Junior Assignments, Fall 2011/Winter 2012

Junior Assignments
Fall 2011/Winter 2012

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 23rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Review the strategies for success on TOMORROW'S ENGLISH REGENTS.

2. Final Q & A

How can students achieve success on the English Regents? PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 24th):
Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TOMORROW, TUES., JANUARY 24TH at 12:15pm (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 8-10 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH. If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. THERE WILL BE MORE REVIEW ON MONDAY!

HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 8-10 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (8-10 sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (8-10 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Friday, January 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Review the strategies for success on the Critical Lens Essay.

    2. Make up owed HW (everything is due by the end of the day!).

    3. Continue Regents practice (receive the June 2011 packet for additional practice).

    How can students achieve success on the English Regents? PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THIS TUESDAY, JANUARY 24th):
    Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS THIS TUES., JANUARY 24TH at 12:15pm (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 8-10 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH. If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. THERE WILL BE MORE REVIEW ON MONDAY!

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 8-10 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (8-10 sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (8-10 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Thursday, January 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Review the contents of the English Regents and strategies.

    2. Make up owed HW!

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students achieve success on the English Regents? TOMORROW IS THE LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER!
  • MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days on this site and also on jupitergrades.com).

    PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THIS TUESDAY, JANUARY 24th):
    Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS THIS TUES., JANUARY 24TH at 12:15pm (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 8-10 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH. If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. THERE WILL BE MORE REVIEW TOMORROW AND MONDAY!

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two paragraph questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for each paragraph and each stanza). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 8-10 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (8-10 sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (8-10 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Wednesday, January 18th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Review Part 3 of the August 2011 English Regents (share summary notes, circled key words in the questions, answers for the multiple-choice questions and answers for the short-response questions (two well-developed paragraphs--think one page each!).

    2. Make up owed HW!

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students achieve success on Part 3 of the English Regents? MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days on this site and also on jupitergrades.com).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, January 17th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Show HW--Part 3 of the August 2011 English Regents (summary notes, circling key words in the questions, answering the multiple-choice questions and answering the short-response questions (two well-developed paragraphs!).

    2. Review Part 3 of the August 2011 English Regents (summary notes, circling key words in the questions, and answering the multiple-choice questions).

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students achieve success on Part 3 of the English Regents? MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, January 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List. Show yesterday's classwork (Part 2: summary notes and multiple-choice questions/answers).

    2. Review Part 2 multiple-choice questions/answers and summary notes (using the August 2011 English Regents). Apply the strategies reviewed in class (previewing the questions before reading, circling key words in the questions, and writing summary notes in the margins).

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to do Part 2 on the English Regents? DUE THIS TUESDAY, JANUARY 17th:
  • Part 3 of the August 2011 English Regents (this includes reading the passages, taking summary notes, circling key words in the questions, answering the multiple-choice questions and answering the short-response questions (two well-developed paragraphs!).

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, January 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Part 2 practice (using the August 2011 English Regents). Apply the strategies reviewed in class (previewing the questions before reading, circling key words in the questions, and writing summary notes in the margins).

    2. Make up any owed HW! Prepare for tomorrow's quiz!

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to do Part 2 on the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:
  • QUIZ on Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List

    DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 17th:

  • Part 3 of the August 2011 English Regents (this includes reading the passages, taking summary notes, circling key words in the questions, answering the multiple-choice questions and answering the short-response questions (two well-developed paragraphs!).

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, January 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Listening Section practice (using the August 2011 regents). Apply the strategies reviewed in class (previewing the questions before listening, circling key words in the questions, and taking notes on the who, what, when, where, why and how).

    2. Turn in the vocabulary story for the Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List. You may only write about works of literature (you may choose to write about one or two works of literature).

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to do the listening section on the English Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:
  • QUIZ on Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, January 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish writing a vocabulary story for the Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List. You may only write about works of literature (you may choose to write about one or two works of literature).

    2. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to write the critical lens essay on the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11th:
  • Finish the in-class assignment: a vocabulary story for the Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List. You may only write about works of literature (you may choose to write about one or two works of literature).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:

  • QUIZ on Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, January 9th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Reflect on your new and improved critical lens essay. What improvements did you make from your rough draft? How was this opportunity to rewrite your critical lens essay? (Turn in your rough draft and revised critical lens essay)

    2. Work Period: Begin to write a vocabulary story for the Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List. You may only write about works of literature (you may choose to write about one or two works of literature).

    How can students effectively prepare to write the critical lens essay on the English Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:
  • QUIZ on Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, January 6th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce the Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List (quiz is next Friday!)

    2. Review and return the first draft of the in-class critical lens essay (from yesterday). Review the areas needing improvement: more details/examples from the works of literature to support the critical lens, references to literary terms (characterization, protagonist, antagonist, setting, point of view, etc.), more sophisticated vocabulary and proofreading of errors in grammar (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, word usage, etc.).

    3. Sharing of 31 Ways to Get Smarter in 2012.

    4. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare to rewrite the critical lens essay by integrating the knowledge acquired in previous classes? DUE THIS MONDAY, JANUARY 9th:
  • Rewrite the in-class Critical Lens Essay (using the recommendations/corrections that Ms. Conn provided in class). Make sure to write a 4-5 paragraph essay (8-10 sentences per paragraph). Focus on the critical lens quote at ALL times! Refer to literary terms from your two works of literature that support the critical lens quote. Use sophisticated language and correct errors in grammar.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:

  • QUIZ on Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, January 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Write a Critical Lens Essay (don't forget the B-REAL formula for the introduction; don't forget to write 4-5 paragraph; don't forget that the essay will be graded on the 5 categories--meaning, development, organization, language and conventions). This essay will be ungraded. We will discuss the essay in class tomorrow.

    2. Return independent novels and show 15 post-its, if necessary.

    How can students effectively compose the critical lens essay by integrating the knowledge acquired in previous classes? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 13th:
  • QUIZ on Regents Preparatory Vocabulary List

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, January 4th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss the top three facts that you remember about Julius Caesar, "The Masque of the Red Death" and "The Minister's Black Veil"? Take notes.

    2. Review the contents of the critical lens essay requirements. Introduce the B-REAL formula (B=Big attention grabber, R=Restate the quote, E=Explain the quote in your own words, A=Agree with the quote, and L=Literature (two works of literature introduced).

    3. Practice the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph for one of the following quotes (choose one):

  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."
  • "Good literature substitutes for an experience which we have not ourselves lived through."

    4. Return independent novels and show 15 post-its, if necessary.

  • How can students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay by recalling their independently chosen novels and the class texts? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Review the texts we've read this semester. Be prepared to write a critical lens essay tomorrow (ungraded; practice for the English Regents).

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on your independent reading novel (the novel you read over the vacation)

    2. Work Period: What are the top three facts that you remember about Julius Caesar, "The Masque of the Red Death" and "The Minister's Black Veil"? Show HW: 15 post-its from your independent reading novel. You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout. Quiz returns.

    How can students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay by recalling their independently chosen novels and the class texts? MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, December 23rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read your independent book and compose at least 1-2 post-its.

    2. Gifts of Kindness Activity!

    How can students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay by reading their independently chosen novels? DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2012 (first day you return from vacation):
    Read your independent novel (Chosen in class or found online! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS! You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout. EXPECT A QUIZ ON YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL WHEN YOU RETURN FROM VACATION!

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, December 22nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the contents/sections of the English Regents. Take notes on strategies for success, which include circling key words in questions, taking summary notes in the margins of the reading passages, underlining line #s (from the questions) in the reading passages, addressing the short response questions before reading, identifying fiction and non-fiction passages, covering the answer choices and writing your own answers in the margins, and more.

    2. Take notes and practice the strategies from the Do Now.

    How can students effectively understand the contents and strategies for success on the English Regents? DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2012 (first day you return from vacation):
    Read your independent novel (Chosen in class or found online! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS! You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, December 21st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Reflections on PERFORMANCES of Julius Caesar scenes. What were strengths? Areas needing improvement?

    2. Awards for Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume and Best Performance (Group)

    3. Introduce vacation HW and choose independent novels. HW make-up reminders!

    4. Begin reading and composing post-its.

    How can students effectively reflect on their interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2012 (first day you return from vacation):
    Read your independent novel (Chosen in class or found online! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Lovely Bones, Night, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS! You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. The literary terms are taken from the handout found here: Literary Terms Handout.

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, December 20th, 2011: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCES of Julius Caesar scenes! Incorporate the physical interactions/tableaus, vocal projections and animated facial expressions into your performances. Remember to use a lot of hand gestures/body language, include good eye contact (don't stare at the script) and articulate clearly. Don't forget to wear appropriate costumes and use props. Choose one person who will introduce your scene. Bow at the end of the performance. Turn in a grading rubric for each group.

    2. Voting on Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume and Best Performance (Group)

    How can students effectively present their interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, December 19th, 2011: 1. Do Now: FINAL REHEARSAL in your Julius Caesar scene groups, on your feet. Incorporate the physical interactions/tableaus, vocal projections and animated facial expressions into your rehearsal. Remember to use a lot of hand gestures/body language and remember to articulate clearly. Don't forget to wear appropriate costumes and bring in props tomorrow. Choose one person who will introduce your scene. Practice bowing at the end of the performance.

    2. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare for their interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
    PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS YOUR CLASS PARTICIPATION GRADE (15% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we will practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, December 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises--tableaus including different levels (statues) of Cassius/Brutus and Antony/Caesar, using animated expression and taking up as much room as possible.

    2. Work Period: Work in your Julius Caesar scene groups, on your feet. Read aloud your scene to determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc. Incorporate the levels, tableaus/statues, vocal projections/echoes and grading requirements (i.e. facial expressions, body language/gesturing, etc.).

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare for their interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
    PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS YOUR CLASS PARTICIPATION GRADE (15% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we will practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, December 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue editing in your groups (it's usually best to keep the first sentence and last sentence of a character's long speech). Read aloud.

    2. Acting Exercises--tableaus including different levels (statues) of Cassius/Brutus and Antony/Caesar, using animated expression and taking up as much room as possible. Vocal Projection: "Et tu, Brute? Then fall Caesar." Have the Caesar characters in each group say these lines and their group to echo "Then fall Caesar."

    3. Work Period: Work in your Julius Caesar scene groups, on your feet. Read aloud your scene to determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc. Incorporate the levels, tableaus/statues, vocal projections/echoes and grading requirements (i.e. facial expressions, body language/gesturing, etc.).

    4. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare for their interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
    PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS YOUR CLASS PARTICIPATION GRADE (15% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we will practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, December 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises--character portrayals of archetypes (greedy elf, pretty princess, opera diva, and valiant knight), tableaus including different levels (statues) of Cassius/Brutus, Cassius/Caesar, Caesar/Calpurnia, Cassius/Brutus/Caesar, Antony/Caesar, using animated expression and taking up as much room as possible.

    2. Work Period: Work in your Julius Caesar scene groups, on your feet. Work on editing your scene's lines (it's usually best to keep the first sentence and last sentence of a character's long speech). Read aloud your scene to determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc. Incorporate the levels, tableaus/statues, and grading requirements (i.e. facial expressions, body language/gesturing, etc.).

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare for their interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
    PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS YOUR CLASS PARTICIPATION GRADE (15% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we will practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, December 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introduce grading requirements for the performances of scenes from Julius Caesar.

    2. Work Period: Work in your Julius Caesar scene groups. Work on editing your scene's lines (it's usually best to keep the first sentence and last sentence of a character's long speech). Read aloud your scene to determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively prepare for their interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
    PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ASSIGNED JULIUS CAESAR SCENE! THIS PERFORMANCE WILL COUNT AS YOUR CLASS PARTICIPATION GRADE (15% of your 3rd marking period grade). Follow the grading rubric (provided in class) to determine what you need to be successful in this performance. Your performance should be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds (if it's below or above that time frame, you will lose at least 5 points!). YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP SO MAKE SURE EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP IS PREPARED! The scenes are assigned in class! Student performers should stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? It can be a sentence or a few words. Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound. Use the acting techniques we will practice in class!

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, December 12th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Work in your Julius Caesar scene groups. Work on editing your scene's lines (it's usually best to keep the first sentence and last sentence of a character's long speech). Read aloud your scene to determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.

    *Present Recitation HW (MEMORIZATION AND RECITATION of Antony's famous speech--see Friday's HW for all details.

    2. HW Reminders

    How can students effectively present recitations of Antony's famous speech and prepare for their interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, December 9th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss and translate/interpret the Recitation HW (Antony's famous lines: "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him...")

    2. Introduce the Julius Caesar scene groups and performance requirements. You will have to edit your scene's lines (it's usually best to keep the first sentence and last sentence of character's long speeches). Determine characters assigned for each person in your group. Begin to read aloud your scene to determine the main focus of your scene. What may be your director's vision? Suggestions: Saints and Sinners, Mafia, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.

    How can students effectively prepare for their recitation and interpretive scenes of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 12th: Recitation HW (counts as THREE HW ASSIGNMENTS!)--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (see handout or HERE).

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, December 8th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Super Quiz on Acts IV and V
    *Show owed HW.

    2. Introduce the Recitation HW (Antony's famous lines: "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him...")

    How can students effectively understand the significance of the characterization of characters and literary elements in Act IV and Act V to the whole play? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 12th: Recitation HW (counts as THREE HW ASSIGNMENTS!)--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (see handout or HERE).

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, December 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Work on the Quiz Review Sheet for Acts IV and V that includes the following:
  • Characterization (personality traits, actions, speech, dialogue, thoughts/feelings, strengths, flaws, and other people’s points of view) of Brutus, Cassius, Octavius, Lepidus, Caesar's Ghost, Titinius
  • Literary Elements (include evidence from the play and purpose--why these elements are in the play) of foreshadowing/omens, external conflicts (man vs. man) and resolution, irony, repetition (such as: "if we meet again")
  • Connections between Acts I-III and IV and V (look at how the major characters, Brutus, Cassius, Caesar/Caesar's Ghost, and Antony, have developed or remained the same throughout these acts)

    *Show HW: Act V Journals #1 and #2 and ALL Act Summaries
    2. Review the Quiz Review Sheet

  • How can students effectively understand the significance of the characterization of characters and literary elements in Act IV and Act V to the whole play? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8th:
  • SUPER QUIZ on Acts IV and V of Julius Caesar (10% of your 3rd term grade)! You should review all in-class notes, characterization of characters, literary terms (including omens/foreshadowing, soliloquy, conflicts and resolution of conflicts)

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, December 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading Act V. Read-aloud Act V Scene II, V Scene III, Act V Scene IV, and Act V Scene V. How do the conspirators die? Why are their deaths significant? Why does Antony give the final speech/final lines of the play? How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?

    2. Take notes. Begin HW, if time allows.

    How can students effectively understand the significance of the resolutions in Act V to the whole play? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Act V Journal #1 and #2: You will write TWO character journal entries. Remember, a journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act V of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Cassius's Journal from Act V." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Antony said, "This was the noblest Roman of them all" (V, V).
  • Write the Act V 20-word summary. ALL ACT SUMMARIES ARE DUE TOMORROW!

    DUE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8th:

  • SUPER QUIZ on Acts IV and V of Julius Caesar (10% of your 3rd term grade)! You should review all in-class notes, characterization of characters, literary terms (including omens/foreshadowing, soliloquy, conflicts and resolution of conflicts)

    MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW from previous days).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, December 5th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Show HW (20-word summary for Act IV and two journals for Act IV). If not completed, there will be time to finish). If you have a canned food item for the food drive, it will count as one homework journal.

    2. HW Returns: return and review the controlling idea mini-essay.

    3. Begin reading Act V. Read-aloud Act V Scene I and Act V Scene II. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?

    How can students effectively understand the significance of Act V to the whole play? MAKE UP HW, if necessary (see HW that was due today).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, December 2nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading Act IV. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius? How is this relationship significant to the storyline? What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance? What happened to Portia? How is her suicide significant to the storyline? What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance? Take notes.

    2. Work Period: Write the 20-word summary for Act IV. Begin HW journals for Act IV. All owed HW assignments are due TODAY (the last day of the marking period!).

    How can students effectively understand the significance of Act IV to the whole play? BRING IN A CANNED FOOD ITEM THIS MONDAY FOR A FREE HW PASS (this pass will give you a free journal!)!

    DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 5th:

  • TWO JOURNALS: Act IV Journal #1 and Journal #2 for Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act IV of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Cassius's Journal from Act IV." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Brutus said, "Portia is dead" (IV, III).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, December 1st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish the ACUITY EXAM.

    2. Read aloud Act IV Scene III. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius? How is this new relationship significant to the storyline? What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance? What happened to Portia? How is her presence and disappearance significant to the storyline? Take notes.

    How can students effectively prepare for the English Regents? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website. The last day of the 2nd marking period is TOMORROW, FRIDAY (all owed work must be turned in by the end of the school day).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, November 30th, 2011: ACUITY EXAM How can students effectively prepare for the English Regents? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website. The last day of the 2nd marking period is THIS FRIDAY (all owed work must be turned in by the end of the school day).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, November 29th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Julius Caesar Acts I, II and III Exam (show any owed HW)

    2. Begin reading aloud Act IV Scene I and Act IV Scene II (if time allows) of Julius Caesar. Analyze the plotting of Antony, Octavius and Lepidus (the new triumvirate) and the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius. Discussion questions: What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning? How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius? How are these dialogues significant to the plot of the play?

    How can students be assessed on Acts I, II and III in the exam on Julius Caesar? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website. The last day of the 2nd marking period is THIS FRIDAY (all owed work must be turned in by the end of the school day).

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, November 28th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Show HW (Act III Journal #1 and #2 AND Act III 20-word Summary). Make up any owed HW at this time.

    2. Julius Caesar Acts I, II and III Exam Review Sheet

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students prepare for the upcoming exam on Julius Caesar? EXAM ON ACTS I, II AND III in JULIUS CAESAR TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:
  • Study the in-class notes, which include the quotes (the speakers of the quotes and interpretations of the quotes), literary terms (such as: soliloquy, simile, irony, and omens/foreshadowing) and why they're important to the play, and characterization of the major characters. Review sheet will be provided in class. This exam will be 25% of the 2nd marking period.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read aloud and analyze the rest of Act III of Julius Caesar. Examine the various reactions to Caesar's death. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)? Compare/Contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans. How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story? Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet? What does this attack reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?

    2. Take notes on the Do Now.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can students analyze the events surrounding and characters' reactions to Caesar's assassination in Act III of Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY (right after Thanksgiving weekend), November 28th:
  • Act III Journal #1 and #2: You will write TWO character journal entries. Remember, a journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act III of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal from Act III." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Antony said, "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears. I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him" (III, II).
  • Write the Act III 20-word summary.

    EXAM ON ACTS I, II AND III in JULIUS CAESAR on TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29th:

  • Study the in-class notes, which include the quotes (the speakers of the quotes and interpretations of the quotes), literary terms (such as: soliloquy, simile, irony, and omens/foreshadowing) and why they're important to the play. This exam will be 25% of the 2nd marking period.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read aloud and analyze the rest of Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar. How do the characters react to Caesar's death? How do their reactions differ? What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, now that Caesar has been assassinated? Begin Act III Scene II in Julius Caesar. Examine the various reactions to Caesar's death. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?

    2. Take notes on the Do Now.

    How can students analyze the events surrounding and characters' reactions to Caesar's assassination in Act III of Julius Caesar? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, November 21st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read aloud and analyze Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine the events and Caesar's choices that lead up to his assassination. How could his murder have been prevented? How do the characters react to his death? How do their reactions differ? What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after his death?

    2. Work Period: Work on owed HW (show HW: two paragraphs).

    How can students analyze the events and characters' choices that lead to Caesar's assassination in Act III of Julius Caesar? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, November 18th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Answer the following--
  • Identify the most suitable leader to lead the assassination of Caesar. Choose between Cassius and Brutus. Write a paragraph that includes specific examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.
  • Choose your favorite wife--Portia or Calpurnia. Write a paragraph that includes specific examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.
    * Show HW (Act II Journal Entry #2 due and Act II summary, if necessary) and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share the Do Now.

    3. Read aloud and analyze Act III Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine the events and Caesar's choices that lead up to his assassination. How could his murder have been prevented? How do the characters react to his death? How do their reactions differ? What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after his death?

  • How can students analyze characterization of Brutus, Cassius, Portia and Calpurnia, relationships and literary elements in Act II of Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21st:
    Finish today's classwork--
  • Identify the most suitable leader to lead the assassination of Caesar. Choose between Cassius and Brutus. Write a paragraph that includes specific examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.
  • Choose your favorite wife--Portia or Calpurnia. Write a paragraph that includes specific examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, November 17th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading Act II of Julius Caesar. Examine the relationship between Brutus and Portia. Examine the omens/foreshadowing and the characterization of Portia, Brutus' wife. Analyze Calpurnia's superstitions (foreshadowing/omens), and Caesar's arrogance, invincibility and ego.

    2. Discuss/Share the Do Now and take notes.

    3. Work Period: Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words). Begin HW. Show HW: Act II Journal #1.

    How can students analyze characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar), relationships and literary elements in Act II of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:
  • Act II Journal #2 for Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Portia's Journal from Act II." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Brutus said that Caesar is just "as a serpent's egg" (II, I).

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, November 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading Act II Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine Brutus' characterization of Caesar, the characterization of Brutus, reasons the conspirators will kill Caesar, Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar, the conspirators' assassination plan--the method to bring Caesar to the Capitol, literary elements (including simile, irony and alliteration), the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia and the relationship between Brutus and Portia.

    2. Discuss/Share the Do Now and take notes.

    3. Work Period: Begin HW.

    How can students analyze characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar), relationships and literary elements in Act II of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:
  • Act II Journal #1 for Julius Caesar. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Julius Caesar. A journal entry MUST be a minimum of 300 words (that's about 2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in your literary analysis section of your notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name and the Act at the top. For example, "Caesar's Journal from Act II." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and points of view of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Brutus said that Caesar is just "as a serpent's egg" (II, I).

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    MY RECOMMENDATION (THIS IS NOT HOMEWORK; THIS IS JUST TO KEEP YOUR MIND IN GREAT SHAPE): READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, November 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read Act II Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine Brutus' characterization of Caesar, the characterization of Brutus, reasons the conspirators will kill Caesar, and Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar.

    2. Discuss/Share the Do Now and take notes.

    How can students analyze characterization of the major characters (Brutus, Cassius and Caesar), relationships and literary elements in Act II of Julius Caesar? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, November 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Write a 20-word summary of Act I of Julius Caesar. Show your HW: Act I Journal Entries (two journal entries must be shown).

    2. Discuss/Share: Share 20-word summaries and excerpts from the Act I journal entries.

    How can students compose a concise summary of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, focusing on the significance of the characterization to the storyline? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • See jupitergrades.com and previous days on this website.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, November 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading Act I Scene II and Scene III of Julius Caesar. Characterize Julius Caesar, Brutus, and Cassius. What conflicts are introduced? Why are these conflicts important to the storyline? Analyze the language choices of William Shakespeare and the differences between prose and poetry. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar? How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous? What are Caesar's weaknesses? In Scene III, focus on omens (signs of bad things to come) and Cassius' scheming to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.

    2. Take notes on the Do Now.

    How can students analyze Act I Scene II Scene III of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, focusing on the significance of the characterization to the storyline? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14th:
  • TWO Act I Journal Entries (write TWO journal entries)=A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act I of Julius Caesar. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (TWO handwritten pages or ONE typed page per journal entry). You should put your journal entries in the literary analysis section of your binder. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top and Act I. For example, "Caesar's Journal in Act I." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for the characters in Act I. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Flavius said, "Hence! Home you idle creatures" (I, I).

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). IT'S -10 POINTS FOR EACH DAY LATE. Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center. Make up any other owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, November 9th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read Act I Scene II of Julius Caesar. Characterize Julius Caesar, Brutus, and Cassius. What conflicts are introduced? Why are these conflicts important to the storyline? Analyze the language choices of William Shakespeare and the differences between prose and poetry. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar? How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous? What are Caesar's weaknesses?

    2. Take notes on the Do Now.

    How can students analyze Act I Scene II of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, focusing on the significance of the characterization to the storyline? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). IT'S -10 POINTS FOR EACH DAY LATE. Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center. Make up any other owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, November 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List.

    2. Work Period: Finish answering these questions: What do you suppose makes Julius Caesar popular? Think of character traits of a popular leader. Name other men in history who have been instantly popular. What were their character traits?

    3. Review/Reflect on Act I Scene I of Julius Caesar. Review the double entendre/puns, dialect, and plot development. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar? How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (i.e. Flavius)? Discuss the popularity of Julius Caesar, his character traits, other men in history who have been instantly popular and their character traits.

    How can students begin the study of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, focusing on the character traits of Julius Caesar and other popular men in history? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). IT'S -10 POINTS FOR EACH DAY LATE. Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center. Make up any other owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, November 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act I Scene I of Julius Caesar. Examine the double entendre/puns, dialect, and plot development. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar? How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (i.e. Flavius)? 2. Work Period: What do you suppose makes Julius Caesar popular? Think of character traits of a popular leader. Name other men in history who have been instantly popular. What were their character traits? When finished answering these questions, prepare for Monday's quiz.

    Turn in your HW vocabulary story, incorporating all of the words from the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List.

    3. Discuss the popularity of Julius Caesar, his character traits, other men in history who have been instantly popular and their character traits.

    4. HW reminders.

    How can students begin the study of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, focusing on the character traits of Julius Caesar and other popular men in history? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • QUIZ on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. Suggestion: Make flashcards to help you study more effectively.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). IT'S -10 POINTS FOR EACH DAY LATE (It was due TODAY). Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center. Make up any other owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, November 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Work on a vocabulary story, incorporating all of the words from the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. You may write on a topic of your choice and your story may be fiction or non-fiction. Topic suggestions include: a ghost story, a day in your life, life at ITHS, Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, or your future. Your story must be a minimum of two pages, handwritten. You MUST underline every vocabulary word used.

    2. HW reminders.

    How can students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4th:
  • Finish today's classwork: Write a vocabulary story, incorporating all of the words from the Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. You may write on a topic of your choice and your story may be fiction or non-fiction. Topic suggestions include: a ghost story, a day in your life, life at ITHS, Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, or your future. Your story must be a minimum of two pages, handwritten OR one full page, typed. You MUST underline every vocabulary word used.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:

  • QUIZ on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List. Suggestion: Make flashcards to help you study more effectively.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). IT'S -10 POINTS FOR EACH DAY LATE (It was due TODAY). Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center. Make up any other owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish the K/W/L on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works. What do you know about William Shakespeare--his life, times, and works? What do you want to know? What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his plays and poetry?

    2. Finish Note-Taking on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works.

    3. K/W/L on Julius Caesar. Discuss/Share: Share students' prior knowledge of Julius Caesar and what they want to know. Discuss how Shakespeare's life and times may be relevant in the play, Julius Caesar.

    4. Introduce Julius Caesar Vocabulary List.

    How can students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • QUIZ on Julius Caesar Vocabulary List.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:

  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). IT'S -10 POINTS FOR EACH DAY LATE (It was due TODAY). Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center. Make up any other owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, November 1st, 2011: 1. Do Now: K/W/L on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works. What do you know about William Shakespeare--his life, times, and works? What do you want to know? What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his plays and poetry?

    2. Note-Taking on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works

    How can students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). IT'S -10 POINTS FOR EACH DAY LATE (It was due TODAY). Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center. Make up any other owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, October 31st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Reflections on writing assignment.

    2. Sharing of Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Bells". How is this poem fitting for Halloween? How is this poem supportive of Poe's trademark style and themes? What poetic terms can you identify and how are they significant to the poem's message?

    3. Turn in HW: Controlling Idea Paragraph (rough draft, final draft, and grading rubric).

    How can students reflect on their writing/analysis of the short story, "The Minister's Black Veil"? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW:
  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). IT'S -10 POINTS FOR EACH DAY LATE (It was due TODAY). Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center. Make up any owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, October 28th, 2011: 1. Work Period: Students will use their findings from the Double-Entry Journal and notes/underlining of the text to write this controlling idea paragraph (rough draft). Do you feel prepared for this assignment? Explain.

    2. If finished early, vocabulary crossword puzzles will be provided.

    How can students analyze the presence and significance of sin and propriety in the short story, "The Minister's Black Veil" and compose a controlling idea paragraph? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph (one, typed page). Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) MUST be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class--attach it to the rough draft and final draft as well. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center.

    Make up any owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, October 27th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introduce the grading rubric for the Controlling Idea Paragraph that will be graded 25% of your 2nd marking period.

    2. Work Period: Students will use their findings from the Double-Entry Journal and notes/underlining of the text to write this controlling idea paragraph (rough draft). Do you feel prepared for this assignment? Explain.

    3. If finished early, vocabulary crossword puzzles will be provided.

    How can students analyze the presence and significance of sin and propriety in the short story, "The Minister's Black Veil" and compose a controlling idea paragraph? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph. Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) will be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class. The FINAL DRAFT must be typed, double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman only). In the heading, you must include your full name and date in the top right hand side and my name (Ms. Conn) and the name of the class and period (E5, Period ___) in the top left hand side. Include the title (Controlling Idea Paragraph) in the center.

    Make up any owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, October 26th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing the end of "The Minister's Black Veil" and take notes and underline evidence of sin and propriety.

    2. Introduce the Controlling Idea Paragraph that will be graded. Students will use their findings from the Double-Entry Journal and notes/underlining of the text to write this paragraph. Do you feel prepared for this assignment? Explain.

    3. Work Period: Work on the Controlling Idea Paragraph (rough draft).

    How can students analyze the presence and significance of sin and propriety in the short story, "The Minister's Black Veil" and compose a controlling idea paragraph? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • FINAL DRAFT (graded 25% of the 2nd marking period) of the Controlling Idea Paragraph. Students MUST include plenty of evidence from "The Minister's Black Veil" to support their controlling idea of sin or propriety (proper behavior). The rough draft (composed in class) will be attached. The grading rubric will be given in class.

    Make up any owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, October 25th, 2011: 1. Do Now=Introduce the double-entry journal:
  • Students fold a piece of paper in half, lengthwise.
  • In the left hand column, the students will write two quotes (phrases or sentences) from "The Minister's Black Veil" on the themes of sin and propriety (which we have already identified and discussed). They will find quotes that were particularly meaningful to them, along with the page number.
  • In the right hand column, the students will react to the select quotes by writing in-depth critical responses to the quotes on the left. The entry may include a comment, a question, a connection made, or an analysis. Reaction starters should include one of the following:
    -The author included this quote because...
    -This quote is important to the story because...
    -This quote can be interpreted as...
    -This quote can connect to the author's life because...
    -This quote compares to...
    -This quote proves that...
  • Students will share their responses with their partner and then share in small groups.

    2. Work Period: Students will work on the double-entry journal and then share with a neighbor.

    3. Discuss/Share: Student volunteers will share their findings.

    4. Reflections: How did the students feel about their understanding of sin and propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil"? How is their comfort level with the complex text? Introduce the Controlling Idea Paragraph that will follow and connect to this lesson. Do they feel prepared for this assignment? Explain.

    OBJECTIVE: Students will cite evidence in "The Minister's Black Veil" that supports the themes of sin and propriety, and they will draw conclusions and engage in critical analysis.

  • How can students analyze the presence and significance of sin and propriety in the short story, "The Minister's Black Veil"? Make up any owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, October 24th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss sin and propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil."

    2. Discuss/Share findings and take notes on the Do Now.

    How can students study the presence of sin and propriety in the short story, "The Minister's Black Veil"? Make up any owed HW.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, October 21st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing the following: SIN and PROPRIETY (PROPER BEHAVIOR). How would we see examples of both sin and propriety today? How would we see examples of sin and propriety during the 1800's, when Edgar Allan Poe was living?

    2. Introduce Nathaniel Hawthorne's life, times and background influences.

    3. Introduce HW: the reading of "The Minister's Black Veil" (packet received in class). Take notes and discuss the themes of sin and propriety (proper behavior).

    How can students begin their study of sin and propriety in our next short story, "The Minister's Black Veil"? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 24th:
  • Read "The Minister's Black Veil" (read the packet received in class or the online version found here). Take notes in the margins of the reading that focus on two themes: sin and propriety (proper behavior).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, October 20th, 2011: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on "The Masque of the Red Death."

    2. Brainstorm the following: SIN and PROPRIETY (PROPER BEHAVIOR). How would we see examples of both sin and propriety today? How would we see examples of sin and propriety during the 1800's, when Edgar Allan Poe was living?

    3. Discuss sin and propriety during our time period (2011) and Edgar Allan Poe's time period (early 1800's).

    How can students prove their analysis and study of "The Masque of the Red Death" in an assessment and prepare to study sin and propriety in our next short story, "The Minister's Black Veil"? READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):
  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, October 19th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Work on the textbook questions for "The Masque of the Red Death."

    2. Review textbook answers.

    3. Quiz reminders/review: notes on the story (taken in class), the questions and answers from the textbook (p. 435), the notes on Edgar Allan Poe, and all literary terms revealed in the story and discussed in class (personification, symbolism, repetition, imagery, and characterization; make sure you know the purpose for each literary term! Know WHY the author included each one.).

    How can students prepare for "The Masque of the Red Death" quiz? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20th:
  • QUIZ on "The Masque of the Red Death"--study the textbook questions, in-class notes and notes on Edgar Allan Poe. Review the literary terms revealed in the story and discussed in class (personification, symbolism, repetition, imagery, and characterization; make sure you know the purpose for each literary term! Know WHY the author included each one.).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, October 18th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook). Summarize each paragraph in your notebook (take notes discussed in class). Answer the following question for each paragraph: why is this important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline. As we read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, imagery, and characterization) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices).

    2. Work Period: Work on the textbook questions for "The Masque of the Red Death."

    3. Critical Lens Essay Distribution, Review and Note-taking

    How can students analyze an allegory and its symbolism, imagery and characterization? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20th:
  • QUIZ on "The Masque of the Red Death"--study the textbook questions, in-class notes and notes on Edgar Allan Poe.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, October 17th, 2011: Work Period: Vocabulary Puzzle How can students apply their vocabulary knowledge? READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):
  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, October 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary quiz on Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story.

    2. Continue reading of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook). Summarize each paragraph in your notebook (take notes discussed in class). Answer the following question for each paragraph: why is this important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline. As we read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, imagery, and characterization) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices).

    How can students analyze an allegory and its symbolism, imagery and characterization? READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):
  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, October 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Reading of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook). Summarize each paragraph in your notebook (10 words or less). Answer the following question for each paragraph: why is this important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline. As we read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, imagery, and characterization) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices).

    2. Vocabulary quiz review for Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story.

    How can students analyze an allegory and its symbolism, imagery and characterization? ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THE END OF TODAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13th! The gradebook closes at the end of today's school day, Thursday, October 13th.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • Vocabulary QUIZ on the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story. This will be your first grade for the 2nd marking period.

    MAKE UP HW:

  • If you did not turn in the critical lens essay, you MUST turn it in by THIS THURSDAY. Each day late is -10 points off your grade. The assignment can be found HERE, including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements were discussed in class last week and details were reviewed in class. This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (a handwritten outline is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    Make up any owed HW (see jupitergrades.com for all assignments and previous days listed below for the details of the assignments).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, October 11th, 2011: 1. Do Now: PSAT Strategies (take notes)

    2. Review the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story and Vocabulary List #1.

    How can students prepare for tomorrow's PSAT? ALL OWED WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13th! The gradebook closes at the end of the school day, Thursday, October 13th.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • Vocabulary QUIZ on the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story. This will be your first grade for the 2nd marking period.

    MAKE UP HW:

  • If you did not turn in the critical lens essay, you MUST turn it in by THIS THURSDAY. Each day late is -10 points off your grade. The assignment can be found HERE, including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements were discussed in class last week and details were reviewed in class. This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (a handwritten outline is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    Make up any owed HW (see jupitergrades.com for all assignments and previous days listed below for the details of the assignments).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, October 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and discussing the article, "Is Violence Finished? In our era of wars, genocide and terrorism, Steven Pinker says we're more peaceful than ever" from Newsweek Magazine, which connects to our discussion on our definitions of safety.

    2. Review the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story and share excerpts from the vocabulary story. Show HW: vocabulary story.

    3. If time allows, make vocabulary study cards.

    How can students prepare to study Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE NEXT, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14th:
  • Vocabulary QUIZ on the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story. This will be your first grade for the 2nd marking period.

    MAKE UP HW:

  • If you did not turn in the critical lens essay on Monday, you MUST turn it in ASAP. Each day late is -10 points off your grade. The assignment can be found HERE, including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements were discussed in class last week and details were reviewed in class. This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (a handwritten outline is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    Make up any owed HW (see jupitergrades.com for all assignments and previous days listed below for the details of the assignments).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, October 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and discussing the article, "Is Violence Finished? In our era of wars, genocide and terrorism, Steven Pinker says we're more peaceful than ever" from Newsweek Magazine, which connects to our discussion on our definitions of safety.

    2. Introduce the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story.

    3. Begin HW.

    How can students prepare to study Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th:
  • Vocabulary Story using the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story. Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: What is your safe place? Is safety an illusion? You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story (you may not work with a partner this time).

    MAKE UP HW:

  • If you did not turn in the critical lens essay on Monday, you MUST turn it in ASAP. Each day late is -10 points off your grade. The assignment can be found HERE, including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements were discussed in class last week and details were reviewed in class. This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (a handwritten outline is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    Make up any owed HW (see jupitergrades.com for all assignments and previous days listed below for the details of the assignments).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, October 5th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Take notes and discuss Edgar Allan Poe's timeline.

    2. Introduce "Is Violence Finished? In our era of wars, genocide and terrorism, Steven Pinker says we're more peaceful than ever" from Newsweek Magazine, which connects to our discussion on our definitions of safety.

    How can students prepare to study Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th:
  • Vocabulary Story using the Vocabulary List for "The Masque of the Red Death" short story. Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Any story topic will be acceptable. Suggestions include: What is your safe place? Is safety an illusion? You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story (you may not work with a partner this time).

    MAKE UP HW:

  • If you did not turn in the critical lens essay on Monday, you MUST turn it in ASAP. Each day late is -10 points off your grade. The assignment can be found HERE, including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements were discussed in class last week and details were reviewed in class. This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (a handwritten outline is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    Make up any owed HW (see jupitergrades.com for all assignments and previous days listed below for the details of the assignments).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, October 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion/note-taking (in the Language and Writing section) on safety. Describe a safe place. Use all of the senses (sight, sound, smell, and taste). What are some things we do to feel safe from harm's way? Possible answers: install an alarm in our homes, avoid walking alone at night, and take precautions with our health/friends/activities. Is safety an illusion? Why or why not? Let's prepare arguments for both sides: Safety is NOT an illusion OR safety is an illusion. One argument for safety is NOT an illusion is the following: people can take steps to prevent them from danger, like looking both ways before crossing the street. One argument for safety is an illusion is the following: people can never avoid danger; if it's meant to happen it will.

    2. Work Period: Begin a K/W/L for students' knowledge of Edgar Allan Poe, the poet/author. Students will fill in what they know about him, his time period and work. They will then write what they want to know (in question form).

    3. Share the K/W/L on students' knowledge of Edgar Allan Poe. If time allows, take notes and discuss Edgar Allan Poe's timeline.

    How can students prepare to study Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? MAKE UP HW:
  • If you did not turn in the critical lens essay, you MUST turn it in ASAP. Each day late is -10 points off your grade. The assignment can be found HERE, including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements were discussed in class last week and details were reviewed in class. This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (a handwritten outline is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    Make up any owed HW (see jupitergrades.com for all assignments and previous days listed below for the details of the assignments).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, October 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Reflections on the critical lens essay, instructions found HERE.

    2. Work Period: In your Language and Writing section, define safety. Describe a safe place. Use all of the senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, and smell). What are some things we do to feel safe from harm's way? Possible answers: install an alarm in our homes, avoid walking alone at night, and take precautions with our health/friends/activities. Is safety an illusion? Why or why not? Let's prepare arguments for both sides: Safety is NOT an illusion OR safety is an illusion. One argument for safety is NOT an illusion is the following: people can take steps to prevent them from danger, like looking both ways before crossing the street. One argument for safety is an illusion is the following: people can never avoid danger; if it's meant to happen it will.

    While working on this brainstorming, students will be called to turn in their essays/outlines/rubrics and return their independent novels.

    How can students properly reflect on the critical lens essay and prepare to study Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? MAKE UP HW:
  • If you did not turn in the critical lens essay, you MUST turn it in ASAP. Each day late is -10 points off your grade. The assignment can be found HERE, including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements were discussed in class last week and details were reviewed in class. This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (a handwritten outline is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    Make up any owed HW (see jupitergrades.com for all assignments and previous days listed below for the details of the assignments).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, September 28th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review components of an outline (follow sample Roman Numeral outline). Introduce critical lens essay rubric. See sample critical lens essay outline.

    2. Work Period: Work on outline composition and draft of critical lens essay found HERE. Read independent novel when finished or when waiting for teacher's assistance.

    How can students properly prepare for the critical lens essay? *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by this Friday, September 30th. Make up any literary term post-its (you should have composed 15!).

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:

  • Compose a critical lens essay (assignment can be found HERE), including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements were discussed in class this week. Details reviewed in class! This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (a handwritten outline is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    Make up any owed HW (see jupitergrades.com for all assignments and previous days listed below for the details of the assignments).

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, September 27th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Create portfolio folders and insert Autobiography Writing Assignment. See teacher comments/edits. Turn in discipline code handout (HW).

    2. Review components of an outline (follow sample Roman Numeral outline).

    3. Work Period: Work on outline composition and draft of critical lens essay found HERE. Read independent novel when finished or when waiting for teacher's assistance.

    How can students properly prepare for the critical lens essay? *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by this Friday, September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. Make up any literary term post-its (you should have composed 15!).

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:

  • Compose a critical lens essay (assignment can be found HERE), including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements are discussed in class this week. Details reviewed in class! This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade. See grading rubric provided in class to understand the grading procedure. You MUST turn in the outline (handwritten is acceptable) and a typed (12 point font), double-spaced essay that is 5 paragraphs long. You must support the critical lens essay quote throughout the essay. Your essay must correspond with the outline. You must include a proper heading that includes the following: your name, the date, my name, and the name of the class and the period.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, September 26th, 2011: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1

    2. Discipline Code booklets distributed and reviewed

    How can students understand the discipline code rules and expand their vocabulary? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:
  • Finish the discipline code handout (given in class). Turn it in.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by this Friday, September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY. Make up any literary term post-its (you should have composed 15!).

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:

  • Compose a critical lens essay (assignment can be found HERE), including an outline that follows the Roman Numeral sample outline. The essay and outline requirements are discussed in class this week. More details to come! This essay is worth 50% of your 1st marking period grade.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, September 23rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue to compose an outline, following the Roman Numeral sample outline, for the critical lens essay assignment found HERE. You should be composing an outline for a 5-paragraph essay. SHOW HW: 5 MORE POST-ITS (a total of 15 post-its).

    2. Work Period: Prepare for Monday's vocabulary quiz. If time allows, compose vocabulary posters/index cards. Vocabulary Q & A.

    How can students understand the components of an outline? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, original sentence.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, September 22nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Sharing of excerpts from vocabulary stories.

    2. Discuss the Roman Numeral sample outline.

    3. Work Period: Begin working on an outline for the critical lens essay assignment found HERE.

    How can students understand the components of an outline? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:
  • Compose five more post-its (YOU SHOULD NOW HAVE A TOTAL OF 15 POST-ITS) for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Commonly Used Literary Terms.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, original sentence.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, September 21st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Do you know how to write an outline for the critical lens essay? Use the Critical Lens Essay found here. Write a one-page outline for the critical lens essay, focusing on your novel. See sample outlines.

    Show your Vocabulary Story #1, using all words from Vocabulary List #1, with a partner (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten).

    2. Sharing of excerpts from vocabulary stories. Sharing of outlines.

    How can students understand the components of an outline? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:
  • Compose five more post-its (YOU SHOULD NOW HAVE A TOTAL OF 15 POST-ITS) for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Commonly Used Literary Terms.

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, original sentence.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Tuesday, September 20th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish writing your Vocabulary Story #1, using all words from Vocabulary List #1, with a partner (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten). Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in the Life of a Teenager, ITHS, The Future, How to Make the World a Better Place, or a topic of your choice. This is a classwork assignment. SHOW any owed HW.

    2. HW reminders

    How can students understand and apply new vocabulary in a creative writing piece? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #1. Suggestion: make flashcards (this is not required, but only suggested). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a detailed, original sentence.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Monday, September 19th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Using Vocabulary List #1, create Vocabulary Story #1 with a partner (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten). Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in the Life of a Teenager, ITHS, The Future, How to Make the World a Better Place, or a topic of your choice. This is a classwork assignment. SHOW HW: five more literary term post-its (students should have a total of 10 post-its).

    2. HW reminders

    How can students understand and apply new vocabulary in a creative writing piece? *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Friday, September 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Volunteer students share their reflections on independent reading, literary term findings, and quotes: Why is this worthwhile? What's challenging? Why do good readers use this strategy of finding literary terms and taking notes during reading? What are your interpretations of the quotes? How do these quotes relate to us and society?

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #1 and Vocabulary Story #1 (a creatively written story on any topic, using all 30 vocabulary words correctly from Vocabulary List #1. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten). Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in the Life of a Teenager, ITHS, The Future, How to Make the World a Better Place, or a topic of your choice. This is a classwork assignment.

    3. Work Period: Begin working on your Vocabulary Story #1 with a neighboring partner.

    4. HW reminders

    How can students understand and apply literary terms, critical lens quotes, and new vocabulary? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th:
  • Compose five more post-its (YOU SHOULD NOW HAVE A TOTAL OF 10 POST-ITS) for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (don't forget to describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Commonly Used Literary Terms.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Thursday, September 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Interpret each of the following quotes in your own words. Write if you agree or disagree and explain why. Choose one quote that connects to your chosen novel. Explain why.
  • "In this world goodness is destined to be defeated"--Walker Percy
  • "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." --George Orwell
  • J.F. Clarke wrote, “The bravest of individuals is the one who obeys his or her conscience.”
  • “Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds.” —Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Show HW: FIVE literary term post-its.

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteer students share sample post-its. Reflections on independent reading, literary term findings, and quotes: Why is this worthwhile? What's challenging? Why do good readers use this strategy of finding literary terms and taking notes during reading? What are your interpretations of the quotes? How do these quotes relate to us and society?

    3. HW Reminders

  • How can students understand and apply literary terms and critical lens quotes? *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

    READ THE NEWS EVERY DAY FROM ONE OF THESE RESPECTED NEWS SOURCES (be aware of state, national and international current events; share your knowledge in class discussion and in writing):

  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report
  • Wednesday, September 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish composition of the three post-its that are taken from the Important Literary Terms (from Purdue Owl). Show HW: binder/notebook with five sections, appropriately labeled.

    2. Work Period: Interpret the following quote in your own words. Write if you agree or disagree and explain why. Explain how that quote connects to your chosen novel.

  • "All conflict in literature, is in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil."

    3. Discuss/Share: Volunteer students share sample post-its. Reflections on independent reading, literary term findings, and quotes: Why is this worthwhile? What's challenging? Why do good readers use this strategy of finding literary terms and taking notes during reading? What are your interpretations of the quotes? How do these quotes relate to us and society?

    4. HW Reminders

  • How can students understand and apply literary terms? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th:
  • Compose a total of five post-its for your chosen novel in which you refer to literary terms found in your novel (now include WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose). The literary terms are taken from the handout found here--Important Literary Terms from Purdue Owl.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

  • Tuesday, September 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introduce Important Literary Terms (from Purdue Owl).

    2. Work Period: Read your independent novel (if you have not chosen a novel yet, please acquire one from our in-class book selections) and compose at least three post-its in which you identify examples of the important literary terms outlined in the link above (handout provided in class).

    3. Discuss/Share: Volunteer students share sample post-its. Reflections on independent reading and literary term findings: Why is this worthwhile? What's challenging? Why do good readers use this strategy of finding literary terms and taking notes during reading?

    4. HW Reminders

    How can students understand and apply literary terms? DUE TOMORROW, Wednesday, September 14th:
  • Bring in your binder/notebook with the five sections (labeled properly). See the Junior English Syllabus for the details. This is your first HW assignment.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

  • Monday, September 12th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish introducing the Junior English Syllabus.

    2. Work Period: Write 1-2 pages on what you read in your independent reading book for homework--plot summary, characters introduced, setting, predictions, etc. Turn in this freewrite. When finished, read.

    How can students understand class expectations? DUE Wednesday, September 14th:
  • Bring in your binder/notebook with the five sections (labeled properly). See the Junior English Syllabus for the details.

    *Read in your independent novel. You MUST be done by September 30th. Bring in the book to class EVERY DAY.

  • Friday, September 9th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's Autobiography Writing: Student Life.

    2. Introduce Junior English Syllabus.

    3. Choose an independent novel from in-class choices.

    How can students self-assess themselves as learners in an introductory writing piece? DUE Monday, September 12th:
  • Begin reading your chosen, independent novel. Be ready to share how the plot begins, characters introduced, setting, and any predictions you can offer.
  • Thursday, September 8th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introductions/Greetings

    2. Work Period: Begin Autobiography Writing: Student Life. (If not completed in class today, finish tomorrow)

    How can students self-assess themselves as learners in an introductory writing piece? DUE TOMORROW, Friday, September 9th:
  • Prepare to finish the in-class autobiographical writing piece.
  • Be prepared to choose an independent novel from Ms. Conn's class selections.