Ms. Conn's Junior English Assignments, Fall 2012

Ms. Conn's Junior English Assignments
Fall 2012

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Friday, January 18th, 2013: WORK PERIOD: Regents Strategies Review (see details in HW) How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on overall Regents strategies? PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THIS COMING TUESDAY, JANUARY 22nd): Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TUES., JANUARY 22nd at 12:15pm (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 10-12 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (one on the Controlling Idea on both passages and one on the literary term from one passage) . If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. I will be available on Monday via e-mail.

HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 22nd at 12:15pm:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Thursday, January 17th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Regents Strategies Review (see details in HW)

    2. Essay Returns/Review (turn in all HW owed--today's the last day I'm accepting work)

    3. Final Q & A and Regents Reminders

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on overall Regents strategies? PREPARE FOR THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THIS COMING TUESDAY, JANUARY 22nd): Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TUES., JANUARY 22nd at 12:15pm (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 10-12 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (one on the Controlling Idea on both passages and one on the literary term from one passage) . If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. I will be available on Monday via e-mail.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 22nd at 12:15pm:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Wednesday, January 16th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Listening Section practice--listen to the the passage being read aloud (2x). Answer the multiple-choice questions. Review answers.

    2. Regents Strategies Review

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on the listening passage and overall Regents strategies? MAKE UP ALL OWED HW BY TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th--the last day to turn ALL HW in for the entire semester.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 22nd at 12:15pm:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Tuesday, January 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish school's exam

    2. Listening Section practice: listen to the the passage being read aloud (2x). Answer the multiple-choice questions.

    3. If time allows, review the vocabulary test answers.

    4. Turn in HW: critical lens essay rewrite and question #27 paragraph (and any owed HW).

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on the listening passage and question #27 paragraph? MAKE UP ALL OWED HW BY THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th--the last day to turn ALL HW in for the entire semester.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JANUARY 22nd at 12:15pm:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Monday, January 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now: School's Exam

    2. HW Reminders/Extra Credit Opportunity

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on the short-response answers DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 15th:
  • Rewrite Critical Lens Essay (see Ms. Conn's corrections/suggestions for improvement).
  • Compose the paragraph (which should be one page/10-12 sentences) for question #27 in the Regents packet.

    MAKE UP ALL OWED HW BY THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th.

  • Friday, January 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Test

    2. Work Period: Make up any owed HW. Work on HW due.

    3. Go over multiple-choice questions/answers.

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on improving language/vocabulary skills? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:
  • ONE LAST OPPORTUNITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT (value: two HW assignments!)=Recitation : Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (speech can be found HERE).

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, JANUARY 15th:

  • Rewrite Critical Lens Essay (see Ms. Conn's corrections/suggestions for improvement).
  • Compose the paragraph (which should be one page/10-12 sentences) for question #27 in the Regents packet.

    MAKE UP ALL OWED HW BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th.

  • Thursday, January 10th, 2013: Work Period: Work on preparing for tomorrow's vocabulary test and any owed HW.

    Show HW: question #26 (the Controlling Idea question)

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on improving language/vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:
  • List #1
  • List #2
  • List #3
  • List #4
  • List #5
  • List #6
  • List #7
  • Lists #8-11

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days and jupitergrades.com for details!).

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • ONE LAST OPPORTUNITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT (value: two HW assignments!)=Recitation : Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (speech can be found HERE).
  • Wednesday, January 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Turn in your HW (Critical Lens Essay with grading rubric).

    2. Work Period: Work on question #26 (the Controlling Idea question). Brainstorm evidence of the controlling idea (for this question, the controlling idea is PARTING) in the two fiction passages FIRST. Next, write your ONE-PAGE paragraph (10-12 sentences). Remember, grab the attention of the reader in the first sentence or two. Then, find A LOT of examples from BOTH PASSAGES that support the controlling idea. Explain how the controlling idea is significant to both passages.

    3. If you are done early/have extra time, study for Friday's BIG vocabulary test.

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on the controlling idea paragraph? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 10th:
    Finish today's classwork: Question #26 (the Controlling Idea question). Compose a ONE-PAGE PARAGRAPH (10-12 sentences) on the controlling idea (for this question, the controlling idea is PARTING) that connects the two fiction passages in Part 3. Remember, grab the attention of the reader in the first sentence or two. Then, find A LOT of examples from BOTH PASSAGES that support the controlling idea. Explain how the controlling idea is significant to both passages.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days and jupitergrades.com for details!).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • List #1
  • List #2
  • List #3
  • List #4
  • List #5
  • List #6
  • List #7
  • Lists #8-11

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • ONE LAST OPPORTUNITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT (value: two HW assignments!)=Recitation : Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (speech can be found HERE).
  • Tuesday, January 8th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review Critical Lens Essay components.

    2. Work Period: Compose a Critical Lens Essay (don't forget to write the introduction in the B-REAL formula!). Show HW: pages 5-12 in the Regents packet provided in class. Show summary notes, circled key words, underlined line numbers, and answers for the multiple-choice questions.

    3. If time allows, study for Friday's BIG vocabulary test.

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on the critical lens essay? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9th:
  • FINISH TODAY'S CRITICAL LENS ESSAY (page 13 of the packet). Make sure it's 5 paragraphs long (each body paragraph MUST be 10-12 sentences, focusing on literary elements from the works of literature that support the critical lens quote). Make sure the introduction follows the B-REAL formula.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days and jupitergrades.com for details!).

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • List #1
  • List #2
  • List #3
  • List #4
  • List #5
  • List #6
  • List #7
  • Lists #8-11

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • ONE LAST OPPORTUNITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT (value: two HW assignments!)=Recitation : Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (speech can be found HERE).
  • Monday, January 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Introduce the B-REAL formula (B=Big attention grabber, R=Restate the quote, E=Explain the quote in your own words, A=Agree with the quote, and L=Literature (two works of literature introduced).

    2. Practice the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph for one of the following quotes (choose one):

  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."
  • "Good literature substitutes for an experience which we have not ourselves lived through."

    3. Discuss/Share your B-REAL introductions and discuss which works of literature studied this semester would work well for each of these quotes.

    4. Review HW due tomorrow and, if time allows, review the contents of the English Regents exam.

  • How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on the critical lens essay? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 8th:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Complete pages 5-12 in the Regents packet provided in class. You must do the following: write summary notes for each paragraph of the reading passages, circle key words in the questions, underline the line #s in the reading passages (the line #s from the questions), and answer the multiple-choice questions--write your own answer in the margins.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days and jupitergrades.com for details!).

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • List #1
  • List #2
  • List #3
  • List #4
  • List #5
  • List #6
  • List #7
  • Lists #8-11

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, JANUARY 14th:

  • ONE LAST OPPORTUNITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT (value: two HW assignments!)=Recitation : Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (speech can be found HERE).
  • Friday, January 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Compose two multiple-choice questions (recommendation: write these questions on the works of literature we studied this semester) for the upcoming vocabulary test (review old lists to refresh your memory).

    2. Discuss the top three facts that you remember about Julius Caesar, "The Masque of the Red Death" and "The Minister's Black Veil"? Take notes.

    3. Review the contents of the English Regents exam.

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on the detailed components of the exam? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, JANUARY 8th:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Complete pages 5-12 in the Regents packet provided in class. You must do the following: write summary notes for each paragraph of the reading passages, circle key words in the questions, underline the line #s in the reading passages (the line #s from the questions), and answer the multiple-choice questions--write your own answer in the margins.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days and jupitergrades.com for details!).

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • List #1
  • List #2
  • List #3
  • List #4
  • List #5
  • List #6
  • List #7
  • Lists #8-11
  • Thursday, January 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on your independent reading novel (prove that you read!). Awards presented for Best Costume, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Performance Group.

    Turn in Julius Caesar and show HW: 15 post-its in your independent novel and, if you have it, recite the extra credit speech. Return your independent novels after showing the HW.

    2. Work Period: What are the top three facts that you remember about Julius Caesar, "The Masque of the Red Death" and "The Minister's Black Veil"?

    3. Discuss the top three facts that you remember about Julius Caesar, "The Masque of the Red Death" and "The Minister's Black Veil"? Take notes.

    4. If time allows, review the contents of the critical lens essay requirements. Introduce the B-REAL formula (B=Big attention grabber, R=Restate the quote, E=Explain the quote in your own words, A=Agree with the quote, and L=Literature (two works of literature introduced).

    5. Practice the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph for one of the following quotes (choose one):

  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."
  • "Good literature substitutes for an experience which we have not ourselves lived through."
  • How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents, focusing on the critical lens essay? Make up any owed HW (see previous days and jupitergrades.com for details!).
    Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: K/W/L about the English Regents. What do you KNOW about the English Regents? What do you WANT to know? What do you WANT to learn? (If you did not e-mail your votes, turn in votes for Best Costume, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Performance for our performances before the vacation)

    2. Review the K/W/L chart on the English Regents. Here are some important strategies for success: Circle key words in questions, take summary notes in the margins of the reading passages, underline line #s (from the questions) in the reading passages, address the short response questions before reading, identify types of passages--fiction and non-fiction passages, cover the answer choices and write your own answers in the margins.

    3. Work Period: Work on tomorrow's HW.

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents? RETURN YOUR JULIUS CAESAR TOMORROW!

    EXTRA CREDIT: DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:

  • Recitation HW (counts as THREE EXTRA CREDIT HW ASSIGNMENTS!)--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (speech can be found HERE).

    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Night, Catcher in the Rye, Romeo and Juliet or Othello). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout (scroll down). You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details!).

  • Friday, December 21st, 2012: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCES (15% of 3rd marking period grade)! Reminders: Turn in one grading rubric per group. Introduce your scene (a brief summary), actors/characters, and theme. Remember to incorporate levels, physical interactions, body language, ENERGY, and vocal projection. At the end, bow!

    2. HW Reminders and Voting/turn in your revised letters (if you don't want your letter sent in the mail, please write: DO NOT SEND at the top).

    How will students effectively interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? HAPPY HOLIDAYS AND HAVE A WONDERFUL VACATION!

    Please e-mail me (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) your votes for the following (based on our in-class performances of Julius Caesar): Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume (one person only), and Best Group Performance.

    EXTRA CREDIT: DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:

  • Recitation HW (counts as THREE EXTRA CREDIT HW ASSIGNMENTS!)--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (speech can be found HERE).

    DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Night, Catcher in the Rye, Romeo and Juliet or Othello). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details!).

  • Thursday, December 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Dress Rehearsal (show excerpts--about 1 minute from each group). Teacher and classmates will offer feedback for improvement.

    2. Work Period: Work on applying your themes/director's vision. Incorporate creative stage directions. Apply the different levels, physical interactions, body language, energy and vocal projection. Act with a lot of energy and enthusiasm! Be ready for tomorrow's performances!

    3. HW and Performance Reminders

    How will students be ready to interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st--REVISE YOUR LETTER (with peer and teacher edits). Your letter was one of the following (use the modified block letter format):
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
    YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE=15% of 3rd marking period; participation grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized or close to memorized. Act I Scene II--until Cassius says "the eternal devil to keep his state in Rome as easily as a king" (6 characters); Act II Scene I--until Brutus says "For he can do no more than Caesar's arm When Caesar's head is off" (6 characters); Act II Scene II (8 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene I--until Cassius says "Shall this our lofty scene be acted over in states unborn and accents yet unknown" (10 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene II--until the Fourth Citizen says "Mark'd ye his words? He would not take the crown; therefore 'tis certain he was not ambitious" (6 characters; 2 are major characters); Act V Scene V (9 characters; 3 are major characters).

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    EXTRA CREDIT: DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:

  • Recitation HW (counts as THREE EXTRA CREDIT HW ASSIGNMENTS!)--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (see handout or HERE

    DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Night, Catcher in the Rye, Romeo and Juliet or Othello). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

  • Wednesday, December 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Exchange your letters with a neighbor and peer review/edit. When finished, turn in all letters to receive credit (you will receive your letters at the end of the period so you can revise them).

    2. Introduce HW/check out books.

    3. Work Period: Work on acting out your themes/director's vision. Add in stage directions. Apply the different levels, physical interactions, body language, energy and vocal projection. Act with a lot of energy and enthusiasm!

    How will students be ready to interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
  • Dress Rehearsal. Be ready to show an excerpt (about 1 minute) of your scene. Be very comfortable with your lines, and be close to memorized. Bring in clothes/costumes and props. Be ready to receive feedback and areas needing improvement. Use the GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE to guide you.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st--REVISE YOUR LETTER (with peer and teacher edits). Your letter was one of the following (use the modified block letter format):

  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
    YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE=15% of 3rd marking period; participation grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized or close to memorized. Act I Scene II--until Cassius says "the eternal devil to keep his state in Rome as easily as a king" (6 characters); Act II Scene I--until Brutus says "For he can do no more than Caesar's arm When Caesar's head is off" (6 characters); Act II Scene II (8 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene I--until Cassius says "Shall this our lofty scene be acted over in states unborn and accents yet unknown" (10 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene II--until the Fourth Citizen says "Mark'd ye his words? He would not take the crown; therefore 'tis certain he was not ambitious" (6 characters; 2 are major characters); Act V Scene V (9 characters; 3 are major characters).

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    EXTRA CREDIT: DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:

  • Recitation HW (counts as THREE EXTRA CREDIT HW ASSIGNMENTS!)--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (see handout or HERE

    DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Night, Catcher in the Rye, Romeo and Juliet or Othello). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

  • Tuesday, December 18th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Arrange into your performance groups. Read aloud your scene.

    2. Work Period: Work on editing long speeches. Work on acting out your themes/director's vision. Add in stage directions. Apply the different levels, physical interactions, body language, energy and vocal projection.

    3. HW reminders and reminders of sending out a flood of kindness, of caring, of compassion, of goodness, of warmth, of benevolence, of support, of reaching out. There are enough of us on this planet to make sure that not one human being ever feels lost. We need a flood of connections. We need to be the light overtaking the darkness.

    How will students be ready to interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19th--Choose one (or more) of the following (use the modified block letter format):
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20th:

  • Dress Rehearsal. Be ready to show an excerpt (about 1 minute) of your scene. Be very comfortable with your lines, and be close to memorized. Bring in clothes/costumes and props. Be ready to receive feedback and areas needing improvement. Use the GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE to guide you.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
    YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE=15% of 3rd marking period; participation grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized or close to memorized. Act I Scene II--until Cassius says "the eternal devil to keep his state in Rome as easily as a king" (6 characters); Act II Scene I--until Brutus says "For he can do no more than Caesar's arm When Caesar's head is off" (6 characters); Act II Scene II (8 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene I--until Cassius says "Shall this our lofty scene be acted over in states unborn and accents yet unknown" (10 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene II--until the Fourth Citizen says "Mark'd ye his words? He would not take the crown; therefore 'tis certain he was not ambitious" (6 characters; 2 are major characters); Act V Scene V (9 characters; 3 are major characters).

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    EXTRA CREDIT: DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:

  • Recitation HW (counts as THREE EXTRA CREDIT HW ASSIGNMENTS!)--Memorize and recite the first 14 lines of Antony's famous burial speech, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (see handout or HERE

    DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Night, Catcher in the Rye, Romeo and Juliet or Othello). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel and describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

  • Monday, December 17th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises=tableaus, which include different levels (statues) of character roles, such as: Cassius/Brutus and Antony/Caesar. Use animated expression and take up as much room as possible. Vocal Projection: "Et tu, Brute? Then fall Caesar." Have the Caesar characters and his allies in each group say, "Et tu, Brute?" and the conspirators say, "Then fall Caesar."

    2. Work Period: Arrange into your groups. Read aloud your scene. Work on editing long speeches. Work on determining your themes/director's vision. Add in stage directions.

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students be ready to interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20th:
  • Dress Rehearsal. Be ready to show an excerpt (about 1 minute) of your scene. Be very comfortable with your lines, and be close to memorized. Bring in clothes/costumes and props. Be ready to receive feedback and areas needing improvement. Use the GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE to guide you.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
    YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE=15% of 3rd marking period; participation grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized or close to memorized. Act I Scene II--until Cassius says "the eternal devil to keep his state in Rome as easily as a king" (6 characters); Act II Scene I--until Brutus says "For he can do no more than Caesar's arm When Caesar's head is off" (6 characters); Act II Scene II (8 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene I--until Cassius says "Shall this our lofty scene be acted over in states unborn and accents yet unknown" (10 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene II--until the Fourth Citizen says "Mark'd ye his words? He would not take the crown; therefore 'tis certain he was not ambitious" (6 characters; 2 are major characters); Act V Scene V (9 characters; 3 are major characters).

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

  • Friday, December 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #11. (Turn in HW: Flashcards and Vocabulary Story #11)

    2. Group arrangement by sibling order (oldest siblings and only children in one group, middle children in another group, and youngest siblings in another group).

    3. Work Period: Read aloud your scene. Choose your roles and determine themes/director's vision. Add in stage directions.

    4. HW Reminders

    How will students be ready to interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
    YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE=15% of 3rd marking period; participation grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized or close to memorized. Act I Scene II--until Cassius says "the eternal devil to keep his state in Rome as easily as a king" (6 characters); Act II Scene I--until Brutus says "For he can do no more than Caesar's arm When Caesar's head is off" (6 characters); Act II Scene II (8 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene I--until Cassius says "Shall this our lofty scene be acted over in states unborn and accents yet unknown" (10 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene II--until the Fourth Citizen says "Mark'd ye his words? He would not take the crown; therefore 'tis certain he was not ambitious" (6 characters; 2 are major characters); Act V Scene V (9 characters; 3 are major characters).

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    Thursday, December 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: With your classmates at your tables, brainstorm different themes that may work well for a modern-day version of Julius Caesar. Provide 1-2 sentences of an explanation as to why these themes work well for Julius Caesar. Be ready to share/turn it in.

    2. Introduce grading rubric for scene requirements.

    3. Acting Exercises: Character portrayals of archetypes (greedy elf, pretty princess, opera diva, and valiant knight), tableaus (statues) including different levels (high, medium, low) of Cassius/Brutus, Cassius/Caesar, Caesar/Calpurnia, Cassius/Brutus/Caesar, Antony/Caesar, using animated expression and taking up as much room as possible.

    4. Work Period: Choose Julius Caesar scene groups of 5-6 people and arrange in your groups.

    How will students be ready to interpret scenes from Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • QUIZ on List #11.
  • Flashcards for List #11.
  • Vocabulary Story #11 for List #11. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: FREEDOM, JULIUS CAESAR (the play), HOLIDAYS, or MURDER PLOT. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st:
    YOU WILL BE GRADED (VALUE=15% of 3rd marking period; participation grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR JULIUS CAESAR SCENE. Have an edited scene so it's 4:30-5:30 (What should be included and what should be excluded?) Have your lines memorized or close to memorized. Act I Scene II--until Cassius says "the eternal devil to keep his state in Rome as easily as a king" (6 characters); Act II Scene I--until Brutus says "For he can do no more than Caesar's arm When Caesar's head is off" (6 characters); Act II Scene II (8 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene I--until Cassius says "Shall this our lofty scene be acted over in states unborn and accents yet unknown" (10 characters; 3 are major characters); Act III Scene II--until the Fourth Citizen says "Mark'd ye his words? He would not take the crown; therefore 'tis certain he was not ambitious" (6 characters; 2 are major characters); Act V Scene V (9 characters; 3 are major characters).

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? Make sure you choose appropriate themes/visions. Examples: Star Wars, Jersey Shore, Superheroes, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

  • Wednesday, December 12th, 2012: 1.) EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR(25% of 3rd marking period). 2.) When finished, work on HW (vocabulary quiz #11, story #11 and flashcards). How will students effectively be evaluated on their analysis of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • QUIZ on List #11.
  • Flashcards for List #11.
  • Vocabulary Story #11 for List #11. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: FREEDOM, JULIUS CAESAR (the play), HOLIDAYS, or MURDER PLOT. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Tuesday, December 11th, 2012: 1.) Do Now: What makes William Shakespeare a universal author (an author who is appropriate for any time period and anywhere in the world)? Refer to at least three examples from Julius Caesar. Interpret your given quote from #2. Be ready to share.
    *Show HW: Questions for Act V

    2. Review the answers to the questions for Acts III, IV and V. Review the significance of each of the following quotes:
    A.) "I am constant as the Northern Star" (Caesar, III, I).
    B.) "Et tu, Brute? Then fall Caesar" (Caesar, III, I).
    C.) "Stoop, Romans, stoop, and let us bathe our hands in Caesar's blood..." (Brutus, III, I).
    D.) "Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more" (Brutus, III, II).
    E.) "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (Antony, III, II).
    F.) "For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel...this was the most unkindest cut of all" (Antony, III, II).
    G.) "You have done that you should be sorry for. There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats; for I am armed so strong in honesty..." (Brutus, IV, III).
    H.) "There is my dagger, and here my naked breast...strike as thou didst at Caesar..." (Cassius, IV, III).
    I.) "To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi" (Caesar's ghost, IV, III).
    J.) "Caesar, thou art revenged even with the sword that killed thee" (Cassius, V, III).
    K.) "Farewell, good Strato. Caesar, now be still. I killed not thee with half so good a will" (Brutus, V, V).
    L.) "This was the noblest Roman of them all...this was a man!" (Antony, V, V).

    How will students understand the significance of events and literary devices in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar--Acts III, IV and V? EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR (25% of the 3rd marking period!) TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th--IT'S BASED ON ALL OF THE HW QUESTIONS, IN-CLASS NOTES AND READING OF THE PLAY!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • QUIZ on List #11.
  • Flashcards for List #11.
  • Vocabulary Story #11 for List #11. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: FREEDOM, JULIUS CAESAR (the play), HOLIDAYS, or MURDER PLOT. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Monday, December 10th, 2012: 1.) Do Now: Compose (and turn in) two multiple-choice questions (with five answer choices) for Julius Caesar. Use the HW questions from any of the acts to guide you. Please identify the correct answer. When finished, prepare for Wednesday's exam on the play. Review the questions/answers for Acts I and II and the in-class notes/quotes.
    *Show HW: Questions for Acts III and IV

    2. Distribution and review of List #11.

    3. Review the answers to the questions for Act III.

    How will students understand the significance of language in depicting characters in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar--Acts III and IV? EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR (25% of the 3rd marking period!) COMING UP THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th--IT'S BASED ON ALL OF THE HW QUESTIONS, IN-CLASS NOTES AND READING OF THE PLAY!

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:

  • Read Act V of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar
  • Answer the following Act V questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act V Questions:
    1. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?
    2. How do the conspirators die?
    3. Why are the conspirators' deaths significant?
    4. Why does Antony give the final speech of the play?
    5. How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?
    6. Write the 20-word summary of Act V.

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

  • EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR (25% of 3rd marking period!). It will be multiple-choice questions only. Study all of the questions/answers for each of the acts and the notes taken in class!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14th:

  • QUIZ on List #11.
  • Flashcards for List #11.
  • Vocabulary Story #11 for List #11. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: FREEDOM, JULIUS CAESAR (the play), HOLIDAYS, or MURDER PLOT. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Friday, December 7th, 2012: 1.) Do Now: QUIZ on List #10.
    *Show HW: flashcards and story #10.

    2. Make a prediction about the rest of the play. What will happen to each of the characters we've met so far? Caesar? Cassius? Brutus? Calpurnia? Portia? What could Caesar have done differently in Acts I or II to prevent his imminent murder?

    3. Introduce List #11.

    How will students hone their vocabulary skills in context? EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR (25% of the 3rd marking period!) COMING UP ON WEDNESDAY--IT'S BASED ON ALL OF THE HW QUESTIONS, IN-CLASS NOTES AND READING OF THE PLAY!

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:

  • Read Acts III and IV of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar. Answer the following Act III questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act III Questions:
    1. How could Caesar's murder have been prevented?
    2. How do the characters react to his death? How do characters' reactions differ?
    3. What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after Caesar's death?
    4. Describe various reactions to Caesar's death.
    5. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?
    6. Compare and contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans.
    7. How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story?
    8. Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet?
    9. What does this attack on Cinna, the poet, reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?
    10. Write the 20-word summary for Act III.

    Answer the following Act IV questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act IV Questions:
    1. What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning?
    2. How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius?
    3. How are these dialogues between Antony and his men and Brutus, Cassius and their men significant to the plot of the play?
    4. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and how is it significant to the plot?
    5. What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?
    6. What happened to Portia?
    7. How does Brutus react to Portia's disappearance and what does his reaction reveal about his character?
    8. Why is Caesar's ghost's appearance important to the play?
    9. Write the 20-word summary for Act IV.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:

  • Read Act V of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar
  • Answer the following Act V questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act V Questions:
    1. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?
    2. How do the conspirators die?
    3. Why are the conspirators' deaths significant?
    4. Why does Antony give the final speech of the play?
    5. How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?
    6. Write the 20-word summary of Act V.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY:

  • EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR (25% of 3rd marking period!). It will be multiple-choice questions only. Study all of the questions/answers for each of the acts and the notes taken in class!
  • Thursday, December 6th, 2012: 1.) Do Now: Interpret (in your own words) important quotes from Act II. Identify the speaker and each quote's significance to the story of Julius Caesar as a whole:
  • “And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg, which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous, and kill him in the shell” (Brutus, II, I).
  • “Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers...let’s kill him boldly, but not wrathfully...” (Brutus, II, I).
  • “A lioness hath whelped in the streets, and graves have yawned and yielded up their dead. Fierce fiery warriors fought upon the clouds in ranks and squadrons right form of war, which drizzled blood upon the Capitol” (Calpurnia, II, II).
  • “Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once” (Caesar, II, II).
  • “She dreamt tonight she saw my statue, which, like a fountain with an hundred spouts, did run pure blood, and many lusty Romans came smiling and did bathe their hands in it” (Caesar, II, II).
  • “Ay me, how weak a thing the heart of a woman is” (Portia, II, IV).

    2. Discuss the quotes in the Do Now.

    3. Make a prediction about the rest of the play. What will happen to each of the characters we've met so far? Caesar? Cassius? Brutus? Calpurnia? Portia?

    4. Review for tomorrow's quiz!

  • How will students improve their understanding of Act II by interpreting quotes and analyzing their significance to the story as a whole? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Flashcards for List #10
  • Vocabulary Story #10 for List #10. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: CONSPIRACY, LOVE IS IN THE AIR, JULIUS CAESAR, or THE HOLIDAYS. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • QUIZ on List #10.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:

  • Read Acts III and IV of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar. Answer the following Act III questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act III Questions:
    1. How could Caesar's murder have been prevented?
    2. How do the characters react to his death? How do characters' reactions differ?
    3. What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after Caesar's death?
    4. Describe various reactions to Caesar's death.
    5. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?
    6. Compare and contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans.
    7. How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story?
    8. Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet?
    9. What does this attack on Cinna, the poet, reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?
    10. Write the 20-word summary for Act III.

    Answer the following Act IV questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act IV Questions:
    1. What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning?
    2. How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius?
    3. How are these dialogues between Antony and his men and Brutus, Cassius and their men significant to the plot of the play?
    4. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and how is it significant to the plot?
    5. What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?
    6. What happened to Portia?
    7. How does Brutus react to Portia's disappearance and what does his reaction reveal about his character?
    8. Why is Caesar's ghost's appearance important to the play?
    9. Write the 20-word summary for Act IV.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:

  • Read Act V of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar
  • Answer the following Act V questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act V Questions:
    1. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?
    2. How do the conspirators die?
    3. Why are the conspirators' deaths significant?
    4. Why does Antony give the final speech of the play?
    5. How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?
    6. Write the 20-word summary of Act V.
  • EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR (25% of 3rd marking period!). It will be multiple-choice questions only. Study all of the questions/answers for each of the acts and the notes taken in class!
  • Wednesday, December 5th, 2012: 1.) Do Now: Discuss Act II questions/answers

    2.) Sharing of Vocabulary Story excerpts--from story #9 and/or story #7.

    3.) If time allows, share important quotes from Act II.

    How will students improve their understanding of characterization in Act II? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Flashcards for List #10
  • Vocabulary Story #10 for List #10. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: CONSPIRACY, LOVE IS IN THE AIR, JULIUS CAESAR, or THE HOLIDAYS. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • QUIZ on List #10.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:

  • Read Acts III and IV of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar. Answer the following Act III questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act III Questions:
    1. How could Caesar's murder have been prevented?
    2. How do the characters react to his death? How do characters' reactions differ?
    3. What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after Caesar's death?
    4. Describe various reactions to Caesar's death.
    5. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?
    6. Compare and contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans.
    7. How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story?
    8. Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet?
    9. What does this attack on Cinna, the poet, reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?
    10. Write the 20-word summary for Act III.

    Answer the following Act IV questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act IV Questions:
    1. What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning?
    2. How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius?
    3. How are these dialogues between Antony and his men and Brutus, Cassius and their men significant to the plot of the play?
    4. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and how is it significant to the plot?
    5. What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?
    6. What happened to Portia?
    7. How does Brutus react to Portia's disappearance and what does his reaction reveal about his character?
    8. Why is Caesar's ghost's appearance important to the play?
    9. Write the 20-word summary for Act IV.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:

  • Read Act V of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar
  • Answer the following Act V questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act V Questions:
    1. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?
    2. How do the conspirators die?
    3. Why are the conspirators' deaths significant?
    4. Why does Antony give the final speech of the play?
    5. How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?
    6. Write the 20-word summary of Act V.
  • EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR (25% of 3rd marking period!). It will be multiple-choice questions only. Study all of the questions/answers for each of the acts and the notes taken in class!
  • Tuesday, December 4th, 2012: 1.) Do Now: Choose your favorite wife--Portia or Calpurnia. Write a paragraph that includes specific examples from the play (find specific quotes in the text) that support your choice.

    Show HW: Act II questions/answers

    2.) Do Now sharing

    3.) Sharing of Vocabulary Story excerpts--from story #9 and/or story #7.

    4.) HW Reminders

    How will students improve their understanding of characterization in Act II? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • Flashcards for List #10
  • Vocabulary Story #10 for List #10. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: CONSPIRACY, LOVE IS IN THE AIR, JULIUS CAESAR, or THE HOLIDAYS. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • QUIZ on List #10.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:

  • Read Acts III and IV of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar
  • QUESTIONS ARE COMING!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:

  • Read Act V of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar
  • QUESTIONS ARE COMING FOR ACT V!
  • EXAM ON JULIUS CAESAR (25% of 3rd marking period!). It will be multiple-choice questions only.
  • Monday, December 3rd, 2012: 1.) Do Now: Introduce List #10. Compose Word Wall flashcards!

    Show HW: Story #7 Rewrite

    2.) Review List #10.

    3.) Sharing of Vocabulary Story excerpts--from story #9 and/or story #7.

    4.) HW Reminders

    How will students improve their vocabulary skills through recitation, visual depictions, and creative writing (vocabulary in context)? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
    Read Act II of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar). If you choose to read the online version, you MUST READ the original text, and you can use the modern text to make sense of the difficult language). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:

  • Flashcards for List #10
  • Vocabulary Story #10 for List #10. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: CONSPIRACY, LOVE IS IN THE AIR, JULIUS CAESAR, or THE HOLIDAYS. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • QUIZ on List #10.
  • Friday, November 30th, 2012: 1.) Do Now: Quiz on List #9

    Show HW: Flashcards for List #9 and Story #9

    2. Work Period: Work on HW due Monday and Tuesday.

    How will students effectively be assessed on vocabulary study and study characterization and the significance of literary terms (foreshadowing, simile, irony and alliteration) in Act II of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 3rd:
  • Rewrite Story #7.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
    Read Act II of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar). If you choose to read the online version, you MUST READ the original text, and you can use the modern text to make sense of the difficult language). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).

  • Thursday, November 29th, 2012: 1.) Do Now: Finish discussing HW questions for Act I of the play, Julius Caesar. Take notes as we discuss. Here they are:
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.

    2.) Review for tomorrow's quiz and introduce HW.

    How will students prove their study of William Shakespeare's Act I of Julius Caesar by examining the significance of literary devices? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th: Make up all owed HW--it's the last day of the 2nd marking period!


  • Flashcards for List #9
  • Vocabulary Story #9 for List #9. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: Thanksgiving, The Abuse of Power, Jealousy, or The Assassination. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • QUIZ on List #9

    DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 3rd:

  • Rewrite Story #7.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
    Read Act II of Julius Caesar (book provided in class or online "No Fear Shakespeare" version of Julius Caesar). If you choose to read the online version, you MUST READ the original text, and you can use the modern text to make sense of the difficult language). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question): Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).

  • Wednesday, November 28th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Interpret the following quotes in your own words, focusing on the theme of fate vs. free will, the importance of foreshadowing/omens, the power of imagery in Shakespeare's plays, and Caesar's characterization:

    "These growing feathers plucked from Caesar's wing will make him fly an ordinary pitch..." (Flavius, I, I).

    "Beware the Ides of March" (Soothsayer, I, II).

    "Men at some time are masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings" (Cassius, I, II).

    "Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed that he is grown so great?" (Cassius, I, II).

    "Men, all in fire, walk up and down the streets. And yesterday the bird of night did sit even at noonday upon the market place, hooting and shrieking" (Casca, I, III).

    2. Discuss Do Now quotes.

    3. Continue discussing HW questions for Act I of the play, Julius Caesar. Take notes as we discuss. Here they are:
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.

    How will students prove their study of William Shakespeare's Act I of Julius Caesar by examining the significance of literary devices? DUE THIS FRIDAY: Make up all owed HW--it's the last day of the 2nd marking period!


  • Flashcards for List #9
  • Vocabulary Story #9 for List #9. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: Thanksgiving, The Abuse of Power, Jealousy, or The Assassination. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • QUIZ on List #9
  • Tuesday, November 27th, 2012: 1. Do Now: A.) Share your three things/people/experiences you are grateful for from your Thanksgiving weekend. Then, write three of your character traits (qualities that you personally possess) that you are grateful for.
    B.) Share excerpts from your character's diary from Act I of Julius Caesar.

    2. Discuss HW questions for Act I of the play, Julius Caesar. Take notes as we discuss.

    How will students prove their study of William Shakespeare's Act I of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY:
  • Flashcards for List #9
  • Vocabulary Story #9 for List #9. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: Thanksgiving, The Abuse of Power, Jealousy, or The Assassination. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • QUIZ on List #9
  • Monday, November 26th, 2012: 1. Do Now: A.) In your Gratitude section, write three things/people/experiences you are grateful for from your Thanksgiving weekend. Then, write three of your character traits (qualities that you personally possess) that you are grateful for.
    B.) Choose one of the characters from Act I of Julius Caesar and write the first paragraph in his personal diary (write in first person).

    Show HW questions!

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now questions.

    3. Introduce Vocabulary List #9: Julius Caesar Vocabulary.

    4. If time allows, discuss HW questions for Act I of the play, Julius Caesar.

    How will students prove their study of William Shakespeare's Act I of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY:
  • Flashcards for List #9
  • Vocabulary Story #9 for List #9. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: Thanksgiving, The Abuse of Power, Jealousy, or The Assassination. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • QUIZ on List #9
  • Wednesday, November 21st, 2012: 1. Do Now: EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES (earn up to 10 points of extra HW credits!)--
    A.) List at least 3 power-hungry characters from popular fiction, films, television, and comic books. Based on the list, characterize (describe) the characters' personalities (3-4 sentences each).

    B.) Answer the following questions (3-4 sentences each) (1) A friend is trying to persuade you to do something that is both dangerous and illegal—to drive without a license. Your friend says he has to take care of an emergency, and this person knows you can drive, even though you are not allowed to do so legally. What will you do? What will you tell your friend? (2) A good friend of yours has been elected president of the student council. Soon, you notice that he or she is abusing the position by claiming privileges and using it to further his or her social life. How would you deal with this situation?

    2. When finished with the Do Now, work on the HW: Read Act I of the play, Julius Caesar. Work on answering the HW questions.

    How will students prepare to study William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, focusing on Act I? HAVE A GREAT THANKSGIVING!

    DUE MONDAY (after Thanksgiving), NOVEMBER 26th:

  • Read Act I of Julius Caesar (No Fear Shakespeare of Julius Caesar--you MUST READ the original text, and you can use the modern text to make sense of the difficult language). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.
  • Tuesday, November 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing some of the most famous Shakespearean lines, taken from Julius Caesar at Caesar's funeral. Discuss answers to the following questions:
    1.) What makes Julius Caesar a popular leader?
    2.) It is well known that authors reference their personal lives in their literature. Identify an example of Shakespeare's life in this excerpt from his play.
    3.) Identify examples of imagery, repetition, and alliteration.
    4.) Identify an example of irony.
    5.) This quote (see the link above) is taken from Act 3. What can you predict will happen in Acts 4 and 5?

    2. Introduce Iambic Pentameter.

    3. Begin reading aloud Act I Scene I of the play, Julius Caesar. Examine the double entendre/puns, dialect, and plot development. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar? How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (i.e. Flavius)?

    4. Start working on the HW.

    How will students prepare to study William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, focusing on Act I? DUE MONDAY (after Thanksgiving), NOVEMBER 26th:
  • Read Act I of Julius Caesar (No Fear Shakespeare of Julius Caesar--you MUST READ the original text, and you can use the modern text to make sense of the difficult language). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.
  • Monday, November 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Distribute copies of Julius Caesar and fill out book receipts. Brainstorm the the true life of Julius Caesar--what do you know? Describe his popularity of Julius Caesar, his character traits, his effect on people, and his time period.

    *Show HW: Reading of some of the most famous Shakespearean lines, taken from Julius Caesar at Caesar's funeral. Show answers to the following questions:
    1.) What makes Julius Caesar a popular leader?
    2.) It is well known that authors reference their personal lives in their literature. Identify an example of Shakespeare's life in this excerpt from his play.
    3.) Identify examples of imagery, repetition, and alliteration.
    4.) Identify an example of irony.
    5.) This quote (see the link above) is taken from Act 3. What can you predict will happen in Acts 4 and 5?

    2. Discuss Do Now.

    3. Introduce Iambic Pentameter.

    4. Begin reading aloud Act I Scene I of the play, Julius Caesar. Examine the double entendre/puns, dialect, and plot development. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar? How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (i.e. Flavius)?

    How will students prepare to study William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY (after Thanksgiving), NOVEMBER 26th:
  • Read Act I of Julius Caesar (No Fear Shakespeare of Julius Caesar--you MUST READ the original text, and you can use the modern text to make sense of the difficult language). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.
  • Friday, November 16th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #8: Julius Caesar Vocabulary

    2. Work Period: By reading/analyzing Life, Times and Work of William Shakespeare, decide the answer to the following: What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his plays and poetry? Be ready to share.

    3. Discuss and take notes on Life, Times and Work of William Shakespeare.

    4. Introduce Iambic Pentameter.

    How will students prepare to study William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar by examining Shakespeare's life and time period and analyzing an excerpt from the play? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
    Read some of the most famous Shakespearean lines, taken from Julius Caesar at Caesar's funeral. Answer the following questions:
    1.) What makes Julius Caesar a popular leader?
    2.) It is well known that authors reference their personal lives in their literature. Identify an example of Shakespeare's life in this excerpt from his play.
    3.) Identify examples of imagery, repetition, and alliteration.
    4.) Identify an example of irony.
    5.) This quote (see the link above) is taken from Act 3. What can you predict will happen in Acts 4 and 5?
    Thursday, November 15th, 2012: 1. Do Now: K/W/L on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works. What do you know about William Shakespeare--his life, times, and works? What do you want to know? What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his plays and poetry? Brainstorm. Be ready to share.

    2. Discuss/Share.

    3. Read, discuss and take notes on Life, Times and Work of William Shakespeare.

    4. Introduce Iambic Pentameter.

    How will students prepare to study of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? Due TOMORROW, Friday, November 16th:
  • QUIZ on List #8: Julius Caesar Vocabulary.
  • Wednesday, November 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: MIDTERM EXAM

    2. Work Period: Make up any owed HW and prepare for Friday's vocabulary quiz.

    3. Read Life, Times and Work of William Shakespeare.

    How will students prove their preparation for the Midterm Exam and prepare to study of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? Due THIS Friday, November 16th:
  • QUIZ on List #8: Julius Caesar Vocabulary.
  • Tuesday, November 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Review Midterm Preparation

    2. Read Life, Times and Work of William Shakespeare.

    Show HW: Vocabulary Flashcards for List #8 and Vocabulary Story #8.

    How will students prepare for the English Regents and the study of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (PSAT-style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. Review in-class notes/strategies. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period. Go over the Midterm Preparation.
    Friday, November 9th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Vocabulary List #7.

    2. Introduce List #8: Julius Caesar Vocabulary.

    3. Share strategies for success on the upcoming midterm: cover up the answer choices and write your answer in the margin, underline line #s in the reading passages, and recall vocabulary learned so far this year as well as Spanish/French connections to English (through Latin).

    4. If time allows, introduce Life, Times and Work of William Shakespeare. Take notes on additional facts that teacher offers.

    5. Introduce HW.

    How will students prepare for the English Regents and the study of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #8: Julius Caesar Vocabulary.
  • Vocabulary Story #8 using List #8: Julius Caesar Vocabulary. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: Why Study Shakespeare, The Election, Hurricane Relief, or Popular Leaders. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (PSAT-style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period.

  • Thursday, November 8th, 2012: 1. Do Now: FINISH ACUITY TEST (this will assess how we're doing in terms of English Regents preparation). If you're done early, prepare for Friday's quiz #7.

    *Turn in owed HW.

    2. Share strategies for success on the upcoming midterm: cover up the answer choices and write your answer in the margin, underline line #s in the reading passages, and recall vocabulary learned so far this year as well as Spanish/French connections to English (through Latin).

    3. If time allows, introduce Life, Times and Work of William Shakespeare. Take notes on additional facts that teacher offers.

    How will students prepare for the English Regents and the study of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #7.

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (PSAT-style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period.

  • Wednesday, November 7th, 2012: 1. Do Now: ACUITY TEST (this will assess how we're doing in terms of English Regents preparation). If you're done early, prepare for Friday's quiz #7.

    *Turn in your Controlling Idea Paragraph (rough and final drafts) AND the presidential HW due today.

    2. If time allows, introduce Life, Times and Work of William Shakespeare. Take notes on additional facts that teacher offers.

    How will students prepare for the English Regents and the study of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #7.

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (PSAT-style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period.

  • Monday, November 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now: In your Gratitude section, write 10 blessings that you are grateful for after Hurricane Sandy.

    *Turn in your Controlling Idea Paragraph (rough and final drafts). Your paragraph should be a minimum of 10 sentences or more. Your paragraph must include two of the quotes and responses from your double-entry journal.

    2. Brainstorm how we at ITHS can help the victims of Hurricane Sandy (provide at least one suggestion).

    3. Reintroduce Vocabulary List #7.

    4. Work Period/Pair/Share: Think of character traits of a popular leader. Name other men in history who have been instantly popular. What were their character traits? Be ready to share with class.

    How will students prepare for the study of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
    Identify three character traits and three actions that make President Obama a popular leader. Identify three character traits and three actions that make Governor Romney a popular leader. You should use these newspaper links and quote the news link of your choice to support your chosen traits and actions for each presidential candidate:
  • The New York Times
  • CNN
  • ABC News

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #7.
  • Monday, October 29th-Friday, November 2nd (Hurricane Sandy Days), 2012: N/A due to Hurricane Sandy Days How will students effectively compose a controlling idea paragraph for sin or propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil"? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5th, THE DAY WE RETURN FROM HURRICANE SANDY DAYS:
  • Compose a final draft of the Controlling Idea Paragraph. See the Controlling Idea Paragraph Instructions. You should show significant improvement from your in-class rough draft. This will be 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will be graded by the grading rubric given and discussed in class.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous HW).

    QUIZ on PSAT/SAT Vocabulary List #7=TBA

  • Friday, October 26th, 2012: 1. Work Period: Work on the Controlling Idea Paragraph (rough draft). Your paragraph should be a minimum of 10 sentences or more. Your paragraph must include two of the quotes and responses from your double-entry journal.

    2. Peer/Self-Assessment of the Controlling Idea Paragraph

    3. Vocabulary Games!

    How will students effectively compose a controlling idea paragraph for sin or propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil"? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Compose a final draft of the Controlling Idea Paragraph. See the Controlling Idea Paragraph Instructions. You should show significant improvement from your in-class rough draft. This will be 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will be graded by the grading rubric given and discussed in class.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous HW).

  • Thursday, October 25th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce the Controlling Idea Paragraph Instructions that will follow and connect to this lesson. Do you feel prepared for this assignment? Explain. How can the double-entry journal help you write the controlling idea paragraph. Review the grading rubric, too.

    2. Work Period: Work on the Controlling Idea Paragraph (rough draft). Your paragraph should be a minimum of 10-12 sentences. Your paragraph must include two of the quotes and responses from your double-entry journal.

    3. Peer/Self-Assessment of the Controlling Idea Paragraph

    How will students effectively compose a controlling idea paragraph for sin or propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil"? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Compose a final draft of the Controlling Idea Paragraph. See the Controlling Idea Paragraph Instructions. You should show significant improvement from your in-class rough draft. This will be 25% of your 2nd marking period grade. You will be graded by the grading rubric given and discussed in class.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous HW).

  • Wednesday, October 24th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish the double-entry journal: Fold a piece of paper in half, lengthwise. In the left hand column, write two more meaningful quotes (phrases or sentences from the narrator or dialogue) from "The Minister's Black Veil" on the themes of sin and propriety (which we have already identified and discussed). Include the page number.

    In the right hand column, you will react to the select quotes by writing in-depth critical responses to the quotes on the left. The entry may include a comment, a question, a connection made, or an analysis. Reaction starters should include one of the following:
    -The author included this quote because...
    -This quote is important to the story because...
    -This quote can be interpreted as...
    -This quote can connect to the author's life because...
    -This quote compares to...
    -This quote proves that...
    *Be ready to share your responses.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share Do Now.

    How will students effectively improve their literary analysis skills, examining sin and propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil"? Make up any owed HW (see previous HW).
    Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss and identify sin and propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil" short story.

    2. Work Period: Introduce the double-entry journal: Fold a piece of paper in half, lengthwise. In the left hand column, write two quotes (phrases or sentences) from "The Minister's Black Veil" on the themes of sin and propriety (which we have already identified and discussed). Then, find quotes that were particularly meaningful, along with the page number. In the right hand column, you will react to the select quotes by writing in-depth critical responses to the quotes on the left. The entry may include a comment, a question, a connection made, or an analysis. Reaction starters should include one of the following:
    -The author included this quote because...
    -This quote is important to the story because...
    -This quote can be interpreted as...
    -This quote can connect to the author's life because...
    -This quote compares to...
    -This quote proves that...
    *Be ready to share your responses.

    *Show HW: Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #7: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary AND turn in Vocabulary Story #7 using Vocabulary List #7: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary.

    How will students effectively improve their literary analysis skills, examining sin and propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil"? Make up any owed HW (see yesterday's HW).
    Monday, October 22nd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Homework Returns and Review

    2. Review "The Minister's Black Veil" packet answers.

    3. Work Period: Work on tomorrow's HW.

    How will students effectively improve their literary analysis skills? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #7: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary
  • Vocabulary Story #7 using Vocabulary List #7: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: My Future, College, Junior Year, or My Career. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Friday, October 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary (this quiz will be on the 2nd marking period's grade).

    *SHOW HW: LAST MAJOR HW assignment (THREE HW CREDITS=30 points!) for the 1st marking period: The reading of "The Minister's Black Veil" (packet will be given in class), which includes annotating the story for evidence of themes of SIN and PROPRIETY, answering the questions on p. 471 and the vocabulary in context on p. 472.

    2. Introduce new list: Vocabulary List #7: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary.

    How will students effectively improve their vocabulary skills? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #7: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary
  • Vocabulary Story #7 using Vocabulary List #7: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: My Future, College, Junior Year, or My Career. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Thursday, October 18th, 2012: 1. Work Period:
  • Work on the HW due TOMORROW--LAST MAJOR HW assignment (THREE HW CREDITS=30 points!) for the 1st marking period: The reading of "The Minister's Black Veil" (packet will be given in class), which includes annotating the story for evidence of themes of SIN and PROPRIETY, answering the questions on p. 471 and the vocabulary in context on p. 472.
  • Prepare for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz on Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary

    2. HW Reminders

  • How will students effectively read Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil" and analyze the themes of sin and propriety present in the short story? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary (this quiz will be on the 2nd marking period's grade).

  • LAST MAJOR HW assignment (THREE HW CREDITS=30 points!) for the 1st marking period: The reading of "The Minister's Black Veil" (packet will be given in class), which includes annotating the story for evidence of themes of SIN and PROPRIETY, answering the questions on p. 471 and the vocabulary in context on p. 472.
  • Tuesday, October 16th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Work on the HW due Friday--LAST MAJOR HW assignment (THREE HW CREDITS=30 points!) for the 1st marking period: The reading of "The Minister's Black Veil" (packet will be given in class), which includes annotating the story for evidence of themes of SIN and PROPRIETY, answering the questions on p. 471 and the vocabulary in context on p. 472.

    *Show HW due today:Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary AND Vocabulary Story #6 using Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary.

    2. PSAT/SAT strategies

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively begin reading Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil" and analyze the themes of sin and propriety present in the short story? GOOD LUCK ON TOMORROW'S PSAT! Eat a hearty dinner and a get a good night's sleep. Don't forget to eat breakfast and be here tomorrow morning on time!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary (this quiz will be on the 2nd marking period's grade).

  • LAST MAJOR HW assignment (THREE HW CREDITS=30 points!) for the 1st marking period: The reading of "The Minister's Black Veil" (packet will be given in class), which includes annotating the story for evidence of themes of SIN and PROPRIETY, answering the questions on p. 471 and the vocabulary in context on p. 472.
  • Monday, October 15th, 2012: 1. Do Now: In the Gratitude section of your notebook, identify 10 things you are grateful for in living in New York in the year 2012 (Remember, you could be living in another country and in another time period).

    2. Share Do Now.

    3. Review the following themes, which will be present in "The Minister's Black Veil": SIN and PROPRIETY (PROPER BEHAVIOR). How would we see examples of both sin and propriety today? How would we see examples of sin and propriety during the 1800's, when Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne were living? Review the brainstorming of sin and propriety, as seen in the 1800's and today, in 2012.

    4. PSAT/SAT strategies

    5. If time remains, work on HW due tomorrow.

    How will students effectively prepare to read Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil" through pre-reading discussion of themes present in the short story? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary
  • Vocabulary Story #6 using Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary. Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: My Future, College, Junior Year, or My Career. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary.

  • LAST MAJOR HW assignment (THREE HW CREDITS=30 points!) for the 1st marking period: The reading of "The Minister's Black Veil" (packet will be given in class), which includes annotating the story for evidence of themes of SIN and PROPRIETY, answering the questions on p. 471 and the vocabulary in context on p. 472.
  • Friday, October 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary.

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary.

    3. HW introduced

    4. PSAT/SAT strategies

    How will students improve their vocabulary skills through assessment? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary
  • Vocabulary Story #6 using Vocabulary List #6: PSAT/SAT Vocabulary. Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these story topics/titles: My Future, College, Junior Year, or My Career. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Thursday, October 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Recall a time when someone close to you changed in a way that made him or her seem like a different person (e.g. Your best friend suddenly doesn't like the things she's always liked. Your brother comes home from college with a new haircut and listening to strange music). Briefly write (a few sentences) to describe the change. Explain why it made you see the person so differently.

    2. Share thoughts on the Do Now.

    3. Review Nathaniel Hawthorne's bio in the textbook (see p. 456) and additional biographical information on Nathaniel Hawthorne. Take notes on important details discussed.

    4. Brainstorm the following: SIN and PROPRIETY (PROPER BEHAVIOR). How would we see examples of both sin and propriety today? How would we see examples of sin and propriety during the 1800's, when Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne were living?

    5. Discuss the brainstorming of sin and propriety, as seen in the 1800's and today, in 2012.

    6. HW Reminder. If time allows, review Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary for tomorrow's quiz!

    How will students effectively prepare to read Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil" through study and analysis of his autobiography and pre-reading discussion of themes present in the short story? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary.
  • Wednesday, October 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Read p. 456 in the textbook (Nathaniel Hawthorne's biography). What does Hawthorne have in common with Edgar Allan Poe? What can you predict that you will see in Hawthorne's short story, based on his personal characteristics, values and life history? Refer to specific details in his biography. Be ready to share.

    *Show HW: Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary and Vocabulary Story #4 using Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary (story topics were the following: My Black Veil, My Religion, The Presidential Election, or The Minister.)

    2. Discuss/Share thoughts on the Do Now.

    3. Vocabulary Story sharing

    How will students effectively prepare to read Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil" through study and analysis of his autobiography and pre-reading predictions? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary.
  • Tuesday, October 9th, 2012: Work Period:
    1.) Make a crossword puzzle for our new vocabulary list: Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary. Turn it in. When finished, prepare for tomorrow's HW.
    2.) Interpret the following quote in your own words: "The bravest of individuals is the one who obeys his or her conscience." Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why. Explain how "The Masque of the Red Death" supports the quote. (All of these answers above should add up to a paragraph of 4-6 sentences) Turn it in.
    How will students effectively improve their vocabulary skills through study and application of new words? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story #4 using Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary. Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: My Black Veil, My Religion, The Presidential Election, or The Minister. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Friday, October 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #4: "The Masque of the Red Death" Vocabulary.

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary.

    How will students effectively improve their vocabulary skills through assessment, study and application of new words? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story #4 using Vocabulary List #5: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary. Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: My Black Veil, My Religion, The Presidential Election, or The Minister. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Thursday, October 4th, 2012: 1. Do Now: TEST on The Masque of the Red Death (25% of 1st marking period's grade). Remember, well-developed paragraphs should be 6-8 sentences. Recommendation: use vocabulary to enhance your writing. 2. Work Period: Study for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz. How will students effectively improve their vocabulary and literary skills through the assessment of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #4 for "The Masque of the Red Death".
  • Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012: 1. Do Now:
  • Finish answering, discuss and take notes on the following questions, which will help you prepare for tomorrow's TEST on The Masque of the Red Death:
    A. Identify an example of symbolism and its importance to the story.
    B. Identify an example of personification and its importance to the story.
    C. Choose one character in the story (you may choose an object that acts as a character) and characterize the character. Characterization includes personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view.
    D. Explain how Edgar Allan Poe's life is revealed in his short story.
    E. Explain how the title is a good choice for the story.
    F. Explain how the theme of safety is revealed in the story.

    2. Work Period: Study for tomorrow's test and Friday's quiz.

    3. Vocabulary Story sharing (volunteers?!).

  • How will students effectively improve their vocabulary and literary skills through the study of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • TEST (25% of 1st marking period's grade) on "The Masque of the Red Death." Study the textbook questions and answers, in-class notes and notes on Edgar Allan Poe, particularly the notes on Poe that I emphasized as most important in class.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:

  • QUIZ on List #4 for "The Masque of the Red Death".
  • Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012: 1. Do Now:
  • Discuss and take notes on ALL of the Comprehension, Literary Analysis and Literary Criticism Questions on p. 435 (in the textbook) in complete sentences (in your Literary Analysis Section of your notebook).

    2. Work Period: Prepare for Thursday's TEST on The Masque of the Red Death by doing the following:
    A. Identify an example of symbolism and its importance to the story.
    B. Identify an example of personification and its importance to the story.
    C. Choose one character in the story (you may choose an object that acts as a character) and characterize the character. Characterization includes personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, speech/dialogue, and other characters' points of view.
    D. Explain how Edgar Allan Poe's life is revealed in his short story.
    E. Explain how the title is a good choice for the story.
    F. Explain how the theme of safety is revealed in the story.
    Show HW: Vocabulary List #4 flashcards and Vocabulary Story #4.

  • How will students effectively improve their vocabulary and literary skills through the study of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • TEST (25% of 1st marking period's grade) on "The Masque of the Red Death." Study the textbook questions and answers, in-class notes and notes on Edgar Allan Poe, particularly the notes on Poe that I emphasized as most important in class.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:

  • QUIZ on List #4 for "The Masque of the Red Death".
  • Monday, October 1st, 2012: Work Period:
  • Answer ALL of the Comprehension, Literary Analysis and Literary Criticism Questions on p. 435 (in the textbook) in complete sentences (in your Literary Analysis Section of your notebook).
  • Work on tomorrow's HW: Vocabulary List #4 flashcards and Vocabulary Story #4.
  • How will students effectively improve their vocabulary and literary skills through the study of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2nd:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #4 for "The Masque of the Red Death". Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story #4 using List #4 for "The Masque of the Red Death". Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: "The Masque of the Red Death" Part 2, Gratitude, The Plague or The Secret Love Story in "The Masque of the Red Death". You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Friday, September 28th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #3 for "The Masque of the Red Death".

    2. Introduce List #4 for "The Masque of the Red Death".

    3. PERIOD 2 ONLY: Discuss the summaries of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook)--paragraph #9-14 (pp. 433-434--the end). Summarize each paragraph in your Literary Analysis section of your notebook (and leave room to take notes discussed in class). As you read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, imagery, and characterization) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices). We will answer the following question for each paragraph: Why are these details/events/literary terms important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline.

    PERIOD 8 ONLY: Work Period: Answer the Comprehension, Literary Analysis and Literary Criticism Questions on p. 435 in complete sentences (in your Literary Analysis Section of your notebook).

    How will students effectively improve their vocabulary skills through study and assessment of vocabulary from Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2nd:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #4 for "The Masque of the Red Death". Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story #4 using List #4 for "The Masque of the Red Death". Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: "The Masque of the Red Death" Part 2, Gratitude, The Plague or The Secret Love Story in "The Masque of the Red Death". You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Thursday, September 27th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss the summaries of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook)--paragraph #9-14 (pp. 433-434--the end). Summarize each paragraph in your Literary Analysis section of your notebook (and leave room to take notes discussed in class). As you read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, imagery, and characterization) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices). We will answer the following question for each paragraph: Why are these details/events/literary terms important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline.

    2. Work Period: Answer the Comprehension, Literary Analysis and Literary Criticism Questions on p. 435 in complete sentences (in your Literary Analysis Section of your notebook). If you're done early, study for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz.

    HW Checks:Vocabulary Story Rewrite (choose story #1 or story #2). Rewrite (handwritten or typed) one of the vocabulary stories returned, making teacher's corrections and adding more details/descriptive language (for example: add adjectives in front of nouns).

    3. If time allows, we will discuss the answers to the questions on p. 435.

    How will students effectively comprehend and analyze the importance of literary terms (i.e. imagery, symbolism, and metaphor) in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3: "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Tuesday, September 25th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss the summaries of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook)--the first 8 paragraphs (pp. 428-433). Summarize each paragraph in your Literary Analysis section of your notebook (and leave room to take notes discussed in class). As you read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, imagery, and characterization) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices).

    2. Discuss/Share: We will answer the following question for each paragraph: Why are these details/events/literary terms important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline.

    3. HW Checks (vocabulary flashcards for List #3 and Story #3--check only, not to be graded).

    4. Work Period: Summarize paragraphs #9-12 (p. 433).

    5. Share yesterday's Gratitude Assignment: Write a list of 10 things/people you are grateful for.

    How will students effectively summarize and identify author's purpose/importance in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE THIS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:
  • Vocabulary Story Rewrite (choose story #1 or story #2). Rewrite (handwritten or typed) one of the vocabulary stories returned, making teacher's corrections and adding more details/descriptive language (for example: add adjectives in front of nouns).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3: "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Monday, September 24th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Continue reading of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook)--the first 8 paragraphs (pp. 428-433). Summarize each paragraph in your Literary Analysis section of your notebook (and leave room to take notes discussed in class). As you read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, imagery, and characterization) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices).

    Turn in HW: Discipline Code Booklet Handout

    2. Discuss/Share: We will answer the following question for each paragraph: Why are these details/events/literary terms important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline.

    3. HW Reminders & Vocabulary Story returns

    4. Gratitude Section: Write a list of 10 things/people you are grateful for.

    How will students effectively summarize and identify author's purpose/importance in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for the Vocabulary List #3: "The Masque of the Red Death". Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story #3 using the Vocabulary List #3: "The Masque of the Red Death". Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: The Red Death, The Prince and his 1,000 Friends, or A Fairy Tale. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    DUE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • Vocabulary Story Rewrite (choose story #1 or story #2). Rewrite (handwritten or typed) one of the vocabulary stories returned, making teacher's corrections and adding more details/descriptive language (for example: add adjectives in front of nouns).

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #3: "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Friday, September 21st, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2: "The Masque of the Red Death"

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #3: "The Masque of the Red Death".

    3. HW introduced

    How will students effectively work on improving their vocabulary skills to better understand Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:
  • Discipline Code Booklet Handouts

    DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Vocabulary Flashcards for the Vocabulary List #3: "The Masque of the Red Death". Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story #3 using the Vocabulary List #3: "The Masque of the Red Death". Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: The Red Death, The Prince and his 1,000 Friends, or A Fairy Tale. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Thursday, September 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Begin reading of "The Masque of the Red Death" (taken from the textbook). Summarize each paragraph in your notebook (10 words or less). Answer the following question for each paragraph: why is this important to the story? You may have to predict why these details/events may be important to the storyline. As we read, see what literary terms you can identify (symbolism, imagery, and characterization) and figure out the author's purpose for the use of those terms (you may refer to the author's life for his particular literary choices).

    2. Review introductory pages of "The Masque of the Red Death" and Do Now notes/questions

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively begin reading Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death", with a focus on author's purpose, imagery, symbolism and characterization? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2: "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Wednesday, September 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: ACUITY EXAM

    *Return of quizzes for Vocabulary List #1. Show HW: Vocabulary List #2 flashcards and Vocabulary Story #2.

    2. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively prove their Regents preparatory skills in a predictive Acuity Exam? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2: "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Friday, September 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ ON Vocabulary List #1

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #2: "The Masque of the Red Death"

    How will students effectively prepare to read Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th, 2012:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for the Vocabulary List #2: "The Masque of the Red Death". Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story #2 using the Vocabulary List for Vocabulary List #2: "The Masque of the Red Death". Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic choices include: My Safe Place, Safety in America, Safety at ITHS, or Edgar Allan Poe. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2: "The Masque of the Red Death"
  • Thursday, September 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's K/W/L for students' knowledge of Edgar Allan Poe, the poet/author. Students will identify what they know about him, his time period and work. They will then write what they want to know (in question form).

    2. Discuss/Share answers to the Do Now.

    3. Introduce the biography of Edgar Allan Poe. Take notes on important dates/events.

    4. Vocabulary Story excerpt sharing

    5. Vocabulary List #1 Review for Quiz

    How will students effectively prepare to read Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 2012:
  • QUIZ ON Vocabulary List #1
  • Wednesday, September 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: In your Language and Writing section, do the following:
    A.) Define "safety."
    B.) Describe a safe place. Use all of the senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, and smell).
    C.) What are some things we do to feel safe from harm's way? (Possible answers: install an alarm in our homes, avoid walking alone at night, and take precautions with our health/friends/activities.)
    D.) Is safety an illusion? Why or why not? (Let's prepare arguments for both sides: Safety is NOT an illusion OR safety is an illusion. One argument for safety is NOT an illusion is the following: people can take steps to prevent them from danger, like looking both ways before crossing the street. One argument for safety is an illusion is the following: people can never avoid danger; if it's meant to happen it will.)

    *Show owed HW and Vocabulary Story #1.

    2. Work Period: Begin a K/W/L for students' knowledge of Edgar Allan Poe, the poet/author. Students will identify what they know about him, his time period and work. They will then write what they want to know (in question form).

    3. Discuss/Share answers to the Do Now and the Work Period.

    How will students effectively prepare to read Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 2012:
  • QUIZ ON Vocabulary List #1
  • Tuesday, September 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Work on finishing your Vocabulary Story #1 (this is a creative writing story in which you use all vocabulary words from Vocabulary List #1). You must include all 30 vocabulary words (underlined) correctly from the list. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten or more. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, My Life as a Superhero, The Future, A Letter to My 10-year-old Self, or A Letter to an ITHS Freshman. If finished with the composition of this vocabulary story, then you should work on studying for Friday's vocabulary quiz.

    *Show HW: 5 properly labeled sections of your notebook/binder, signed portion of the syllabus, and vocabulary list #1 flashcards.

    2. Gratitude Writing: In your Gratitude section of your notebook/binder, write the following: List 10 body parts that you are grateful for. By showing this gratitude, you are honoring the memories of the victims who lost their lives on 9/11/01.

    *Check out 9/11 Day Website and do a good deed: volunteer, make a pledge to do good for others, and more.

    How will students effectively compose their first creative writing piece, vocabulary story #1, and honor 9/11? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12th:
  • Finish Vocabulary Story #1 (this is a creative writing story in which you use all vocabulary words from Vocabulary List #1). You must include all 30 vocabulary words (underlined) correctly from the list. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten or more. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, My Life as a Superhero, The Future, A Letter to My 10-year-old Self, or A Letter to an ITHS Freshman.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 2012:

  • QUIZ ON Vocabulary List #1
  • Monday, September 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Listen to instructions on Vocabulary Story #1--begin to compose a creative writing story in which you use all vocabulary words from Vocabulary List #1. You must include all 30 vocabulary words (underlined) correctly from the list. The story must be a minimum of 300 words--about two pages handwritten. Topic suggestions include the following: A Day in My Life, My Life as a Superhero, The Future, A Letter to My 10-year-old Self, or A Letter to an ITHS Freshman. This is a classwork assignment.

    2. Work Period: Work on Vocabulary Story #1.

    3. HW Reminders

    3. Summer reading/writing HW collected.

    How will students compose their first creative writing piece--vocabulary story #1? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th, 2012:
  • Signed portion of the Junior English Syllabus
  • 5-subject/binder with labeled sections for this English class. See details in the Junior English Syllabus.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for the Vocabulary List #1

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 2012:

  • QUIZ ON Vocabulary List #1
  • Friday, September 7th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce Junior English Syllabus.

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #1.

    3. Compose a sample vocabulary flashcard.

    3. Summer reading/writing HW collected.

    How will students understand course expectations and requirements? DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th, 2012:
  • Signed portion of the Junior English Syllabus
  • 5-subject/binder with labeled sections for this English class. See details in the Junior English Syllabus.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for the Vocabulary List #1

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 2012:

  • QUIZ ON Vocabulary List #1
  • Thursday, September 6th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Fill out index card #1, answering the following:
    A.) Your full name (in parentheses, write any nickname that you want to be called in class)
    B.) Home phone #
    C.) Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
    D.) Three of your good character traits
    E.) One of your passions
    F.) Your career goal
    G.) One thing/person that you're grateful for

    2. Now take index card #2, and do the following:

  • Choose a quote from one of the quotes around the classroom, and write it down.
  • Interpret the quote in your own words.
  • Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why.
  • Choose two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Introduce these two works of literature with their authors, if you can.

    3. Find a neighbor, and interview that person. Find out his/her name and answers to letters D, E, F and G. Be ready to introduce that neighbor to the class.

    4. Class introductions of #3.

    5. Class Expectations and Reflections on today's index cards (positives, negatives, and areas needing improvement)

    6. Summer reading/writing HW collected.

  • How will students introduce themselves in written and oral expression? Not Applicable at this time.