Ms. Conn's Junior English Assignments, Fall-Winter, 2013-2014

Ms. Conn's Junior English Assignments
Fall-Winter, 2013-2014

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Friday, January 24th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Regents Review: HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (MONDAY, JANUARY 27th at 12:15pm:
  • HERE'S A SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013.
  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. You MUST write on both The Scarlet Letter and Othello. You MUST write FIVE paragraphs. KEY TO SUCCESS: CIRCLE KEY WORDS IN THE CRITICAL LENS QUOTE (on the instructions page) AND USE THOSE KEY WORDS (AND THEIR SYNONYMS: WORDS THAT HAVE SIMILAR MEANINGS) THROUGHOUT YOUR ESSAY!! First, the introduction (4-6 sentences) includes the following: the critical lens quote (first sentence), your interpretation of the quote (in your own words), your opinion (whether you agree or disagree and why; it's better to agree!), and an introduction of the two works of literature (The Scarlet Letter and Othello and how they support the quote). Next, body paragraph #1 focuses on one work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote). You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #2 focuses on the other work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote. You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #3 should compare/contrast the two works of literature and connect both of them to the quote. The body paragraphs should be 8-10 sentences each, with lots of evidence from the texts. Finally, the conclusion (4-6 sentences) should summarize the ideas presented in the entire essay. USE VOCABULARY THROUGHOUT YOUR WRITING: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary List, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. HERE'S A LIST OF IMPORTANT LITERARY TERMS to use in this critical lens essay.
  • HERE'S A HELPFUL GUIDE TO WRITING THE ESSAY AND PARAGRAPHS ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS, COURTESY OF MS. HYDE.
  • See a SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013.

    2. Show all owed HW (today is the last day of semester!) and return all copies of Othello.

    3. Work on the sample English Regents exam. HERE ARE THE ANSWERS FOR THE MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS.

  • How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents? GOOD LUCK ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS! REVIEW ALL OF YOUR NOTES AND HOMEWORK ON OTHELLO AND THE SCARLET LETTER.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THIS COMING MONDAY, JANUARY 27th at 12:15pm):

  • HERE'S A SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013. HERE ARE THE ANSWERS FOR THE MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS.
  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. You MUST write FIVE paragraphs. KEY TO SUCCESS: CIRCLE KEY WORDS IN THE CRITICAL LENS QUOTE (on the instructions page) AND USE THOSE KEY WORDS (AND THEIR SYNONYMS: WORDS THAT HAVE SIMILAR MEANINGS) THROUGHOUT YOUR ESSAY!! First, the introduction (4-6 sentences) includes the following: the critical lens quote (first sentence), your interpretation of the quote (in your own words), your opinion (whether you agree or disagree and why; it's better to agree!), and an introduction of the two works of literature (The Scarlet Letter and Othello and how they support the quote). Next, body paragraph #1 focuses on one work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote). You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #2 focuses on the other work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote. You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #3 should compare/contrast the two works of literature and connect both of them to the quote. The body paragraphs should be 8-10 sentences each, with lots of evidence from the texts. Finally, the conclusion (4-6 sentences) should summarize the ideas presented in the entire essay.
  • USE VOCABULARY THROUGHOUT YOUR WRITING: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary List, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2.
  • HERE'S A LIST OF IMPORTANT LITERARY TERMS to use in this critical lens essay.
  • HERE'S A HELPFUL GUIDE TO WRITING THE ESSAY AND PARAGRAPHS ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS, COURTESY OF MS. HYDE.
  • See a SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013. HERE ARE THE ANSWERS FOR THE MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS.
  • Thursday, January 23rd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Work on any owed HW including the assignment due today (Critical Lens Essay).

    *Show HW: Critical Lens Essay due today and extra credit.

    2. Regents Review: HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (MONDAY, JANUARY 27th at 12:15pm:

  • HERE'S A SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013.
  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. You MUST write on both The Scarlet Letter and Othello. You MUST write FIVE paragraphs. KEY TO SUCCESS: CIRCLE KEY WORDS IN THE CRITICAL LENS QUOTE (on the instructions page) AND USE THOSE KEY WORDS (AND THEIR SYNONYMS: WORDS THAT HAVE SIMILAR MEANINGS) THROUGHOUT YOUR ESSAY!! First, the introduction (4-6 sentences) includes the following: the critical lens quote (first sentence), your interpretation of the quote (in your own words), your opinion (whether you agree or disagree and why; it's better to agree!), and an introduction of the two works of literature (The Scarlet Letter and Othello and how they support the quote). Next, body paragraph #1 focuses on one work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote). You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #2 focuses on the other work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote. You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #3 should compare/contrast the two works of literature and connect both of them to the quote. The body paragraphs should be 8-10 sentences each, with lots of evidence from the texts. Finally, the conclusion (4-6 sentences) should summarize the ideas presented in the entire essay. USE VOCABULARY THROUGHOUT YOUR WRITING: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary List, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. HERE'S A LIST OF IMPORTANT LITERARY TERMS to use in this critical lens essay.
  • HERE'S A HELPFUL GUIDE TO WRITING THE ESSAY AND PARAGRAPHS ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS, COURTESY OF MS. HYDE.
  • See a SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013.
  • How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th:
  • IF YOU DID NOT PRESENT YOUR GROUP SCENE FROM OTHELLO ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th, THEN YOU MUST MEMORIZE YOUR GIVEN SOLILOQUY SO YOU WILL NOT HAVE A "O". YOU ARE ALLOWED ONE MISTAKE, THOUGH AFTER THAT ONE MISTAKE, EVERY MISTAKE IS -10 POINTS.


  • ALL HOMEWORK/EXAMS MUST BE MADE UP BY TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th, WHICH IS THE LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER. I WILL ACCEPT THE EXTRA CREDIT (5 points each, instead of 10 points each).
  • RETURN ALL COPIES OF OTHELLO.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THIS COMING MONDAY, JANUARY 27th at 12:15pm):

  • HERE'S A SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013.
  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. You MUST write FIVE paragraphs. KEY TO SUCCESS: CIRCLE KEY WORDS IN THE CRITICAL LENS QUOTE (on the instructions page) AND USE THOSE KEY WORDS (AND THEIR SYNONYMS: WORDS THAT HAVE SIMILAR MEANINGS) THROUGHOUT YOUR ESSAY!! First, the introduction (4-6 sentences) includes the following: the critical lens quote (first sentence), your interpretation of the quote (in your own words), your opinion (whether you agree or disagree and why; it's better to agree!), and an introduction of the two works of literature (The Scarlet Letter and Othello and how they support the quote). Next, body paragraph #1 focuses on one work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote). You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #2 focuses on the other work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote. You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #3 should compare/contrast the two works of literature and connect both of them to the quote. The body paragraphs should be 8-10 sentences each, with lots of evidence from the texts. Finally, the conclusion (4-6 sentences) should summarize the ideas presented in the entire essay.
  • USE VOCABULARY THROUGHOUT YOUR WRITING: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary List, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2.
  • HERE'S A LIST OF IMPORTANT LITERARY TERMS to use in this critical lens essay.
  • HERE'S A HELPFUL GUIDE TO WRITING THE ESSAY AND PARAGRAPHS ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS, COURTESY OF MS. HYDE.
  • See a SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013.
  • Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014: Regents Practice WORK PERIOD: Work on the HW Critical Lens Essay.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (MONDAY, JANUARY 27th at 12:15pm:

  • HERE'S A SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013.
  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23rd:
  • LAST HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT FOR THE SEMESTER: Compose the Critical Lens Essay (Part 4, question 28) from the ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013: PART 4, QUESTION 28. You MUST write on both The Scarlet Letter and Othello. You MUST write FIVE paragraphs. KEY TO SUCCESS: CIRCLE KEY WORDS IN THE CRITICAL LENS QUOTE (on the instructions page) AND USE THOSE KEY WORDS (AND THEIR SYNONYMS: WORDS THAT HAVE SIMILAR MEANINGS) THROUGHOUT YOUR ESSAY!! First, the introduction (4-6 sentences) includes the following: the critical lens quote (first sentence), your interpretation of the quote (in your own words), your opinion (whether you agree or disagree and why; it's better to agree!), and an introduction of the two works of literature (The Scarlet Letter and Othello and how they support the quote). Next, body paragraph #1 focuses on one work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote). You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #2 focuses on the other work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote. You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #3 should compare/contrast the two works of literature and connect both of them to the quote. The body paragraphs should be 8-10 sentences each, with lots of evidence from the texts. Finally, the conclusion (4-6 sentences) should summarize the ideas presented in the entire essay. USE VOCABULARY THROUGHOUT YOUR WRITING: "The Minister's Black Veil" Vocabulary List, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. HERE'S A LIST OF IMPORTANT LITERARY TERMS to use in this critical lens essay.
  • HERE'S A HELPFUL GUIDE TO WRITING THE ESSAY AND PARAGRAPHS ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS, COURTESY OF MS. HYDE.

    EXTRA CREDIT (VALUE=2 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013: QUESTIONS 26 and 27. They must be 8-10 sentences each.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th:

  • IF YOU DID NOT PRESENT YOUR GROUP SCENE FROM OTHELLO ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th, THEN YOU MUST MEMORIZE YOUR GIVEN SOLILOQUY SO YOU WILL NOT HAVE A "O". YOU ARE ALLOWED ONE MISTAKE, THOUGH AFTER THAT ONE MISTAKE, EVERY MISTAKE IS -10 POINTS.

    ALL HOMEWORK/EXAMS MUST BE MADE UP BY THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th, WHICH IS THE LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER.

  • Tuesday, January 21st, 2014: 1. Do Now: Review answers to the Othello Exam.

    2. Othello Award Presentations

    3. Regents Review:

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (MONDAY, JANUARY 27th at 12:15pm:

  • HERE'S A SAMPLE ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013.
  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • How can we effectively present soliloquys from scenes of Othello in modern interpretations? DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 23rd:
  • LAST HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT FOR THE SEMESTER: Compose the Critical Lens Essay (Part 4, question 28) from the ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013: PART 4, QUESTION 28. You MUST write on both The Scarlet Letter and Othello. You MUST write FIVE paragraphs. First, the introduction includes the following: the critical lens quote (first sentence), your interpretation of the quote (in your own words), your opinion (whether you agree or disagree and why; it's better to agree!), and an introduction of the two works of literature (The Scarlet Letter and how they support the quote. Next, body pargraph #1 focuses on one work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote. You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body pargraph #2 focuses on the other work of literature (either The Scarlet Letter or Othello) and how that text supports the quote. You MUST refer to literary terms like characterization, theme, foreshadowing, etc. Then, body paragraph #3 should compare/contrast the two works of literature and connect both of them to the quote. The body paragraphs should be 8-10 sentences each, with lots of evidence from the texts. Finally, the conclusion should summarize the ideas presented in the entire essay.

    EXTRA CREDIT (VALUE=2 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): ENGLISH REGENTS FROM JANUARY 2013: QUESTIONS 26 and 27. They must be 8-10 sentences each.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th:

  • IF YOU DID NOT PRESENT YOUR GROUP SCENE FROM OTHELLO ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th, THEN YOU MUST MEMORIZE YOUR GIVEN SOLILOQUY SO YOU WILL NOT HAVE A "O". YOU ARE ALLOWED ONE MISTAKE, THOUGH AFTER THAT ONE MISTAKE, EVERY MISTAKE IS -10 POINTS.

    ALL HOMEWORK/EXAMS MUST BE MADE UP BY THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th, WHICH IS THE LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER.

  • Thursday, January 16th, 2014: 1. Work Period: Work on preparing your performance presentation of the soliloquy from the Othello scene. Remember, incorporate the tableaus (frozen statues) and the levels (low, middle and high). You will be graded AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances.

    Soliloquy reminders:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    2. HW Reminders, including Voting tomorrow (Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Group Performance)

    How can we effectively prepare to present soliloquys from scenes of Othello in modern interpretations? IF YOU HAVE NOT TAKEN THE OTHELLO EXAM, YOU MUST TAKE IT BY TOMORROW, OR YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO TAKE IT AGAIN. ALSO, IF YOU HAVE NOT TURNED IN THE FINAL PAPER ON THE SCARLET LETTER, YOU MUST TURN IT IN BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 21st!

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th:
    PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO (You signed up in class). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10-15% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I, Act II Scene I, Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III, and Act V Scene II. Student performers should learn their lines (you can use the text, but you should be very comfortable with the lines, and nearly memorized would help), stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? Examples: Superheroes vs. Villains, Mafia, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    *Students will get to choose from one of the following:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    Friday, January 17th, 2014: 1. OTHELLO SCENE PERFORMANCE PRESENTATIONS: Each group will present their performances of the soliloquy from the Othello scene. Remember, incorporate the tableaus (frozen statues) and the levels (low, middle and high). You will be graded AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances.

    Soliloquy reminders:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    2. Voting (Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Group Performance)

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively present soliloquys from scenes of Othello in modern interpretations? IF YOU HAVE NOT TURNED IN THE FINAL PAPER ON THE SCARLET LETTER, YOU MUST TURN IT IN BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 21st!

    ALL HOMEWORK/EXAMS MUST BE MADE UP BY NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th, WHICH IS THE LAST DAY OF THE SEMESTER.

    Thursday, January 16th, 2014: 1. Work Period: Work on preparing your performance presentation of the soliloquy from the Othello scene. Remember, incorporate the tableaus (frozen statues) and the levels (low, middle and high). You will be graded AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances.

    Soliloquy reminders:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    2. HW Reminders, including Voting tomorrow (Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, and Best Group Performance)

    How can we effectively prepare to present soliloquys from scenes of Othello in modern interpretations? IF YOU HAVE NOT TAKEN THE OTHELLO EXAM, YOU MUST TAKE IT BY TOMORROW, OR YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO TAKE IT AGAIN. ALSO, IF YOU HAVE NOT TURNED IN THE FINAL PAPER ON THE SCARLET LETTER, YOU MUST TURN IT IN BY TUESDAY, JANUARY 21st!

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th:
    PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO (You signed up in class). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10-15% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I, Act II Scene I, Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III, and Act V Scene II. Student performers should learn their lines (you can use the text, but you should be very comfortable with the lines, and nearly memorized would help), stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? Examples: Superheroes vs. Villains, Mafia, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    *Students will get to choose from one of the following:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    Wednesday, January 15th, 2014: 1. DO NOW: Grading Reminders: YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10-15% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances.

    2. Soliloquy reminders:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    3. Tableaus to mark the character relationships (become your chosen character) in Othello (i.e. Othello and Desdemona, Othello and Iago, Iago and Cassio, Othello and Brabantio, etc.). Include tableaus of three or more persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.

    4. Soliloquy Performance Practice

    How can we effectively prepare to present soliloquys from scenes of Othello in modern interpretations? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th:
    PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO (You signed up in class). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10-15% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I, Act II Scene I, Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III, and Act V Scene II. Student performers should learn their lines (you can use the text, but you should be very comfortable with the lines, and nearly memorized would help), stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? Examples: Superheroes vs. Villains, Mafia, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    *Students will get to choose from one of the following:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    Tuesday, January 14th, 2014: 1.DO NOW: PASSAGE II (reading and multiple-choice questions-regents practice)

    2. PASSAGE I (Listening section-regents practice

    How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th:
    PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO (You signed up in class). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10-15% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I, Act II Scene I, Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III, and Act V Scene II. Student performers should learn their lines (you can use the text, but you should be very comfortable with the lines, and nearly memorized would help), stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? Examples: Superheroes vs. Villains, Mafia, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    *Students will get to choose from one of the following:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    Monday, January 13th, 2014: 1. DO NOW: Tableaus to mark the character relationships (become your chosen character) in Othello (i.e. Othello and Desdemona, Othello and Iago, Iago and Cassio, Othello and Brabantio, etc.). Include tableaus of three or more persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.

    2. Sound Machine

    3. Distribution of Soliloquys from each group's chosen scene. Students will get to choose from one of the following:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    4. HW and assessment reminder

    How can we effectively prepare to present soliloquys from scenes of Othello in modern interpretations? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th:
    PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO (You signed up in class). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10-15% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I, Act II Scene I, Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III, and Act V Scene II. Student performers should learn their lines (you can use the text, but you should be very comfortable with the lines, and nearly memorized would help), stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? Examples: Superheroes vs. Villains, Mafia, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.

    *Students will get to choose from one of the following:
    A.) All of the soliloquy is spoken by one actor (while the other actors physically act out the soliloquy).
    B.) The soliloquy is spoken by multiple actors (actors are saying different lines)
    C.) The soliloquy is spoken by one actor but is supported by ensemble/choral effects

    Friday, January 10th, 2014: Work Period:
  • Make up any owed journal HW for Othello
  • Read your chosen scene and work on understanding the summary of the scene. Work with your group on which character you'll perform and the director's vision (a modern theme, such as Mafia, Jersey Shore, Superheroes vs. Villains, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.)
  • Interpret the following quotes in your own words and explain if you agree or disagree and why. Then, explain how both Othello and The Scarlet Letter support the quotes. Do this in 3-4 sentences for each quote. Be ready to share on Monday.
    1.) "All conflict in literature is, in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil."
    2.) “You must take life the way it comes at you and make the best of it.”
  • How can we effectively prepare to present scenes of Othello in modern interpretations? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th:
    PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO (You signed up in class). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10-15% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I, Act II Scene I, Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III, and Act V Scene II. Student performers should learn their lines (you can use the text, but you should be very comfortable with the lines, and nearly memorized would help), stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? Examples: Superheroes vs. Villains, Mafia, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.
    Thursday, January 9th, 2014: 1. Do Now: EXAM on Othello

    2. Introduce Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances.

    3. Organize into chosen groups.

    How can we effectively prove our knowledge in an assessment on all of Othello? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 17th:
    PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE FROM OTHELLO (You signed up in class). Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?). YOU WILL BE GRADED (a class participation grade--about 10-15% of 3rd marking period) AS A GROUP ON the Grading Sheet for Othello Scene Performances. The Othello scene groups are: Act I Scene I, Act II Scene I, Act II Scene III, Act III Scene III, Act V Scene II. Student performers should learn their lines (you can use the text, but you should be very comfortable with the lines, and nearly memorized would help), stage the scenes effectively, dress in costumes, use props, include stage directions, incorporate physical and emotional expressions to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), and a director's theme/vision (What is the creative focus of your scene? Examples: Superheroes vs. Villains, Mafia, Jersey Shore, Revenge of the Nerds, etc.). Make the scene location come to life and add music, lighting and/or sound.
    Wednesday, January 8th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Review Act V Notes for Othello:
    Scene I:
  • The scene opens up with Iago orchestrating Roderigo's attack on Cassio. Roderigo reveals that he doesn't really want to commit the crime against Cassio: "I have no great devotion to the deed" (9).
  • Iago reveals, in a soliloquy, that he doesn't care if Rodrigo dies or not (when killing Cassio). Iago also reveals that Cassio's presence on earth makes Iago look bad, so Cassio must be annihilated: "If Cassio do remain, he hath a daily beauty in his life that make me look ugly" (19-21).
  • Roderigo thrusts his knife at Cassio, Cassio stabs Roderigo, Roderigo falls, and Iago stabs Cassio in the leg.
  • Othello enters and thinks that Iago has killed Cassio. He then proceeds to kill Desdemona.
  • Iago enters the scene, playing dumb and ignorant, and asks who did this to Cassio. Cassio reveals it was a villain, pointing to Roderigo. Iago kills Roderigo, and Roderigo says before his death: "O damned Iago! O inhuman dog" (74). Iago then binds Cassio's leg.
  • Bianca enters the scene, and Iago blames her for Cassio's injury. He is clearly a misogynist when he says: "this is the fruits of whoring" (137).

    Scene II:

  • Othello enters, beginning with a soliloquy about Desdemona's alleged infidelity and his need to murder her. "Yet she must die, else she'll betray more men" (6). He repeats "put out thy light" three times (7, 10), which is regarding his need to murder her. He uses imagery, such as: "when I have plucked the rose" (13-14), to emphasize her beauty and his need to destroy her. Othello kisses her twice. Desdemona awakens, and Othello asks if she's prayed yet (28), likely because she should repent before death.
  • Othello tells Desdemona what's been torturing him: "That handkerchief which I so loved, and gave thee, thou gav'st to Cassio" (58-60). Desdemona denies it, and she said to send for Cassio and prove that it's not true. He doesn't believe her and tells her to repent and that she's going to die. They go back and forth, Othello saying she's being deceptive and Desdemona saying she's not.
  • Desdemona asks for sympathy: banishment instead of death (98).
  • Othello has no sympathy, and smothers her. Though, Desdemona still hangs on, dying slowly, as she informs Emilia that she's wrongly on her deathbed: "O falsely, falsely murdered" (144). Then she says "farewell" and dies.
  • Othello reveals to Emilia that he murdered Desdemona, and that it was her fault: "She's like a liar gone to burning hell! 'Twas I that killed her" (159-160). He continues on, calling her a "whore" (162) and "false" (164, 166).
  • Othello tells Emilia that her husband, Iago, knew it all (Desdemona's alleged deceptions). Othello calls Iago an honest husband. Emilia disputes this, and reveals that Iago is a liar. Emilia then cries out that "The Moor hath killed my mistress! Murder, murder!" (203).
  • Emilia confronts her husband, Iago, asking him if he said that Desdemona was having an affair with Cassio. Emilia tells Iago that his reports have instigated her murder. Emilia then realizes that her husband is a villain (227-230). Emilia reveals that she had taken the handkerchief, after the prompting of her husband, Iago. Iago then calls her a "villainous whore" (273). Othello tries to attack Iago, but he can't because he's disarmed. Iago kills his wife (though she sings the same song that Desdemona sang first).
  • Othello bemoans his fate and the death of his beloved Desdemona (316-332).
  • Othello stabs Iago.
  • Othello asks for pardon for accusing Cassio of having an affair with Desdemona (352-354).
  • Lodovico reveals that the slain Rodrigo's pockets contain a letter remarking the importance of killing Cassio.
  • Othello asks Cassio: "How came you, Cassio, by that handkerchief that was my wife's?" (376-377). Cassio explains that he found it in his chamber, and Iago confessed that he dropped it for "a special purpose" (380).
  • Othello tells Lodovico what to say at Othello's funeral (400-417), and then Othello kills himself, but first kisses Desdemona (420-421).
  • Lodovico puts Cassio in charge, and tells Cassio that he needs to punish Iago for his crimes.

    2. Compose two multiple-choice questions for the Othello Exam (Regents-style).

  • How can we effectively prepare for an assessment on all of Othello? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9th, 2014:
  • EXAM ON OTHELLO (25% of the 3rd marking period). First and foremost, READ THE PLAY! Next, study all notes taken in class for Acts I-V and the notes provided on this website, which can be found HERE. Make sure to understand the use of misogynist and prophecy, as revealed in the play. The exam will be composed of multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil.
  • Tuesday, January 7th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing Act IV notes for Othello:

    Scene I:
  • Iago conjures up images of Desdemona's fictional affair, which haunt Othello. "Naked in bed, Iago, and not mean harm? It is hypocrisy against the devil!" (7-8).
  • Iago brings up the significance of the missing "handkerchief" and Othello is tormented about its whereabouts. Othello falls in a trance (fainting) from this tormenting.
  • Iago tells Othello that he shouldn't assume that Desdemona is honest and chaste (pure, innocent).
  • Iago tells the audience (in a mini-soliloquy) that he will have Cassio talk to Bianca (a prostitute), and it will appear that Cassio is speaking about Desdemona in a sexual manner.
  • Othello watches them talking and sees Cassio take out Desdemona's handkerchief (though Cassio is talking to Bianca about copying the needlework). Othello says: "my heart is turned to stone" (201-202). Othello wants to murder Cassio for his supposed cheating with Desdemona.
  • Othello tells Iago that he wants to kill Desdemona: "hang her" (206), "I will chop her into messes" (219) and "get me some poison, Iago" (223). Iago tells Othello to kill her in different way: "strangle her in her bed, even the bed she hath contaminated" (226-227).
  • Othello sees Desdemona and strikes her. She replies, "I have not deserved this" (269).
  • Othello is not regretful for striking Desdemona, as he believes that she's a deceiver.
  • Lodovico is stunned by Othello's action and cannot believe that he is the virtuous man that was once extolled by the entire senate. Lodovico believes that over-working might be the root of his cruel action.

    Scene II:

  • Othello interrogates Emilia about Cassio and Desdemona, asking what they said and how they acted. Emilia says that Desdemona is honest.
  • Othello gives a soliloquy (lines 22-25) about Emilia being a whore who keeps secrets.
  • Othello confronts Desdemona and claims she's being deceptive to him: "Heaven truly knows that thou art false as hell" (48). Othello calls her a "strumpet" (94), and she replies that she is a "Christian" (95).
  • In a soliloquy, Desdemona asks, "How have I been behaved that he might stick the small'st opinion on my least misuse?" (126-127). She questions how she's behaved, because she believes she's behaved beautifully with Othello.
  • Emilia claims that an "eternal villain" (153) and a "villainous knave" (164) has instigated trouble with the Moor. This suggests Iago as the villain (and the audience knows the truth).
  • Desdemona confides in Iago, asking him how she can win Othello's love back (175-176). Then, she's prophetic, saying "his unkindnesss may defeat my life, but never taint my love" (189-190).
  • Iago replies that Othello is busy with work, and that's why he's being nasty (195-196). Iago, ironically, comforts Desdemona.
  • Iago is having Roderigo engaged in trivial errands; in particular, Roderigo has delivered jewelry to Desdemona but has received no reply (217-222).
  • Iago says that they need to kill Cassio (262-263), as that will help prevent Desdemona and Othello's relationship from blossoming further if they are delayed from going to Mauritania.
  • Iago tells Roderigo that killing Cassio is the right decision and Iago will relay the reasons soon.

    Scene III:

  • The scene opens up with Othello commanding Desdemona to go to bed, and for Emilia to be dismissed.
  • Prior to dismissing Emilia, Desdemona tells her a prophetic command: "If I do die before thee, prithee shroud me in one of those same sheets" (25-26).
  • Desdemona is singing (she recalls that her mother's maid was singing before her death; Shakespeare's other characters sing before their deaths, like Ophelia in Hamlet) in lines 43-51.
  • Desdemona questions Emilia if women would abuse their husbands like Othello did to Desdemona (lines 68-69). Desdemona doesn't think there are any women who would abuse their husbands and/or cheat, though Emilia believes there are women who would. Though, she blames men for women's infidelities: "But I do think it is their husbands' faults if wives do fall" (97-98).

    2. Review Act V of Othello:
    Scene I:

  • The scene opens up with Iago orchestrating Roderigo's attack on Cassio. Roderigo reveals that he doesn't really want to commit the crime against Cassio: "I have no great devotion to the deed" (9).
  • Iago reveals, in a soliloquy, that he doesn't care if Rodrigo dies or not (when killing Cassio). Iago also reveals that Cassio's presence on earth makes Iago look bad, so Cassio must be annihilated: "If Cassio do remain, he hath a daily beauty in his life that make me look ugly" (19-21).
  • Roderigo thrusts his knife at Cassio, Cassio stabs Roderigo, Roderigo falls, and Iago stabs Cassio in the leg.
  • Othello enters and thinks that Iago has killed Cassio. He then proceeds to kill Desdemona.
  • Iago enters the scene, playing dumb and ignorant, and asks who did this to Cassio. Cassio reveals it was a villain, pointing to Roderigo. Iago kills Roderigo, and Roderigo says before his death: "O damned Iago! O inhuman dog" (74). Iago then binds Cassio's leg.
  • Bianca enters the scene, and Iago blames her for Cassio's injury. He is clearly a misogynist when he says: "this is the fruits of whoring" (137).

    Scene II:

  • Othello enters, beginning with a soliloquy about Desdemona's alleged infidelity and his need to murder her. "Yet she must die, else she'll betray more men" (6). He repeats "put out thy light" three times (7, 10), which is regarding his need to murder her. He uses imagery, such as: "when I have plucked the rose" (13-14), to emphasize her beauty and his need to destroy her. Othello kisses her twice. Desdemona awakens, and Othello asks if she's prayed yet (28), likely because she should repent before death.
  • Othello tells Desdemona what's been torturing him: "That handkerchief which I so loved, and gave thee, thou gav'st to Cassio" (58-60). Desdemona denies it, and she said to send for Cassio and prove that it's not true. He doesn't believe her and tells her to repent and that she's going to die. They go back and forth, Othello saying she's being deceptive and Desdemona saying she's not.
  • Desdemona asks for sympathy: banishment instead of death (98).
  • Othello has no sympathy, and smothers her. Though, Desdemona still hangs on, dying slowly, as she informs Emilia that she's wrongly on her deathbed: "O falsely, falsely murdered" (144). Then she says "farewell" and dies.
  • Othello reveals to Emilia that he murdered Desdemona, and that it was her fault: "She's like a liar gone to burning hell! 'Twas I that killed her" (159-160). He continues on, calling her a "whore" (162) and "false" (164, 166).
  • Othello tells Emilia that her husband, Iago, knew it all (Desdemona's alleged deceptions). Othello calls Iago an honest husband. Emilia disputes this, and reveals that Iago is a liar. Emilia then cries out that "The Moor hath killed my mistress! Murder, murder!" (203).
  • Emilia confronts her husband, Iago, asking him if he said that Desdemona was having an affair with Cassio. Emilia tells Iago that his reports have instigated her murder. Emilia then realizes that her husband is a villain (227-230). Emilia reveals that she had taken the handkerchief, after the prompting of her husband, Iago. Iago then calls her a "villainous whore" (273). Othello tries to attack Iago, but he can't because he's disarmed. Iago kills his wife (though she sings the same song that Desdemona sang first).
  • Othello bemoans his fate and the death of his beloved Desdemona (316-332).
  • Othello stabs Iago.
  • Othello asks for pardon for accusing Cassio of having an affair with Desdemona (352-354).
  • Lodovico reveals that the slain Rodrigo's pockets contain a letter remarking the importance of killing Cassio.
  • Othello asks Cassio: "How came you, Cassio, by that handkerchief that was my wife's?" (376-377). Cassio explains that he found it in his chamber, and Iago confessed that he dropped it for "a special purpose" (380).
  • Othello tells Lodovico what to say at Othello's funeral (400-417), and then Othello kills himself, but first kisses Desdemona (420-421).
  • Lodovico puts Cassio in charge, and tells Cassio that he needs to punish Iago for his crimes.
  • How can we identify comparisons and contrasts between Act IV and Act V of Othello and the events in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 9th, 2014:
  • EXAM ON OTHELLO (25% of the 3rd marking period). First and foremost, READ THE PLAY! Next, study all notes taken in class for Acts I-V and the notes provided on this website, which can be found HERE. Review will be provided in class as well. The exam will be composed of multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil.
  • Monday, January 6th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your groups. On your individual goals sheet, answer the following:
    1.) Did you complete today's homework? If not, why not?
    2.) What is your goal grade for the 3rd marking period? Is it realistic? What steps are you taking to ensure that you earn your goal grade?

    Show HW: compare/contrast journals for Act IV and Act V (two HW assignments).

    2. Review Act IV notes for Othello:

    Scene I:

  • Iago conjures up images of Desdemona's fictional affair, which haunt Othello. "Naked in bed, Iago, and not mean harm? It is hypocrisy against the devil!" (7-8).
  • Iago brings up the significance of the missing "handkerchief" and Othello is tormented about its whereabouts. Othello falls in a trance (fainting) from this tormenting.
  • Iago tells Othello that he shouldn't assume that Desdemona is honest and chaste (pure, innocent).
  • Iago tells the audience (in a mini-soliloquy) that he will have Cassio talk to Bianca (a prostitute), and it will appear that Cassio is speaking about Desdemona in a sexual manner.
  • Othello watches them talking and sees Cassio take out Desdemona's handkerchief (though Cassio is talking to Bianca about copying the needlework). Othello says: "my heart is turned to stone" (201-202). Othello wants to murder Cassio for his supposed cheating with Desdemona.
  • Othello tells Iago that he wants to kill Desdemona: "hang her" (206), "I will chop her into messes" (219) and "get me some poison, Iago" (223). Iago tells Othello to kill her in different way: "strangle her in her bed, even the bed she hath contaminated" (226-227).
  • Othello sees Desdemona and strikes her. She replies, "I have not deserved this" (269).
  • Othello is not regretful for striking Desdemona, as he believes that she's a deceiver.
  • Lodovico is stunned by Othello's action and cannot believe that he is the virtuous man that was once extolled by the entire senate. Lodovico believes that over-working might be the root of his cruel action.

    Scene II:

  • Othello interrogates Emilia about Cassio and Desdemona, asking what they said and how they acted. Emilia says that Desdemona is honest.
  • Othello gives a soliloquy (lines 22-25) about Emilia being a whore who keeps secrets.
  • Othello confronts Desdemona and claims she's being deceptive to him: "Heaven truly knows that thou art false as hell" (48). Othello calls her a "strumpet" (94), and she replies that she is a "Christian" (95).
  • In a soliloquy, Desdemona asks, "How have I been behaved that he might stick the small'st opinion on my least misuse?" (126-127). She questions how she's behaved, because she believes she's behaved beautifully with Othello.
  • Emilia claims that an "eternal villain" (153) and a "villainous knave" (164) has instigated trouble with the Moor. This suggests Iago as the villain (and the audience knows the truth).
  • Desdemona confides in Iago, asking him how she can win Othello's love back (175-176). Then, she's prophetic, saying "his unkindnesss may defeat my life, but never taint my love" (189-190).
  • Iago replies that Othello is busy with work, and that's why he's being nasty (195-196). Iago, ironically, comforts Desdemona.
  • Iago is having Roderigo engaged in trivial errands; in particular, Roderigo has delivered jewelry to Desdemona but has received no reply (217-222).
  • Iago says that they need to kill Cassio (262-263), as that will help prevent Desdemona and Othello's relationship from blossoming further if they are delayed from going to Mauritania.
  • Iago tells Roderigo that killing Cassio is the right decision and Iago will relay the reasons soon.

    Scene III:

  • The scene opens up with Othello commanding Desdemona to go to bed, and for Emilia to be dismissed.
  • Prior to dismissing Emilia, Desdemona tells her a prophetic command: "If I do die before thee, prithee shroud me in one of those same sheets" (25-26).
  • Desdemona is singing (she recalls that her mother's maid was singing before her death; Shakespeare's other characters sing before their deaths, like Ophelia in Hamlet) in lines 43-51.
  • Desdemona questions Emilia if women would abuse their husbands like Othello did to Desdemona (lines 68-69). Desdemona doesn't think there are any women who would abuse their husbands and/or cheat, though Emilia believes there are women who would. Though, she blames men for women's infidelities: "But I do think it is their husbands' faults if wives do fall" (97-98).
  • How can we identify comparisons and contrasts between Act IV of Othello and the events in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 9th, 2014:
  • EXAM ON OTHELLO (25% of the 3rd marking period). Study all notes taken in class for Acts I-V and the notes provided on this website. More details coming! The exam will be composed of multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil.
  • Friday, January 3rd, 2014: SNOW DAY DATE CHANGE: DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 6th, 2014:
  • Read Acts IV and V of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write TWO compare/contrast journals (one for each act)--two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Thursday, January 2nd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Synopsis Review of Acts I, II and III of Othello, taken from A Teacher’s Guide to the Signet Classic Edition of William Shakespeare’s Othello (each student will write a brief commentary, 1-2 sentences, with evidence from the play to support their given sentence):

    The play is set primarily in Cyprus. However, the opening act takes place in Venice, providing us with an understanding of the authoritarian government controlled by the Venetian senators. Also, we begin to understand Othello’s tenuous standing in Venice, as well as Desdemona’s privileged background.

    The first scenes introduce the primary plot, beginning outside Brabantio’s house with Iago already intent upon manipulation and trouble-making. He encourages Roderigo to rouse Brabantio, Desdamona’s father, and tell him of her elopement with Othello. Iago makes the announcement as alarming and disruptive as possible. Both Iago and Roderigo reveal their motivation: Roderigo’s passion for Desdemona and Iago’s appetite for revenge on Othello for choosing Michael Cassio over him as his second in command. Although Brabantio and Othello had been friends, or at least amiable acquaintances, Brabantio’s first thought is that his daughter would never have done this of her own free will—Othello must have used witchcraft and potions.

    The secondary plot, introduced in the following scene, is that the Turks have taken a fleet to Cyprus, and the senators want to send Othello as the best and most experienced general to defend it. The Turks’ threat to Venetian civilization echoes Brabantio’s concerns about what he interprets as Othello’s barbarian threat to his civilized daughter; he wants the powerful senators to condemn Othello for wooing her. However, Desdemona declares that her love for the Moor is free of any external influence.

    After Desdemona’s declaration all attention is returned to the attack on Cyprus. Othello is ordered to leave Venice immediately. Ironically, he commends Desdemona into Iago’s keeping and requests that she be allowed to come to him in Cyprus. Brabantio warns Othello that if Desdemona deceived her father she could also be false to her husband. At the end of the act, Iago persuades Roderigo to abandon his plans to kill himself over Desdemona and come to Cypress disguised and ready seek revenge on Cassio and Othello.

    The next act opens with a conversation that tells of the Turks’ drowning in a storm, thus ending their threat to Cyprus. Cassio arrives, and we learn that Othello’s ship is still at sea. Desdemona and her entourage, including Iago, appear shortly thereafter; all await news of Othello. Othello appears and a tender moment of reunion with Desdemona ensues. Iago is ordered to take over the watch of the city. He seeks Roderigo’s help in his plot to undo Cassio. The plan works smoothly— Cassio gets drunk and fights with Roderigo and one of the Cypriot leaders. The fight arouses Othello. Based on Iago’s explanation, Othello dismisses Cassio and names Iago his replacement. Iago, encouraging Cassio to seek Desdemona’s assistance in returning to Othello’s favor, begins slowly poisoning Othello’s mind by making him think that Desdemona is illicitly involved with Cassio.

    In Act III Iago’s plot progresses. Cassio asks Desdemona to plead his case to Othello. She freely and happily accepts his suit and pledges herself to urge his case relentlessly. In the meantime Iago continues to poison Othello’s mind. Othello demands visual proof:
    Villain, be sure thou prove my love a whore
    Be sure of it; give me ocular proof;
    Or, by the worth of mine eternal soul,
    Thou hadst been better have been born a dog
    Than answer my naked wrath. (III, iii, 356-360)

    Iago quickly seizes the opportunity. Othello has given Desdemona a special handkerchief, a family heirloom passed down from his mother to his bride. Iago gets the handkerchief from Emilia, his wife and Desdemona’s attendant. Emilia is unaware of her husband’s intent. Iago plants the handkerchief in Cassio’s rooms. At Iago’s urging Othello asks Desdemona for it. Worried because it seems to mean so much to her husband, Desdemona lies and says she doesn’t have it at the moment. This arouses Othello’s doubt and distrust.

    2. Do Now Sharing: Each student will share their assigned sentence and a brief commentary, 1-2 sentences, with evidence from the play to support their given sentence.

    3. HW Reminder

    How can we effectively review the synopsis of Acts I, II and III of Othello in order to prepare for Acts IV and V? DATE CHANGE: DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 6th, 2014:
  • Read Acts IV and V of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write TWO compare/contrast journals (one for each act)--two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Friday, December 20th, 2013: Work Period: Literary Baseball for Othello and The Scarlet Letter----divide into two teams. Divide students into two teams and draw a baseball diamond on the blackboard. Each team has three outs per inning (like regular baseball) and one player from each team goes at a time. Teacher asks a question about Othello or The Scarlet Letter, and the student has 30 seconds to answer. If he answers correctly in five seconds, the team gets a home run; within 10 seconds, it's a triple; within 15 seconds, it's a double; and just before the time limit, it's a single. If the student does not get the answer right, he's out. Draw an icon for a base runner when a student gets a hit. When a player gets to home plate the team scores a run. The team with the most runs at the end of nine innings (or whenever time runs out) wins the game. How can we prove our knowledge of Othello and The Scarlet Letter? HAPPY HOLIDAYS! ENJOY YOUR VACATION!

    DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2014 (after vacation):

  • Read Acts IV and V of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write TWO compare/contrast journals (one for each act)--two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Thursday, December 19th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read the following (and prepare to discuss): Act III of Othello--
    Scene I:
  • Cassio arrives with a musician and a clown (this is suspense-building) to honor Othello and Desdemona.
  • Cassio asks Iago to find Desdemona so he can get his lieutenant job back. Cassio says that Iago is "kind and honest" (45), though the audience knows the truth.
  • Cassio then speaks to Emilia (Desdemona's assistant and Iago's wife) to get Desdemona, and Emilia declares that Othello loves Cassio. Cassio asks for some alone time with Desdemona.

    Scene II:

  • Othello asks Iago to deliver letters to the pilot of the ship that bore Othello to Cyprus.

    Scene III:

  • Desdemona vows to Cassio that she will have him and Othello on good terms again.
  • Othello quickly leaves upon Othello's entrance. Then, Iago notes that Cassio looked guilty: "that he would steal away so guiltylike, seeing your coming" (42-43).
  • Desdemona stands up for Cassio, saying that he's regretful: "he's penitent" (71).
  • Othello says that he'll listen to what Cassio has to say because he will do anything for Desdemona: "I will deny thee nothing" (84).
  • Iago reveals his true nature lies in his ability to spy on others, be jealous, be honest and be wise. "It is my nature's plague to spy into abuses, and my jealousy shapes faults that are not...my manhood, honesty and wisdom to let you know my thoughts" (172-180).
  • Iago then warns Othello to "beware, my lord, of jealousy! It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock the meat it feeds on" (195-197).
  • Othello says that he needs proof before he would ever be jealous or suspicious of his wife, Desdemona.
  • Iago then says, "Look to your wife; observe her well with Cassio; weare your eyes thus, not jealous nor secure" (228-229).
  • Iago warns Othello that Desdemona has lied before, and she could do it again. "She did deceive her father, marrying you..." (238). Iago continues to say that Desdemona has poor judgment. "I may fear her will, recoiling to her better judgment, may fall to match you with her country forms..." (275-277).
  • Othello begins to doubt Desdemona. "Why did I marry? This honest creature (Iago) doubtless sees and knows more, much more, than he unfolds" (283-284).
  • Othello, in a soliloquy, declares that Iago is honest and understands human behavior. Othello talks about people's appetites outside of marriage: "O curse of marriage, that we can call these delicate creatures ours and not their appetites" (309-311).
  • Then, Desdemona arrives, and Othello complains of a headache. Desdemona gets a handkerchief and binds Othello's head with it. Then, the handkerchief falls, unnoticed.
  • In a soliloquy, Emilia picks up the handkerchief and comments about how her husband, Iago, had asked for it numerous times. Now, she can bring it to him.
  • In a soliloquy, Iago reveals that he will use the handkerchief as evidence of an affair between Cassio and Desdemona. Iago will put the handkerchief in Cassio's home, and it will be the proof that Othello needs to support an affair between Desdemona and Cassio.
  • Othello demands proof of Desdemona's infidelity from Iago. "Give me a living reason she's disloyal" (466).
  • Iago tells Othello that Cassio was calling out Desdemona's name in his sleep. Then, Cassio would kiss Iago as if he was Desdemona.
  • Othello is disgusted and replies with "O monstrous! Monstrous" (483)! Though, Othello says it could just be a dream.
  • Iago claims that he has seen Desdemona's handkerchief (spotted with strawberries) and Cassio was wiping his beard with it. Othello is disgusted: Arise, black vengeance, from the hollow hell" (507).
  • Othello is convinced by the proof and vows to kill Desdemona, and Iago will kill Cassio. Othello makes Iago lieutenant.

    Scene IV:

  • Desdemona realizes that her handkerchief is missing, and she tells Emilia (who claims that she doesn't know where it is). Desdemona says that Othello will be jealous.
  • Othello enters, and asks Desdemona for the handkerchief. Desdemona says that she doesn't have it. Othello says that there's magic in the stitching.
  • Cassio enters and asks Desdemona to help him get his position back. "I do beseech you that by your virtuous means I may again exist, and be a member of his love..." (128-130). Desdemona replies that Othello is not acting like himself. She tells Cassio to be patient.
  • Desdemona tells Emilia that Othello is acting strangely. She says "Heaven keep that monster from Othello's mind" (184)!
  • Cassio asks Bianca to copy the needlework in the handkerchief that he found in his home.

    Show HW: Act III compare/contrast journal.

    2. Review Do Now notes for Act III.

  • How can we identify comparisons and contrasts between Act III of Othello and the events in The Scarlet Letter? DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2014 (after vacation):
  • Read Acts IV and V of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write TWO compare/contrast journals (one for each act)--two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Wednesday, December 18th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read-aloud Act III, Scenes I, II and the beginning of III in Othello.

    2. Answer the Aim: How can we identify comparisons and contrasts between Act III of Othello and the events in The Scarlet Letter?

    3. HW Reminder

    How can we identify comparisons and contrasts between Act III of Othello and the events in The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19th:
  • Read Act III of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.

    DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2014 (after vacation):

  • Read Acts IV and V of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write TWO compare/contrast journals (one for each act)--two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Tuesday, December 17th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review Act II, Scene III of Othello--
  • Honor is bestowed on Iago with Cassio's reference to Othello: "Iago hath direction what to do" (4) and Othello's reference that "Iago is most honest" (7).
  • Cassio tells Iago that Desdemona is an "exquisite lady" (20). To contrast this, Iago is trying to show Cassio that Desdemona is a slut when he says, "I'll warrant her, full of game" (21). Cassio goes on to say that Desdemona is "indeed perfection" (29).
  • Iago proceeds to follow through with his plan: get Cassio drunk. "Come, lieutenant, I have a stoup of wine" (30-31). Cassio refuses a few times, yet Iago persists. Cassio gives in: "I'll do 't, but it dislikes me" (48).
  • Iago reveals, in a soliloquy, how he will get Cassio drunk. "If I can fasten but one cup upon him with that which he hath drunk tonight already, he'll be as full of quarrel and offense as my young mistress' dog" (49-52).
  • Iago leads drinking songs to encourage Cassio's drunkenness.
  • Iago tells Montano that Othello puts too much trust in Cassio and does not see his evils: "Perhaps he sees it not, or his good nature prizes the virtue that appears in Cassio and looks not on his evils" (139-141).
  • Cassio appears drunk and hits Roderigo, and then fights with Montano. Montano attacks Cassio. Othello observes this raucous behavior and is appalled. "For Christian shame, put by this barbarous brawl" (184).
  • Othello consults "Honest Iago" (189) and asks his opinion. Iago responds, playing dumb, by saying that he doesn't know what's going on: "I cannot speak any beginning to this peevish odds" (196-197).
  • Cassio cannot speak coherently: "I pray you pardon me; I cannot speak" (201).
  • Othello asks Iago who began this brawl. Iago claims that he doesn't want to offend Cassio: "I had rather have this tongue cut from my mouth than it should do offense to Michael Cassio" (236-237).
  • Iago goes on to reveal the so-called truth about the start of the brawl. First, he says that "men are men; the best sometimes forget. Though Cassio did some little wrong to him, as men in rage strike those that wish them best, yet surely Cassio, I believe, received from him that fled some strange indignity which patience could not pass" (256-261).
  • Othello takes away Cassio's lieutenancy as punishment: "Cassio, I love thee, but nevermore be officer of mine" (264-265).
  • Cassio is mortified by this punishment and damage to his reputation. "Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation!" (281-284).
  • Cassio looks to Iago for wisdom and comfort.
  • Cassio describes how men get drunk and abuse themselves: "O, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains! That we should with joy, pleasance, revel, and applause transfor ourselves into beasts!" (308-312).
  • Iago tells Cassio to confide in Desdemona (more of Iago's scheme to create an appearance of an affair between Desdemona and Cassio): "Confess freely to her. Importune her help to put you in your place again" (337-339). Cassio believes that Iago is a good adviser.
  • Iago, revealing in his soliloquy, that he will use Desdemona's good qualities to bring down Othello. "So will I turn her virtue into pitch, and out of her own goodness make the net that shall enmesh them all" (380-382).

    2. Begin Act III read-aloud/HW.

    3. Answer the Aim: How can we identify comparisons and contrasts between Act II, Scene III of Othello and the events in The Scarlet Letter?

  • How can we identify comparisons and contrasts between Act II, Scene III of Othello and the events in The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19th:
  • Read Act III of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.

    DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2014 (after vacation):

  • Read Acts IV and V of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write TWO compare/contrast journals (one for each act)--two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Monday, December 16th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your groups. On your individual goals sheet, answer the following:
    1.) Did you achieve your goal from last Monday?
    2.) Did you complete today's homework? If not, why not?
    3.) What is your goal grade for the 3rd marking period?

    2. Share your Do Now answers with your group mates.

    Show HW: compare/contrast journal for Act II of Othello.

    3. Find a quote in the classroom that supports Othello, and write it in your LA section. Interpret the quote in your own words. Agree with it and explain why. Then, explain (in 1-2 sentences) how the quote supports Othello.

    How can we effectively set academic goals in English and analyze Act II of Othello? DUE THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19th:
  • Read Act III of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.

    DUE FRIDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2014 (after vacation):

  • Read Acts IV and V of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write TWO compare/contrast journals (one for each act)--two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Friday, December 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Continue read-aloud of Act II, Scenes I and II.

    2. Begin HW.

    How can we effectively analyze Act II, Scenes I and II and compare/contrast Othello and The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 16th:
  • Read Act II of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19th:

  • Read Act III of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Thursday, December 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the notes (below) from Act I, Scene III, as well as the students' compare/contrast to The Scarlet Letter.

    Othello: Act I, Scene III
    1.) A Turkish fleet is targeting Cyprus
    2.) Brabantio confronts Othello for using spells and medicines to lure Desdemona, Brabantio's daughter, and make her Othello's wife.
    3.) Othello responds by saying that he has married Desdemona and "let her speak of me before her father" (136). Othello says that he'll prove how they've fallen in love: "So justly to your grave ears I'll present how I did thrive in this fair lady's love, and she in mine" (145-147).
    4.) Othello continues to explain that Desdemona was captivate by his stories of struggle in slavery and overcoming: "wherein I spoke of most disastrous chances: of moving accidents by flood and field, of hairbreadth 'scapes...of being taken by the insolent foe and sold to slavery...these things to hear would Desdemona seriously incline" (155-170). He continued: "she loved me for the dangers I had passed, and I loved her that she did pity them. This only is the witchcraft I have used" (193-195).
    5.) Desdemona reveals to her father that she loves Othello: "My noble father, I do perceive here a divided duty. To you I am bound for life and education. My life and education both do learn me how to respect you. You are the lord of duty. I am hitherto your daughter. But here's my husband" (208-214).
    6.) Brabantio tells Othello to focus on maintaining the Venetian military.. The Duke orders Othello to Cyprus because of his skill as a general.
    7.) Desdemona wishes to join Othello in Cyprus: "The rites for why I love him are bereft me and I a heavy interim shall support by his dear absence. Let me go with him" (292-294).
    8.) Brabantio reveals foreshadowing about his daughter, Desdemona, as he tells Othello not to trust her: "Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see. She has deceived her father, and may thee" (333-334).
    9.) Othello tells Iago to help bring Desdemona to Cyprus: "Honest Iago, My Desdemona must I leave to thee" (336-337). This sets up Iago, the antagonist, to weave his web of evil.
    10.) Roderigo threatens suicide (347) because he's not going to win over Desdemona since she is married to Othello. Iago convinces him to try and woo her.
    11.) Iago says that it's their fault that they're treated like slaves: "Tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners" (361-363). Iago tells Roderigo to be a man and "put money in thy purse" (382, 384, 386, 389 and 395), which means he should sell his lands for cash and follow Desdemona in Cyprus. Desdemona will change her mind about Othello because young people are fickle (they change their minds often!).
    12.) Iago convinces Roderigo to unite in their revenge against Othello: "Let us be conjunctive in our revenge against him" (410-411).
    13.) Iago ends the act with a soliloquy (speaking directly to the audience without anyone else around) in which he reveals that he will get Cassio to look comfortable with Desdemona and cause Othello's jealousy. "After some time, to abuse Othello's ear that he is too familiar with his wife" (438-439).

    2. Begin read-aloud of Act II.

    How can we effectively analyze Act I, Scene III and compare/contrast Othello and The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 16th:
  • Read Act II of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19th:

  • Read Act III of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Wednesday, December 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Students (in think/pair/share) will be assigned 2-3 of the following events from Act I, Scene III. They will explain how the events can compare and contrast to events in The Scarlet Letter.

    Othello: Act I, Scene III
    1.) A Turkish fleet is targeting Cyprus
    2.) Brabantio confronts Othello for using spells and medicines to lure Desdemona, Brabantio's daughter, and make her Othello's wife.
    3.) Othello responds by saying that he has married Desdemona and "let her speak of me before her father" (136). Othello says that he'll prove how they've fallen in love: "So justly to your grave ears I'll present how I did thrive in this fair lady's love, and she in mine" (145-147).
    4.) Othello continues to explain that Desdemona was captivate by his stories of struggle in slavery and overcoming: "wherein I spoke of most disastrous chances: of moving accidents by flood and field, of hairbreadth 'scapes...of being taken by the insolent foe and sold to slavery...these things to hear would Desdemona seriously incline" (155-170). He continued: "she loved me for the dangers I had passed, and I loved her that she did pity them. This only is the witchcraft I have used" (193-195).
    5.) Desdemona reveals to her father that she loves Othello: "My noble father, I do perceive here a divided duty. To you I am bound for life and education. My life and education both do learn me how to respect you. You are the lord of duty. I am hitherto your daughter. But here's my husband" (208-214).
    6.) Brabantio tells Othello to focus on maintaining the Venetian military.. The Duke orders Othello to Cyprus because of his skill as a general.
    7.) Desdemona wishes to join Othello in Cyprus: "The rites for why I love him are bereft me and I a heavy interim shall support by his dear absence. Let me go with him" (292-294).
    8.) Brabantio reveals foreshadowing about his daughter, Desdemona, as he tells Othello not to trust her: "Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see. She has deceived her father, and may thee" (333-334).
    9.) Othello tells Iago to help bring Desdemona to Cyprus: "Honest Iago, My Desdemona must I leave to thee" (336-337). This sets up Iago, the antagonist, to weave his web of evil.
    10.) Roderigo threatens suicide (347) because he's not going to win over Desdemona since she is married to Othello. Iago convinces him to try and woo her.
    11.) Iago says that it's their fault that they're treated like slaves: "Tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners" (361-363). Iago tells Roderigo to be a man and "put money in thy purse" (382, 384, 386, 389 and 395), which means he should sell his lands for cash and follow Desdemona in Cyprus. Desdemona will change her mind about Othello because young people are fickle (they change their minds often!).
    12.) Iago convinces Roderigo to unite in their revenge against Othello: "Let us be conjunctive in our revenge against him" (410-411).
    13.) Iago ends the act with a soliloquy (speaking directly to the audience without anyone else around) in which he reveals that he will get Cassio to look comfortable with Desdemona and cause Othello's jealousy. "After some time, to abuse Othello's ear that he is too familiar with his wife" (438-439).

    Show HW: Compare/Contrast journal of Act I of Othello with The Scarlet Letter.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now findings.

    3. Teacher Review of all events from Act I, Scene III of Othello.

    4. HW introduced

    How can we effectively analyze Act I, Scene III and compare/contrast Othello and The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 16th:
  • Read Act II of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19th:

  • Read Act III of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Tuesday, December 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish reading aloud Act I, Scenes I and II of Othello. Take notes on similarities and differences between Othello and The Scarlet Letter. Attend to characterization of main characters, plot events, themes of sin and propriety, setting and language.

    2. HW review/reminder

    How can we effectively prepare for our compare/contrast study of Othello and The Scarlet Letter? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
  • Read Act I of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Monday, December 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your groups and write your 2nd marking period grades on the index card provided. Calculate the average and write it on the card as well. On your individual goals sheet, answer the following:
  • What do you hope to achieve for improvement in English for the 3rd marking period?
  • How can you help each other?
  • For the students who are excelling (80+), share your method for excellence.
  • For the students who are struggling (70's and below), share your areas that you need to improve.
  • Make a new goal for next Monday, December 16th. Example: I will read 30 minutes per night.

    2. Begin reading aloud Act I, Scene I of Othello. Take notes on similarities and differences between Othello and The Scarlet Letter. Attend to characterization of main characters, plot events, themes of sin and propriety, setting and language.

    3. HW review/reminder

  • How can we effectively prepare for our compare/contrast study of Othello and The Scarlet Letter? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
  • Read Act I of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, setting, language and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you). You MUST write in paragraph form. Include a proper heading, which includes your name, your teacher's name, the date, and Junior English, Period______.
  • Friday, December 6th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish introducing iambic pentameter.

    2. Prove iambic pentameter with the following famous quotes. First, interpret the quotes. Then discuss their meanings and scan for iambic pentameter.

  • "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" (Sonnet 18).
  • ""This above all: to thine own self be true" (Hamlet, Act I, Scene III).
  • "I will speak daggers to her, but use none" (Hamlet, Act III, Scene II).
  • "The robbed that smiles steals something from the thief" (Othello, Act I, Scene III).
  • "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;/ I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him" (Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene II).

    3. Discuss/Take notes on the following: What are the rules for relationships in the Puritan community of The Scarlet Letter? How may those rules be similar to and different from people living during Shakespeare's time?

    4. Distribution of Othello by William Shakespeare.

    5. Introduce HW.

  • How can we effectively prepare for our Shakespearean unit? DUE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11th:
  • Read Act I of Othello by William Shakespeare (copies distributed in class or available online). If you read the online version, read the original text (on the left-hand side) and then ready the modern text to better understand the language.
  • Write a compare/contrast journal (two handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page) in which you find similarities and differences between the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in Othello and the characters, events, and themes (sin and propriety) in The Scarlet Letter (use your sin/propriety t-charts and synopses to guide you).
  • Thursday, December 5th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish answering the following questions.
    PRE-READING FOR OTHELLO:
    1.) What rules dictate the behavior of young men and women in relationships today?
    2.) Name a situation in which the rules have clearly been violated. That is, what are things “nice girls” just don’t do? What are things “nice boys” just don’t do?
    3.) Why do these rules exist? Do you think they just apply locally or even just in your school? What are the possible consequences of breaking these rules?

    2. Introduce iambic pentameter.

    3. Prove iambic pentameter with the following famous quotes. First, interpret the quotes. Then discuss their meanings and scan for iambic pentameter.

  • "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" (Sonnet 18).
  • ""This above all: to thine own self be true" (Hamlet, Act I, Scene III).
  • "I will speak daggers to her, but use none" (Hamlet, Act III, Scene II).
  • "The robbed that smiles steals something from the thief" (Othello, Act I, Scene III).
  • "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;/ I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him" (Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene II).
  • How can we effectively prepare for our Shakespearean unit? MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous days).
    Wednesday, December 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing Shakespeare's life, times and background. Take notes.

    2. Work Period:
    PRE-READING FOR OTHELLO:
    1.) What rules dictate the behavior of young men and women in relationships today?
    2.) Name a situation in which the rules have clearly been violated. That is, what are things “nice girls” just don’t do? What are things “nice boys” just don’t do?
    3.) Why do these rules exist? Do you think they just apply locally or even just in your school? What are the possible consequences of breaking these rules?

    SHOW HW: REWRITE OF VOCABULARY STORY (with the original attached).

    3. Review answers from the work period.

    4. If time allows, introduce iambic pentameter.

    How can we effectively prepare for our Shakespearean unit? MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous days).
    Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: K/W/L on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works. What do you know about William Shakespeare--his life, times, and works? What do you want to know? What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his play? Brainstorm. Be ready to share.

    Turn in FINAL PAPER ON PROPRIETY. Include the rough draft, peer review sheet and grading rubric.

    2. Introduce Shakespeare's life, times and background. Take notes.

    3. Introduce iambic pentameter.

    4. HW Reminder

    How can we effectively prepare for our Shakespearean unit? DUE TODAY, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3rd:
  • Compose the FINAL (Graded! It's 25% of the 3rd marking period!) argumentative essay on propriety in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs), following the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements and Argumentative Essay Rubric. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists): The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Minister's Black Veil Vocabulary. Use today's in-class peer review sheet to guide you! Your FINAL paper MUST be a well-written paper of 2-3 pages (5 paragraphs), which is typed and double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman font only). AVOID using any form of first person (I, me, my, mine, etc.) and second person (you, your our, we, us, etc.). You MUST include a proper heading, which includes your name, the date, your teacher's name, and the course's name (Junior English, Period _____). You must also include the following title: Argumentative Essay on Propriety in The Scarlet Letter
    Please attach your rough draft, peer review sheet and the grading rubric.
  • IF YOU DON'T TURN IN THE PAPER ON TIME, THEN IT'S -10 POINTS EACH DAY IT'S LATE.
  • PLEASE RETURN THE SCARLET LETTER TOMORROW!

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4th:

  • Rewrite Vocabulary Story (attach the original vocabulary story with Ms. Conn's edits). Here are the details of the original vocabulary story:
    Creative Vocabulary Story. You must use ALL of the words (underline them) in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write a creative vocabulary story (your OWN story) using all of the words above. Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. Include the following four proper elements of a heading: your name (at the top!), the date, Ms. Conn, Creative Writing, and the Period #. Don't forget to include the title, which should be one of the chapter titles (choose from chapters 10-24) in The Scarlet Letter. THIS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT WILL BE TURNED IN AND GRADED. This is the Vocabulary Story Grading Rubric.
  • Monday, December 2nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Story returns and review

    2. HW Reminders: Follow the Argumentative Essay Rubric, review the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements, and re-read the Peer Edit of Rough Draft:
    1.) Did your peer include an attention grabber in the intro. paragraph?
    2.) Did your peer include a clear thesis statement that supports or opposes propriety?
    3.) Did your peer write 4-6 sentences in the intro. paragraph?
    4.) Did your peer begin each body paragraph with a topic sentence that supports his/her thesis statement?
    5.) Did your peer include two citations (direct quotes) in body paragraph #1 and two citations in body paragraph #2 that support his/her thesis statement?
    6.) Did your peer follow Ms. Conn's sample citation format (see the outline)?
    7.) Did your peer introduce each citation and and explain why each citation supports the thesis statement?
    8.) Did your peer include a clear counterclaim, with a one citation (which follows Ms. Conn's format), and an attack on the counterclaim?
    9.) Did your peer write 8-10 sentences for each body paragraph?
    10.) Did your peer write a conclusion that was 4-6 sentences, summarized and supported his/her thesis statement?
    11.) Did your peer write an organized paper with transitions and flow?
    12.) Did your peer use sophisticated vocabulary?
    13.) Did your peer avoid grammatical errors, such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation errors?

    3. Work Period: Work on Homework due tomorrow and Wednesday.

    How can we effectively prepare for the final drafts of our argumentative essays? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3rd:
  • Compose the FINAL (Graded! It's 25% of the 3rd marking period!) argumentative essay on propriety in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs), following the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements and Argumentative Essay Rubric. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists): The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Minister's Black Veil Vocabulary. Use today's in-class peer review sheet to guide you! Your FINAL paper MUST be a well-written paper of 2-3 pages (5 paragraphs), which is typed and double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman font only). AVOID using any form of first person (I, me, my, mine, etc.) and second person (you, your our, we, us, etc.). You MUST include a proper heading, which includes your name, the date, your teacher's name, and the course's name (Junior English, Period _____). You must also include the following title: Argumentative Essay on Propriety in The Scarlet Letter
    Please attach your rough draft, peer review sheet and the grading rubric.
  • IF YOU DON'T TURN IN THE PAPER ON TIME, THEN IT'S -10 POINTS EACH DAY IT'S LATE.
  • PLEASE RETURN THE SCARLET LETTER TOMORROW!

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4th:

  • Rewrite Vocabulary Story (attach the original vocabulary story with Ms. Conn's edits). Here are the details of the original vocabulary story:
    Creative Vocabulary Story. You must use ALL of the words (underline them) in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write a creative vocabulary story (your OWN story) using all of the words above. Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. Include the following four proper elements of a heading: your name (at the top!), the date, Ms. Conn, Creative Writing, and the Period #. Don't forget to include the title, which should be one of the chapter titles (choose from chapters 10-24) in The Scarlet Letter. THIS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT WILL BE TURNED IN AND GRADED. This is the Vocabulary Story Grading Rubric.
  • Wednesday, November 27th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Film viewing of The Scarlet Letter

    2. Introduce the Argumentative Essay Rubric and review the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements.

    3. Review answers to the Peer Edit of Rough Draft:
    1.) Did your peer include an attention grabber in the intro. paragraph?
    2.) Did your peer include a clear thesis statement that supports or opposes propriety?
    3.) Did your peer write 4-6 sentences in the intro. paragraph?
    4.) Did your peer begin each body paragraph with a topic sentence that supports his/her thesis statement?
    5.) Did your peer include two citations (direct quotes) in body paragraph #1 and two citations in body paragraph #2 that support his/her thesis statement?
    6.) Did your peer follow Ms. Conn's sample citation format (see the outline)?
    7.) Did your peer introduce each citation and and explain why each citation supports the thesis statement?
    8.) Did your peer include a clear counterclaim, with a one citation (which follows Ms. Conn's format), and an attack on the counterclaim?
    9.) Did your peer write 8-10 sentences for each body paragraph?
    10.) Did your peer write a conclusion that was 4-6 sentences, summarized and supported his/her thesis statement?
    11.) Did your peer write an organized paper with transitions and flow?
    12.) Did your peer use sophisticated vocabulary?
    13.) Did your peer avoid grammatical errors, such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation errors?

    How can we effectively prepare for the final drafts of our argumentative essays? HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3rd:

  • Compose the FINAL (Graded! It's 25% of the 3rd marking period!) argumentative essay on propriety in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs), following the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements and Argumentative Essay Rubric. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists): The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Minister's Black Veil Vocabulary. Use today's in-class peer review sheet to guide you! Your FINAL paper MUST be a well-written paper of 2-3 pages (5 paragraphs), which is typed and double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman font only). AVOID using any form of first person (I, me, my, mine, etc.) and second person (you, your our, we, us, etc.). You MUST include a proper heading, which includes your name, the date, your teacher's name, and the course's name (Junior English, Period _____). You must also include the following title: Argumentative Essay on Propriety in The Scarlet Letter
    Please attach your rough draft, peer review sheet and the grading rubric.
  • Tuesday, November 26th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Film viewing of The Scarlet Letter

    2. Peer Edit of Rough Draft:
    1.) Did your peer include an attention grabber in the intro. paragraph?
    2.) Did your peer include a clear thesis statement that supports or opposes propriety?
    3.) Did your peer write 4-6 sentences in the intro. paragraph?
    4.) Did your peer begin each body paragraph with a topic sentence that supports his/her thesis statement?
    5.) Did your peer include two citations (direct quotes) in body paragraph #1 and two citations in body paragraph #2 that support his/her thesis statement?
    6.) Did your peer follow Ms. Conn's sample citation format (see the outline)?
    7.) Did your peer introduce each citation and and explain why each citation supports the thesis statement?
    8.) Did your peer include a clear counterclaim, with a one citation (which follows Ms. Conn's format), and an attack on the counterclaim?
    9.) Did your peer write 8-10 sentences for each body paragraph?
    10.) Did your peer write a conclusion that was 4-6 sentences, summarized and supported his/her thesis statement?
    11.) Did your peer write an organized paper with transitions and flow?
    12.) Did your peer use sophisticated vocabulary?
    13.) Did your peer avoid grammatical errors, such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation errors?

    3. Introduce grading rubric and go over final draft requirements.

    How can we effectively view the film version of The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne and peer edit our argumentative essays? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (all homework due by TOMORROW, Wednesday, November 27th--the last day of the 2nd marking period!):
  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis) and ALL OTHER WORK!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3rd:

  • Compose the FINAL (Graded! It's 25% of the 3rd marking period!) argumentative essay on propriety in The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs), following the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements and Argumentative Essay Rubric. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists): The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Minister's Black Veil Vocabulary. Use today's in-class peer review sheet to guide you! Your FINAL paper MUST be a well-written paper of 2-3 pages (5 paragraphs), which is typed and double-spaced with 12 point font (Times New Roman font only). AVOID using any form of first person (I, me, my, mine, etc.) and second person (you, your our, we, us, etc.). You MUST include a proper heading, which includes your name, the date, your teacher's name, and the course's name (Junior English, Period _____). You must also include the following title: Argumentative Essay on Propriety in The Scarlet Letter
    Please attach your rough draft, peer review sheet and the grading rubric.
  • Monday, November 25th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review The Scarlet Letter movie discussion questions:
  • Who is assumed to be the narrator (who's point of view)? Does this remain constant throughout the movie?
    1.) Who is the audience?
    2.) How does time flow?
    3.) Does the director make it clear that Hester is the hero and Chillingworth is the villain? What are the cues (both visual and dialogue) that support Hester as the hero and Chillingworth as the villain?
    4.) What is the set like?
    5.) Are the costumes accurate? Explain.
    6.) How would you describe the music and sound? Why are these choices made?
    7.) Are there any literary inaccuracies? If yes, explain. If not, explain.
    8.) What are your impressions of the primary characters: Hester, Chillingworth, Dimmesdale and Pearl? Do they match your impressions of them as you were reading the novel? Explain.
    9.) Compare/Contrast any other qualities of the novel with the film.
    10.) What are your overall impressions/reviews of the film?

    2. Film viewing of The Scarlet Letter

    3. Reflections: Discuss the Do Now questions and how they relate to the film.

  • How can we effectively view the film version of The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26th:
  • HOMEWORK VALUE=20 POINTS. Compose a rough draft of an argumentative essay on The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs), following the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists): The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Minister's Black Veil Vocabulary.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (all homework due by THIS Wednesday, November 27th--the last day of the 2nd marking period!):

  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis) and ALL OTHER WORK!
  • Friday, November 22nd 2013: 1. Do Now: Introduce The Scarlet Letter movie discussion questions:
  • Who is assumed to be the narrator (who's point of view)? Does this remain constant throughout the movie?
    1.) Who is the audience?
    2.) How does time flow?
    3.) Does the director make it clear that Hester is the hero and Chillingworth is the villain? What are the cues (both visual and dialogue) that support Hester as the hero and Chillingworth as the villain?
    4.) What is the set like?
    5.) Are the costumes accurate? Explain.
    6.) How would you describe the music and sound? Why are these choices made?
    7.) Are there any literary inaccuracies? If yes, explain. If not, explain.
    8.) What are your impressions of the primary characters: Hester, Chillingworth, Dimmesdale and Pearl? Do they match your impressions of them as you were reading the novel? Explain.
    9.) Compare/Contrast any other qualities of the novel with the film.
    10.) What are your overall impressions/reviews of the film?

    2. Film viewing of The Scarlet Letter

    3. Reflections: Discuss the Do Now questions and how they relate to the film.

  • How can we effectively view the film version of The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26th:
  • HOMEWORK VALUE=20 POINTS. Compose a rough draft of an argumentative essay on The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs), following the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists): The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Minister's Black Veil Vocabulary.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (all homework due by next Wednesday, November 27th--the last day of the 2nd marking period!):

  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Thursday, November 21st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your groups and review your goals (write an answer for the following):
  • Did you achieve your one realistic goal for improvement in English over the past week? Explain your answer.
  • Did you achieve your goal in your other classes?
  • Did you achieve your one realistic goal for improvement in your personal life over the past week? Explain your answer.
  • Make new goals for the next two weeks (by the Thursday after Thanksgiving, December 5th). What do you hope to achieve for improvement in English? What do you hope to achieve in your other classes? What do you hope to achieve in your personal life?

    2. Sharing of achieving of goals (thumbs up for all goals achieved in English, thumbs sideways if some goals achieved in English, thumbs down if no goals achieved in English for the past week). Teacher tallies.

    3. Introduce Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements.

    4. Work Period: Begin writing your Argumentative Essay.

    5. Reflections:

  • What did you do today?
  • Why did you do it?
  • So What are you doing next?
  • How can we effectively understand how to compose an argumentative essay by compiling claims and counterclaims on the theme of propriety in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26th:
  • HOMEWORK VALUE=20 POINTS. Compose a rough draft of an argumentative essay on The Scarlet Letter (5 paragraphs), following the Argumentative Essay Outline and Requirements. Include sophisticated vocabulary (see our vocabulary lists): The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2, The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1, and The Minister's Black Veil Vocabulary.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (all homework due by next Wednesday, November 27th--the last day of the 2nd marking period!):

  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Wednesday, November 20th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Think/Pair/Share=Sit in your groups. Then, individually, write at least ONE counterclaim (con) to your argumentative thesis statement (write one sentence on the index card provided).
    Sentence Starter: A counterclaim to the thesis statement is...
    How would you attack the counterclaim (write one-two sentences on the index card provided)?
    Sentence Starter: The counterclaim can be attacked by...

    2. Mini-Lesson: Share your counterclaim and attack with a neighbor in your group.

    2. Share-Out: With the whole class, student volunteers will share the Do Now counterclaim and attack. How can students compare and contrast their counterclaims and attacks? DOK 3: How can students elaborate on their counterclaims and attacks?

    3. Extended Activity: Debate between the supporters of PROPRIETY and the opposers of PROPRIETY. Student representatives will voice their claims and counterclaims, while the rest of the class will choose at least TWO classmates that they will add or argue with (based on the Add and Argue sentence starters). All students will prepare to turn in their Add and Argue responses on the exit slip (index card). Incorporate our academic vocabulary in both writing and speaking.

    Students must use the following SENTENCE STARTERS (they will also be available at your table) during the debate:

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO PROVE A POINT:

  • To support my claim in favor/opposed to propriety, I found on page___________, where it said...
  • The author wrote...
  • I know my claim in favor/opposed to propriety is right because...
  • In the text, it said...
  • A textual example is...
    To paraphrase/summarize the author's ideas...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ADD TO A POINT:

  • I agree with _______________'s point because...
  • I think ________________'s opinion is valid because...
  • I'd like to add...
  • In addition to what ____________said,...
  • I appreciate ________________'s idea because...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ASK A QUESTION:

  • Can you please repeat your idea?
  • Why do you think that...?
  • How can you explain...?
  • What would you do if...?
  • Can you PROVE your claim?
  • Can you give more details about...?
  • How is ________different from______?
  • How could we test...?

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ARGUE A POINT:

  • I respect __________________'s opinion, but disagree because...
  • I'd like to argue that...
  • I partially disagree with________________because...
  • I understand _________________'s point, but on the other hand...
  • I'd also like to consider...

    4. EXIT SLIP:

  • Counterclaim and attack (from the Do Now)
  • Include TWO Add and Argue responses on the exit slip (index card).

    CCLS STANDARD ADDRESSED:

  • RL.11.1 (citing textual evidence)
  • W.11.1 (writing arguments to support claims)
  • SL.11.1 (initiating and participating in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners)
  • How can we effectively debate the author's claims and counterclaims on the theme of propriety in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, in order to prepare us for a writing opportunity when we effectively compose and elaborate on our claims and counterclaims? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Monday, November 18th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read Thesis Statement Tips for Argumentative Papers (taken from Tips for Writing a Thesis Statement from the Owl at Purdue University Writing Lab).

    2. Compose your argumentative thesis statement in which you choose a side--either in favor of propriety or against propriety. Make sure your thesis statement includes the key word "should."

    3. Based on students' understanding of our writing purpose, students will begin to engage in debate: the supporters of PROPRIETY vs. the opposers of PROPRIETY (based on our PRO/CON T-CHARTS). Student representatives will voice their claims and counterclaims.

    Students must use the following SENTENCE STARTERS (they will also be available at your table) during the debate:

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO PROVE A POINT:

  • To support my claim in favor/opposed to propriety, I found on page___________, where it said...
  • The author wrote...
  • I know my claim in favor/opposed to propriety is right because...
  • In the text, it said...
  • A textual example is...
    To paraphrase/summarize the author's ideas...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ADD TO A POINT:

  • I agree with _______________'s point because...
  • I think ________________'s opinion is valid because...
  • I'd like to add...
  • In addition to what ____________said,...
  • I appreciate ________________'s idea because...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ASK A QUESTION:

  • Can you please repeat your idea?
  • Why do you think that...?
  • How can you explain...?
  • What would you do if...?
  • Can you PROVE your claim?
  • Can you give more details about...?
  • How is ________different from______?
  • How could we test...?

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ARGUE A POINT:

  • I respect __________________'s opinion, but disagree because...
  • I'd like to argue that...
  • I partially disagree with________________because...
  • I understand _________________'s point, but on the other hand...
  • I'd also like to consider...

    CCLS STANDARD ADDRESSED: RL11.1 (citing textual evidence)

  • How can we effectively debate the author's claims and counterclaims on the theme of propriety in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, in order to prepare us for a writing opportunity when we present our claims and counterclaims? BRING IN THE SCARLET LETTER TOMORROW!

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:

  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Tuesday, November 19th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Think/Pair/Share=In your groups, finish your argumentative thesis statement in which you choose a side--either in favor of propriety or against propriety. Make sure your thesis statement includes the key word "should."

    2. Mini-Lesson: Share with a neighbor in your group. How would you compare and contrast your thesis statements (DOK 2)? Here are guides:

  • Thesis Statement Tips for Argumentative Papers
  • Tips for Writing a Thesis Statement from the Owl at Purdue University Writing Lab.

    2. Share-Out: With the whole class, student volunteers will share Do Now (Think/Pair/Share) question: How can students compare and contrast their thesis statements? DOK 3: How can students elaborate on their thesis statements?

    3. Extended Activity: Debate between the supporters of PROPRIETY and the opposers of PROPRIETY. Student representatives will voice their claims and counterclaims, while the rest of the class will choose at least TWO classmates that they will add or argue with (based on the Add and Argue sentence starters). All students will prepare to turn in their Add and Argue responses on the exit slip (index card). Incorporate our academic vocabulary in both writing and speaking.

    Students must use the following SENTENCE STARTERS (they will also be available at your table) during the debate:

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO PROVE A POINT:

  • To support my claim in favor/opposed to propriety, I found on page___________, where it said...
  • The author wrote...
  • I know my claim in favor/opposed to propriety is right because...
  • In the text, it said...
  • A textual example is...
    To paraphrase/summarize the author's ideas...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ADD TO A POINT:

  • I agree with _______________'s point because...
  • I think ________________'s opinion is valid because...
  • I'd like to add...
  • In addition to what ____________said,...
  • I appreciate ________________'s idea because...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ASK A QUESTION:

  • Can you please repeat your idea?
  • Why do you think that...?
  • How can you explain...?
  • What would you do if...?
  • Can you PROVE your claim?
  • Can you give more details about...?
  • How is ________different from______?
  • How could we test...?

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ARGUE A POINT:

  • I respect __________________'s opinion, but disagree because...
  • I'd like to argue that...
  • I partially disagree with________________because...
  • I understand _________________'s point, but on the other hand...
  • I'd also like to consider...

    4. EXIT SLIP: Reflections/Goals

  • WHAT did we do today?
  • WHY did we do it?
  • SO WHAT are we doing next?
  • Include TWO Add and Argue responses on the exit slip (index card).

    CCLS STANDARD ADDRESSED:

  • RL.11.1 (citing textual evidence)
  • W.11.1 (writing arguments to support claims)
  • SL.11.1 (initiating and participating in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners)
  • How can we effectively debate the author's claims and counterclaims on the theme of propriety in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, in order to prepare us for a writing opportunity when we effectively compose and elaborate on our claims and counterclaims? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Monday, November 18th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read Thesis Statement Tips for Argumentative Papers (taken from Tips for Writing a Thesis Statement from the Owl at Purdue University Writing Lab).

    2. Compose your argumentative thesis statement in which you choose a side--either in favor of propriety or against propriety. Make sure your thesis statement includes the key word "should."

    3. Based on students' understanding of our writing purpose, students will begin to engage in debate: the supporters of PROPRIETY vs. the opposers of PROPRIETY (based on our PRO/CON T-CHARTS). Student representatives will voice their claims and counterclaims.

    Students must use the following SENTENCE STARTERS (they will also be available at your table) during the debate:

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO PROVE A POINT:

  • To support my claim in favor/opposed to propriety, I found on page___________, where it said...
  • The author wrote...
  • I know my claim in favor/opposed to propriety is right because...
  • In the text, it said...
  • A textual example is...
    To paraphrase/summarize the author's ideas...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ADD TO A POINT:

  • I agree with _______________'s point because...
  • I think ________________'s opinion is valid because...
  • I'd like to add...
  • In addition to what ____________said,...
  • I appreciate ________________'s idea because...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ASK A QUESTION:

  • Can you please repeat your idea?
  • Why do you think that...?
  • How can you explain...?
  • What would you do if...?
  • Can you PROVE your claim?
  • Can you give more details about...?
  • How is ________different from______?
  • How could we test...?

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ARGUE A POINT:

  • I respect __________________'s opinion, but disagree because...
  • I'd like to argue that...
  • I partially disagree with________________because...
  • I understand _________________'s point, but on the other hand...
  • I'd also like to consider...

    CCLS STANDARD ADDRESSED: RL11.1 (citing textual evidence)

  • How can we effectively debate the author's claims and counterclaims on the theme of propriety in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, in order to prepare us for a writing opportunity when we present our claims and counterclaims? BRING IN THE SCARLET LETTER TOMORROW!

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:

  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Friday, November 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review The Scarlet Letter Exam. Add to your goals sheet in your group's folder by completing these sentence starters:
    1.) Based on The Scarlet Letter Exam, my weaknesses or areas that I would like to work on are...
    2.) My action plan for success in English is...

    2. Finish your PRO/CON T-Chart for PROPRIETY in your group. Identify at least two reasons that are in favor of propriety and at least two reasons that are opposed to propriety. Include at least one example of textual evidence (identify page #s and you may search anywhere in the book and in your notes) for the PRO and one example of textual evidence for the CON. Share with a neighbor.

    3. With your table mates, choose TWO examples of textual evidence from The Scarlet Letter that supports your claim (PRO or CON) on PROPRIETY. One claim is in favor of PROPRIETY and the counterclaim (opposing argument) is against PROPRIETY.

    4. Debate begins between the supporters of PROPRIETY and the opposers of PROPRIETY. Class will vote for the winners of the debate. Students must use the following SENTENCE STARTERS (they will also be available at your table) during the debate:

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO PROVE A POINT:

  • To support my claim in favor/opposed to propriety, I found on page___________, where it said...
  • The author wrote...
  • I know my claim in favor/opposed to propriety is right because...
  • In the text, it said...
  • A textual example is...
    To paraphrase/summarize the author's ideas...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ADD TO A POINT:

  • I agree with _______________'s point because...
  • I think ________________'s opinion is valid because...
  • I'd like to add...
  • In addition to what ____________said,...
  • I appreciate ________________'s idea because...


    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ASK A QUESTION:

  • Can you please repeat your idea?
  • Why do you think that...?
  • How can you explain...?
  • What would you do if...?
  • Can you PROVE your claim?
  • Can you give more details about...?
  • How is ________different from______?
  • How could we test...?

    SENTENCE STARTERS TO ARGUE A POINT:

  • I respect __________________'s opinion, but disagree because...
  • I'd like to argue that...
  • I partiall disagree with________________because...
  • I understand _________________'s point, but on the other hand...
  • I'd alos like to consider... CCLS STANDARD ADDRESSED: RL11.1 (citing textual evidence)
  • How can we effectively debate the author's claims and counterclaims on the theme of propriety in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18th:
  • Make sure you finished today's classwork. Finish your PRO/CON T-Chart for PROPRIETY in your group. Identify at least two reasons that are in favor (PRO) of propriety and at least two reasons that are opposed (CON) to propriety. Include at least one example of textual evidence (identify page #s/chapter #s and you may search anywhere in the book and in your notes) for the PRO and one example of textual evidence for the CON. Show on Monday.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:

  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Thursday, November 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your groups and review your goals (write an answer for the following):
  • Did you achieve your one realistic goal for improvement in English over the past week? Explain your answer.
  • Did you achieve your goal in your other classes?
  • Did you achieve your one realistic goal for improvement in your personal life over the past week? Explain your answer.
  • Make new goals for the next week (by next Thursday, November 21st). What do you hope to achieve for improvement in English? What do you hope to achieve in your other classes? What do you hope to achieve in your personal life?
    *Next Thursday (November 21st) we will see if those goals were achieved for members of the group. Each group will have a folder to keep in Room 232.

    2. Sharing of achieving of goals (thumbs up for all goals achieved in English, thumbs sideways if some goals achieved in English, thumbs down if no goals achieved in English for the past week). Teacher tallies.

    3. Create a PRO/CON T-Chart for PROPRIETY. Identify at least two reasons that are in favor of propriety and at least two reasons that are opposed to propriety. Include at least one example of textual evidence (identify page #s and you may search anywhere in the book and in your notes. Share with a neighbor.

    4. Move to different sides of the classroom that correspond with the PRO or CON for PROPRIETY. 5. With your table mates, find at least TWO examples of textual evidence from The Scarlet Letter that supports your claim (PRO or CON) on PROPRIETY. One claim is in favor of SIN and the counterclaim (opposing argument) is against PROPRIETY. 6. Debate ensues between the supporters of SIN and the opposers of PROPRIETY. Class will vote for the winners of the debate. Students must use the following SENTENCE STARTERS during the debate:

  • To support my claim in favor/opposed to propriety, I found on page___________, where it said...
  • The author wrote...
  • I know my claim in favor/opposed to propriety is right because...
  • In the text, it said...
  • A textual example is...

    CCLS STANDARD ADDRESSED: RL11.1 (citing textual evidence)

  • How can we effectively set and achieve our academic goals and debate the author's claims and counterclaims on the theme of propriety in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Wednesday, November 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Midterm Exam (15% of the 2nd marking period) on listening and reading comprehension skills.
  • Listen to the passage being read to you, and fill the given page with plentiful notes.
  • Answer the multiple-choice questions that follow.
  • Then, read the reading passages given and answer the corresponding multiple-choice questions.

    2. Make up any owed HW.

  • How can we effectively apply our listening and reading comprehension skills in the midterm assessment? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).
  • Tuesday, November 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now: EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter.

    2. Choose a quote in the classroom that supports The Scarlet Letter. Interpret the quote in your own words (1-2 sentences). Explain why the novel supports the quote (1-2 sentences). Be ready to share in class tomorrow.

    3. Make up any owed HW.

    How can we effectively prove our knowledge of the sins, propriety and synopses of chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
    SCHOOL-WIDE MIDTERM FOR JUNIORS=This exam will assess your reading level, vocabulary, listening and note-taking skills. You will show how you've grown in these areas since September. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL. This will be a classwork grade (15%). Please take it seriously.

  • Friday, November 8th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Quiz on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2.

    Show HW (Vocabulary flashcards) and turn in Vocabulary Story with the grading rubric.

    2. Introduce THE STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTERS 10-24 EXAM.

    3.
    Compose at least one PSAT/SAT-style multiple-choice question for The Scarlet Letter (chapters 10-24). You MUST include FIVE answer choices and circle the correct answer. Here is a sample PSAT/SAT-style question from The Scarlet Letter: SAMPLE QUESTION: On page 45, "a throng of bearded men, in sad-colored garments and gray, steeple-crowned hat" primarily serves to suggest that
    A) the men don't like their garments
    B) gray is the men's favorite color
    C) the mood of the novel is gloomy (The answer is C)
    D) the men are uncomfortable in the throng
    E) the men are kings

    4. Discuss and take notes on the sin, propriety and synopsis for chapters 23 and 24.

    5. Discuss HW and take notes on previous chapters (including chapters 21 and 22), chapter 23 (The Revelation of the Scarlet Letter; pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (Conclusion; pp. 223-228).

    6. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively identify textual evidence of sin and propriety in chapters 23-24 and clearly express the synopsis of each chapter in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • You may turn in the Vocabulary Story late, though you will have -10 points deducted.
  • Make up any owed chapter notes (sin, propriety and synopsis).

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
    EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You must study all class and homework notes on SIN and PROPRIETY and the synopsis (summary) for each chapter. HERE'S THE STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTERS 10-24 EXAM. The Exam will be multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
    SCHOOL-WIDE MIDTERM FOR JUNIORS=This exam will assess your reading level, vocabulary, listening and note-taking skills. You will show how you've grown in these areas since September. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL. This will be a classwork grade (15%). Please take it seriously.

  • Thursday, November 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your groups and review your goals (write an answer for the following):
  • Did you achieve your one realistic goal for improvement in English over the past week? Explain your answer.
  • Did you achieve your goal in your other classes?
  • Did you achieve your one realistic goal for improvement in your personal life over the past week? Explain your answer.
  • Make new goals for the next week (by next Thursday, November 14th). What do you hope to achieve for improvement in English? What do you hope to achieve in your other classes? What do you hope to achieve in your personal life?
    *Next Thursday (November 14) we will see if those goals were achieved for members of the group. Each group will have a folder to keep in Room 232.

    Show HW: sin, propriety and synopsis for chapters 23 and 24.

    2. Discuss HW and take notes on previous chapters (including chapters 21 and 22), chapter 23 (The Revelation of the Scarlet Letter; pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (Conclusion; pp. 223-228).

    3. If time allows, work on the following:
    Compose at least one PSAT/SAT-style multiple-choice question for The Scarlet Letter (chapters 10-24). You MUST include FIVE answer choices and circle the correct answer. Here is a sample PSAT/SAT-style question from The Scarlet Letter: SAMPLE QUESTION: On page 45, "a throng of bearded men, in sad-colored garments and gray, steeple-crowned hat" primarily serves to suggest that
    A) the men don't like their garments
    B) gray is the men's favorite color
    C) the mood of the novel is gloomy (The answer is C)
    D) the men are uncomfortable in the throng
    E) the men are kings

    4. HW Reminders

  • How can we effectively identify textual evidence of sin and propriety in chapters 21-24 and clearly express the synopsis of each chapter in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:
  • QUIZ (20% of your 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story (HOMEWORK VALUE=40 POINTS) using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write a creative vocabulary story (your OWN story) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. Include the following four proper elements of a heading: your name (at the top!), the date, Ms. Conn, Creative Writing, and the Period #. Don't forget to include the title, which should be one of the chapter titles (choose from chapters 10-24) in The Scarlet Letter. THIS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT WILL BE TURNED IN AND GRADED. This is the Vocabulary Story Grading Rubric.

    NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
    EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You must study all class and homework notes on SIN and PROPRIETY and the synopsis (summary) for each chapter. THE STUDY GUIDE WILL BE POSTED SOON. The Exam will be multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
    SCHOOL-WIDE MIDTERM FOR JUNIORS=This exam will assess your reading level, vocabulary, listening and note-taking skills. You will show how you've grown in these areas since September. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL. This will be a classwork grade (15%). Please take it seriously.

  • Wednesday, November 6th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • Describe what you believe is the celebration for Bill DeBlasio, who was just elected Mayor of New York City. Compare and contrast it to the Puritan era (1600's in Boston) from The Scarlet Letter.
  • Read the Vocabulary Story Grading Rubric.

    Show HW: SIN, PROPRIETY and the SYNOPSIS for chapter 21 (The New England Holiday; pp. 197-204) and chapter 22 (The Procession; pp. 205-214).

    2. Review Do Now (question and vocabulary story rubric), HW and take notes.

    3. HW Reminders

  • How can we effectively identify textual evidence of sin and propriety in chapter 20 and 22 and clearly express the synopsis of each chapter in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • Read chapter 23 (The Revelation of the Scarlet Letter; pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (Conclusion; pp. 223-228).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • FOR EACH CHAPTER, write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 23 and chapter 24.

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:

  • QUIZ (20% of your 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story (HOMEWORK VALUE=40 POINTS) using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write a creative vocabulary story (your OWN story) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. Include the following four proper elements of a heading: your name (at the top!), the date, Ms. Conn, Creative Writing, and the Period #. Don't forget to include the title, which should be one of the chapter titles (choose from chapters 10-24) in The Scarlet Letter. THIS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT WILL BE TURNED IN AND GRADED. This is the Vocabulary Story Grading Rubric.

    NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
    EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You must study all class and homework notes on SIN and PROPRIETY and the synopsis (summary) for each chapter. THE STUDY GUIDE WILL BE POSTED SOON. The Exam will be multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
    SCHOOL-WIDE MIDTERM FOR JUNIORS=This exam will assess your reading level, vocabulary, listening and note-taking skills. You will show how you've grown in these areas since September. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL. This will be a classwork grade (15%). Please take it seriously.

  • Monday, November 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • Describe a time, when you were a child, that made you uncomfortable because it was a sudden change (e.g. a move, a divorce, a change of schools, etc.).
  • Just like the forest and a room of books are comforting refuges for Minister Dimmesdale, what's a comforting refuge for you? Explain.

    Show HW: SIN, PROPRIETY and the SYNOPSIS for chapter 19 (The Child at the Brook-Side; pp. 180-186) and chapter 20 (The Minister in a Maze; pp. 187-196).

    2. Review HW and take notes.

    3. HW Reminders

  • How can we effectively identify textual evidence of sin and propriety in chapter 19 and chapter 20 and clearly express the synopsis of each chapter in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6th:
  • Read chapter 21 (The New England Holiday; pp. 197-204) and chapter 22 (The Procession; pp. 205-214).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • FOR EACH CHAPTER, write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 21 and chapter 22.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:

  • Read chapter 23 (The Revelation of the Scarlet Letter; pp. 215-222) and chapter 24 (Conclusion; pp. 223-228).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • FOR EACH CHAPTER, write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 23 and chapter 24.

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:

  • QUIZ (20% of your 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story (HOMEWORK VALUE=40 POINTS) using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write a creative vocabulary story (your OWN story) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. Include the following four proper elements of a heading: your name (at the top!), the date, Ms. Conn, Creative Writing, and the Period #. Don't forget to include the title, which should be one of the chapter titles (choose from chapters 10-24) in The Scarlet Letter. THIS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT WILL BE TURNED IN AND GRADED. This is the Vocabulary Story Grading Rubric.
  • Friday, November 1st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Introduce The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2.

    2. Review examples of SIN, PROPRIETY and the SYNOPSIS for chapter 18 (A Flood of Sunshine; pp. 174-179). Take notes.

    3. HW introduced.

    4. If time allows, begin HW.

    How can we effectively identify textual evidence of sin and propriety in chapter 18 and clearly express the synopsis of chapter 18, as well as study vocabulary from The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4th
  • Read chapter 19 (The Child at the Brook-Side; pp. 180-186) and chapter 20 (The Minister in a Maze; pp. 187-196).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • FOR EACH CHAPTER, write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 19 and chapter 20.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:

  • QUIZ (20% of your 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write a creative vocabulary story (your OWN story) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words.
  • Thursday, October 31st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your groups and review your goals (write an answer for the following):
  • Did you achieve your one realistic goal for improvement in English over the past week? Explain your answer.
  • Did you achieve your one realistic goal for improvement in your personal life over the past week? Explain your answer.
  • Make new goals for the next week (by next Thursday). What do you hope to achieve for improvement in English? What do you hope to achieve in your other classes? What do you hope to achieve in your personal life?
    *Next Thursday (November 7) we will see if those goals were achieved for members of the group. Each group will have a folder to keep in Room 232.

    Show HW: Chapters 17 and 18 sin, propriety and synopsis notes and any owed HW.

    2. Reflections on goals from Do Now.

    3. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY and the SYNOPSIS for chapter 16 (pp. 159-164), chapter 17 (The Pastor and His Parishioner; pp. 165-173) and chapter 18 (A Flood of Sunshine; pp. 174-179).

    4. HW Reminders

  • How can we effectively identify textual evidence of sin and propriety in chapters 16, 17 and 18 and the synopsis for each of the previously mentioned chapters in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4th
  • Read chapter 19 (The Child at the Brook-Side; pp. 180-186) and chapter 20 (The Minister in a Maze; pp. 187-196).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • FOR EACH CHAPTER, write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 19 and chapter 20.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th:

  • QUIZ (20% of your 2nd marking period) on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #2. Write a creative vocabulary story (your OWN story) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 10-24 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words.
  • Wednesday, October 30th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • Answer the following question (in your LA section): What kind of child were you (around age 7)? Include your personality type, the kinds of activities you enjoyed and the questions you liked to ask your parents/family members.
  • Find an unknown word between the pages of 122-228. Write it on the paper provided. Write down the word, page number, and chapter number. Then, look up the part of speech and definition (use a class dictionary or online dictionary). Finally, write an original sentence using the word correctly.

    Show HW: Chapter 16 sin, propriety and synopsis notes and any owed HW.

    2. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY and the SYNOPSIS for chapter 14 (pp. 147-152), chapter 15 (pp. 153-158), and chapter 16 (pp. 159-164).

    3. Get into your groups and read over your goals (goals to be achieved tomorrow!).

    4. HW introduced

  • How can we effectively identify textual evidence of sin and propriety in chapters 14, 15 and 16 and the synopsis for each of the previously mentioned chapters in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY OCTOBER 31st:
  • Read chapter 17 (The Pastor and His Parishioner; pp. 165-173) and chapter 18 (A Flood of Sunshine; pp. 174-179).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • FOR EACH CHAPTER, write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 17 and chapter 18.
  • Tuesday, October 29th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Create a PRO/CON T-Chart for SIN. Identify at least two reasons that are in favor of sin and at least two reasons that are opposed sin. Include at least one example of textual evidence (identify page #s and you may search anywhere in the book, though there's a preference for chapters 14 and 15) for each (pro and con). Share with a neighbor.

    Show HW: Chapters 14 and 15 sin, propriety and synopsis notes.

    2. Move to different sides of the classroom that correspond with the PRO or CON for SIN.

    3. With your table mates, find at least TWO examples of textual evidence from The Scarlet Letter that supports your claim (PRO or CON) on SIN. One claim is in favor of SIN and the counterclaim (opposing argument) is against SIN.

    4. Debate ensues between the supporters of SIN and the opposers of SIN. Class will vote for the winners of the debate.

    5. HW introduced and reflections.

    CCLS STANDARD ADDRESSED: RL11.1 (citing textual evidence)

    How can we effectively identify textual evidence and present the PRO'S (claims) and CON'S (counterclaims) of SIN in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 30th:
  • Read chapter 16 (A Forest Walk; pp. 159-164).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 16.

    DUE THURSDAY OCTOBER 31st:

  • Read chapter 17 (The Pastor and His Parishioner; pp. 165-173) and chapter 18 (A Flood of Sunshine; pp. 174-179).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • FOR EACH CHAPTER, write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 17 and chapter 18.
  • Monday, October 28th, 2013:
    1. Do Now:
  • Can everyone recover from sin? Explain.

    Show HW: Chapter 13 sin, propriety and synopsis notes.

    2. Review HW (chapter 13).

    3. HW Reminders and begin HW, if time allows.

  • How can we effectively debate the positives (claims) and negatives (counterclaims) of SIN in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY OCTOBER 29th:
  • Read chapter 14 (Hester and the Physician; pp. 147-152) and chapter 15 (Hester and Pearl; pp. 153-158)
  • For EACH CHAPTER, identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • For EACH CHAPTER, write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 14 and chapter 15.
  • Friday, October 25th, 2013: FOR PERIODS 2 AND 4 ONLY:
    1. Do Now: With your table-mates, find at least TWO examples of textual evidence from The Scarlet Letter that supports your claim on SIN. One claim is in favor of SIN and the counterclaim (opposing argument) is against SIN.

    2. Debate ensues between the supporters of SIN and the opposers of SIN. (The winners who are the most convincing, with real evidence from the novel, will get chocolate!)

    3. HW Reminders (including working on your group goals!)

    How can we effectively debate the positives (claims) and negatives (counterclaims) of SIN in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE THIS MONDAY OCTOBER 28th:
  • Read chapter 13 (Another View of Hester; pp. 139-146).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 13.
  • Thursday, October 24th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    Have you ever punished yourself? If yes, explain how and why.

    Show HW: Sin, Propriety and Synopsis for chapter 12 in The Scarlet Letter.

    2. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY and the synopsis from chapter 11 (pp. 122-128) and chapter 12 (pp. 129-138).

    3. Groups arranged (period 4: share contact info) and do the following:

  • Each member of the group: make one realistic goal for improvement in English by next Thursday (one week from today). For example: "I will turn in at least one HW assignment in on time."
  • Each member of the group: make one realistic goal for improvement in your personal life by next Thursday (one week from today). For example: "When I talk to my mom, I will be calm and respectful. I understand that she wants what's best for me."
    *Next week we will see if those goals were achieved for members of the group. Each group will have a folder to keep in Room 232.
  • How can we effectively prove our knowledge of chapters 11 and 12 The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and make personal connections to the themes of sin and propriety? DUE THIS MONDAY OCTOBER 28th:
  • Read chapter 13 (Another View of Hester; pp. 139-146).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 13.
  • Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • Identify a sentence with a simile or strong imagery in chapter 10 or 11. Write it on a notebook page in your VISUALS section.
  • Write SIMILE or IMAGERY FROM THE SCARLET LETTER at the top of the page.
  • Here's an example: "...the scarlet letter was represented in exaggerated and gigantic proportion, so as to be greatly the most prominent feature of her appearance" (Hawthorne, 94).
  • Write INTERPRETATION under the quote and then explain why the simile or imagery is important to the story. Sentence starter: This simile is important to the story because...
  • Finally, draw a large image to represent the simile or imagery.

    FOR PERIOD 4 ONLY: Show HW: Sin, Propriety and Synopsis for chapters 10 and 11 in The Scarlet Letter.

    2. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 10 (pp. 113-121) and the synopsis AND examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 11 (pp. 122-128) and the synopsis.

    3. FOR PERIOD 4 ONLY: Discuss/Answer the following questions--
    1.) Describe a time that you hid a personal mistake and then revealed it to others. How did it feel when you kept the mistake hidden? How did it feel when you revealed it to another person?
    2.) Describe a person you greatly respect. What are their qualities? Does he/she have any flaws? If so, explain.
    3.) Share a time when you were disappointed in yourself. How did you feel?

    4. FOR PERIOD 4 ONLY: Groups assigned and contact information shared.

  • How can we effectively prove our knowledge of chapters 10 and 11 The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and make personal connections to the themes? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY OCTOBER 24th:
  • Read chapter 12 (The Minister's Vigil; pp. 129-138).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 12.
  • Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) Describe a time that you hid a personal mistake and then revealed it to others. How did it feel when you kept the mistake hidden? How did it feel when you revealed it to another person?
    2.) Describe a person you greatly respect. What are their qualities? Does he/she have any flaws? If so, explain.
    3.) Share a time when you were disappointed in yourself. How did you feel?

    Show HW: Sin, Propriety and Synopsis for chapters 10 and 11 in The Scarlet Letter.

    2. Share Do Now answers with a neighbor. Share Do Now answers with the class.

    3. Groups assigned and contact information shared.

    How can we effectively prove our knowledge of chapters 10 and 11 The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and make personal connections to the themes? Make up any owed HW!
    Monday, October 21st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review exam on chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter.

    2. Presentations of predictions (1-2 sentences, using prior knowledge from previous chapters) for the chapter titles for chapters 10-24. Each person is presenting 4-5 chapter titles. Each person will present 1-2 sentences that predict what that chapter will focus on (use your prior knowledge: chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter).

    How can we effectively prove our knowledge of chapters 1-9 of The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and make effective predictions for chapters 10-24? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22nd (TWO HW ASSIGNMENTS):
  • Read chapter 10 (The Leech and His Patient; pp. 113-121) and chapter 11 (The Interior of a Heart; pp. 122-128).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY FOR EACH CHAPTER (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 10 and a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 11.
  • Friday, October 18th, 2013: 1. DO NOW:
    Now that you've read chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter, make a prediction about what's going to happen in the rest of the novel. Include predictions about the major characters: Hester, Pearl, Dimmesdale and Chillingworth. Include predictions that include major events to come, including the climax and resolution. Your prediction should be a minimum of one long paragraph (8-10 sentences).

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Share Do Now with a neighbor. Share Do Now with the class.

    3. Work Period: Now look at the chapter titles for chapters 10-24. With neighbors at your table, divide up the chapter titles so that each person is assigned 4-5 chapter titles. Each person will write 1-2 sentences that predict what that chapter will focus on (use your prior knowledge: chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter).

    4. Share chapter title predictions.

    How can we effectively prove our knowledge of chapters 1-9 of The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and make effective predictions for chapters 10-24? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 21st:
  • Finish today's classwork: Look at the chapter titles for chapters 10-24. With neighbors at your table, divide up the chapter titles so that each person is assigned 4-5 chapter titles. Each person will write 1-2 sentences that predict what that chapter will focus on (use your prior knowledge: chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter). Be ready to present your chapter predictions on Monday. If you were not in class, please choose 5 chapter titles and write 1-2 sentences that predict what that chapter will focus on.

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22nd (TWO HW ASSIGNMENTS):

  • Read chapter 10 (The Leech and His Patient; pp. 113-121) and chapter 11 (The Interior of a Heart; pp. 122-128).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY FOR EACH CHAPTER (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 10 and a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains the events in chapter 11.
  • Thursday, October 17th, 2013: 1. EXAM on chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Make up any owed HW. If every HW assignment has been completed, work on the following: find an inspirational quote from The Scarlet Letter and write it on the large index card provided. Here's an example: "It (the scarlet letter) gave her a sympathetic knowledge of the hidden sin in other hearts" (Hawthorne, chapter 5, p. 78).

    How can we effectively prove our knowledge of chapters 1-9 of The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th: THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD!! Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Tuesday, October 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Quiz on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1

    Show HW: vocabulary story (make sure that you focused on one of the chapter titles from The Scarlet Letter and included all 25 vocabulary words correctly in a story that makes sense), and flashcards. Turn in your visuals and extra credit HW.

    2. Review THE SCARLET LETTER STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTERS 1-9 EXAM.

    3. Discuss PSAT strategies for success (it's tomorrow!).

    How can we effectively prove our vocabulary knowledge, prepare for the PSAT and the exam on chapters 1-9 of The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? TOMORROW IS THE PSAT!! DON'T MISS IT!! BE THERE ON TIME!! THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO KNOW HOW MUCH PREPARATION YOU NEED FOR THE SAT (which you should take at the end of your junior year).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17th:

  • EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period) on Chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You must study all class and homework notes on SIN and PROPRIETY and the synopsis (summary) for each chapter. HERE'S THE SCARLET LETTER STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTERS 1-9 EXAM. The Exam will be multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th: THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD!! Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Friday, October 11th, 2013: Work Period:
    1.) Work on owed HW (chapter notes, including the T-chart for Sins and Propriety and the synopsis for each chapter).
    2.) Prepare for Tuesday's vocabulary quiz and the HW due Tuesday.
    3.) Work on extra credit opportunity (due Tuesday ONLY): Compose two PSAT-style multiple-choice questions for The Scarlet Letter (chapters 1-9) and you can earn ONE extra credit HW. You can compose four PSAT-style multiple-choice questions and earn TWO extra credits for HW. You MUST include FIVE answer choices and circle the correct answer. You should use the practice PSAT booklet to guide you and a sample question below as a guide to writing the questions correctly. Here is a sample PSAT-style question from The Scarlet Letter:
    SAMPLE QUESTION: On page 45, "a throng of bearded men, in sad-colored garments and gray, steeple-crowned hat" primarily serves to suggest that
    A) the men don't like their garments
    B) gray is the men's favorite color
    C) the mood of the novel is gloomy (The answer is C)
    D) the men are uncomfortable in the throng
    E) the men are kings
    How can we effectively prepare for work due next week in chapters 1-9 of The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15th:
  • Quiz on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write a creative vocabulary story (with a partner or on your own) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You may write your own story or you may work with a partner.
  • Turn in the visuals you drew for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1.
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: Here's an amazing extra credit opportunity (due Tuesday ONLY): Compose two PSAT-style multiple-choice questions for The Scarlet Letter (chapters 1-9) and you can earn ONE extra credit HW. You can compose four PSAT-style multiple-choice questions and earn TWO extra credits for HW. You MUST include FIVE answer choices and circle the correct answer. You should use the practice PSAT booklet to guide you and a sample question below as a guide to writing the questions and answers correctly. Here is a sample PSAT-style question (of course, you cannot use this question) from The Scarlet Letter:
    SAMPLE QUESTION: On page 45, "a throng of bearded men, in sad-colored garments and gray, steeple-crowned hat" primarily serves to suggest that
    A) the men don't like their garments
    B) gray is the men's favorite color
    C) the mood of the novel is gloomy (The answer is C)
    D) the men are uncomfortable in the throng
    E) the men are kings

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17th:

  • EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period) on Chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You must study all class and homework notes on SIN and PROPRIETY and the synopsis (summary) for each chapter. HERE'S THE SCARLET LETTER STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTERS 1-9 EXAM. The Exam will be multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th: THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD!! Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Thursday, October 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish drawing images for the words from the list; make sure that each of the images associate with each of the words (enter in the visual section of your notebook). Write the word by each image.

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 9 (pp. 104-112) with THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page numbers) and brief synopsis (2-4 sentences) of Chapter 9

    2. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 9 (pp. 104-112) and the synopsis.

    3. HW Reminders.

    How can we effectively review chapter 9 synopsis, analyze the themes of SIN and PROPRIETY and maintain new vocabulary knowledge from The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15th:
  • Quiz on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write a creative vocabulary story (with a partner or on your own) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You may write your own story or you may work with a partner.
  • Turn in the visuals you drew for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17th:

  • EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period) on Chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You must study all class and homework notes on SIN and PROPRIETY and the synopsis (summary) for each chapter. HERE'S THE SCARLET LETTER STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTERS 1-9 EXAM. The Exam will be multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th: THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD!! Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Wednesday, October 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) Read aloud the new vocabulary list: The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1
    2.) Choose at least three more words from the list, and draw an image that associates with each of the words (enter in the visual section of your notebook). Be ready to share.

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 8 (pp. 96-103) with THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page numbers) and brief synopsis (2-4 sentences) of Chapter 8

    2. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 8 (pp. 96-103) and the synopsis.

    3. HW Reminders.

    How can we effectively review chapter 8 synopsis, analyze the themes of SIN and PROPRIETY and acquire new vocabulary knowledge from The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY OCTOBER 10th:
  • Read chapter 9 (The Leech; pp. 104-112).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 9.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Quiz on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write a creative vocabulary story (with a partner or on your own) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You may write your own story or you may work with a partner.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17th:

  • EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period) on Chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You must study all class and homework notes on SIN and PROPRIETY and the synopsis (summary) for each chapter. A review sheet will be provided. The Exam will be multiple-choice questions. PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th: THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD!! Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Tuesday, October 8th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) Read the new vocabulary list: The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1
    2.) Choose at least three words from the list, and draw an image that associates with each of the words (enter in the visual section of your notebook). Be ready to share.

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 7 (pp. 89-95) with THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page numbers) and brief synopsis (2-4 sentences) of Chapter 7

    2. Review the new vocabulary list: The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1.

    3. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 6 (pp. 80-88) and the synopsis AND examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 7 (pp. 89-95) and the synopsis.

    4. Introduce HW.

    How can we review chapter 6 and 7 in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, through the lenses of SIN and PROPRIETY and determine a brief synopsis for chapter 6 and chapter 7? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 9th:
  • Read chapter 8 (The Elf-Child and the Minister; pp. 96-103).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 8.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Quiz on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write a creative vocabulary story (with a partner or on your own) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You may write your own story or you may work with a partner.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Monday, October 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) How would you describe an ideal parent?
    2.) Why has bullying been a problem for hundreds of years? What is a solution to the problem of bullying?
    3.) Why do you believe that some people choose not to believe in G-d?

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 6 (pp. 80-88) with THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page numbers) and brief synopsis (2-4 sentences) of Chapter 6

    2. Discuss the Do Now questions.

    3. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 6 (pp. 80-88) and the synopsis.

    4. Introduce HW.

    How can we review chapter 6 in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, through the lenses of SIN and PROPRIETY and determine a brief synopsis for chapter 6? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY OCTOBER 8th:
  • Read chapter 7 (The Governor's Hall; pp. 89-95).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and ideas in your own words; no direct quotes unless you explain the quotes in your own words, too).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 7.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15th:

  • Quiz on The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Creative Vocabulary Story using ALL of the words in The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Write a creative vocabulary story (with a partner or on your own) using all of the words above. You MUST use ALL of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) MUST be one of the chapter titles for chapters 1-9 in The Scarlet Letter. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You may write your own story or you may work with a partner.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Friday, October 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) Who is a role model (or poster child) of what NOT to do in today's modern era? Explain why.

    2.) Find an unknown word between the pages of 45-121. Write it on the paper provided. Write down the word, page number, and chapter number. Then, look up the part of speech and definition (use a class dictionary or online dictionary). Finally, write an original sentence using the word correctly.

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 5 (pp. 71-79) with THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page numbers) and brief synopsis (2-4 sentences) of Chapter 5

    2. Discuss the Do Now question and turn in the information on the unknown word.

    3. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 5 (pp. 71-79) and the synopsis.

    4. Introduce HW.

    How can we review chapter 5 in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, through the lenses of SIN and PROPRIETY and determine a brief synopsis for chapter 5? DUE THIS MONDAY OCTOBER 7th:
  • Read chapter 6 (Pearl; pp. 80-88).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 6.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Thursday, October 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) If you found out that your boyfriend/girlfriend cheated on you, how would you respond? Explain why you have this reaction.
    2.) Is revenge appropriate for a cheater? Explain your answer.
    3.) How would your family feel if you (or your girlfriend) became pregnant? Is it acceptable if you're not married?

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 4 (pp. 65-70) with THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page numbers) and brief synopsis (2-4 sentences) of Chapter 4

    2. Discuss the Do Now questions.

    3. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 4 (pp. 65-70) and the synopsis.

    4. Introduce HW.

    How can we review chapter 4 in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, through the lenses of SIN and PROPRIETY and determine a brief synopsis for chapter 4? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY OCTOBER 4th:
  • Read chapter 5 (Hester at Her Needle; pp. 71-79).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 5.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) For whom would you keep a secret, even if it means that you are punished? Why?
    2.) Is it ever acceptable to commit adultery? Explain.
    3.) In this modern era, what would be an appropriate punishment for an adulterer (a person who commits adultery)? Explain reasoning for this punishment.

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 3 (pp. 56-64) with THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page numbers) and brief synopsis (2-4 sentences) of Chapter 3

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 3 (pp. 56-64).

    4. Introduce HW.

    How can we review chapter 3 in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, through the lenses of SIN and PROPRIETY and determine a brief synopsis for chapter 3? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY OCTOBER 3rd:
  • Read chapter 4 (The Interview; pp. 65-70).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 4.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Tuesday, October 1st, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) What's a popular subject of gossip among your friends and why?
    2.) Why would teenagers ostracize (make someone an outcast; exclude) someone today?
    3.) If Miley Cyrus or Lindsey Lohan (choose one) was forced to wear a letter (from the alphabet) on her clothes, which would reveal that she was ostracized, what letter would it be and why?

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 2 (pp. 47-55) with THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page numbers) and brief synopsis (2-4 sentences) of Chapter 2

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Review examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 2 (pp. 47-55).

    4. Introduce HW.

    How can we review chapter 2 in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, through the lenses of SIN and PROPRIETY and determine a brief synopsis for chapter 2? DUE TOMORROW, OCTOBER 2nd:
  • Read chapter 3 (The Recognition; pp. 56-64).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 3.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Monday, September 30th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) Take a copy of The Scarlet Letter and sign it out (write the last four digits of the bar code # from the back, inside cover).
    2.) Read the back cover synopsis (summary) and identify one example of sin and one example of propriety that you will be reading in this novel (in your sin/propriety t-chart).

    Distribution of vocabulary quizzes.

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Determine examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from chapter 1 (The Prison-Door) and compose a class synopsis.

    4. Determine examples of SIN and PROPRIETY from p. 47 of chapter 2 (The Market-Place).

    5. Introduce HW.

    How can we read chapter 1 and the beginning of chapter 2 in The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, through the lenses of SIN and PROPRIETY and compose a brief synopsis for chapter 1? DUE TOMORROW, OCTOBER 1st:
  • Read the rest of chapter 2 (The Market-Place; pp. 47-55).
  • Identify at least THREE examples of SIN and PROPRIETY (with page #s and direct quotes, with quotation marks).
  • Write a brief synopsis (summary) of 2-4 sentences that explains what the events in chapter 2.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Friday, September 27th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    1.) What is the purpose of the first three pages of The Scarlet Letter?
    2.) What sort of story do you think it will be?
    3.) Based on the chapter titles for chapters 1 and 2, what can you predict about the story in the upcoming pages?

    Show HW: the 5 literary devices and examples from the first three pages of The Scarlet Letter. 2. Discuss the Do Now, the HW and your opinions from the Anticipation Guide. See details below:

    In the first three pages of The Scarlet Letter, there are many examples of literary devices. Choose FIVE literary devices from the list below, and identify at least ONE example (from the text) for each of the literary devices (identify the page # and use quotation marks):
    1.) Setting
    2.) Imagery
    3.) Mood
    4.) Characterization
    5.) Simile
    6.) Personification
    7.) Foreshadowing
    8.) Conflict
    9.) Alliteration
    10.) Hyperbole

    Anticipation Guide: Share your opinion for each of the statements below: AGREE or DISAGREE.

    _________ 1. Adultery is never acceptable.
    _________ 2. It is acceptable to let someone take the blame for something you are responsible for.
    _________ 3. Publicly shaming someone is an acceptable form of punishment.
    _________ 5. Guilt is the strongest emotion.
    _________ 6. There is good in everyone.
    _________ 7. Having a good reputation is important.
    _________ 8. It is acceptable to publically humiliate someone if they have done something wrong.
    _________ 9. You should keep a secret for someone you love if it means you will be punished.
    _________ 10. Certain people in society should uphold a higher code of morals.

    3. Make up any owed HW.

    How can we effectively prepare to read The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, by examining the literary devices, our predictions and personal connections, as we analyze the first three pages? Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Thursday, September 26th, 2013: 1. Do Now: In the first three pages of The Scarlet Letter, there are many examples of literary devices. Choose FIVE literary devices from the list below, and identify at least ONE example (from the text) for each of the literary devices (identify the page # and use quotation marks):
    1.) Setting
    2.) Imagery
    3.) Mood
    4.) Characterization
    5.) Simile
    6.) Personification
    7.) Foreshadowing
    8.) Conflict
    9.) Alliteration
    10.) Hyperbole

    2. Make up any owed HW.

    How can we effectively prepare to read The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, by examining the literary devices used in the first three pages? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:
  • Finish the classwork, which was to identify at least ONE example (from the text) for FIVE of the following literary devices (identify the page # and use quotation marks):
    1.) Setting
    2.) Imagery
    3.) Mood
    4.) Characterization
    5.) Simile
    6.) Personification
    7.) Foreshadowing
    8.) Conflict
    9.) Alliteration
    10.) Hyperbole

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Wednesday, September 25th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read the first three pages of The Scarlet Letter and find at least ONE example of SIN and ONE example of PROPRIETY. Insert the packet and make a new T-Chart in your LA section of your notebook.

    Show HW: yesterday's Anticipation Guide (include your 1-2 sentence opinions about five statements) and Do Now.

    2. Discuss the answers to following questions (from yesterday) in your Literary Analysis section:

  • Just like Mr. Hooper, there are people today who have been ostracized (treated as an outcast). Who are three people in the media today who have been ostracized and why?
  • Why are people ostracized today? Offer three reasons.
  • Why do you believe people were ostracized in the 18th century (the 1700's--the time period of "The Minister's Black Veil"--the puritans' time)? Offer three reasons.
  • Describe a time when you "sinned." Was this sin against the law, moral or ethical code, or your parent's code? What was the outcome/punishment of this "sin"?

    2. Anticipation Guide: Share your opinion for each of the statements below: AGREE or DISAGREE.

    _________ 1. Adultery is never acceptable.
    _________ 2. It is acceptable to let someone take the blame for something you are responsible for.
    _________ 3. Publicly shaming someone is an acceptable form of punishment.
    _________ 5. Guilt is the strongest emotion.
    _________ 6. There is good in everyone.
    _________ 7. Having a good reputation is important.
    _________ 8. It is acceptable to publically humiliate someone if they have done something wrong.
    _________ 9. You should keep a secret for someone you love if it means you will be punished.
    _________ 10. Certain people in society should uphold a higher code of morals.

    3. After you finish responding to the statements, Share your opinions on statements that you feel strongly about and explain about why you responded AGREE or DISAGREE (1-2 sentences are sufficient) in your Literary Analysis section.

  • How can we effectively prepare to read The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, by examining the themes of guilt, reputation, morality, and sin, as they relate personally to our lives? Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Tuesday, September 24th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish answering the following questions (from yesterday) in your Literary Analysis section:
  • Just like Mr. Hooper, there are people today who have been ostracized (treated as an outcast). Who are three people in the media today who have been ostracized and why?
  • Why are people ostracized today? Offer three reasons.
  • Why do you believe people were ostracized in the 18th century (the 1700's--the time period of "The Minister's Black Veil"--the puritans' time)? Offer three reasons.
  • Describe a time when you "sinned." Was this sin against the law, moral or ethical code, or your parent's code? What was the outcome/punishment of this "sin"?

    2. Anticipation Guide: Write your opinion for each of the statements below: AGREE or DISAGREE.

    _________ 1. Adultery is never acceptable.
    _________ 2. It is acceptable to let someone take the blame for something you are responsible for.
    _________ 3. Publicly shaming someone is an acceptable form of punishment.
    _________ 5. Guilt is the strongest emotion.
    _________ 6. There is good in everyone.
    _________ 7. Having a good reputation is important.
    _________ 8. It is acceptable to publically humiliate someone if they have done something wrong.
    _________ 9. You should keep a secret for someone you love if it means you will be punished.
    _________ 10. Certain people in society should uphold a higher code of morals.

    3. After you finish responding to the statements, choose five statements that you feel strongly about and write about why you responded AGREE or DISAGREE (1-2 sentences are sufficient) in your Literary Analysis section.

  • How can we effectively prepare to read The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, by examining the themes of guilt, reputation, morality, and sin, as they relate personally to our lives? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Finish today's classwork: Do Now and Anticipation Guide

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Monday, September 23rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil"). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Turn in HW: completed discipline code booklet worksheets.

    2. Work Period: Answer the following questions in your Literary Analysis section:

  • Just like Mr. Hooper, there are people today who have been ostracized (treated as an outcast). Who are three people in the media today who have been ostracized and why?
  • Why are people ostracized today? Offer three reasons.
  • Why do you believe people were ostracized in the 18th century (the 1700's--the time period of "The Minister's Black Veil"--the puritans' time)? Offer three reasons.
  • ? Describe a time when you "sinned." Was this sin against the law, moral or ethical code, or your parent's code? What was the outcome/punishment of this "sin"?
  • How can we effectively improve our vocabulary skills and prepare to read The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne? Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Friday, September 20th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Work on Discipline Code Booklet worksheets. (Show HW: answers to the questions on p. 471 for "The Minister's Black Veil." Make sure you answer in complete sentences.)

    2. Review the answers to the questions (p. 471) for "The Minister's Black Veil." Make sure you answer in complete sentences.

    3. If time allows, work on the HW: discipline code booklet worksheets and vocabulary quiz.

    How can we effectively study the themes of sin and propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil", by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:
  • QUIZ on vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil"). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Turn in completed discipline code booklet worksheets.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Thursday, September 19th, 2013: WORK PERIOD: Work on the questions (p. 471) for "The Minister's Black Veil." Make sure you answer in complete sentences. The answers are due tomorrow! When finished, study for Monday's vocabulary quiz. How can we effectively study the themes of sin and propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil", by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:
  • Answer the questions at the end of the reading of "The Minister's Black Veil."

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:

  • QUIZ on vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil"). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Wednesday, September 18th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Continue reading "The Minister's Black Veil", focusing on identifying evidence of sin and propriety.

    2. Begin questions at the end of the reading, if time allows.

    How can we effectively study the themes of sin and propriety in "The Minister's Black Veil", by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th:
  • Answer the questions at the end of the reading of "The Minister's Black Veil."

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:

  • QUIZ on vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil"). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Tuesday, September 17th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Choose from one of the following:
  • Create images for each of the vocabulary words in the list of vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil"
  • Create a crossword puzzle for each of the vocabulary words in the list of vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil"
  • Create a word search for each of the vocabulary words in the list of vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil"

    2. Show HW (flashcards and vocabulary story for vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil").

    3. Review the reasoning behind these vocabulary activities.

    4. If time allows, continue reading "The Minister's Black Veil", focusing on identifying evidence of sin and propriety.

  • How can we effectively study vocabulary presented in "The Minister's Black Veil", by Nathaniel Hawthorne? Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:

  • QUIZ on vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil"). Know the definitions and how to use each word in a sentence.
  • Monday, September 16th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Continue reading "The Minister's Black Veil", and take notes in a T-Chart of the themes: Sin and Propriety.

    2. HW Reminders.

    How can we effectively read "The Minister's Black Veil", by Nathaniel Hawthorne, through the lens: the themes of sin and propriety? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil". Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story using vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil". Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: Sin, Propriety, My Religion, or Making the World a Better Place. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Friday, September 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Review Nathaniel Hawthorne's bio in the textbook (see p. 456) and additional biographical information on Nathaniel Hawthorne. What can you predict that you will see in Hawthorne's short story, based on his personal characteristics, values and life history? Refer to specific details in his biography. Be ready to share. (Show HW: signed portion of the syllabus and the labeled sections of a 5-subject notebook/binder)

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers. How would we see examples of sin and propriety during the 1800's, when Nathaniel Hawthorne was living?

    3. Begin reading "The Minister's Black Veil", and take notes in a T-Chart of the themes: Sin and Propriety.

    How can we effectively prepare to read "The Minister's Black Veil" by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil". Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story using vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil". Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: Sin, Propriety, My Religion, or Making the World a Better Place. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Thursday, September 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's brainstorming of the following: SIN and PROPRIETY (PROPER BEHAVIOR). You may provide definitions, examples, and word associations.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your brainstorming. Discuss answers to the following: How would we see examples of both sin and propriety today? How would we see examples of sin and propriety during the 1800's, about 200 years ago?

    3. If time allows, introduce vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil".

    How can we effectively prepare to read "The Minister's Black Veil" by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13th:
  • Signed portion of the Junior English Syllabus.
  • Bring in a 5-subject/binder with labeled sections for this English class. See details in the Junior English Syllabus.

    OPTIONAL, BUT RECOMMENDED:

  • In honor of 9/11, pledge to volunteer. See Volunteering in the Community in Honor of 9/11.

    DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17th:

  • Vocabulary Flashcards for vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil". Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story using vocabulary for "The Minister's Black Veil". Write a vocabulary story (individually) using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: Sin, Propriety, My Religion, or Making the World a Better Place. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.
  • Wednesday, September 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Turn in the HW (one page Letter to Yourself). Brainstorm at least THREE volunteer opportunities that you would consider getting involved in this semester. In honor of 9/11, pledge to volunteer. See Volunteering in the Community in Honor of 9/11.

    2. Share your volunteering interests to honor the memory of the victims of 9/11 and the heroes who gave their lives as well as supported others who suffered and everyday people who united together.

    3. Read Junior English Syllabus.

    4. Review Do Now (syllabus).

    5. Recall a time when someone close to you changed in a way that made him or her seem like a different person (e.g. Your best friend suddenly doesn't like the things she's always liked. Your brother comes home from college with a new haircut and listening to strange music). Briefly share the change with a neighbor. Explain why it made you see the person so differently. Be ready to share with the class.

    6. If time allows, brainstorm the following: SIN and PROPRIETY (PROPER BEHAVIOR). How would we see examples of both sin and propriety today? How would we see examples of sin and propriety during the 1800's, about 200 years ago?

    How can we understand course expectations? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13th:
  • Signed portion of the Junior English Syllabus.
  • Bring in a 5-subject/binder with labeled sections for this English class. See details in the Junior English Syllabus.

    OPTIONAL, BUT RECOMMENDED:

  • In honor of 9/11, pledge to volunteer. See Volunteering in the Community in Honor of 9/11.
  • Tuesday, September 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Turn in your HW (completed self-assessment index card--front and back, from top to bottom). Take a piece of blank paper and two markers. Draw a large circle on one side and draw a straight line, dividing the paper in half, on the other side. The circle will be a pie graph of how you spend your time. The straight line will be a timeline of your life. Prepare to fill in both.

    2. Listen to instructions on how to create the pie graph of how you spend your free time (besides sleeping and other daily habits--eating, brushing your teeth, etc.) and the timeline of your life. For the pie graph, the total has to add up to 100%. For example, 50% of your free time on the internet, 20% taking care of your siblings, 20% playing sports, 10% reading for pleasure. For your timeline, identify your birthdate (including the year) as your first major event. Include a total of 4-6 major events in your life so far.

    3. Work Period: Work on the pie graph and the timeline for your life. Put your name on the bottom right-hand corner of both sides.

    4. When finished, if time allows, do a gallery walk around the room and view each other's pie graphs/timelines.

    5. Work Period: Write a letter to yourself (a minimum of one full page) to be read on the last day of the semester. In the letter you should write down specific goals that you want to accomplish for the first half of this school year (first semester, which ends at the end of January, 2014), including the following:

  • what grade you hope to get
  • how you have improved as a student
  • what will have changed in your life (you may include what will have changed in and out of school)
  • How can we introduce ourselves in unique visual formats? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • Finish the letter to yourself (a minimum of one full page or more) to be read on the last day of the semester. In the letter you should write down specific goals that you want to accomplish for the first half of this school year (first semester, which ends at the end of January), including the following:
  • what grade you hope to get
  • how you have improved as a student
  • what will have changed in your life (you may include what will have changed in and out of school)
  • Monday, September 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Teacher Quiz:
    1.) Where am I from (what state)?
    2.) Where did I go to college?
    3.) How old am I?
    4.) How long have I been teaching at Info Tech HS?
    5.) Who's my favorite author?
    6.) What was my childhood pet?
    7.) What's my first name?
    8.) What's my favorite website?
    9.) What's one of my hobbies?
    10.) What can you expect in my English class?

    2. Review answers to quiz.

    3. First Assignment: They have three minutes to complete their first assignment: "Sort yourselves in alphabetical order by last name."

    4. Discuss the process of working together to arrange seats in alphabetical order.

    5. Work Period: Choose one of these self-assessment questions, and fill up the index card (front and back). Focus on the ONE question you chose. Write your name in ALL CAPS in the top, right-hand corner.
    1.) Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
    2.) If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself?
    3.) What skills do you want to acquire in or out of school?
    4.) In thirty years, if there is a newspaper article about you, what will it say?

    6. Course Expectations (preview)

    How can we introduce ourselves in a unique format?

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10th:
    Finish one of these self-assessment questions, and fill up the index card (front and back). Focus on the ONE question you chose. Write your name in ALL CAPS in the top, right-hand corner.
    1.) Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
    2.) If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself?
    3.) What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
    4.) What are your future goals? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?