Discuss/Analyze the Do Now questions. Take notes.

    How can students effectively identify and analyze characters' choices and events that follow Caesar's assassination in Act III Scenes I and II of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
  • Act III Journal #1 for Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act III of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal from Act III." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (II, I, 1).
  • Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud and analyze Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine the events and Caesar's choices that lead up to his assassination. How could his murder have been prevented? How do the characters react to his death? How do their reactions differ? What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after his death?

    2. Discuss/Analyze the Do Now questions. Take notes.

    How can students effectively identify and analyze characters' choices and events that lead to Caesar's assassination in Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar? Make up any owed HW.
    Monday, November 1st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Answer the following--
  • Identify the most suitable leader to lead the assassination of Caesar. Choose between Cassius and Brutus. Write a paragraph including examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.
  • Choose your favorite wife--Portia or Calpurnia. Write a paragraph including examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.
    * Show HW (Act II Journal Entry #2 due and Act II summary, if necessary) and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share the Do Now.

  • How can we analyze characterization in Act II of Julius Caesar? Make up any owed HW.
    Friday, October 29th, 2010: Work Period: Work on HW (Act II Journal Entry #2 due on Monday) and any owed HW. How can we analyze characterization in Act II of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:
  • Act II Journal #2 for Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal from Act II." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (II, I, 1).
  • Thursday, October 28th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue reading Act II Scenes III and IV of Julius Caesar. Finish analyzing Act II and taking notes. Examine the omens/foreshadowing and the characterization of Portia, Brutus' wife. Write the Act II summary.

    2. Work Period: Work on HW--Act II Journal Entry #2. Show any owed HW.

    How is characterization of Portia and other minor characters revealed as foreshadowing in Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1st:
  • Act II Journal #2 for Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal from Act II." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (II, I, 1).
  • Wednesday, October 27th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Begin Act II Scene II of Julius Caesar. Examine the conspirators' assassination plan--the method to bring Caesar to the Capitol, Calpurnia's superstitions (foreshadowing/omens), and Caesar's arrogance/invincibility and ego.

    2. Work Period: With a partner, choose a favorite character from Julius Caesar. Identify three character traits that your chosen character (suggestions: Brutus, Caesar, Cassius, Portia, Calpurnia) possesses to play his/her role in the play. Also, identify five objects your character can be personified and why (for example: a song, an animal, website, weather, etc.). Be prepared to share. Show HW: Act II Journal #1.

    How will students analyze characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar), relationships and literary elements in Act II of Julius Caesar? Make up any owed HW.
    Tuesday, October 26th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reading Act II Scene i of Julius Caesar. Examine Brutus' characterization of Caesar, the characterization of Brutus, reasons the conspirators will kill Caesar, Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar, the conspirators' assassination plan--the method to bring Caesar to the Capitol, literary elements (including irony and alliteration), the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia and the relationship between Brutus and Portia.

    2. Work Period: Begin Act II Journal #1.

    How will students analyze characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar), relationships and literary elements in Act II of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27th:
  • Act II Journal #1 for Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal from Act II." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (II, I, 1).
  • Monday, October 25th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Begin reading Act II Scene i of Julius Caesar. Examine Brutus' characterization of Caesar, the characterization of Brutus, reasons the conspirators will kill Caesar, and Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar.

    2. Show your Act I Journal #2 HW.

    How will students analyze characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar), relationships and literary elements in Act II of Julius Caesar? Make up any owed HW (vocabulary story, Act I Journal Entries #1 and #2)
    Friday, October 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Compose Act I Journal Entry #2. Show your 20-word summary of Act I and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share 20-word summaries of Act I. Share excerpts of journal entries.

    How will students improve their character analysis and textual citations in Act I of Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 25th:
  • Turn in Act I Journal Entry #2. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act I of Julius Caesar. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). You should put your journal entries in the literary analysis section of your binder. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top and ACT I. For example, "Caesar's Journal in ACT I." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens in Act I. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (I, i, 1).

    Make up any owed HW (vocabulary story and/or Act I Journal Entry #1)

  • Thursday, October 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act I Scene iii. Focus on omens (signs of bad things to come) and Cassius' scheming to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar. Take notes.

    2. Work Period: Write a 20-word summary of Act I. Show your HW: Act I Journal Entry #1.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share 20-word summaries.

    How will students improve their character analysis in Act I of Julius Caesar? Make up any owed HW (vocabulary story and/or Act I Journal Entry #1)
    Wednesday, October 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act I Scene ii. What conflicts are introduced? How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar? How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous? What are Caesar's weaknesses? Take notes.

    2. Introduce HW.

    How will students improve their character analysis in Act I Scene ii of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21st:

    Act I Journal Entry #1=A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act I Scene i or ii of Julius Caesar. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). You should put your journal entries in the literary analysis section of your binder. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (I, i, 1).

    Tuesday, October 19th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act I Scene ii. Characterize Julius Caesar, Brutus, and Cassius. What conflicts are introduced? Analyze the language choices of William Shakespeare and the differences between prose and poetry. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar? How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous? What are Caesar's weaknesses? Take notes.

    2. Turn in your vocabulary story incorporating the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List.

    How will students improve their character analysis in Act I Scene ii of Julius Caesar? None.
    Monday, October 18th, 2010: 1. Do Now: QUIZ ON Julius Caesar Vocabulary List

    2. Work Period: Continue to write a vocabulary story incorporating the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: Julius Caesar, Shakespeare, A Day in Your Life.

    3. Story Map returns and grade reviews.

    How will students improve their vocabulary and writing skills? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • FINISH THE VOCABULARY STORY using the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List!!! You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: Julius Caesar, Shakespeare, A Day in Your Life. You may work with a partner (two pages maximum; no minimum). You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Typed papers are preferred (double spaced); handwritten papers are accepted.
  • Friday, October 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act I Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine the double entendre/puns, dialect, and plot development. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar? How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (i.e. Flavius)?

    2. Work Period: Write a vocabulary story incorporating the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: Julius Caesar, Shakespeare, A Day in Your Life. Turn in any owed HW (all due today!)

    How will students effectively engage in the study of Act I Scene I of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:
  • QUIZ ON Julius Caesar Vocabulary List!!!
  • Thursday, October 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List.

    2. Work Period: K/W/L on Julius Caesar.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share students' prior knowledge of Julius Caesar and what they want to know. Discuss how Shakespeare's life and times may be relevant in the play, Julius Caesar.

    How will students improve their vocabulary skills and reflect on prior knowledge in order to prepare them in the study of Julius Caesar? The last day of the 1st marking period is TOMORROW--all owed work MUST be turned in!!


    STORY MAP WAS DUE LAST TUESDAY (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class!!! You will lose -10 points each day it's late!!! It MUST be turned in by FRIDAY (the last day of the 1st marking period)

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • QUIZ ON Julius Caesar Vocabulary List
  • Tuesday, October 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2. Show Story #2 (HW).

    2. Grade quizzes.

    3. Introduce Julius Caesar Vocabulary List.

    How will students improve their vocabulary skills (this will particularly help for tomorrow's PSAT) and prepare for a better understanding of the language in our upcoming study of Julius Caesar? Good luck on the PSAT tomorrow!!


    STORY MAP WAS DUE LAST TUESDAY (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class!!! You will lose -10 points each day it's late!!! It MUST be turned in by FRIDAY (the last day of the 1st marking period)

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • QUIZ ON Julius Caesar Vocabulary List
  • Friday, October 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish Note-Taking on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works.

    2. Work Period: Work on the Vocabulary Story #2 for Vocabulary List #2.

    How will students acquire background knowledge on Shakespeare's life, times and work to enable success on the upcoming study of Julius Caesar? Due THIS COMING Tuesday, October 12th:
  • Vocabulary List #2 QUIZ (10% of your grade for this marking period)
  • Compose a Vocabulary Story (you can write in poetry or prose! Write a creatively written story on any topic, using all vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #2. Typed or handwritten is acceptable. You MAY write this story with a partner, if you choose. No minimum paper length. Just make sure that the words are used correctly in a story that makes sense and you underline the worlds. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, Shakespeare, or a topic of your choice.


    STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class!!! You will lose -10 points each day it's late!!!

  • Thursday, October 7th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish Brainstorming--K/W/L on Shakespeare's life and times. What do you know about William Shakespeare--his life, times, and works? What do you want to know? What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his plays and poetry?

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss K/W/L. Add to your notes in the "L" section (what did you learn?).

    3. Note-Taking on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works.

    How will students acquire background knowledge on Shakespeare's life, times and work to enable success on the upcoming study of Julius Caesar? Due Tuesday, October 12th:
  • Vocabulary List #2 QUIZ (10% of your grade for this marking period)
  • Compose a Vocabulary Story (a creatively written story on any topic, using all vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #2. Typed or handwritten is acceptable. You MAY write this story with a partner, if you choose. No minimum paper length. Just make sure that the words are used correctly in a story that makes sense and you underline the worlds. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, Shakespeare, or a topic of your choice.


    STORY MAP WAS DUE ON TUESDAY (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class!!! You will lose -10 points each day it's late!!!

  • Wednesday, October 6th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Reflections on the Story Map--are you satisfied with your Story Map? Describe the process of composing the Story Map and explain difficulties and challenges. How did you overcome those difficulties and challenges?

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #2.

    3. Work Period: Brainstorming--K/W/L on Shakespeare's life and times. What do you know about William Shakespeare--his life, times, and works? What do you want to know? What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his plays and poetry?

    4. Discuss/Share: Discuss K/W/L.

    How will students self-assess and improve their language skills? Due Tuesday, October 12th:
  • Vocabulary List #2 QUIZ (10% of your grade for this marking period)
  • Compose a Vocabulary Story (a creatively written story on any topic, using all vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #2. Typed or handwritten is acceptable. You MAY write this story with a partner, if you choose. No minimum paper length. Just make sure that the words are used correctly in a story that makes sense and you underline the worlds. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, ITHS, My Future, Shakespeare, or a topic of your choice.


    STORY MAP WAS DUE YESTERDAY (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class (get the notes from a classmate if you weren't in class to obtain them)!!! It's -10 points each day it's late!!!

  • Tuesday, October 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: TURN IN STORY MAP!! Instructions on the Acuity Exam, too.

    2. Work Period: Acuity Exam (Pre-Regents Predictive Exam--no studying was required)

    How will students be assessed on their skill in order to best serve them on the upcoming English Regents?
    STORY MAP WAS DUE TODAY (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class (get the notes from a classmate if you weren't in class to obtain them)!!! It's -10 points each day it's late!!!
    Monday, October 4th, 2010: Work Period: Work on the final touches of your story map project. You should be able to take care of the final sections, such as: theme, literary terms, etc. Any questions? Ask Ms. Conn! How will students analyze and synthesize the literary terms present in their independent reading novels to enable them to write the Story Map? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
    STORY MAP (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class (get the notes from a classmate if you weren't in class to obtain them)!!! It's -10 points each day it's late SO TURN IT IN ON TIME!!!
    Friday, October 1st, 2010: Work Period: Work on compiling information for story map project. You should be able to write the characterization, setting, vocabulary, plot, conflicts and quotation sections. How will students analyze and synthesize the literary terms present in their independent reading novels to enable them to write the Story Map? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
    STORY MAP (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class (get the notes from a classmate if you weren't in class to obtain them)!!!
    Thursday, September 30th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish review of the STORY MAP SAMPLE.

    2. Work Period: Work on compiling information for story map project. You should be able to write the characterization, setting, vocabulary, plot, conflicts and quotation sections.

    How will students analyze and synthesize the literary terms present in their independent reading novels to enable them to write the Story Map? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
    STORY MAP (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We reviewed the details of this project in class (get the notes from a classmate if you weren't in class to obtain them)!!!
    Wednesday, September 29th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce STORY MAP SAMPLE. Students will turn in their Discipline Code Handbook HW, if necessary.

    2. Work Period: Work on compiling information for story map project.

    How will students analyze and synthesize the literary terms present in their independent reading novels? *Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by TOMORROW, Thursday, September 30th). Make up any post-its owed (you must have a total of 15 post-its). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
    STORY MAP (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We will review the details of this project in class!!!

    Tuesday, September 28th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Students will finish illustrating the vocabulary words for Vocabulary List #1. Students will then display their illustrations around the classroom. When finished, students will finish any owed 15 post-its, if necessary OR read independently. Students will turn in their Discipline Code Handbook HW.

    2. Review Vocab. Quiz #1 answers.

    How will students expand their lexicon? *Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by THIS Thursday, September 30th). Make up any post-its owed (you must have a total of 15 post-its). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
    STORY MAP (50% OF 1ST MARKING PERIOD!) for your independent novel (use your literary term post-its to help you). Here's a SAMPLE STORY MAP GUIDE. We will review the details of this project in class!!!

    Monday, September 27th, 2010: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1

    2. Distribution and work on the Discipline Code Handbook and forms.

    How will students expand their lexicon? DUE TOMORROW: Bring in parent-signed and student-completed forms for Discipline Code Handbook.

    *Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by THIS Thursday, September 30th). Make up any post-its owed (you must have a total of 15 post-its). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Friday, September 24th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Volunteers will share excerpts from their vocabulary stories.

    2. Work Period: Students will illustrate the vocabulary words for Vocabulary List #1. In the meantime, students will show their 15 post-its (HW).

    How will students expand their lexicon? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, sophisticated sentence.

    *Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by Thursday, September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Thursday, September 23rd, 2010: Do Now: With a partner, finish writing your Vocabulary Story #1 (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten). Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in the Life of a Teenager, ITHS, The Future, How to Make the World a Better Place, or a topic of your choice. When finished, work on reading and composition of post-its OR study of the vocabulary words. How will students expand their lexicon? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:
  • Compose four more post-its (YOU SHOULD NOW HAVE A TOTAL OF 15 POST-ITS) for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, sophisticated sentence.

    *Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by Thursday, September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish review of Vocabulary List #1.

    2. Work Period: With a partner, begin Vocabulary Story #1 (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten). Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in the Life of a Teenager, ITHS, The Future, How to Make the World a Better Place, or a topic of your choice. Show your HW: THREE new post-its for your chosen novel.

    How will students expand their lexicon? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:
  • Compose four more post-its (YOU SHOULD NOW HAVE A TOTAL OF 15 POST-ITS) for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, sophisticated sentence.

    *Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by Thursday, September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Tuesday, September 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the multiple choice answers from Task III from August 2010.

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #1.

    3. Work Period: With a partner, begin Vocabulary Story #1 (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten). Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in the Life of a Teenager, ITHS, The Future, How to Make the World a Better Place, or a topic of your choice.

    How will students practice effective reading habits? DUE TOMORROW WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:
  • Compose three more post-its for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:

  • Compose four more post-its (YOU SHOULD NOW HAVE A TOTAL OF 15 POST-ITS) for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, sophisticated sentence.

    *Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by Thursday, September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Monday, September 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Regents reading strategies are provided and notes will be taken. Those strategies include taking notes in the margins, with a purpose (refer to the instructions and the multiple choice questions). Preview the multiple choice questions before reading the text. Write the main idea(s) from the instructions at the top of each page of text so there's a clear focus while reading. Underline key words and dates/numbers that address the focus and purpose. Circle unknown words. Identify literary terms in fiction text and poetry and think about why the author has chosen these terms.

    2. Work Period: Find the specific lines in both passages where the answers to the multiple choice questions can be found. Show your HW: FIVE post-its for the literary terms in your independent novel.

    How will students practice effective reading habits? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:
  • Compose three more post-its for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:

  • Compose four more post-its (YOU SHOULD NOW HAVE A TOTAL OF 15 POST-ITS) for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, sophisticated sentence.

    *Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by Thursday, September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

  • Friday, September 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Reading Assessment--August 2010 Task III. Students will read the fiction passage and poem and then answer the multiple-choice questions. If students are finished early, they will have time to read their independent novel and work on the post-its. .

    2. Discuss/Share: Students will exchange with their neighbors and grade the multiple-choice answers. If time allows, reading strategies will be provided (notes will be taken).

    How will students practice effective reading habits? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:
  • Compose five post-its for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.


  • Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Thursday, September 16th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Interpret each of the following quotes in your own words. Write if you agree or disagree and explain why. Choose one quote that connects to your chosen novel. Explain why.
  • "In this world goodness is destined to be defeated"--Walker Percy
  • "All conflict in literature, is in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil."
  • "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." --George Orwell
  • J.F. Clarke wrote, “The bravest of individuals is the one who obeys his or her conscience.”
  • “Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds.” —Franklin D. Roosevelt

    ***Show your HW--the three post-its in which you referred to the literary terms list (from yesterday).

    2. Discuss/Share: Students will share their interpretations and connections to their chosen novels.

    3. Work Period: Independent reading time.

  • How will students practice effective reading habits? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:
  • Compose five post-its for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.


  • Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Wednesday, September 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.

    2. Work Period: Read your independent novel (if you have not chosen a novel yet, please acquire one from our in-class book selections) and compose at least three post-its in which you identify examples of the important literary terms outlined in the link above (handout provided in class). Meet with individual students in student-teacher conferences regarding their strengths and areas needing improvement in reading. Have each student read a paragraph aloud as well.

    3. Discuss/Share: Volunteer students share sample post-its. Reflections on independent reading and literary term findings: Why is this worthwhile? What's challenging? Why do good readers use this strategy of finding literary terms and taking notes during reading?

    How will students practice effective reading habits? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:
  • Finish the three post-its from class. Compose the post-its by reading your chosen novel and choosing three literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.


  • Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Tuesday, September 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish review of the Junior English syllabus.

    2. Work Period:
    Self-Assessment: On loose leaf paper (which will be entered in your new student folder), write your answer to each question below in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples.
    1.) Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
    2.) Describe your academic and personal strengths.
    3.) What three characteristics or traits best define you?
    4.) If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself?
    5.) What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
    6.) What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?
    7.) Share three random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

    When completed with the self-assessment, you can do the following: read your independent novel and make a list of literary elements that you know (the elements and their definitions).

    3. Discuss/Share: Student volunteers share #3 and #7.

    4. HW reminders.

    How will students understand the course expectations and requirements and assess their own personal/academic identities?
  • Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Monday, September 13th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Take out a piece of loose leaf paper and write 1-2 pages on what you read in your chosen book for homework--plot summary, characters introduced, setting, predictions, etc. (show your chosen book). Turn in this freewrite. Show your binder/notebook with five sections. Move to your assigned seat, when given.

    2. Review the Junior English syllabus.

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the course expectations and requirements?
  • Continue reading your chosen book (you need to be finished by September 30th). Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. If you didn't do the homework, you MUST find a chosen book. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Wednesday, September 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and fill out the index card, answering the following in complete sentences (when appropriate):
  • your full name (in parentheses, write any nickname that you want to be called in class)
  • your e-mail address (make sure it's appropriate to be used for school)
  • your parent's/guardian's e-mail address (please identify his/her name and their relation to you)
  • Home phone #
  • Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
  • What did you read this summer? Provide titles of books, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • What genres of books do you enjoy?
  • What is your short-term goal (within this school year and/or within the next two years)?
  • What is your long-term goal (5-10 years from now)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share responses.

    3. Class expectations and curriculum preview.

  • How will students introduce themselves, with reference to recent literary practice and personal and academic goals? Due MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13th (the next day we will be in class):
  • Begin reading a book and be prepared to share a little about the plot summary. Bring in the book to class. Suggested titles can be found here: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Bring in the required binder/notebook with appropriate labels. You can find the details here: Junior English syllabus.