Junior Assignments, Spring 2009

Junior Assignments
Spring 2009

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 15th, 2009: Regents Preparation: Review the Final Exam answers. Review the essay outlines--Task I Essay Outline, Task II Essay Outline, Task III essay outline, Task IV Critical Lens Essay Outline.

How will we effectively prepare for the Regents by reviewing the final exam answers and essay outlines? Prepare for the Regents. Review all notes, exams and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS ON WEDNESDAY AT 8:15AM AND THURSDAY AT 8:15AM. DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID. Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! REMEMBER, THIS IS A TWO-DAY EXAM. BOTH DAYS BEGIN AT 8:15 AM. BRING PLENTY OF PENS. WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR EACH ESSAY, AND 6-8 SENTENCES PER PARAGRAPH. THERE ARE FOUR ESSAYS (TOTAL). If you have any questions, email me at hconn28@yahoo.com. It has been a wonderful semester. I enjoyed teaching all of you!

Prepare for the English Regents Exam (Wednesday, June 17th at 8:15am and Thursday, June 18th at 8:15am):

  • Regents Vocabulary List.
  • All strategies reviewed in class for each section of the English Regents. A Review sheet is available here: English Regents Exam Strategies
  • Use these essay outlines to understand the structure/format for each essay on the Regents--Task I Essay Outline, Task II Essay Outline, Task III essay outline, Task IV Critical Lens Essay Outline.
  • Friday, June 12th, 2009: Regents Preparation: Review the Final Exam answers. Review the essay outlines--Task I Essay Outline, Task II Essay Outline, Task III essay outline, Task IV Critical Lens Essay Outline.

    How will we effectively prepare for the Regents by reviewing the final exam answers and essay outlines? Prepare for the English Regents Exam (Wednesday, June 17th at 8:15am and Thursday, June 18th at 8:15am):
  • Regents Vocabulary List.
  • All strategies reviewed in class for each section of the English Regents. A Review sheet is available here: English Regents Exam Strategies
  • Use these essay outlines to understand the structure/format for each essay on the Regents--Task I Essay Outline, Task II Essay Outline, Task III essay outline, Task IV Critical Lens Essay Outline.
  • Thursday, June 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the essay outlines--Task I Essay Outline, Task II Essay Outline, Task III essay outline, Task IV Critical Lens Essay Outline.

    2. Work Period: Practice writing essays, using the outlines and the August 2008 English Regents Exam.

    How will we effectively prepare for the Regents by reviewing essay outlines and writing practice essays? All work MUST be turned in by TOMORROW, the last day of the semester!

    Prepare for the English Regents Exam (Wednesday, June 17th at 8:15am and Thursday, June 18th at 8:15am):

  • Regents Vocabulary List.
  • All strategies reviewed in class for each section of the English Regents. A Review sheet is available here: English Regents Exam Strategies

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Wednesday, June 10th, 2009: ~FINAL EXAM ON REGENTS STRATEGIES AND VOCABULARY~ How will we effectively prepare for the Regents by taking today's final exam? All work MUST be turned in by Friday, the last day of the semester!

    Prepare for the English Regents Exam (Wednesday, June 17th at 8:15am and Thursday, June 18th at 8:15am):

  • Regents Vocabulary List.
  • All strategies reviewed in class for each section of the English Regents. A Review sheet is available here: English Regents Exam Strategies

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Tuesday, June 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the English Regents Exam Strategies needed to know for the Regents and for the English Final Exam TOMORROW, Wednesday, June 10th.

    2. Review Game for TOMORROW'S Exam.

    How will we effectively prepare for the Final Exam and the Regents? FINAL EXAM (50% of this marking period)--TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10TH:
    You will be tested on the following:
  • Regents Vocabulary List.
  • All strategies reviewed in class for each section of the English Regents. A Review sheet is available here: English Regents Exam Strategies

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Monday, June 8th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the English Regents Exam Strategies needed to know for the Regents and for the English Final Exam THIS Wednesday, June 10th.

    2. Review Game for this Wednesday's Exam.

    How will we effectively prepare for Task III, the Final Exam and the Regents? FINAL EXAM (50% of this marking period)--THIS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10TH:
    You will be tested on the following:
  • Regents Vocabulary List.
  • All strategies reviewed in class for each section of the English Regents. A Review sheet is available here: English Regents Exam Strategies

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Friday, June 5th, 2009: Read/Review/Analyze: Introduce the English Regents Exam Strategies needed to know for the Regents and for the English Final Exam on Wednesday, June 10th. How will we effectively prepare for Task III, the Final Exam and the Regents? FINAL EXAM (50% of this marking period)--NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10TH:
    You will be tested on the following:
  • Regents Vocabulary List.
  • All strategies reviewed in class for each section of the English Regents. A Review sheet is available here: English Regents Exam Strategies

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review a sample exemplary essay on the August 2007 Task II Regents Exam and the students' essays, which follow the Task II Outline.

    2. Introduce the Task III components and strategies.

    How will we effectively prepare for the Tasks II and III? FINAL EXAM (50% of this marking period)--NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10TH:
    You will be tested on the following:
  • Regents Vocabulary List.
  • All strategies reviewed in class for each section of the English Regents. A Review sheet will be available soon.

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • THIS WAS DUE YESTERDAY: Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009: Work Period: Using our analysis of the August 2007 Task II Regents Exam and the strategies for successful reading (including underlining with a purpose, addressing the directions sheet, underlining the first and last sentences of each paragraph of the text, paying attention to names, dates and other numbers, and finally writing summary notes), write the Task II essay. Use the Task II Outline. How will we effectively prepare for the Task II essay? Make up ALL owed HW:
  • THIS WAS DUE YESTERDAY: Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Monday, June 1st, 2009: Work Period: Using our analysis of the August 2007 Task II Regents Exam review the strategies for successful reading (including underlining with a purpose, addressing the directions sheet, underlining the first and last sentences of each paragraph of the text, paying attention to names, dates and other numbers, and finally writing summary notes), and prepare to write the Task II essay. Use the Task II Outline. How will we effectively prepare for the Task II essay? Make up ALL owed HW:
  • THIS WAS DUE TODAY: Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Friday, May 29th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish analyzing the August 2007 Task II Regents Exam. We will examine strategies for successful reading: underline with a purpose (addressing the directions sheet), underline the first and last sentences of each paragraph of the text, pay attention to names, dates and other numbers, and finally write summary notes.

    2. Work on the vocabulary story due Monday (see HW).

    How will we effectively prepare for the Task II essay? Due Monday, June 1st:
  • Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Thursday, May 28th, 2009: Work Period/Discussion/Analysis: Analyze the August 2007 Task II Regents Exam. We will examine strategies for successful reading: underline with a purpose (addressing the directions sheet), underline the first and last sentences of each paragraph of the text, pay attention to names, dates and other numbers, and finally write summary notes. How will we effectively prepare for the Task II essay? Due Monday, June 1st:
  • Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Wednesday, May 27th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish working on the August 2007 Task II Regents Exam and answering the multiple choice questions. Tomorrow we will review the summary notes, underlined words/phrases, and multiple choice questions. We also introduce the outline and begin to write the essay.

    2. Introduce the Regents Vocabulary List.

    How will we effectively prepare for the Task II essay? Due Monday, June 1st:
  • Write a creative story on one of the following topics: My Future, Life at ITHS, or a topic of your choice. You must include all of the vocabulary words (underlined) from the Regents Vocabulary List. You must write 250 words or more. Each paragraph must be 6-8 sentences. You can type or handwrite.

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Tuesday, May 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Take notes on Task II strategies, using the August 2007 Task II Regents Exam.

    2. Begin working on the August 2007 Task II Regents Exam.

    How will we effectively prepare for the Task II essay? Make up ALL owed HW:
  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Friday, May 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Listen to 2nd reading of the passage on Christopher Reeve (taken from the June 2006 Regents). Take notes and apply the listening strategies reviewed yesterday.

    2. Take notes on multiple choice question strategies. Answer the multiple choice questions.

    3. Read the Task I (Listening) Essay Outline.

    How will we effectively prepare for the Task I (Listening) essay? EXTRA CREDIT (WORTH TWO HW CREDITS)--DUE TUESDAY:
  • Write the Task I (Listening) Essay, following the Task I (Listening) Essay Outline. Your essay should focus on the accomplishments of individuals with disabilities, as directed in the listening passage on Christopher Reeve (taken from the June 2006 Regents).

    Make up ALL owed HW:

  • Critical Lens Essays-rough draft and final draft (applying Ms. Conn's corrections)=Write the critical lens essays (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Thursday, May 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce Listening Strategies:
  • Prepare to Listen: Set a purpose for listening. Do you expect to be entertained, informed or persuaded to change your minnd? Activate your prior knowledge. What do you already know about the topic or the speaker?
  • While You're Listening: Focus on the speaker. Don't get distracted. Visualize what you hear. Try to see, hear, and feel what the speaker is talking about. Ask questions. Use the who, what, where, when, why and how questions to get started. Take notes. Record key words and phrases, draw pictures or diagrams, or use the Cornell note-taking system (divde your paper into two halves; take notes on the right-hand side and create summary titles and make sense of your notes on the left-hand side) to record the main ideas and supporting details. Listen for signal/transition words. Words like first, next, however, therefore, finally tell something about the message.
  • Digesting the Message: Review your notes and think about the message. Make personal connections to the topic or the speaker. Ask yourself, "How does this apply to me? How can I use this information?" Summarize the message or story in a few sentences. Discuss the importance of the message or story with others (if you are able).

    2. Listen to the passage on Christopher Reeve (taken from the June 2006 Regents). Take notes and apply the listening strategies reviewed today.

  • How will we effectively prepare for the Task I (Listening) essay? HW (due the day after you receive the teacher's corrections on the first draft of the Critical Lens Essay) :
  • Write a FINAL DRAFT of your Critical Lens Essay (with the teacher's corrections).

    Make up any owed HW:

  • Critical Lens Essay=Write a critical lens essay (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Wednesday, May 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Following the Critical Lens Essay Outline, write and/or revise Critical Lens Essay.Review the contents of your Critical Lens Essay with me, your teacher.

    2. Work Period: Make up any owed HW (see list in the HW section).

    How will we effectively prepare for the composition of the Critical Lens essay? Make up any owed HW:
  • Critical Lens Essay=Write a critical lens essay (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Tuesday, May 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Following the Critical Lens Essay Outline, write a Critical Lens Essay.

    2. Review the contents of your Critical Lens Essay with me, your teacher.

    How will we effectively prepare for the composition of the Critical Lens essay? Make up any owed HW:
  • Critical Lens Essay=This was due TODAY. Write a critical lens essay (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Monday, May 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish interpreting the quotes from the Critical Lens Quotes, and explain how they agree with and support Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984.

    2. Introduce the Critical Lens Essay Outline.

    How will we effectively prepare for the composition of the Critical Lens essay? Make up any owed HW:
  • Critical Lens Essay=This was due TODAY. Write a critical lens essay (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984 to support the quote you selected.
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well (such as: 1984 or another novel you've read in the past two years), which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).
  • Friday, May 15th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Student volunteers teach the interpretations of the quotes from the List of Critical Lens Quotes to the students who were absent yesterday. Turn in the Freewrite HW on a novel.

    2. Discussion: Continue interpreting the quotes from the Critical Lens Quotes, and explain how they agree with and support Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984.

    3. Introduce HW.

    How will we effectively reflect on our scene from Hamlet at the Shakespeare Festival and 1984 and use it in the Critical Lens? DUE THIS Monday, May 18th:
  • Write a critical lens essay (handwritten; 5 paragraphs or more) on one of the quotes, taken from the Critical Lens Quotes. You MUST use Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984.
  • Thursday, May 14th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion and note-taking on the Hamlet Act III Scene I Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, their appearances, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).

    2. Discussion: Interpret the quotes from the Critical Lens Quotes, and explain how they agree with and support Hamlet Act III Scene I and 1984.

    3. Introduce HW.

    How will we effectively reflect on our scene from Hamlet at the Shakespeare Festival and 1984 and use it in the Critical Lens? DUE TOMORROW (Friday, May 15th):
  • Freewrite=Freewrite two full pages (that's front and back on loose leaf; you must handwrite) on a novel that you know well, which can be used for the Task IV (Critical Lens) essay. Freewriting involves writing everything known about the novel, including plot summary, characterization of the characters, setting description, conflicts and any other literary elements (like flashback, point of view, foreshadowing, etc.).
  • Wednesday, May 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Discuss and Take Notes on the Hamlet Act III Scene I Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, their appearances, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).

    2. Work Period: Choose at least two quotes from the Critical Lens Quotes, and explain, in at least one paragraph, how they agree with and support Hamlet Act III Scene I.

    How will we effectively reflect on our scene from Hamlet at the Shakespeare Festival and use it in the Critical Lens? Make up any HW owed.
    Tuesday, May 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the HW (if necessary) Hamlet Act III Scene I Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!).

    2. When you're done, fill out the Shakespeare Festival surveys.

    3. Shakespeare Festival Awards!

    How will we effectively reflect on our scene from Hamlet at the Shakespeare Festival? DUE TOMORROW:
  • If you still have a copy of 1984, please bring it in, along with all of your exams on 1984 and HW.
  • Monday, May 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Reflect on the success of the Shakespeare Festival.

    2. Work Period: Work on the NYC Dept. of Education required exam of reading skills.

    How will we effectively reflect on our scene from Hamlet at the Shakespeare Festival? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Hamlet Scene Reflection=write as much as you can (two pages or more) about every detail of the scene in which we performed at the Shakespeare Festival. Describe the plot, setting, each character, their actions, interactions with each character, their thoughts and feelings, other characters' points of view, and EVERYTHING you can include about the scene. Include YOUR lines as well (by memory! Don't look at the script!). THIS IS THE BEGINNING OF INTENSE ENGLISH REGENTS PREP!
  • Friday, May 8th, 2009: SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL!! How will we effectively perform and self-evaluate our scene from Hamlet at the Shakespeare Festival? None.
    Thursday, May 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Field Trip reminders and permission slip collections. Fill out field trip permission slips correctly.

    2. Costume changes.

    3. Scene Practice: Practice our scene clearly and loudly! If you need a line, say LINE! Work on the emotional and physical acting; portray your character roles! Focus on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line? How can you be successful according to the Grading Rubric?

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet?
  • Bring in your signed field trip TOMORROW! You cannot go on the trip unless you bring in the field trip permission slip form.
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!! WE ARE PERFORMING TOMORROW!! Review the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric to make sure that you memorize your lines effectively to earn the highest grade.

    Make-Up HW (DUE TOMORROW):

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Wednesday, May 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Field Trip reminders and permission slip collections. Fill out field trip permission slips correctly.

    2. Costume reminders.

    3. Scene Practice off-book: Run-Through. Practice our scene without the script, as fast as you can run through your lines! If you need a line, say LINE! The speed-through aspect helps with timing and efficiency. Though, keep the emotional and physical acting. Students need to work on portraying their character roles. Focus on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line? How can you be successful according to the Grading Rubric?

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet?
  • Bring in your signed field trip form ASAP! You cannot go on the trip unless you bring in the field trip permission slip form.
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!! WE ARE PERFORMING THIS FRIDAY, MAY 8TH!! Review the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric to make sure that you memorize your lines effectively to earn the highest grade.

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Tuesday, May 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Field Trip reminders and permission slip collections. Fill out field trip permission slips correctly.

    2. Costume reminders.

    3. Scene Practice off-book: Speed-Through. Practice our scene without the script, as fast as you can run through your lines! If you need a line, say LINE! The speed-through aspect helps with timing and efficiency. Though, keep the emotional and physical acting. Students need to work on portraying their character roles. Focus on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line? How can you be successful according to the Grading Rubric?

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet?
  • Bring in your signed field trip form ASAP! You cannot go on the trip unless you bring in the field trip permission slip form.
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!! WE ARE PERFORMING THIS FRIDAY, MAY 8TH!! Review the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric to make sure that you memorize your lines effectively to earn the highest grade.

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Monday, May 4th, 2009: 1. Do Now: In a circle, share one adjective that best describes your character. Now, walk across the room physically showing that adjective.

    2. Tongue Twisters: Betty bought a batch of bitter butter. Six sharp sharks. These tongue twisters show the importance of enunciation.

    3. Scene Practice with Script: Speed-Through. Students use their scene scripts and work on portraying their character roles. Practice continues, focusing on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line? How can you be successful according to the Grading Rubric?

    4. Field trip form collections.

    5. HW reminders: Practice your lines! Performance is Friday.

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet?
  • Bring in your signed field trip form ASAP!
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!! WE ARE PERFORMING THIS FRIDAY, MAY 8TH!! Review the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric to make sure that you memorize your lines effectively to earn the highest grade.

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Friday, May 1st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Scene Practice with Script: Speed-Through. Students use their scene scripts and work on portraying their character roles. Practice continues, focusing on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line? How can you be successful according to the Grading Rubric?

    2. Scene Practice--Take Two! This time, we will practice our scene without the script, as fast as you can run through your lines! If you need a line, say LINE! The speed-through aspect helps with timing and efficiency. Though, keep the emotional and physical acting.

    3. Field trip form distribution.

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet?
  • Bring in your signed field trip form on Monday!
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!! WE ARE PERFORMING NEXT FRIDAY, MAY 8TH!! Review the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric to make sure that you memorize your lines effectively to earn the highest grade.

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Thursday, April 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Scene Practice. Students use their scene scripts and work on portraying their character roles. Practice continues, focusing on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line? How can you be successful according to the Grading Rubric?

    2. Evaluations by Bobby Martin, Teaching Artist from the NYC Student Shakespeare Festival

    3. Scene Practice--Take Two! This time, we will practice our scene in a speed-through, as fast as you can run through your lines! This helps with timing and efficiency. Though, keep the emotional and physical acting.

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet?
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!! WE ARE PERFORMING NEXT FRIDAY, MAY 8TH!! Review the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric to make sure that you memorize your lines effectively to earn the highest grade.

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Wednesday, April 29th, 2009: Scene Practice. Students use their scene scripts and work on portraying their character roles. Practice continues, focusing on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line? How can you be successful according to the Grading Rubric? How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, April 30th:
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!! Review the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric to make sure that you memorize your lines effectively to earn the highest grade.

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Tuesday, April 28th, 2009: 1. Do Now: 1984 Exam Distribution and Review

    2. HW reminders and Grading for this 2nd Marking Period: 25%=1984 Exam, 25%=Shakespeare Festival Preparation and Performance. See the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric. 35%=HW. 15%=Class Participation.

    3. Scene Practice: Students use their scene scripts and work on portraying their character roles. Practice continues, focusing on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line? How can you be successful according to the Grading Rubric?

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Due THIS Thursday, April 30th:
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!! Review the Shakespeare Festival Performance Grading Rubric to make sure that you memorize your lines effectively to earn the highest grade.

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Monday, April 27th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Scene Practice. Students use their scene scripts and work on portraying their character roles. Practice continues, focusing on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line?

    2. HW reminders

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Due THIS Thursday, April 30th:
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!!

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Friday, April 24th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Acting Warm-Up Exercise. Everyone will stand in a circle and do tableaus (frozen statues) as the following people: confident and arrogant king, secretive spy, loving and concerned mother, caring father, guilty murderer, noble and intelligent prince, devil, crazy man, ladies man, angel, tough security agent.

    2. Scene Practice: Students use their scene scripts and work on portraying their character roles. Practice continues, focusing on physical actions when speaking and not speaking onstage. Think about the following: What are you doing when you're not speaking? What would you do with your body to show those feelings? What's your interpretation of each line?

    3. HW reminders!

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Due Next Thursday, April 30th:
  • Your lines MUST be memorized!!!

    Make-Up HW:

  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Thursday, April 23rd, 2009--Shakespeare's Birthday!: 1. Do Now: Introduction of Mr. Bob Martin, guest teacher, professional actor, director and producer from the Shakespeare Festival.

    2. Scene Practice: Students use their scene scripts and work on portraying their character roles. Practice continues, with guidance from Mr. Bob Martin!

    How will we sharpen our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Make-Up HW:
  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review characterization of the characters in Hamlet--Act III Scene I.

    2. Scene Practice: Students are given their scene scripts and parts. Practice begins!

    How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Make-Up HW:
  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Tuesday, April 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Get in yesterday's assigned groups and act out your assigned parts in the modern-language Act III Scene I from Hamlet. Be loud and dramatic. Use hand gestures, different levels, eye contact, spatial relationships (some characters physically closer and others farther apart, facing each other or turning away), physical behaviors/actions, background sound effects, etc.

    2. Brainstorming/Character Portrayals: Brainstorm each character's role in this scene. Here are some questions to address: How are they acting, thinking/feeling, interacting with other characters and depicted in the scene? How would each character appear in costume and what kind of presence would each character have in this scene? What kind of animal would each character most closely resemble and why?

    3. HW reminders, collections and returns.

    How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Make-Up HW:
  • This was due YESTERDAY: Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Monday, April 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Get in assigned groups and read aloud your assigned parts in the modern-language Act III Scene I from Hamlet. Then, read aloud, standing up and acting out your assigned parts. Repeat again, louder and more dramatic. Use hand gestures, different levels, eye contact, spatial relationships (some characters physically closer and others farther apart, facing each other or turning away), physical behaviors/actions, background sound effects, etc.

    2. Reflections/Discussion: Reflect on each character's role in this scene. How are they acting, thinking/feeling, interacting with other characters and depicted in the scene? How would each character appear in costume and what kind of presence would each character have in this scene? What kind of animal would each character most closely resemble and why?

    3. HW reminders, collections and returns.

    How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Make-Up HW:
  • This was due TODAY: Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • Due April 5th: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • 1984 Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • 1984 Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?
  • Wednesday, April 8th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Begin small-group auditions for King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost. Students interested in an acting part in the Shakespeare Festival performance will audition by reading 1-3 lines from Act III Scene I (the scene chosen for the festival).

    3. Work Period: Work on vacation HW. Make up any HW owed, especially the one page My Role in the Hamlet Scene, which explains the character or non-speaking role each student would like to play and why.

    How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Vacation HW-due Monday, April 20th:
  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?

    Make up any HW owed:

  • DUE YESTERDAY: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (due yesterday!).
  • Tuesday, April 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce the summary of Act III Scene i (the scene chosen for the festival).

    2. Acting Auditions: Continue the auditions for King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost. Students interested in an acting part in the Shakespeare Festival performance will audition by reading 1-3 lines from Act III Scene I (the scene chosen for the festival). Class Votes: Class will vote on two students who would best fit each character role.

    3. Work Period: Make up any HW owed, especially the one page My Role in the Hamlet Scene, which explains the character or non-speaking role each student would like to play and why.

    How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Vacation HW-due Monday, April 20th:
  • Write a one-page, typed diary entry for the character you will be performing in the Hamlet scene--Act III Scene I. If you do not know which character you will be or you have not been assigned a part, then you may choose any character you prefer. In this diary entry, you will write in first person ("I"), pretending you are the character. You must reveal the character's thoughts, feelings, actions and interactions with other characters ONLY in Act III Scene I.
  • EXTRA CREDIT (value=up to 20 extra points on your 1984 exam): Watch the Hamlet movie (the version with Mel Gibson and Glenn Close). Write a two-page review (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) of ONE character (preferably the character is the one you will be in the performance!) throughout the movie. Here are some questions to answer in your review: How does he/she transform throughout the movie? How does he/she interact with other characters? What is he/she thinking and feeling throughout the movie? How does the actor/actress portray this character?

    Make up any HW owed:

  • DUE YESTERDAY: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (due yesterday!).
  • Monday, April 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the improvisations of the ten scenes from Hamlet:
    1.) Hamlet, Horatio and Guards see Ghost of Hamlet's Father outside of the castle at midnight. Hamlet speaks to the Ghost. Ghost tells Hamlet to get revenge for his murder.
    2.) Laertes is warning his sister, Ophelia, about Hamlet before he leaves for school. His old father, Polonius, is talking too much.
    3.) King Claudius, Queen Gertrude and Polonius hide behind a curtain, spying on Ophelia and Hamlet talking. Hamlet is acting strange.
    4.) At the play Hamlet has arranged, the Player King is acting out Claudius' murder of Hamlet's father onstage. Claudius is running out of the room, very upset. Gertrude is following him. Hamlet and Horatio are watching how Claudius reacts.
    5.) Polonius, hiding behind a curtain in Gertrude's room, is stabbed by Hamlet. Hamlet and Gertrude, his mother, are in an argument about his mother's marriage to Claudius, his uncle and now his stepfather.
    6.) Laertes has returned to school to get revenge for Polonius' (his father) murder. Ophelia, his sister, has gone crazy. Claudius tries to keep Laertes calm.
    7.) First Laertes, and then Hamlet jump into Ophelia's grave at her funeral. Claudius, Gertrude and Horatio try to break up their fight.
    8.) Hamlet and Laertes are sword-fighting on a bet. Gertrude is dying from drinking from a poisoned cup that was meant for Hamlet. Hamlet has just discovered Claudius' plot to kill him. Hamlet stabs Claudius. Claudius is dying.
    9.) Laertes has accidentally been stabbed with his own poisoned sword and is dying. Hamlet, too, is stabbed by the poisoned sword.
    10.) Hamlet whispers his last words to Horatio. Fortinbras, the Prince of Norwar, enters and sees this terrible scene of Gertrude, Claudius, Laertes and Hamlet lying dead.

    2. Acting Auditions: Begin the auditions for King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost. Students interested in an acting part in the Shakespeare Festival performance will audition by reading 1-3 lines from Act III Scene i (the scene chosen for the festival).

    3. HW reminders and collection (today's HW was the one page My Role in the Hamlet Scene, which explains the character or non-speaking role each student would like to play and why).

    How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Make up any HW owed:
  • DUE TODAY: My Role in the Hamlet Scene. Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (due yesterday!).
  • Friday, April 3rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce 10 scenes from Hamlet:
    1.) Hamlet, Horatio and Guards see Ghost of Hamlet's Father outside of the castle at midnight. Hamlet speaks to the Ghost. Ghost tells Hamlet to get revenge for his murder.
    2.) Laertes is warning his sister, Ophelia, about Hamlet before he leaves for school. His old father, Polonius, is talking too much.
    3.) King Claudius, Queen Gertrude and Polonius hide behind a curtain, spying on Ophelia and Hamlet talking. Hamlet is acting strange.
    4.) At the play Hamlet has arranged, the Player King is acting out Claudius' murder of Hamlet's father onstage. Claudius is running out of the room, very upset. Gertrude is following him. Hamlet and Horatio are watching how Claudius reacts.
    5.) Polonius, hiding behind a curtain in Gertrude's room, is stabbed by Hamlet. Hamlet and Gertrude, his mother, are in an argument about his mother's marriage to Claudius, his uncle and now his stepfather.
    6.) Laertes has returned to school to get revenge for Polonius' (his father) murder. Ophelia, his sister, has gone crazy. Claudius tries to keep Laertes calm.
    7.) First Laertes, and then Hamlet jump into Ophelia's grave at her funeral. Claudius, Gertrude and Horatio try to break up their fight.
    8.) Hamlet and Laertes are sword-fighting on a bet. Gertrude is dying from drinking from a poisoned cup that was meant for Hamlet. Hamlet has just discovered Claudius' plot to kill him. Hamlet stabs Claudius. Claudius is dying.
    9.) Laertes has accidentally been stabbed with his own poisoned sword and is dying. Hamlet, too, is stabbed by the poisoned sword.
    10.) Hamlet whispers his last words to Horatio. Fortinbras, the Prince of Norwar, enters and sees this terrible scene of Gertrude, Claudius, Laertes and Hamlet lying dead.

    Students will get in groups and act out each scene.

    2. If time allows, begin the Angel/Devil activity. Hamlet is unsure if he should kill Claudius. Three volunteers. One actor will play the "angel" and try to persuade Hamlet to not kill Claudius. One actor will play the "devil" and try to persuade Hamlet to kill Claudius. The class will observe and determine which actors--the angel or devil--were more persuasive.

    How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? DUE MONDAY:
  • My Role in the Hamlet Scene: Write one page (handwritten or typed) explaining what role you want to have in our performance of Hamlet. You should explain which character you'd like to act out and why. If you don't want an acting part, explain what you can contribute to the scene. The character choices are the following: King Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Hamlet, and Hamlet's father's ghost.

    Make up any HW owed:

  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (due yesterday!).
  • Thursday, April 2nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Illustration of the concept of conflict in theater. Two students volunteer to improvise two short scenes. They will act out each scene and the class will watch and comment afterward on which scene is best for a play. 1st scene=At a bus stop, one actor accidentally drops their Metrocard. The second actor picks it up and returns it to them. 2nd scene=At a bus stop, one actor accidentally drops their Metrocard. The second actor picks it up and won't give it back. The first actor tries to get their Metrocard back. The second actor will not give it to them. The class will be asked to comment on which scene is best for a play and why. The second scene contains conflict. One actor had the Metrocard and the second actor wanted it back.

    2. Brainstorming and Tableaus: Brainstorm a common conflict with the class. An example is a child wants their parent to buy something and the parent won't buy it. These will be the actors' objectives. With the class, brainstorm 4-5 actions each character can take to achieve their objective. One word verbs work best. Actions for the child can be beg, cry, bargain, flatter, and throw a tantrum. Actions for the parent can be ignore, distract, threaten, give the evil eye, and punish. Write each action on a sheet of paper. The class will physicalize each action in tableaus. They will make statues focusing on the physical choices and facial expressions of each action. Two volunteers will play out this scene, using these actions. The only word the child can use is "please" and the only word the adult can use is "no." The purpose is to observe how much the physicality can influence the actions.

    3. Introduce 10 scenes from Hamlet. Have the students get in groups of three and act out each scene.

    4. Reflection: Share today's reflections and yesterday's reflections.

    How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Make up any HW owed:
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (due yesterday!).
  • Wednesday, April 1st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Common Experience Questions that relate to Hamlet (stand in the circle if it applies to you; remain at your spot if it doesn't):
  • Have you ever wanted revenge?
  • Have you ever seen a ghost?
  • Do you believe in spirits and the supernatural?
  • Have you ever been too distracted by something (work, school, personal problems) to notice what was really important in your life?
  • Have you ever hated someone you worked for?
  • Have you ever listened to your father's advice?
  • Have you ever fallen in love at first sight?
  • Have you ever defied your parents?
  • Have you ever learned a family secret?
  • Has your family ever demanded something unreasonable from you?
  • Have you ever thought your mom was making a huge mistake?
  • Have you ever questioned the meaning of your life?

    2. Tableaus: Working on your feet in a circle, introduce the three basic levels of space: air space (high), floor space (low) and middle space (in between, standing or sitting). The teacher will call out different emotions or situations (e.g. you forgot your homework, you just won the lottery, revenge, anger, jealousy, 'in love', fear, sadness, joy), asking students to create a series of frozen statues with their bodies that:

  • use all the muscles of their bodies
  • take up as much or as little space as possible
  • use a different level of space (air, floor, or middle) every time
  • require some effort for them to hold
    *Half of the class will work or perform for other half. Switch on and off.

    3. Reflection Writing: What was valuable about today's acting activities? What themes were acted out? What themes and emotions do you believe will be part of our Hamlet scene?

  • How will we prepare for our acting/writing unit on Hamlet? Make up any HW owed:
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (due yesterday!).
  • Tuesday, March 31st, 2009: EXAM ON PART III in 1984 How do we assess our understanding of Part III in 1984? Make up any HW owed:
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (due yesterday!).
  • Monday, March 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read chapter 6 (the final chapter in the novel).

    2. Discuss/Share: Analyze George Orwell's (author) message in this final chapter--a message that human beings have been dehumanized by government. This is his warning to his readers. He wants to awaken his readers to take action and not let this happen. He's saying that there's danger that we are losing our individuality, ability to critically think, and desire to challenge authority. He's saying that we can't succumb to the government's control over us, like Winston did.

    How do we work on understanding the final chapter of 1984? Make up any HW owed:
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.
  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (due today!).

    EXAM on Part III-TOMORROW, Tuesday, March 31st: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Friday, March 27th, 2009: No Class due to Parent-Teacher Conferences. How do we work on understanding 1984? Make up any HW owed:
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    DATE CHANGE: Due THIS Monday, March 30th:

  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    DATE CHANGE: Exam on Part III-THIS Tuesday, March 31st: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Thursday, March 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Analyze Part III chapters 3 and 4 by answering the following questions: How does O'Brien appear to Winston? What's the reason that O'Brien made Winston look in the mirror? Who did Winston claim not to betray? O'Brien will send Winston to ____________ to make him love Big Brother.

    2. Discuss/Share/Read-Aloud: Read aloud chapter 5. Discuss and analyze the following: Why is Room 101 everyone's worst fear? Why does O'Brien have Winston encounter his worst fear (rats)? What does Winston say to save himself from the rats? Why does Winston's betrayal save himself?

    How do we evaluate Winston's dehumanization and salvation in Part III of 1984? Make up any HW owed:
  • Part II multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    DATE CHANGE: Due THIS Monday, March 30th:

  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    DATE CHANGE: Exam on Part III-THIS Tuesday, March 31st: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Wednesday, March 25th, 2009: 1. Do Now: What's the difference between a thought and an action (as determined in 2009 in the U.S.)? What's the difference between a thought and an action in 1984? If everyone acted on his or her thought/feeling today (and in 1984), what would happen? Is it a good idea to say and do everything you think? Why or why not? Answer these questions individually. Discuss with a neighbor. Be prepared to discuss as a class.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the Do Now questions. Today we have the freedom to think and feel as we please. In 1984, the people are not allowed to think and feel freely. Though, today there are profound differences between our thoughts and actions. In 1984, there weren't any differences. It requires maturity and control to prevent our thoughts to turn into actions, especially potentially dangerous thoughts/feelings. The characters in 1984 are only allowed to follow the government and love Big Brother completely--in both thought and action. Since Winston is now in jail, he is being broken down so that he will eventually succumb to the Party's wishes to love Big Brother. How does O'Brien break down Winston in Part III chapter 3-4? Answers=physical beatings, starvation, Winston's view of himself (as an emaciated and broken man) in the mirror, O'Brien telling Winston that no one will ever revolt (the proles, especially) so his efforts are worthless.

    How do we evaluate the differences between thought and action in connection to our study of Part III of 1984? Make up any HW owed:
  • Read Part III chapters 3 and 4, if necessary. Answer the following questions and be prepared to know the answers for the exam: Who does O'Brien say will never revolt against the party? How does O'Brien appear to Winston? How does Big Brother gain power? How does Winston appear in the mirror? What's the reason that O'Brien made Winston look in the mirror? Who did Winston claim not to betray? O'Brien will send Winston to ____________ to make him love Big Brother.

    DATE CHANGE: Due THIS Monday, March 30th:

  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    DATE CHANGE: Exam on Part III-THIS Tuesday, March 31st: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Tuesday, March 24th, 2009: Work Period: Make up any HW owed, which includes the reading of Part III chapters 3-4. How do we ensure success on the Regents through our study of Part III of 1984? Make up any HW owed:
  • Read Part III chapters 3 and 4, if necessary. Answer the following questions and be prepared to discuss on Wednesday: Who does O'Brien say will never revolt against the party? How does O'Brien appear to Winston? How does Big Brother gain power? How does Winston appear in the mirror? What's the reason that O'Brien made Winston look in the mirror? Who did Winston claim not to betray? O'Brien will send Winston to ____________ to make him love Big Brother.

    DATE CHANGE: Due Monday, March 30th:

  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    DATE CHANGE: Exam on Part III-Monday, March 30th: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Monday, March 23rd, 2009: Work Period: Make up any HW owed. How do we ensure success on the Regents through our study of Part III of 1984? Make up any HW owed:
  • Read Part III chapters 3 and 4, if necessary. Answer the following questions and be prepared to discuss on Wednesday: Who does O'Brien say will never revolt against the party? How does O'Brien appear to Winston? How does Big Brother gain power? How does Winston appear in the mirror? What's the reason that O'Brien made Winston look in the mirror? Who did Winston claim not to betray? O'Brien will send Winston to ____________ to make him love Big Brother.

    DATE CHANGE: Due Monday, March 30th:

  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    DATE CHANGE: Exam on Part III-Monday, March 30th: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Friday, March 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish reading aloud Part III Chapter 2, taking notes on how the themes of rebellion and restriction are revealed through characterization of Winston and O'Brien; take notes on setting, mood, conflicts, irony, and foreshadowing.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss Winston's prison experience and his interactions with O'Brien. Discuss student impressions of imprisonment and O'Brien's revelation.

    How do we ensure success on the Regents through our study of Part III Chapter Two of 1984? Due THIS Monday, March 23rd:
  • Read chapters 3 and 4 (pages 261-282). Take notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts and mood. Be ready to share your notes in discussion on Monday.

    Due Tuesday, March 24th:

  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    Exam on Part III-Wednesday, March 25th!: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Thursday, March 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue reading aloud Part III Chapter 2, taking notes on how the themes of rebellion and restriction are revealed through characterization of Winston, prisoners/criminals, Parsons, and O'Brien; take notes on setting, mood, conflicts, irony, and foreshadowing.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss Winston's initial prison experience, his fellow prisoners, their treatment by the Party members/guards, Parsons, and O'Brien. Discuss student impressions of imprisonment and O'Brien's revelation.

    How do we ensure success on the Regents through our study of Part III Chapter Two of 1984? Make-up HW:
  • Part II (1984) multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (it was due yesterday!).

    Due Monday, March 23rd:

  • Read chapters 3 and 4 (pages 261-282). Take notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts and mood. Be ready to share your notes in discussion on Monday.

    Due Tuesday, March 24th:

  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    Exam on Part III-Wednesday, March 25th!: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Wednesday, March 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish reading aloud Part III Chapter 1, taking notes on how the themes of rebellion and restriction are revealed through characterization of Winston, prisoners/criminals, Parsons, and O'Brien; take notes on setting, mood, conflicts, irony, and foreshadowing.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss Winston's initial prison experience, his fellow prisoners, their treatment by the Party members/guards, Parsons, and O'Brien. Discuss student impressions of imprisonment and O'Brien's revelation.

    3. Begin reading Part III Chapter 2.

    How do we ensure success on the Regents through our study of Part III Chapter One of 1984? Make-up HW:
  • Part II (1984) multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (it was due yesterday!).

    Due Monday, March 23rd:

  • Read chapters 3 and 4 (pages 261-282). Take notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts and mood. Be ready to share your notes in discussion on Monday.

    Due Tuesday, March 24th:

  • Part III multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    Exam on Part III-Wednesday, March 25th!: Use in-class notes on the themes of rebellion and restriction, as revealed through characterization, setting, conflicts, resolution, and mood. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and a Critical Lens Essay. You have to make plenty of references to Part III.

  • Tuesday, March 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Part III Chapter 1, taking notes on how the themes of rebellion and restriction are revealed through characterization of Winston, prisoners/criminals, Parsons, and O'Brien; take notes on setting, mood, conflicts, irony, and foreshadowing.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss Winston's initial prison experience, his fellow prisoners, their treatment by the Party members/guards, Parsons, and O'Brien. Discuss student impressions of imprisonment and O'Brien's revelation.

    How do we ensure success on the Regents through our study of Part III Chapter One of 1984? Make-up HW:
  • Part II (1984) multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (it was due yesterday!).
  • Monday, March 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review 1984 Exam on Parts I and II.

    2. Work Period: Work on owed HW.

    How do we ensure success on the Regents through our study of Part II of 1984? Make-up HW:
  • Part II (1984) multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question (it was due today!).
  • Friday, March 13th, 2009: Work Period: Work on Part II multiple choice questions HW. How do we ensure success on the Regents through our study of Part II of 1984? DUE MONDAY, MARCH 16th:
  • Part II (1984) multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    Make up any HW owed by e-mailing me at hconn28@yahoo.com (no later than tomorrow-Friday-by midnight), which includes the following:

  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Thursday, March 12th, 2009: 1.) Do Now: Make up any owed HW (today's the last day!).

    2. Work Period: Work on Part II multiple choice questions HW.

    How do we ensure success in our study of 1984? DUE MONDAY, MARCH 16th:
  • Part II (1984) multiple choice questions (10 questions) with four answer choices for each question.

    Make up any HW owed by e-mailing me at hconn28@yahoo.com (no later than tomorrow-Friday-by midnight), which includes the following:

  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Wednesday, March 11th, 2009: 1.) Do Now: Reflection on the Exam on Parts I and II in 1984.

    2. Work Period: Work on making up owed HW.

    How do we reflect on the assessment on Parts I and II in 1984? Make up any HW owed by TOMORROW, which includes the following:
  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Tuesday, March 10th, 2009: EXAM ON PARTS I AND II IN 1984 How are we effectively assessed on Parts I and II of 1984? Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:
  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Monday, March 9th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Finish discussing Part II of 1984, by answering the following questions: 3.) What's the purpose of Mr. Charrington's shop? 4.) What animal does Winston despise? How do you think it might be meaningful to the story? 5.) What happened to Syme and what does Winston discover about him in the Records Department? 6.) How does O'Brien invite Winston to his home? 7.) Describe Winston's memory of his life as a child and, in particular, the time his mother and sister disappeared. 8.) Why have the proles remained human? 9.) In which organization is O'Brien a member? What is the focus of this organization? 10.) Why did Oceania's war with Eurasia change to a war with Eastasia? 11.) At the end of Part II, readers learn that Mr. Charrington is really a member of what group? Why is this important?

    2. Review/Discuss: Review the details of the exam. There will be 20 multiple choice questions (2 points each; 40 points total) and a critical lens essay (60 points).

    How do we understand the details of Part II of 1984 and prepare for the Exam on Parts I and II on 1984? READ!! You MUST read Parts I and II of 1984 by TOMORROW!! If you're not done, catch up!!

    EXAM TOMORROW, TUESDAY (March 10th) on Parts I and II of 1984 (you don't need to read pages 184-216). There will be 20 multiple choice questions (2 points each; 40 points total) and a critical lens essay (60 points).

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Friday, March 6th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Begin discussing Part II of 1984, by answering the following questions: 1.)What did Julia write on the note she handed to Winston and why is it a meaningful message? 2.) Describe Julia's sexual past and explain how Winston feels about it. 3.) What's the purpose of Mr. Charrington's shop? 4.) What animal does Winston despise? How do you think it might be meaningful to the story? 5.) What happened to Syme and what does Winston discover about him in the Records Department?

    2. Review/Discuss: Review the details of the exam. There will be 20 multiple choice questions (2 points each; 40 points total) and a critical lens essay (60 points).

    How do we understand the details of Part II of 1984 and prepare? READ!! You MUST read Parts I and II of 1984 by Tuesday!! If you're not, catch up!!

    EXAM NEXT TUESDAY (March 10th) on Parts I and II of 1984 (you don't need to read pages 184-216). There will be 20 multiple choice questions (2 points each; 40 points total) and a critical lens essay (60 points).

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Thursday, March 5th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Discuss the rest of Part I of 1984, by answering the following questions: 11.) Describe Newspeak and its purpose. 12.) Who is Comrade Ogilvy and how does he support this "fake" world of 1984? 13.) Why will Syme be vaporized? 14.) Why is Mr. Parsons considered an ideal citizen? 15.) Why is Katharine, Winston's wife, an ideal citizen? 16.) Why does Winston write "If there is hope, it lies in the proles"? 17.) Why would the Party make its citizens believe that 2+2=5? 18.) What was the proles' principal reason for remaining alive and how did this reason promote their ignorance? 19.) What does Winston learn when he goes to the town of the proles? 20.) Who said "we shall meet in the place where there is no darkness" and what does it mean?

    2. Work Period: Read! Make up any owed HW.

    How do we understand the details of Part I of 1984? READ!! You should have been done reading Part I of 1984!! If you're not, catch up!!

    EXAM NEXT TUESDAY (March 10th) on Part I and II of 1984 (you don't need to read pages 184-216).

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Wednesday, March 4th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Analyze the rest of Part I of 1984, by answering the following questions: 11.) Describe Newspeak and its purpose. 12.) Who is Comrade Ogilvy and how does he support this "fake" world of 1984? 13.) Why will Syme be vaporized? 14.) Why is Mr. Parsons considered an ideal citizen? 15.) Why is Katharine, Winston's wife, an ideal citizen? 16.) Why does Winston write "If there is hope, it lies in the proles"? 17.) Why would the Party make its citizens believe that 2+2=5? 18.) What was the proles' principal reason for remaining alive and how did this reason promote their ignorance? 19.) What does Winston learn when he goes to the town of the proles? 20.) Who said "we shall meet in the place where there is no darkness" and what does it mean? How do we understand the details of Part I of 1984? READ!! You should have been done reading Part I of 1984!! If you're not, catch up!!

    EXAM NEXT TUESDAY (March 10th) on Part I and II of 1984 (you don't need to read pages 184-216).

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009: 1.Do Now: Finish discussing (and taking notes!) the following questions on Part I in 1984: 1.) What does it reveal about the society that the three slogans of the Party are "War is Peace", "Freedom is Slavery" and "Ignorance is Strength"? 2.) Why is it meaningful that the Ministry of Truth changes the news, the Ministry of Peace focuses on war, the Ministry of Love appears to be a fearful place, and the Ministry of Plenty has few resources? 3.) What does Winston write in his diary and why is it important? 4.) Who are the people supposed to direct their hate toward and why is his name important? 5.) Why does Winston have hatred toward the woman with dark hair? 6.) Who are the proles and why are they important (refer to p. 9)? 7.) Who are the people of Oceania fighting against? 8.) What is thoughtcrime? 9.) Why does Winston have trouble remembering the past? 10.) Describe Winston's job.

    2. Discussion/Note-Taking: Analyze the rest of Part I of 1984, by answering the following questions: 1.) Describe Newspeak and its purpose. 2.) Who is Comrade Ogilvy and how does he support this "fake" world of 1984? 3.) Why will Syme be vaporized? 4.) Why is Mr. Parsons considered an ideal citizen? 5.) Why is Katharine, Winston's wife, an ideal citizen? 6.) Why does Winston write "If there is hope, it lies in the proles"? 7.) Why would the Party make its citizens believe that 2+2=5? 8.) What was the proles' principal reason for remaining alive and how did this reason promote their ignorance? 9.) What does Winston learn when he goes to the town of the proles? 10.) Who said "we shall meet in the place where there is no darkness" and what does it mean?

    How do we understand the details of Part I of 1984? READ!! You should have been done reading Part I of 1984!! If you're not, catch up!!

    EXAM NEXT TUESDAY (March 10th) on Part I and II of 1984 (you don't need to read pages 184-216).

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Monday, March 2nd, 2009--SNOW DAY: Work Period: Work on creating the TEN Multiple-Choice Questions for Part I--HW due TOMORROW (see HW for the details). Make up any HW owed. How do we effectively create Regents-style questions based on Part I of 1984? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY (March 3rd):
  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Friday, February 27th, 2009: Work Period: Work on creating the TEN Multiple-Choice Questions for Part I (see HW for the details). Make up any HW owed. How do we effectively create Regents-style questions based on Part I of 1984? DUE TUESDAY (March 3rd):
  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Thursday, February 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions on Part I in 1984--What does it reveal about the society that the three slogans of the Party are "War is Peace", "Freedom is Slavery" and "Ignorance is Strength"? Why is it meaningful that the Ministry of Truth changes the news, the Ministry of Peace focuses on war, the Ministry of Love appears to be a fearful place, and the Ministry of Plenty has few resources? What does Winston write in his diary and why is it important? Who are the people supposed to direct their hate toward and why is his name important? Why does Winston have hatred toward the woman with dark hair? Who are the proles and why are they important (refer to p. 9)? Who are the people of Oceania fighting against? What is thoughtcrime? Why does Winston have trouble remembering the past? Describe Winston's job.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the Do Now questions.

    3. Work Period: Introduce and begin the Multiple-Choice Questions HW.

    How do we effectively analyze the protagonist, Winston Smith, the importance of other characters, the mood and the setting in Part I of 1984? DUE TUESDAY:
  • FOUR HOMEWORK CREDITS: Create 10 questions and answers (4 answer choices for each question) for Part I of 1984. Use the model provided in class (taken from the January 2008 Regents Exam-Task III). You should write the following types of questions--characterization (character feelings, personality traits, actions, and other characters' points of view), narrator's tone (positive or negative), vocabulary in context, setting, mood, symbolism, and other literary elements.

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Wednesday, February 25th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Forced Class Exercises (like in the novel, 1984). The Class will engage in 5 minutes of forced jumping jacks and toe touching, while smiling the whole time. Then they will answer these questions--Did you cooperate? Why or why not? How did you feel about doing the forced exercises, while smiling? How did this exercise connect to 1984?

    2. Work Period: Brainstorm two reasons for one of these statements (each person will be assigned a statement to support)--1.) There should be a restricted society in which the government controls everything and nobody is allowed to rebel against the government. 2.) People should rebel against restrictions, break rules and make their own choices.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share and evaluate your neighbor's arguments.

    4. Class Debate: Class will debate arguments for each statement and connect the arguments to 1984.

    How do we effectively analyze and debate the theme of rebellion and restriction, as evident in Part I of 1984? Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Tuesday, February 24th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Work Period instructions

    2. Work Period: Work on reading (catching up in the reading of Part I) and identifying evidence (taking notes) from 1984 that reveals rebellious characters and restrictive government. Work on making up HW owed.

    How do we effectively analyze the ideal and rebelling characters in Part I of 1984? Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Freewrite (casual note-taking) ONE PAGE on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Monday, February 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm one full page about the ideal citizen that would reside, as described in Part I of 1984. What would he/she look like, act like, sound like? Brainstorm one full page about Winston, the rebel. Why is he NOT an ideal citizen? What makes him a rebel? Be ready to share. Turn in the HW: TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your interpretations of the ideal citizen and the rebel in Part I of 1984.

    How do we effectively analyze the ideal and rebelling characters in Part I of 1984? Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Take notes on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Find a newspaper article (and bring it in, if you can; if not, then describe the article in detail) that addresses one of the statements in the Anticipation Guide. Read the article and be prepared to share reasons why you chose this article. Some suggested newspapers include: The New York Times, Newsday, The Washington Post, or USA Today.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.
  • Friday, February 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Freewrite one full page on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction as it appears in Chapter 1 (HW) in 1984. You may use the notes gathered from the HW and the novel to assist you. You may use direct quotes. You should identify characters, events in the novel and historical background in your freewrite.

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share their insight from the freewrite.

    3. Group Work: Modeling the question types (determined in Wednesday's class) from Task III (Part A of Session II)-January 2008 Regents, create 10 Regents-style questions and answers for Chapter 1 of 1984. Question types include characterization, author's tone, setting, etc.

    4. Reflections: How was the process of composing Regents-type questions and answers? What were the challenges? What were the benefits?

    How do we effectively read and analyze Chapter One of 1984? Due Monday, February 23rd (the day we return from vacation):
  • Read all of Part I of 1984 (up to p. 104). Write TWO full pages (handwritten) or ONE full, typed page on evidence of the themes of Rebellion and Restriction as seen in Part I (excluding Chapter One, since we completed it in class). Refer to page numbers and chapters. You may write more for extra credit. For every extra page written, you will earn an extra HW credit.

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Take notes on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Find a newspaper article (and bring it in, if you can; if not, then describe the article in detail) that addresses one of the statements in the Anticipation Guide. Read the article and be prepared to share reasons why you chose this article. Some suggested newspapers include: The New York Times, Newsday, The Washington Post, or USA Today.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Thursday, February 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Freewrite one full page on your personal and worldly knowledge of the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction. If you did the HW, include references to Chapter 1 in 1984. You may use the notes gathered from last night's HW and the novel to assist you. You may use direct quotes. You should identify characters, events in the novel and historical background in your freewrite.

    2. Work Period: Work on reading Chapter 1, if not finished with the HW. If completed, read ahead. Take notes on the theme as you read.

    How do we effectively read and analyze Chapter One of 1984? Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Take notes on the theme of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Find a newspaper article (and bring it in, if you can; if not, then describe the article in detail) that addresses one of the statements in the Anticipation Guide. Read the article and be prepared to share reasons why you chose this article. Some suggested newspapers include: The New York Times, Newsday, The Washington Post, or USA Today.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Wednesday, February 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: With your group mates, finish your introductory analysis of 1984 and identify the strategies that good readers use to read and analyze literature effectively.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and take notes on the Do Now.

    3. Literary Question Analysis: Analyze the question types from Task III (part A of Session II)-January 2008 Regents. For example: characterization, author's tone, etc.

    4. Work Period: Continue reading Chapter One.

    How do we effectively prepare to read and analyze chapter one of 1984? Due Tomorrow:
  • Read Chapter One of 1984. Take notes on the topic of Rebellion vs. Restriction, with a focus on identifying literary elements. Determine why the elements are important and relevant to the topic.

    Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:

  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Find a newspaper article (and bring it in, if you can; if not, then describe the article in detail) that addresses one of the statements in the Anticipation Guide. Read the article and be prepared to share reasons why you chose this article. Some suggested newspapers include: The New York Times, Newsday, The Washington Post, or USA Today.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Tuesday, February 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Begin the reading and analysis of the packaging (front and back cover) and the introductory pages (1-2) of 1984. Freewrite everything you've ever learned about how to analyze literature, referring only to the packaging and first pages of 1984. Think about setting, flashback, characterization, repetition, motif, mood, and any other literary elements. Make predictions and identify what led you to those predictions. Use all of your prior knowledge about literary analysis. Prove that you are an expert high school student (you are juniors!) in the analysis of literature.

    2. Group Work: Share your introductory analysis of 1984 with your assigned group mates. Add to your list. On another sheet of loose leaf, write a list of strategies that good readers use to read and analyze literature effectively. Work with your group mates to come up with a list that all of you agree on.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your introductory analysis of 1984 and the strategies that good readers use to read effectively.

    How do we effectively prepare to read 1984? Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Find a newspaper article (and bring it in, if you can; if not, then describe the article in detail) that addresses one of the statements in the Anticipation Guide. Read the article and be prepared to share reasons why you chose this article. Some suggested newspapers include: The New York Times, Newsday, The Washington Post, or USA Today.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Monday, February 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read over your "Deep Thoughts" paper. On a post-it, write at least two strengths in your writing. On another post-it, write at least two goals for your writing (what you'd like to improve). If you didn't do the "Deep Thoughts" HW, then take out a piece of loose leaf and write the reasons that prevented you from doing the assignment (1/2 the page) and your writing goals (what you'd like to improve in your writing).

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss/Share Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Reading/Analysis of the packaging (front and back cover) and first page of 1984. Predict the plot based on the packaging. What does this illustration have to do with the plot? What do you anticipate? Identify the setting, mood, and protagonist's characterization.

    How do we effectively prepare to read 1984? Make up any HW owed, which includes the following:
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Find a newspaper article (and bring it in, if you can; if not, then describe the article in detail) that addresses one of the statements in the Anticipation Guide. Read the article and be prepared to share reasons why you chose this article. Some suggested newspapers include: The New York Times, Newsday, The Washington Post, or USA Today.
  • Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today (or in the past)? Provide three examples (potential or real examples). Write in detail, about 1/2-one page.
  • Friday, February 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Identify your favorite statement from the Anticipation Guide. Write three specific examples (you may want to refer to the newspaper article HW and other real-world examples) that support the statement. Show the newspaper article HW. 2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the identified examples in the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Begin the "Deep Thoughts" 500-word HW (two pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that the statement is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.

    How do we learn and apply the themes in 1984? Due Monday:
  • The "Deep Thoughts" paper (500 words or more=two pages typed, double spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading--your name, date, my name, and course name-E6R period 7). Make sure that your chosen statement chosen from Anticipation Guide is your thesis statement, which goes at the end of the introduction. Start the "Deep Thoughts" paper with an attention grabber (like your opinion about the statement or public opinion). Make sure each of your body paragraphs develop the specific examples (in which you refer to current events and/or personal examples). Conclude your paper by restating the thesis in new words and summarize all of your ideas.
  • Thursday, February 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the Self-Assessment, if necessary. Complete the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Show HW. 2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the HW and the Anticipation Guide, a survey of themes found in 1984. Students will share why they agreed or disagreed with each statement. How do we learn and apply the themes in 1984? Find a newspaper article (and bring it in tomorrow if you can; if not, then describe the article in detail) that addresses one of the statements in the Anticipation Guide discussed in class today. Read the article and be prepared to share reasons why you chose this article. Some suggested newspapers include: The New York Times, Newsday, The Washington Post, or USA Today.
    Wednesday, February 4th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the Self-Assessment: Write a minimum of one paragraph for each question below. Write in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples.
  • Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
  • Describe your academic and personal strengths.
  • What three characteristics or traits best define you?
  • Choose one: If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself? What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
  • What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?
  • For Fun: Share five random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share any insight and/or random things about themselves.

    3. Introduce Spring 2009 Syllabus.

  • How do we learn from a self-assessment and prepare for success this semester? Answer this question: How was your privacy invaded today? Provide three examples (potential or real examples).
    Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009: Do Now: Complete the Self-Assessment: Write a minimum of one paragraph for each question below. Write in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples.
  • Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
  • Describe your academic and personal strengths.
  • What three characteristics or traits best define you?
  • Choose one: If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself? What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
  • What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?
  • For Fun: Share five random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

  • How do we engage in a self-assessment? N/A