Junior (periods 7, 8, and 9) English Assignments, Spring 2010

Junior (periods 7, 8, and 9) English Assignments
Spring 2010

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Grades distributed.

2. Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, etc.), work on your resume, write a draft of your college essay, prepare and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications.

3. End of the Year Gifts from Ms. Conn and your fellow classmates (gifts of flattery!)

How can we end the semester effectively? None (the semester is over!). Best of luck on your Regents Exams!

Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, etc.), work on your resume, write a draft of your college essay, prepare and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, and so much more!

Friday, June 11th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Return final papers and review teacher commentaries. Turn in all owed HW (today's the last day!).

2.Work Period: See Resume Samples and Resume Tips. Prepare your own resume. Make up any quizzes, if necessary. Present your extra credit "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy.

How can we end the semester effectively? None (the semester is over!). Best of luck on your Regents Exams!
Wednesday, June 9th, 2010: 1. HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCE AWARDS: Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Costume, Best Performance!

2. Discuss/Brainstorm/Analyze: Introduce Resume Samples and Resume Tips. Take notes. Prepare your own resume.

3. HW Reminders

How can we end the semester effectively? ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 11TH!!! IF YOU DO NOT TURN IN THE FINAL PAPER, YOU WILL LIKELY NOT PASS ENGLISH. JUST DO IT!!!!!

MAKE UP HOMEWORK BY FRIDAY!!! YOU CAN WRITE VOCABULARY STORIES AND MAKE UP VOCABULARY QUIZZES, IF YOU NEED TO. ALL VOCABULARY LISTS CAN BE FOUND HERE.

EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY DUE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 11TH:

  • For a free 100% quiz grade, memorize the first 14 lines of the TO BE OR NOT TO BE SOLILOQUY FROM HAMLET.

    FINAL PAPER WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 26TH!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
  • Tuesday, June 8th, 2010: 1. HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCES!
    *Be mindful of proper articulation, volume/projection, spatial relationships/levels, eye contact, body language, staging, and facial expressions/emotions/energy.

    2. Voting/Q & A (e.g. Why did you choose that interpretation? Did you enjoy preparing Hamlet? What was your favorite part in Hamlet?)

    3. Reflections (What are you most proud of in today's scene performances? What would you want to work on in the future, if there was more time? What did you learn from this experience of practice and performing?)

    How can we successfully perform our Hamlet acting scenes? ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 11TH!!! IF YOU DO NOT TURN IN THE FINAL PAPER, YOU WILL LIKELY NOT PASS ENGLISH. JUST DO IT!!!!!

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY DUE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 11TH:

  • For a free 100% quiz grade, memorize the first 14 lines of the TO BE OR NOT TO BE SOLILOQUY FROM HAMLET.

    FINAL PAPER WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 26TH!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
  • Monday, June 7th, 2010: Work Period: FINAL REHEARSAL! Rehearse your scene, paying close attention to articulation and vocal projection with your fellow actors. Incorporate the volume/articulation, spatial relationships/levels, eye contact, body language, staging, and facial expressions/emotions/energy. How can we finish preparing for our Hamlet acting scenes? LEARN YOUR CHARACTER'S PART (You can find all scenes here: HAMLET. Work on learning your lines, understanding your character's emotions, personality, and interactions with other characters.

    DUE IN CLASS TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JUNE 8th:
    PREPARE AND PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED WITH YOUR GROUP. YOU CAN FIND THE SCENES HERE: HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (quiz grade!)AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    FINAL PAPER WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 26TH!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    

    ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 11TH!!! IF YOU DO NOT TURN IN THE FINAL PAPER, YOU WILL LIKELY NOT PASS ENGLISH. JUST DO IT!!!!!

    Friday, June 4th, 2010: 1. Acting Exercises: Tongue Twisters to work on diction (Betty bought a batch of bitter butter. Six sharp sharks.) and sound passing to work on volume/projection (pass "To Be or Not to Be" and then "That is the Question") across the room (each performance group will stand in a different corner of the room and yell their phrase to another group, with a sad tone).

    2. Work Period: Rehearse your scene, standing up and physically interacting with your fellow actors. Incorporate the volume/articulation, spatial relationships/levels, eye contact, body language, staging, and facial expressions/emotions/energy.

    How can we continue to prepare for our Hamlet acting scenes? LEARN YOUR CHARACTER'S PART (You can find all scenes here: HAMLET. Work on learning your lines, understanding your character's emotions, personality, and interactions with other characters.

    DUE IN CLASS ON TUESDAY, JUNE 8th:
    PREPARE AND PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED WITH YOUR GROUP. YOU CAN FIND THE SCENES HERE: HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (quiz grade!)AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    FINAL PAPER WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
    Thursday, June 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: In your performance group, write/brainstorm the director's vision (your interpretation of the scene; examples=gangster, dancers, soap opera, puppets, sports version, etc.), costumes, staging (entrances and exits), levels, props, and character portrayals (emotions, interactions with other characters).

    2. Work Period: Rehearse your scene, standing up and physically interacting with your fellow actors. Incorporate spatial relationships/levels, eye contact, body language, staging, facial expressions/emotions/energy and volume/articulation.

    How can we continue to prepare for our Hamlet acting scenes? LEARN YOUR CHARACTER'S PART (You can find all scenes here: HAMLET. Work on learning your lines, understanding your character's emotions, personality, and interactions with other characters.

    DUE IN CLASS JUNE 8th and 9th:
    PREPARE AND PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED WITH YOUR GROUP. YOU CAN FIND THE SCENES HERE: HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (quiz grade!)AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    FINAL PAPER WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
    Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud your new and improved (edited) scene in your group. Work on implementing stage directions, physical interactions/spatial relationships, levels, facial expressions and understanding of your character portrayals.

    2. Acting Exercises: Students go to their assigned scene and find a page with their character speaking. Then they will find one line to read aloud. Next, they will share their one line, standing up, using their vocal and facial expressions and body language to reveal emotion and personality.

    How can we continue to prepare for our Hamlet acting scenes? LEARN YOUR CHARACTER'S PART (You can find all scenes here: HAMLET. Work on learning your lines, understanding your character's emotions, personality, and interactions with other characters.

    DUE IN CLASS JUNE 8th and 9th:
    PREPARE AND PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED WITH YOUR GROUP. YOU CAN FIND THE SCENES HERE: HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (quiz grade!)AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    FINAL PAPER WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
    Tuesday, June 1st, 2010: Work Period: Work on editing of your assigned scene. Remember, your scene must be between 4 minutes and 30 seconds and 5 minutes and 30 seconds. You will have points deducted for under time and over time. Please cut out long speeches/soliloquys. Read aloud your scene in your group. How can we continue to prepare for our Hamlet acting scenes? LEARN YOUR CHARACTER'S PART (You can find all scenes here: HAMLET. Work on learning your lines, understanding your character's emotions, personality, and interactions with other characters.

    DUE IN CLASS JUNE 8th and 9th:
    PREPARE AND PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED WITH YOUR GROUP. YOU CAN FIND THE SCENES HERE: HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (quiz grade!)AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    FINAL PAPER WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
    Friday, May 28th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises! Class arranges in a circle. Students go to their assigned scene and find a page with their character speaking. Then they will find one line to read aloud. Next, they will share their one line, using their vocal and facial expressions to reveal emotion and personality. Finally, they will stand up and share their one line again, but this time they will use body language and different levels while interacting with other characters.

    2. Reflections: Write your character's emotions, vocal and facial expressions, body language, levels used, and interactions with other characters. Use these reflections/ideas to prepare and use for your upcoming scene performance.

    How can we continue to prepare for our Hamlet acting scenes? LEARN YOUR CHARACTER'S PART (You can find all scenes here: HAMLET. Work on learning your lines, understanding your character's emotions, personality, and interactions with other characters.

    DUE IN CLASS THE WEEK OF JUNE 7th:
    PREPARE AND PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED WITH YOUR GROUP. YOU CAN FIND THE SCENES HERE: HAMLET (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (quiz grade!)AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    FINAL PAPER WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
    Thursday, May 27th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce the GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE. An explanation of the Hamlet scene groups. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    2. Work Period: Get into assigned performance groups. Read aloud your scene, determine character roles, and figure out how to edit the scene.

    How can we continue to prepare for our Hamlet acting scenes? FINAL PAPER WAS DUE YESTERDAY!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    

    DUE IN CLASS THE WEEK OF JUNE 7th:
    PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (quiz grade!)AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    Wednesday, May 26th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Turn in the final paper with the grading rubric.

    2. Reflections. How did the writing process go? Are you happy with the final product? Why or why not?

    3. Acting Exercises: Begin tableaus--Statues (acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet). Statues will include archetypes in literature (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, valiant knight) and characters as animals in Hamlet. Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Archetype portrayals (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight). Do a tableau for each of the major scenes from Hamlet:
    1.) Hamlet, Horatio, and Guards see Ghost of Hamlet's Father outside of the castle at midnight. Hamlet speaks to the Ghost. Ghost tells Hamlet to get revenge for his murder.
    2.) Laertes is warning his sister, Ophelia about Hamlet before he leaves for school. His old father, Polonius is talking too much.
    3.) King Claudius, Queen Gertrude and Polonius hide behind a curtain, spying on Ophelia and Hamlet talking. Hamlet is acting strange.
    4.) At the play Hamlet has arranged, the Player King is acting out Claudius' murder of Hamlet's father onstage. Claudius is running out of the room, very upset. Gertrude is following him. Hamlet and Horatio are watching how Claudius reacts.
    5.) Polonius, hiding behind a curtain in Gertrude's room, is stabbed by Hamlet. Hamlet and Gertrude, his mother, are in an argument about his mother's marriage to Claudius, his uncle and now his stepfather.
    6.) Laertes is planning to get revenge for Polonius' (his father) murder. Ophelia, his sister, has gone crazy. Claudius tries to keep Laertes calm.
    7.) First Laertes and then Hamlet jump into Ophelia's grave at her funeral. Claudius, Gertrude and Horatio try to break up their fight.
    8.) Hamlet and Laertes are sword-fighting on a bet. Gertrude is dying from drinking from a poisoned cup that was meant for Hamlet. Hamlet has just discovered Claudius' plot to kill him. Hamlet stabs Claudius. Claudius is dying.
    9.) Laertes has accidentally been stabbed with his own poisoned sword and is dying. Hamlet has also been stabbed by the poisoned sword.
    10.) Hamlet, on his death bed, whispers his last words to Horatio. Fortinbras, the Prince of Norway, enters and sees this terrible scene of Gertrude, Claudius, Laertes and Hamlet lying dead.

    How can we begin to prepare for our Hamlet acting scenes? FINAL PAPER WAS DUE TODAY!!! It's -10 points for each day it's turned in late. It's 25% of your grade. It's on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    

    DUE IN CLASS THE WEEK OF JUNE 7th:
    PERFORM ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES ASSIGNED (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded? Remember, each scene must be performed in 5 minutes) Act I Scene V (4 characters); Act II Scene II until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene I (7 characters); Act III Scene II--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene II--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (quiz grade!)AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.

    Tuesday, May 25th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Freewrite on the essay question: How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings?

    2. Work Period: Work on journals owed and final paper.

    3. Review the final paper requirements (especially the Works Cited page). Q & A for the final paper.

    How can we effectively prepare for the final analysis paper? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26th: FINAL PAPER (25% of your grade) on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
    Monday, May 24th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review Act V. Take notes.

    2. Work Period: Work on journals owed. Turn in Act V journal.

    3. Discuss the final paper requirements (especially the Works Cited page). Freewrite for the final paper.

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act V of Hamlet? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 26th: FINAL PAPER (25% of your grade) on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.) or I (my, me, mine, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
    Friday, May 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the end of Act IV.

    2. Work Period: Work on journals owed. Read Act V (due Monday). Turn in Act IV journal.

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act IV of Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 24th:
  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 26th: FINAL PAPER (25% of your grade) on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

    Works Cited
    
    Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. New York: Signet Classic, 1977.
    
    Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. 1603. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007.
    
  • Thursday, May 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act IV Scenes IV, V, VI and VII. In Scene IV, suspense builds in the play, as Fortinbras' army marches over to Denmark, waiting to embark in battle. Hamlet acknowledges that every man needs a mission. In Scene V, Ophelia has gone mad over Polonius' death and Hamlet's rejection. Denmark is in disorder. Laertes is vengeful against Hamlet for killing his father. In Scene VI, Hamlet is a prisoner and sends notice to Horatio to help him. In Scene VII, Laertes vows revenge against Hamlet. Claudius gets Laertes on his side to seek revenge against Hamlet. They conspire to kill Hamlet. Ophelia is dead (drowning). Laertes has a mission.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss and analyze the end of Act IV. Take notes.

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act IV Scenes IV, V, and VII of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 21st:
  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 26th: FINAL PAPER (25% of your grade) on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

  • Wednesday, May 19th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read aloud Act IV Scenes I, II and III. In Scene I, Claudius and Gertrude discuss Hamlet's madness/danger and decide to send him to England. In Scene II, Hamlet reveals to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern that he knows the truth about them. Hamlet knows that they can't be trusted. Hamlet tells them that Claudius wil throw them away when he's done with them. In Scene III, Hamlet refuses to tell Claudius what he did with Polonius' body. Hamlet reveals that he is more clever than Claudius. He has a way with words.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Review the requirements for the final paper (see details in the HW section).

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act IV Scenes I, II and III of Hamlet? DUE THIS, FRIDAY, MAY 21st:
  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 26th: FINAL PAPER (25% of your grade) on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

  • Tuesday, May 18th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review Act III, focusing on scenes III and IV. Take notes as we discuss/analyze Claudius' unraveling (his guilty revelations) and Hamlet's unraveling (killing Polonius and appearing mad to his mother).

    2. Work Period: Make up any owed journals/vocabulary stories. Turn in Act III journal.

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act III Scenes III and IV of Hamlet? DUE THIS, FRIDAY, MAY 21st:
  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 26th: FINAL PAPER (25% of your grade) on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

  • Monday, May 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #11 Quiz. Turn in Story #11.

    2. Work Period: If you did not complete Story #11, write it at this time. Make up any vocabulary stories or journal entries you may owe. Work on Act III journal entry (due tomorrow!).

    How can we effectively improve our vocabulary/language skills? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MAY 18th:
  • Finish reading Act III of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.

    DUE THIS, FRIDAY, MAY 21st:

  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MAY 26th: FINAL PAPER (25% of your grade) on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

  • Friday, May 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read Act III Scene II. Discuss how Hamlet has arranged a play that models his father's murder. What are his plans? How does he make these arrangements? Why is this play within the play important to the story? He arranges this play to be seen by the King and Queen so he can observe Claudius' reaction and reveal his guilt. Hamlet only trusts Horatio, so he confides in him about his plan--the play and the revelation of Claudius' guilt.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Analyze and take notes on this scene.

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act III Scene II of Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 17th:
  • List #11 QUIZ--YOUR FINAL VOCABULARY QUIZ!
  • Vocabulary #11 STORY (it MUST be on Shakespeare OR Hamlet)--YOUR FINAL VOCABULARY STORY. Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #11 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE THIS, TUESDAY, MAY 18th:

  • Finish reading Act III of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.

    DUE NEXT, FRIDAY, MAY 21st:

  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE MONDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MAY 26th: FINAL PAPER (25% of your grade) on THIS QUESTION=How do characters in both Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 1984 by George Orwell find purpose and meaning in their lives as they deal with personal sufferings? You should illustrate, explain, analyze, and evaluate the chosen characters in depth. Do NOT summarize the plot. Do NOT use any form of you (your, our, we, etc.). The paper should be 3-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, in Times New Roman. Include sufficient supporting evidence, at least three meaningful quotes with analysis for each quote (reasons that these quotes are appropriate and supportive of the paper's question). Those quotes should be properly inserted in your paper (here's a resource on using proper in-text citation). Here's an example: Winston said, "Down with Big Brother" (Orwell 53). Also, include a Works Cited at the end of your paper (here's a great Works Cited Resource, proper heading and page format (here's a Sample Paper with a Proper Heading and Page Format, an original title, a clear thesis statement (which addresses the paper's question) in your introduction, and a paper that follows the categories of audience & expression, organization & structure, development, sentence structure & word choice, and grammar & mechanics. Use this Grading Rubric to guide you in composing a successful paper.

  • Thursday, May 13th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read Act III Scene I. Analyze the characterization of Hamlet, as seen through other characters (Claudius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Ophelia) and the audience. Examine the significance of the famous "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy. Why does Hamlet's mental state appear imbalanced and balanced at the same time?

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Analyze and take notes on these two scenes.

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act III Scenes I and II of Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 17th:
  • List #11 QUIZ--YOUR FINAL VOCABULARY QUIZ!
  • Vocabulary #11 STORY (it MUST be on Shakespeare OR Hamlet). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #11 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE THIS, TUESDAY, MAY 18th:

  • Read Act III of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.

    DUE NEXT, FRIDAY, MAY 21st:

  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE MONDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Wednesday, May 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Discuss the rest of Act II Hamlet. Discuss and take notes on the following: The characterization of Polonius and what we can anticipate from his character later in the play, the relationships between Polonius and Laertes and Polonius and Ophelia and the class structure that creates some characters in authoritative positions and others in inferior positions. How does status affect the play? How does Hamlet reveal his shrewdness and sharp intellect (refer to the arrangement of the play to reveal Claudius's guilt)? Identify his portentous language. Examine the relationship between Hamlet's childhood friends, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, and Hamlet. Identify evidence supporting that they are typical teenage males. Finally, discuss and analyze Hamlet's soliloquy, at the end of Act II, in which he reveals to his audience his plotting against Claudius and how he plans to uncover Claudius' guilt.

    2. Work Period: Share Act II journal entries OR write the Act II journal entry. Show your Act II journal HW.

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act II Scene II of Hamlet? DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 17th:
  • List #11 QUIZ--YOUR FINAL VOCABULARY QUIZ!
  • Vocabulary #11 STORY (it MUST be on Shakespeare OR Hamlet). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #11 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE NEXT, TUESDAY, MAY 18th:

  • Read Act III of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.

    DUE NEXT, FRIDAY, MAY 21st:

  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE MONDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Tuesday, May 11th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Begin reading Act II Scene I of Hamlet. Discuss the following: The characterization of Polonius and what we can anticipate from his character later in the play, the relationships between Polonius and Laertes and Polonius and Ophelia and the class structure that creates some characters in authoritative positions and others in inferior positions. How does status affect the play? How does Hamlet reveal his shrewdness and sharp intellect (refer to the arrangement of the play to reveal Claudius's guilt)?

    2. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act II Scene I of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12th:
  • Read the rest of Act II of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 17th:

  • List #11 QUIZ--YOUR FINAL VOCABULARY QUIZ!
  • Vocabulary #11 STORY (it MUST be on Shakespeare OR Hamlet). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #11 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE NEXT, TUESDAY, MAY 18th:

  • Read Act III of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.

    DUE NEXT, FRIDAY, MAY 21st:

  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE MONDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Monday, May 10th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #10. Turn in Story #10.

    2. Introduce our final vocabulary list--List #11.

    How can we effectively improve our vocabulary/language skills? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 12th:
  • Read Act II of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page, double-spaced). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.
  • Friday, May 7th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review and discuss the remaining scenes (Scenes III, IV and V) of Act I of Hamlet. Discuss the following: What's Laertes's advice to his sister Ophelia? What's Polonius's advice to his son Laertes? How does the audience know that Hamlet is feeling depressed and having low self worth? What important "truths" does the ghost reveal to Hamlet? How does the ghost feel about Queen Gertrude? What religious references are used and for what purpose?

    2. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively discuss and analyze Act I of Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 10th:
  • List #10 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #10 STORY (it MUST be on Shakespeare OR Hamlet). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #10 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Thursday, May 6th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue reading Scene II of Act I of Hamlet. Take notes and answer the following questions: Why has the ghost of King Hamlet appeared? What can we expect in the scenes to come? How do we characterize Claudius? How do we characterize young Hamlet? How are these opening scenes typical of Shakespeare's style and time period? What are the audience's first impressions of Gertrude (look at her first words in Scene II)? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Claudius and Hamlet? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Queen Gertrude and Hamlet? How does Hamlet's (and Shakespeare's) misogyny reveal itself in Act I? What's Laertes's advice to his sister Ophelia? What's Polonius's advice to his son Laertes? How does the audience know that Hamlet is feeling depressed and having low self worth? Why would the audience suspect the ghost is not trustworthy? What important "truths" does the ghost reveal to Hamlet? How does the ghost feel about Queen Gertrude? What religious references are used and for what purpose?

    2. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively analyze Act I of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 14th:
  • Finish Act I of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 10th:

  • List #10 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #10 STORY (it MUST be on Shakespeare OR Hamlet). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #10 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Wednesday, May 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read the introductory scene of Act I of Hamlet. Why has the ghost of King Hamlet appeared? What can we expect in the scenes to come? How do we characterize Claudius? How do we characterize young Hamlet? How are these opening scenes typical of Shakespeare's style and time period? What are the audience's first impressions of Gertrude (look at her first words in Scene II)? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Claudius and Hamlet? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Queen Gertrude and Hamlet? How does Hamlet's (and Shakespeare's) misogyny reveal itself in Act I? What's Laertes's advice to his sister Ophelia? What's Polonius's advice to his son Laertes? How does the audience know that Hamlet is feeling depressed and having low self worth? Why would the audience suspect the ghost is not trustworthy? What important "truths" does the ghost reveal to Hamlet? How does the ghost feel about Queen Gertrude? What religious references are used and for what purpose?

    2. Introduce the character journal HW.

    How can we effectively begin Act I of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 14th:
  • Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 10th:

  • List #10 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #10 STORY (it MUST be on Shakespeare OR Hamlet). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #10 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Tuesday, May 4th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Note-taking on Shakespeare--his life and times, iambic pentameter and Hamlet predictions.

    2. 1984 EXAM on Parts II and III returns.

    How can we acquire Shakespeare and Hamlet background information? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 14th:
  • Read Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 10th:

  • List #10 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #10 STORY (it MUST be on Shakespeare OR Hamlet). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #10 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Monday, May 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #9. Turn in Story #9.

    2. Introduce List #10.

    How can we improve our vocabulary/language skills? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 14th:
  • Read Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose ONE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRY. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. A journal entry should be a minimum of 300 words (that's about two handwritten pages or one typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 10th:

  • List #10 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #10 STORY (it can be on anything--your life, teenagers in America, news, celebrities, etc.). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #10 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Friday, April 30th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the answers to the 1984 EXAM ON PARTS II AND III

    2. Work Period: Work on Story #9. Study List #9.

    How can we prove our knowledge and study of Parts II and III in 1984? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 3RD:
  • List #9 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #9 STORY (it can be on anything--your life, teenagers in America, news, celebrities, etc.). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #9 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Thursday, April 29th, 2010: 1984 EXAM ON PARTS II AND III How can we prove our knowledge and study of Parts II and III in 1984? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 3RD:
  • List #9 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #9 STORY (it can be on anything--your life, teenagers in America, news, celebrities, etc.). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #9 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    1984 MOVIE SHOWING TOMORROW AT 2PM IN MY ROOM (232)! FREE POPCORN, CANDY, VANILLA WAFERS, AND JUICE!

  • Wednesday, April 28th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish review of the 1984 Parts II and III Exam Review Questions, using the novel. See key pages to better understand each question on the review sheet. O'Brien (pp. 244-245; 250); doublethink (p. 247); Winston (p. 270); Room 101 (p. 283); Winston betrays Julia to save himself from the rats (p. 286); Winston's released (p. 287); the ending--Winston and Julia are frozen robots, obeying and loving Big Brother (pp. 287-297)

    2. Work Period: Read and review for tomorrow's EXAM!

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we prepare for our upcoming exam on Parts II and III in 1984? TOMORROW, THURSDAY, APRIL 29TH:
  • EXAM ON PARTS II AND III OF 1984 (25% of 3rd marking period grade). Use the 1984 Parts II and III Exam Review Questions to guide you in your study. Also, study your post-its and how the pursuit of happiness is revealed in Parts II and III, as well as your class notes.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 3RD:

  • List #9 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #9 STORY (it can be on anything--your life, teenagers in America, news, celebrities, etc.). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #9 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Tuesday, April 27th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Answer the 1984 Parts II and III Exam Review Questions, using the novel. Make up the List #8 Quiz, if necessary.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the Do Now answers.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we prepare for our upcoming exam on Parts II and III in 1984? THIS THURSDAY, APRIL 29TH:
  • EXAM ON PARTS II AND III OF 1984 (25% of 3rd marking period grade). Use the 1984 Parts II and III Exam Review Questions to guide you in your study. Also, study your post-its and how the pursuit of happiness is revealed in Parts II and III, as well as your class notes.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 3RD:

  • List #9 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #9 STORY (it can be on anything--your life, teenagers in America, news, celebrities, etc.). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #9 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Monday, April 26th, 2010: 1. Do Now: List #8 Quiz. Turn in your Story #8.

    2. Discuss/Share: Introduce List #9.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we improve our vocabulary/language skills? THIS THURSDAY, APRIL 29TH:
  • EXAM ON PARTS II AND III OF 1984 (25% of 3rd marking period grade).

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 3RD:

  • List #9 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #9 STORY (it can be on anything--your life, teenagers in America, news, celebrities, etc.). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #9 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Friday, April 23rd, 2010--Happy Birthday Shakespeare!: 1. Do Now: Reading and analysis of Sonnet 18. Partake of the treats to commemorate Shakespeare's birthday!

    2. Work Period: Study List #8 and work on story #8 on 1984. Turn in your Part III post-its (15) and any owed HW today (the last day of the 2nd marking period).

    How can we commemorate Shakespeare's birthday and improve our lexicon? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 26TH:
  • Vocabulary #8 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #8 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #8 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    EXAM ON PARTS II AND III OF 1984--NEXT THURSDAY, APRIL 29TH! It's 25% of the 3rd marking period grade!

  • Thursday, April 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read the "In Washington, Thousands Stage Protest Against Big Government" article taken from The New York Times. Answer the following questions: Is our American government turning into the government in 1984? Explain your opinion, based on the article. How can we prevent our own society from turning into the 1984 society?

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the article and the questions/answers in the Do Now.

    How can we make worldly connections to 1984? DUE TOMORROW FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:
  • All owed work due tomorrow (it's the last day of the 2nd marking period)!
  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING NEXT WEEK--THURSDAY, APRIL 29TH.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 26TH:

  • Vocabulary #8 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #8 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #8 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

  • Wednesday, April 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: What was George Orwell's purpose in writing his novel? Was it to entertain, persuade or inform? Find evidence in the novel to support your claims. What would George Orwell think of our present-day world?

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss students' answers to the Do Now questions. How can we prevent our own society from turning into the 1984 society?

    How can we understand the author's purpose and make worldly connections in 1984? DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:
  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING NEXT WEEK--THURSDAY, APRIL 29TH.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 26TH:

  • Vocabulary #8 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #8 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #8 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

  • Tuesday, April 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Poster-making, using the slogans/catch-phrases from 1984! Decorate the room with the posters and streamers. Show your blue clothing HW!

    2. Work Period: Learn the Michigan Fight Song!

    3. Exercises

    4. Two Minutes Hate (enemy=bad student)

    5. Reflections: How did you feel living in the world of 1984?

    How can we enact a 1984 world through visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning? DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:
  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING NEXT WEEK--THURSDAY, APRIL 29TH.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 26TH:

  • Vocabulary #8 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #8 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #8 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

  • Monday, April 19th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #7 QUIZ. Read 1984!

    2. Work Period: Read over Vocabulary List #8.

    How can we improve our vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Wear all blue (yes, this is a homework assignment!) in honor of 1984. We will have 1984 activities tomorrow: we will put up banners and streamers, make posters, listen to marching band/patriotic music, learn a fight song, practice exercises, and do a Two Minutes Hate.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING NEXT WEEK--WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28TH.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 26TH:

  • Vocabulary #8 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #8 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #8 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

  • Friday, April 16th, 2010: 1. Do Now: With your assigned partner, share your interpretation of your given quote taken from Part II of 1984 (see quotes below). How is this quote important to the story? What do you learn about the speaker? About other characters?
  • Chapter I: At the sight of the words I love you the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor risks suddenly seemed stupid (narrator, p. 109).
  • Chapter II: Their embrace had been a battle, the climax a victory. It was a blow struck against the Party. It was a political act (narrator, p. 126).
  • Chapter III: “When you make love, you’re using up energy; and afterwards you feel happy and don’t give a damn for anything. They can’t bear you to feel like that. They want you to be bursting with energy all the time. All this marching up and down and cheering and waving flags is simply sex gone sour (Julia, p. 133).
  • Chapter IV: “I’m going to get hold of a real woman’s frock from somewhere and wear it instead of these bloody trousers. I’ll wear silk stockings and high-heeled shoes! In this room I’m going to be a woman, not a Party comrade” (Julia, p. 143).
  • Chapter V: Squads of volunteers, organized by Parsons, were preparing the street for Hate Week, stitching banners, painting posters, erecting flagstaffs on the roofs, and perilously slinging wires across the street for the reception of streamers (narrator, p. 148).
  • Chapter VI: He had the sensation of stepping into the dampness of a grave, and it was not much better because he had always known that the grave was there and waiting for him (narrator, p. 159).
  • Chapter VII: “The can’t get inside of you. If you can feel that staying human is worthwhile, even when it can’t have any result whatever, you’ve beaten them” (Winston, p. 166).
  • Chapter VIII: “The Brotherhood cannot be wiped out because it is not an organization in the ordinary sense. Nothing holds it together except an idea which is indestructible. You will never have anything to sustain you except the idea” (O’Brien, p. 176).
  • Chapter IX: The next moment there was a tremendous commotion. The banners and posters with which the square was decorated were all wrong! Quite half of them had the wrong faces on them. It was sabotage! The agents of Goldstein had been at work! (narrator, p. 181).
  • Chapter X: Out of their bodies no child would ever come. That was the one thing they could never do. Only by word of mouth, from mind to mind, could they pass on the secret (narrator, p. 219)

    *Take notes on your classmates' interpretations and the quotes' significance to the story.

    2. Work Period: Work on Vocabulary List #7 Story (due Monday!) and study for the quiz.

  • How can we examine significant quotes and understand their importance in Part II of 1984? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 19TH:
  • Vocabulary #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #7 STORY (it can be about ANY topic (some suggestions include: a day in your life, your future, life at ITHS, your friends, or 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #7 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING.
  • Thursday, April 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: With your assigned partner, interpret your given quote taken from Part II of 1984 (see quotes below). How is this quote important to the story? What do you learn about the speaker? About other characters?
  • Chapter I: At the sight of the words I love you the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor risks suddenly seemed stupid (narrator, p. 109).
  • Chapter II: Their embrace had been a battle, the climax a victory. It was a blow struck against the Party. It was a political act (narrator, p. 126).
  • Chapter III: “When you make love, you’re using up energy; and afterwards you feel happy and don’t give a damn for anything. They can’t bear you to feel like that. They want you to be bursting with energy all the time. All this marching up and down and cheering and waving flags is simply sex gone sour (Julia, p. 133).
  • Chapter IV: “I’m going to get hold of a real woman’s frock from somewhere and wear it instead of these bloody trousers. I’ll wear silk stockings and high-heeled shoes! In this room I’m going to be a woman, not a Party comrade” (Julia, p. 143).
  • Chapter V: Squads of volunteers, organized by Parsons, were preparing the street for Hate Week, stitching banners, painting posters, erecting flagstaffs on the roofs, and perilously slinging wires across the street for the reception of streamers (narrator, p. 148).
  • Chapter VI: He had the sensation of stepping into the dampness of a grave, and it was not much better because he had always known that the grave was there and waiting for him (narrator, p. 159).
  • Chapter VII: “The can’t get inside of you. If you can feel that staying human is worthwhile, even when it can’t have any result whatever, you’ve beaten them” (Winston, p. 166).
  • Chapter VIII: “The Brotherhood cannot be wiped out because it is not an organization in the ordinary sense. Nothing holds it together except an idea which is indestructible. You will never have anything to sustain you except the idea” (O’Brien, p. 176).
  • Chapter IX: The next moment there was a tremendous commotion. The banners and posters with which the square was decorated were all wrong! Quite half of them had the wrong faces on them. It was sabotage! The agents of Goldstein had been at work! (narrator, p. 181).
  • Chapter X: Out of their bodies no child would ever come. That was the one thing they could never do. Only by word of mouth, from mind to mind, could they pass on the secret (narrator, p. 219)

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your findings with the class. Take notes on your classmates' interpretations and the quotes' significance to the story.

  • How can we examine significant quotes in Part II of 1984? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, APRIL 16TH:
  • Read Part II of 1984 (chapters 1-10 EXCEPT pp. 184-216). Compose 25 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 19TH:
  • Vocabulary #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #7 STORY (it can be about ANY topic (some suggestions include: a day in your life, your future, life at ITHS, your friends, or 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #7 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING.
  • Wednesday, April 14th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Read Part II chapters I and II of 1984. Compose 5 post-its on characters pursuing happiness.

    2. Discuss/Share: What makes people fall in love? Answers include: personalities, attraction (magnetic pull), money, similar values and backgrounds, etc. Why do Winston and Julia get together? Answers include: Winston's rebellious nature is very attractive to Julia, therefore she seeks him out. Is it love? Why or why not? Answers include: It may develop into love because they share the same values and belief system. Why doesn't the Party approve? Because the Party only allows its citizens to have love for it, not for each other. How does Winston feel now that he learns Julia loves him? He feels empowered and not alone anymore. How do you think it's meaningful to Winston's mission in the story? It's important because now he has a partner in crime.

    How can we understand the blossoming relationship between Winston and Julia in Part II of 1984? DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 16TH:
  • Read Part II of 1984 (chapters 1-10 EXCEPT pp. 184-216). Compose 25 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 19TH:
  • Vocabulary #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #7 STORY (it can be about ANY topic (some suggestions include: a day in your life, your future, life at ITHS, your friends, or 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #7 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING.
  • Tuesday, April 13th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Grade List #6 quiz.

    2. Work Period: Read Part II chapters I and II of 1984. Compose 5 post-its on characters pursuing happiness.

    3. Discuss/Share: How does Winston feel now that he learns Julia loves him? How is this new relationship between Winston and Julia meaningful to Winston's mission in the story?

    How can we improve our reading skills and study of Part II of 1984? DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 16TH:
  • Read Part II of 1984 (chapters 1-10 EXCEPT pp. 184-216). Compose 25 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 19TH:
  • Vocabulary #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #7 STORY (it can be about ANY topic (some suggestions include: a day in your life, your future, life at ITHS, your friends, or 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #7 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING.
  • Monday, April 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #6. Turn in Story #6 (HW due today).

    2. Discuss/Share: Introduce List #7.

    How can we improve our lexicon for the SAT and college? DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 16TH:
  • Read Part II of 1984 (chapters 1-10 EXCEPT pp. 184-216). Compose 25 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 19TH:
  • Vocabulary #7 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #7 STORY (it MUST be about 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #7 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING.
  • Friday, April 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #6.

    2. Work Period: Work on Story #6 and other owed HW.

    How can we effectively improve our vocabulary and prepare for our upcoming quiz on list #6? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 12TH:
  • Vocabulary #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #6 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #6 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, APRIL 16TH:

  • Read Part II of 1984 (chapters 1-10 EXCEPT pp. 184-216). Compose 25 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness.

    DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING.
  • Thursday, April 8th, 2010: ESSAY EXAM ON PART I OF 1984 How can we effectively prove our understanding of Part I of 1984? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 12TH:
  • Vocabulary #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #6 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #6 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, APRIL 16TH:

  • Read Part II of 1984 (chapters 1-10 EXCEPT pp. 184-216). Compose 25 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness.

    DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING.
  • Wednesday, April 7th, 2010--Welcome Back!: 1. Do Now: Make a list of pro's and con's of the 1984 society. Half the class will be writing the pro list and the other half will write the con list. This will be debated later! While students are working on this Do Now, others will be called up individually to show their 20 post-its for Part I and any other owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss/Debate the pro and con lists! Review the rest of Part I. Focus on the following:

  • Why does Winston say "If there is hope, it lies in the proles"? (p. 69)
  • Why is it important that the Party makes its citizens believe that 2+2=5? (p. 80)
  • What was the proles' principal reason for remaining alive and how did this reason promote their ignorance? (p. 85)
  • What does Winston learn when he goes to the town of the proles? (pp. 86-100)
  • Who said "we shall meet in the place where there is no darkness" and what does it mean? (pp. 103-104)

    3. HW Reminders: Prepare for tomorrow's essay exam components and grading rubric. Distribute Vocabulary List #6.

  • How can we effectively evaluate the essence of Part I of 1984? PART I EXAM ON 1984 TOMORROW, THURSDAY, APRIL 8TH:
  • This will be an in-class essay exam (50% of your 2nd marking period grade!). It will test your knowledge of Part I and your study/analysis of the theme of "pursuit of happiness." You should know how characters pursue happiness and how they are prevented from happiness under the authority of Big Brother. You should use your post-its, vocabulary stories (see all of my teacher comments!), and in-class notes to guide you in studying!

    DUE MONDAY, APRIL 12TH:

  • Vocabulary #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #6 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #6 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, APRIL 16TH:

  • Read Part II of 1984 (chapters 1-10 EXCEPT pp. 184-216). Compose 25 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness.

    DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23RD:

  • FINISH 1984! Read Part III (chapters 1-6). Compose 15 post-its (5 post-its for every two chapters) that reveal how characters pursue happiness and how they're prevented from achieving happiness. EXAM COMING.
  • Friday, March 26th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish creating a Top Ten List of the top ten things that exist in 1984 that also exist today. Here are some suggestions: 1.) telescreen monitoring their every move=video cameras in subways, buses, schools, department stores, snapgrades!, etc., 2.) children taught to be spies="if you see something, say something"--mantra repeated in subways/buses to encourage citizens to spy on each other, 3.) fear/hatred toward "enemies of the state, foreigners, traitors, etc." (p. 24)=fear/hatred toward terrorists, both at home and abroad, 4.) Pro-War (p. 32-"Winston could not remember a time when his country had not been at war..")=War with Iraq and Terrorism, 5.) Focus on entertainment (drama, music, porn, astrology, crime) and rubbish news (p. 43)=same today!, 6.) Newspeak (pp. 44 and 52)=Texting/IM language to simplify ideas, 7.) Prostitution/Affairs (p. 65)=same today!, 8.) Banning and rationing everything (pp. 58-59-chocolate, tobacco, razors, etc.)=banning trans fat in restaurants in NYC, home-baked goods at school fundraisers in NYC schools, requiring calories shown at stores/restaurants, etc., 9.) Monopoly on everything (p. 58-Victory Cigarettes and p. 5-Victory Gin)=Monopoly on everything (Apple computers, Ipods, Barnes and Noble bookstores, Chase banks, etc.), 10.) Patriotism is good! (p. 68-slogans, military music, parades)=same today!

    2. Discuss and take notes on the Top Ten List.

    How can we expand understand the theme of "pursuit of happiness" as revealed in Part I of 1984? Make up ALL HW owed OVER SPRING BREAK:
  • 15 post-its for Part I (chapters 1-6, up to p. 69) in 1984.
  • Vocabulary Stories #1-5. Use an entire list for each story; see the vocabulary lists HERE.
  • Register for collegeboard.com HERE. Bring in proof of registration!

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7TH (the day we get back after Spring Break!):

  • Read ALL of Part I (chapters 1-8, up to p. 104) in 1984. You should have a total of 20 post-its!! That's FIVE post-its for every two chapters. Your post-its should include notes on how characters pursue happiness and how Big Brother prevents their happiness.

    PART I EXAM ON 1984 ON THURSDAY, APRIL 8TH:

  • This will be an in-class essay exam (50% of your 2nd marking period grade!). It will test your knowledge of Part I and your study/analysis of the theme of "pursuit of happiness." You should know how characters pursue happiness and how they are prevented from happiness under the authority of Big Brother. You should use your post-its, vocabulary stories (see all of my teacher comments!), and in-class notes to guide you in studying!

    DUE MONDAY, APRIL 12TH:

  • Vocabulary #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #6 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #6 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Thursday, March 25th, 2010: PERIOD 8 GOES HERE

    1. Do Now: Finish discussing the following questions:
    1.) What is Comrade Ogilvy's purpose in the world of 1984? How is he meant to make the citizens happy? See pp. 46-48
    2.) Why doesn't Katharine, Winston's wife, make him happy? See pp. 66-67
    3.) Why does Winston seek out a prostitute? See p. 68
    4.) What's the purpose of Newspeak? p. 52
    5.) Describe an ideal citizen. See pp. 21, 24, and 47

    2. Work Period: Create a Top Ten List of the top ten laws that exist in 1984 that also exist today.

    How can we expand understanding the theme of "pursuit of happiness" as revealed in Part I of 1984? PERIOD 8 GOES HERE

    Make up ALL HW owed:

  • 15 post-its for Part I (chapters 1-6, up to p. 69) in 1984.
  • Vocabulary Stories #1-5. Use an entire list for each story; see the vocabulary lists HERE.
  • Register for collegeboard.com HERE. Bring in proof of registration!

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7TH (the day we get back after Spring Break!):

  • Read ALL of Part I (chapters 1-8, up to p. 104) in 1984. You should have a total of 20 post-its!! That's FIVE post-its for every two chapters.

    PART I EXAM ON 1984 ON THURSDAY, APRIL 8TH:

  • This will be an in-class essay exam (50% of your 2nd marking period grade!). It will test your knowledge of Part I and your study/analysis of the theme of "pursuit of happiness." You should know how characters pursue happiness and how they are prevented from happiness under the authority of Big Brother. You should use your post-its, vocabulary stories (see all of my teacher comments!), and in-class notes to guide you in studying!

    DUE MONDAY, APRIL 12TH:

  • Vocabulary #6 QUIZ
  • Vocabulary #6 STORY (it MUST be on 1984). Again, remember, you MUST use ALL of the words from the list correctly in the story. You must underline the words in your story. Your story should be two pages, handwritten, OR one page, typed. You must include a proper heading (your name, the date, my name, and the course name/period). You must write Story #6 for the title. Use proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization.
  • Wednesday, March 24th, 2010: PERIOD 8 GOES HERE

    1. Do Now: Turn in your college board proof of registration. Listen and take notes when listening to Ms. Soriano, your guidance counselor, speak about the SAT and college information.

    2. Work Period: Write and answer the following questions:
    1.) What is Comrade Ogilvy�s purpose in the world of 1984? How is he meant to make the citizens happy?
    2.) Why doesn�t Katharine, Winston's wife, make him happy?
    3.) Why does Winston seek out a prostitute?
    4.) What�s the purpose of Newspeak?
    5.) Describe an ideal citizen.

    3. Discuss the work period questions. Take notes.

    How can we expand understand the theme of "pursuit of happiness" as revealed in Part I of 1984? PERIOD 8 GOES HERE

    Make up any HW owed:

  • 15 post-its for Part I (chapters 1-6, up to p. 69) in 1984.
  • Vocabulary Stories #1-5. Use an entire list for each story; see the vocabulary lists HERE.
  • Register for collegeboard.com HERE. Bring in proof of registration!
  • Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010: PERIOD 8 GOES HERE

    1. Do Now: Make a list of five things that make you happy and explain why and how they make you happy. List five things that make Winston happy. Find page #s. Show your 15 HW post-its.

    2. Discuss the following questions:
    1.) What is Comrade Ogilvy�s purpose in the world of 1984? How is he meant to make the citizens happy?
    2.) Why doesn�t Katharine, Winston's wife, make him happy?
    3.) Why does Winston seek out a prostitute?
    4.) What�s the purpose of Newspeak?
    5.) Describe an ideal citizen.

    How can we expand understand the theme of "pursuit of happiness" as revealed in Part I of 1984? PERIOD 8 GOES HERE

    Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, March 24th:

  • Register for collegeboard.com HERE. Bring in proof of registration!
  • Monday, March 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary #5 Quiz. Turn in Story #5. (Read 1984, make post-its, and make up HW when finished with the quiz).

    2. Grade quizzes!

    3. HW reminders.

    How can we expand our lexicon? Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, March 23rd:
  • Read chapters V and VI in 1984 (up to p. 69). Write 5 post-its that focus on the characters pursuing happiness and characters being oppressed (having their freedom taken away). Some suggested questions to answer in your post-its are the following: How does Winston stay happy in this society? How do other characters, like the girl with dark hair and the children, stay happy? How are the characters being oppressed? Look for evidence of their freedoms taken away.

    Due THIS Wednesday, March 24th:

  • Register for collegeboard.com HERE. Bring in proof of registration!
  • Thursday, March 18th, 2010: PERIOD 8 GOES HERE

    1. Do Now: In your notebook (literature section), answer the following questions for chapters I, II, III and IV: How are Winston and his fellow citizens being oppressed? How is oppression hindering Winston's pursuit of happiness? How is Winston dealing with oppression? How does Winston keep his sanity? How are the people being tricked into happiness? Why do the children adore the party (p. 24)? Show your 10 post-its (5 post-its for chapters I and II and 5 post-its for chapters III and IV).

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the answers to the Do Now questions. Take notes!

    How can we effectively analyze the theme of pursuit of happiness and the issue of oppression in chapters I-IV in 1984? PERIOD 8 GOES HERE

    Due THIS COMING Monday, March 22nd:

  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #5 Story. You MUST write your story on any topic introduced in the novel 1984. Some suggestions include (but you are not limited to these!): A Day in the Life of Winston Smith, Big Brother's Influence, The Pursuit of Happiness in 1984, The Girl with Dark Hair, etc.

    Due THIS COMING Tuesday, March 23rd:

  • Read chapters V and VI in 1984 (up to p. 69). Write 5 post-its that focus on the characters pursuing happiness and characters being oppressed (having their freedom taken away). Some suggested questions to answer in your post-its are the following: How does Winston stay happy in this society? How do other characters, like the girl with dark hair and the children, stay happy? How are the characters being oppressed? Look for evidence of their freedoms taken away.

    Due THIS COMING Wednesday, March 24th:

  • Register for collegeboard.com HERE. Bring in proof of registration!
  • Wednesday, March 17th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Prepare two intelligent, appropriate questions for our Career Day guest speaker.

    2. Listen and Learn from our Career Day guest speaker.

    How can we benefit from Career Day? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, March 18th:
  • Read chapters III and IV in 1984 (up to p. 48), writing post-its (a minimum of 5 post-its) that focus on the course theme of the "pursuit of happiness". Pay attention to the protagonist, Winston, the government, and the events that take place that oppress Winston and the society's people. Also, identify examples of Winston's pursuit of happiness in this oppressive society.

    Due NEXT Monday, March 22nd:

  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #5 Story. You MUST write your story on any topic introduced in the novel 1984. Some suggestions include (but you are not limited to these!): A Day in the Life of Winston Smith, Big Brother's Influence, The Pursuit of Happiness in 1984, The Girl with Dark Hair, etc.
  • Tuesday, March 16th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish introducing List #5. Grade List #4 Quiz.

    2. Work Period: In your notebook (literature section), answer the following questions: Define oppression. How is Winston being oppressed? How is oppression hindering Winston's pursuit of happiness? How is Winston dealing with oppression? While answering these questions, show your HW post-its (5 post-its in chapters I and II).

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the answers to the Work Period questions.

    How can we effectively analyze the theme of pursuit of happiness and the issue of oppression in chapters I and II in 1984? Due Thursday, March 18th:
  • Read chapters III and IV in 1984 (up to p. 48), writing post-its (a minimum of 5 post-its) that focus on the course theme of the "pursuit of happiness". Pay attention to the protagonist, Winston, the government, and the events that take place that oppress Winston and the society's people. Also, identify examples of Winston's pursuit of happiness in this oppressive society.

    Due NEXT Monday, March 22nd:

  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #5 Story. You MUST write your story on any topic introduced in the novel 1984. Some suggestions include (but you are not limited to these!): A Day in the Life of Winston Smith, Big Brother's Influence, The Pursuit of Happiness in 1984, The Girl with Dark Hair, etc.
  • Monday, March 15th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #4. Turn in story #4 (topic was on the novel 1984 or the year 1984).

    2. Read-Aloud: Introduce List #5.

    3. HW Reminders!

    How can we effectively improve our command of language? Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, March 16th:
  • Read chapters I and II in 1984 (up to p. 29), writing post-its (a minimum of 5 post-its) that focus on the course theme of the "pursuit of happiness". Pay attention to the protagonist, Winston, the government, and the events that take place that allow Winston to pursue his definition of happiness and prevent his happiness.

    Due NEXT Monday, March 22nd:

  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #5 Story. You MUST write your story on any topic introduced in the novel 1984. Some suggestions include (but you are not limited to these!): A Day in the Life of Winston Smith, Big Brother's Influence, The Pursuit of Happiness in 1984, The Girl with Dark Hair, etc.
  • Friday, March 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Fill out the book receipt for 1984.

    2. Read-Aloud: Begin reading aloud chapter one of 1984, focusing on the course theme of "the pursuit of happiness". How does Winston, the protagonist, define and pursue his happiness in the midst of the restrictive society? How is society/government trying to restrict him and have him to their ideals of happiness? Take notes as you read, keeping the course theme in mind.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share insights with the whole class.

    How can we effectively begin the study of 1984? Due THIS Monday, March 15th:
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #4 Story. Topic suggestions include: any topic having to do with the novel 1984 or the year 1984 (check out this cool link about what happened in the year 1984).

    Due THIS Tuesday, March 16th:

  • Read chapters I and II in 1984 (up to p. 29), writing post-its (a minimum of 5 post-its) that focus on the course theme of the "pursuit of happiness". Pay attention to the protagonist, Winston, the government, and the events that take place that allow Winston to pursue his definition of happiness and prevent his happiness.
  • Thursday, March 11th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the answers of the Quiz on the Harlem Renaissance unit (the poems "My City," "America" and What it Feels Like to be Colored Me).

    2. Work Period: Reading/Analysis of the packaging (front and back cover) and first page of 1984.

  • Predict the plot based on the packaging. What does this illustration have to do with the plot? What do you anticipate/predict about the plot?
  • Identify the setting, mood, and characters.
  • What strategies do good readers use before and during the study of a novel? Which strategies work well for you?
  • How do you think this novel will fit into our course focus of "the pursuit of happiness"?

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your answers with a neighbor and with the whole class.

  • How can we effectively prepare to study 1984? Due THIS COMING Monday, March 15th:
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #4 Story. Topic suggestions include: any topic having to do with the novel 1984 or the year 1984 (check out this cool link about what happened in the year 1984).
  • Wednesday, March 10th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Quiz on the Harlem Renaissance unit (the poems "My City," "America" and What it Feels Like to be Colored Me).

    2. Grade/Evaluate the quiz on Vocabulary List #3.

    3. If time allows, work on HW owed (vocabulary story #3) and work due (vocabulary story #4).

    How can we improve our knowledge and understanding of literary devices in poetry and an autobiographical essay? Due THIS COMING Monday, March 15th:
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #4 Story. Topic suggestions include: any topic having to do with the novel 1984 or the year 1984 (check out this cool link about what happened in the year 1984).
  • Tuesday, March 9th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing Vocabulary List #4.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the textbook questions on What it Feels Like to be Colored Me.

    3. Prepare for tomorrow's quiz by reviewing the poems "My City," "America" and What it Feels Like to be Colored Me.

    How can we improve our knowledge and understanding of literary devices in poetry and an autobiographical essay? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, March 10th
  • Quiz on the Harlem Renaissance Unit: Study your notes on the poem "America" by Claude McKay, the poem "My City" by James Weldon Johnson and the autobiographical essay How It Feels to Be Colored Me by Zora Neale Hurston (review the questions and answers that follow the essay in the textbook). Study the poetic techniques (imagery, personification, diction, rhyme scheme, etc.) and characterization and tone.

    Due NEXT Monday, March 15th:

  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #4 Story. Topic suggestions include: any topic having to do with the novel 1984 or the year 1984.
  • Monday, March 8th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #3 QUIZ

    2. Discuss/Share: Introduce Vocabulary List #4.

    3. If time allows, finish the textbook questions on What it feels like to be Colored Me, if necessary.

    How can we improve our knowledge and acquisition of vocabulary? Due THIS Wednesday, March 10th:
  • Quiz on the Harlem Renaissance Unit: Study your notes on the poem "America" by Claude McKay, the poem "My City" by James Weldon Johnson and the autobiographical essay How It Feels to Be Colored Me by Zora Neale Hurston (review the questions and answers that follow the essay in the textbook). Study the poetic techniques (imagery, personification, diction, rhyme scheme, etc.) and characterization and tone.

    Due NEXT Monday, March 15th:

  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #4 Story. Topic suggestions include: any topic having to do with the novel 1984
  • Friday, March 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish answering the questions that follow the autobiographical essay, How It Feels to Be Colored Me by Zora Neale Hurston. Focus on characterization, tone and diction. Write in complete sentences.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and take notes on the answers.

    How can we improve our analysis of a short story through characterization, tone and diction? Due THIS Monday, March 8th:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #3
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: America, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity. Don't forget, your story MUST be two full pages handwritten OR one page, typed. Include a proper heading as well, which includes the following: your name, the date, my name and the course name/period.

    Due Wednesday, March 10th

  • Quiz on the Harlem Renaissance Unit: Study your notes on the poem "America" by Claude McKay, the poem "My City" by James Weldon Johnson and the autobiographical essay How It Feels to Be Colored Me by Zora Neale Hurston (review the questions and answers that follow the essay in the textbook). Study the poetic techniques (imagery, personification, diction, rhyme scheme, etc.) and characterization and tone.
  • Thursday, March 4th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and analyzing How It Feels to Be Colored Me by Zora Neale Hurston. Focus on characterization, tone and diction. Take notes.

    2. Work Period: Answer the questions that follow the reading. Work with your table mates.

    How can we improve our analysis of a short story through characterization, tone and diction? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Make up HW--tomorrow is the last day of the first marking period (see previous days for all the details)!

    Due NEXT Monday, March 8th:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #3
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: America, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity. Don't forget, your story MUST be two full pages handwritten OR one page, typed. Include a proper heading as well, which includes the following: your name, the date, my name and the course name/period.

  • Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Continue reading and analyzing How It Feels to Be Colored Me by Zora Neale Hurston. Focus on tone and diction. How can we improve our analysis of a short story through tone and diction? Due NEXT Monday, March 8th:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #3
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: America, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity. Don't forget, your story MUST be two full pages handwritten OR one page, typed. Include a proper heading as well, which includes the following: your name, the date, my name and the course name/period.

    Make up HW (see previous days for all the details)!

  • Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing List #3.

    2. Begin reading and analyzing How It Feels to Be Colored Me by Zora Neale Hurston. Focus on tone and diction.

    How can we improve our vocabulary acquisition and analysis of a short story through tone and diction? Due NEXT Monday, March 8th:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #3
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: America, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity. Don't forget, your story MUST be two full pages handwritten OR one page, typed. Include a proper heading as well, which includes the following: your name, the date, my name and the course name/period.

    Make up HW (see previous days for all the details)!

  • Monday, March 1st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #2 Quiz. Turn in Vocabulary Story #2.

    2. Introduce List #3.

    How can we improve our language skills and vocabulary acquisition? Due NEXT Monday, March 8th:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #3
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: America, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity.

    Make up HW (see previous days for all the details)!

  • Friday, February 26th, 2010:

    Standard 3: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation; Standard 4: Language for Social Interaction

    SNOW DAY N/A Due THIS Monday, March 1st:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: My City, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity.

    Make up HW (see previous days for all the details)!

  • Thursday, February 25th, 2010:

    Standard 3: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation; Standard 4: Language for Social Interaction

    1. Do Now: Introduce the poem "America" by Claude McKay (1889-1948; Jamaican writer/poet). Students will recite different lines. Poem will be recited twice.

    2. Work Period: Partners will annotate the poem "America" just as they did when studying/analyzing "My City" (Johnson), the poem we have studied in class in previous days. Then, they will create a Venn Diagram in which students will compare and contrast "America" with "My City."

    3. Discuss/Share (Small Groups): Students will share their Venn Diagrams in groups of four. Suggested analytical questions include: What were similar poetic techniques identified (answers may include, but are not limited to, the following: alliteration, imagery, diction, personification, rhyme scheme)? How did the poetic techniques contribute to the greater meanings of the poems (answers may include, but are not limited to, the following: the imagery of "tiger's tooth," "hell" and "might" contribute to the negative qualities of America that invoke fear in the speaker)?

    4. Discuss/Share (Whole Class): Student pairs will share insightful analysis discovered through annotations and Venn Diagrams.

    5. Reflections: What was valuable in the compare/contrast of "America" and "My City" poems? How do these poets reflect the Harlem Renaissance time period? What was challenging in this poetry analysis and how did you overcome the challenges?

    6. HW Reminders & HW collection (Analysis/Creative Paper)

    How do we analyze poems with similar poetic techniques and understand the greater significance of these poetic techniques to the poems in both written and verbal expression? MAKE UP HW:
  • Vocab. Story #1 MUST be turned in!
  • Harlem Visit Paper and Photo: Visit one of the landmarks of the Harlem Renaissance: Apollo Theater (Directions: Take the A, B, C or D trains to 125th Street and walk 1.25 blocks East to the Apollo Theater OR take the 2 or 3 trains to 125th Street and walk 1.75 blocks West to the Apollo Theater), Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Lenox Lounge (You can take the 2 and 3 train to 125th Street and you would be let off right in front of the Lounge. It's a famous jazz club where Billie Holiday, Miles Davis and other great jazz musicians performed). You can also look up a birthplace of a Harlem Renaissance author or another location that you can argue was important of the time period. You MUST take a picture of yourself standing at that landmark. You and the landmark MUST be clearly in view to earn credit. You then will write a one-page typed (or two-pages handwritten), double-spaced, 12-point font paper in which you will analyze (describe in detail) the landmark today and your impressions, its importance to the Harlem Renaissance (cite sources if used!) and its importance to learn and study today. Use great detail when describing your impressions (refer to the senses--sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touch) and show how your impressions connect to the historical significance of the location. Bring in your picture (digital or print is acceptable) and analytical paper.

    Due THIS Monday, March 1st:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: My City, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity.

  • Wednesday, February 24th, 2010:

    Standard 3: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation; Standard 4: Language for Social Interaction

    1. Do Now: Finish the one-page writing with your partner on "My City" by James Weldon Johnson. You can choose one of the following: 1.) Analysis Paper in which you write about one or two of the poetic techniques discussed in class (tone, imagery, personification, rhyme scheme, etc.) and explain how they contribute to the speaker's feelings toward Manhattan (include plenty of quoted references to the poem) OR 2.) Creative Paper in which you write as if you are the poem's speaker, composing his diary entry about his feelings, as expressed in the poem.

    2. Discuss/Share in Small Groups: In groups of four students (two pairs), share excerpts (one sentence to one paragraph) of your writing that reveal higher-level thinking (analysis of the poem that can be inferred or suggested rather than directly identified). Be ready to share your classmates' excellent work with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share (Whole Class): Students will share their classmates' writing excerpts and exemplary analysis and creative interpretations of the poem "My City." The class will also engage in reflections on the valuable lessons learned from the analysis and creative papers as well as the share-outs. Reflective questions will include: What were the lessons learned from the writing and share-outs? What were the challenges? How did you overcome the challenges with your partner?

    4. HW Reminders

    How do we analyze poetry more effectively, understanding the greater significance of poetic techniques to the poems in both written and verbal expression? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, Feb. 25th:
  • Finish today's Analysis Paper or Creative Paper (see the classwork for details).

    MAKE UP HW:

  • Vocab. Story #1 MUST be turned in!
  • Harlem Visit Paper and Photo: Visit one of the landmarks of the Harlem Renaissance: Apollo Theater (Directions: Take the A, B, C or D trains to 125th Street and walk 1.25 blocks East to the Apollo Theater OR take the 2 or 3 trains to 125th Street and walk 1.75 blocks West to the Apollo Theater), Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Lenox Lounge (You can take the 2 and 3 train to 125th Street and you would be let off right in front of the Lounge. It's a famous jazz club where Billie Holiday, Miles Davis and other great jazz musicians performed). You can also look up a birthplace of a Harlem Renaissance author or another location that you can argue was important of the time period. You MUST take a picture of yourself standing at that landmark. You and the landmark MUST be clearly in view to earn credit. You then will write a one-page typed (or two-pages handwritten), double-spaced, 12-point font paper in which you will analyze (describe in detail) the landmark today and your impressions, its importance to the Harlem Renaissance (cite sources if used!) and its importance to learn and study today. Use great detail when describing your impressions (refer to the senses--sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touch) and show how your impressions connect to the historical significance of the location. Bring in your picture (digital or print is acceptable) and analytical paper.

    Due NEXT Monday, March 1st:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: My City, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity.

  • Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010: PERIOD 8 SHOULD GO HERE

    1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's poetry analysis. This is the poem: "My City" by James Weldon Johnson. Some of the poetic techniques that are present in this poem are rhyme scheme, imagery, alliteration, personification, and more. Everyone will discuss and take notes on the literary elements and come to understand their significance to the poem as a whole. Everyone will answer the following questions: Is the speaker's description of Manhattan appealing? Why or why not? What is the message of the poem? Since Johnson was a famous Harlem Renaissance poet who lived 1871-1938, why would he include features of both Shakespearean sonnet (16th century England; iambic pentameter and rhyme scheme of ababcdcdefefgg) and Petrarchan (Italian) sonnet (13th century Italy; typically depict a lady as a beloved inspiration; an octave of abbaabba and a sestet of cdccde or cdccdc)? Why are the choices that Johnson made in his poem so important (like the tone, literary elements and techniques of characterization of Manhattan, setting, and imagery)? How is the poet feeling throughout this poem (infer!)?

    2. Work Period: For "My City," compose a one-page reflection writing with a partner. Choose one--(challenge) write an analysis of two of the poetic techniques discussed in class (imagery, personification, rhyme scheme, etc.) and explain how they contribute to the speaker's feelings toward Manhattan OR write the speaker's diary entry about his feelings, as expressed in the poem.

    How do we analyze poetry more effectively, understanding the greater significance of poetic techniques to the poems in their entirety? PERIOD 8 SHOULD GO HERE

    MAKE UP HW:

  • Vocab. Story #1 MUST be turned in!
  • Harlem Visit Paper and Photo: Visit one of the landmarks of the Harlem Renaissance: Apollo Theater (Directions: Take the A, B, C or D trains to 125th Street and walk 1.25 blocks East to the Apollo Theater OR take the 2 or 3 trains to 125th Street and walk 1.75 blocks West to the Apollo Theater), Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Lenox Lounge (You can take the 2 and 3 train to 125th Street and you would be let off right in front of the Lounge. It's a famous jazz club where Billie Holiday, Miles Davis and other great jazz musicians performed). You can also look up a birthplace of a Harlem Renaissance author or another location that you can argue was important of the time period. You MUST take a picture of yourself standing at that landmark. You and the landmark MUST be clearly in view to earn credit. You then will write a one-page typed (or two-pages handwritten), double-spaced, 12-point font paper in which you will analyze (describe in detail) the landmark today and your impressions, its importance to the Harlem Renaissance (cite sources if used!) and its importance to learn and study today. Use great detail when describing your impressions (refer to the senses--sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touch) and show how your impressions connect to the historical significance of the location. Bring in your picture (digital or print is acceptable) and analytical paper.

    Due NEXT Monday, March 1st:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: My City, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity.

  • Monday, February 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #2.

    2. Poetry Analysis: This is the poem: "My City" by James Weldon Johnson. Some of the poetic techniques that are present in this poem are rhyme scheme, imagery, alliteration, personification, and more. Everyone will discuss and take notes on the literary elements and come to understand their significance to the poem as a whole. Everyone will answer the following questions: Is the speaker's description of Manhattan appealing? Why or why not? Since Johnson was a famous Harlem Renaissance poet who lived 1871-1938, why would he include features of both Shakespearean sonnet (16th century England; iambic pentameter and rhyme scheme of ababcdcdefefgg) and Petrarchan (Italian) sonnet (13th century Italy; typically depict a lady as a beloved inspiration; an octave of abbaabba and a sestet of cdccde or cdccdc)?

    3. HW reminders! Also, turn in your Harlem visit paper and photo.

    How do we analyze poetry more effectively, understanding the greater significance of poetic techniques to the poems in their entirety? MAKE UP HW:
  • Vocab. Story #1 MUST be turned in!
  • Harlem Visit Paper and Photo: Visit one of the landmarks of the Harlem Renaissance: Apollo Theater (Directions: Take the A, B, C or D trains to 125th Street and walk 1.25 blocks East to the Apollo Theater OR take the 2 or 3 trains to 125th Street and walk 1.75 blocks West to the Apollo Theater), Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Lenox Lounge (You can take the 2 and 3 train to 125th Street and you would be let off right in front of the Lounge. It's a famous jazz club where Billie Holiday, Miles Davis and other great jazz musicians performed). You can also look up a birthplace of a Harlem Renaissance author or another location that you can argue was important of the time period. You MUST take a picture of yourself standing at that landmark. You and the landmark MUST be clearly in view to earn credit. You then will write a one-page typed (or two-pages handwritten), double-spaced, 12-point font paper in which you will analyze (describe in detail) the landmark today and your impressions, its importance to the Harlem Renaissance (cite sources if used!) and its importance to learn and study today. Use great detail when describing your impressions (refer to the senses--sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touch) and show how your impressions connect to the historical significance of the location. Bring in your picture (digital or print is acceptable) and analytical paper.

    Due NEXT Monday, March 1st:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (homework credit, not a grade) on any of the following topics: My City, Harlem, Renaissance, Race, Identity.
  • Friday, February 12th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Retake Quiz on Vocabulary List #1. If necessary, turn in Vocabulary Story #1 with attached grading rubric. Continue student-teacher conferences.

    2. Discussion Group Work: Each assigned group will have students with various roles: Reciter (one student will read the poem twice with energy and emphasis), Summarizer (one student will summarize each line on a separate piece of paper), Literary Element Identifier (one student will identify literary elements), Evaluator (one student will evaluate the significance/importance of literary elements the poem as a whole). This is the poem: "My City" by James Weldon Johnson. Some of the poetic techniques that are present in this poem are rhyme scheme, imagery, alliteration, personification, and more. Everyone will discuss the literary elements and come to understand their significance to the poem as a whole. Everyone will answer the following questions: Is the speaker's description of Manhattan appealing? Why or why not?

    3. Whole Group Discussion/Reflections: Reflect on group discussion work.

    4. HW reminders!

    How do we analyze poetry more effectively, understanding the greater significance of poetic techniques to the poems in their entirety? Vocab. Story #1 MUST be turned in OR e-mailed (it was due yesterday! It's -10 points each day it's late, and that includes vacation!).

    Due MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22nd (the day we return after vacation):

  • Visit one of the landmarks of the Harlem Renaissance: Apollo Theater (Directions: Take the A, B, C or D trains to 125th Street and walk 1.25 blocks East to the Apollo Theater OR take the 2 or 3 trains to 125th Street and walk 1.75 blocks West to the Apollo Theater), Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Lenox Lounge (You can take the 2 and 3 train to 125th Street and you would be let off right in front of the Lounge. It's a famous jazz club where Billie Holiday, Miles Davis and other great jazz musicians performed). You can also look up a birthplace of a Harlem Renaissance author or another location that you can argue was important of the time period. You MUST take a picture of yourself standing at that landmark. You and the landmark MUST be clearly in view to earn credit. You then will write a one-page typed (or two-pages handwritten), double-spaced, 12-point font paper in which you will analyze (describe in detail) the landmark today and your impressions, its importance to the Harlem Renaissance (cite sources if used!) and its importance to learn and study today. Use great detail when describing your impressions (refer to the senses--sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touch) and show how your impressions connect to the historical significance of the location. Bring in your picture (digital or print is acceptable) and analytical paper.

  • Thursday, February 11th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Vocabulary List #1. Turn in Vocabulary Story #1 with attached grading rubric. Continue student-teacher conferences.

    2. Work Period: Read "My City" by James Weldon Johnson. Identify the poetic techniques that are present in this poem (e.g. rhyme scheme, imagery, alliteration, personification, etc.) and explain their significance to the poem as a whole. Is the speaker's description of Manhattan appealing? Why or why not?

    How do we work on improving our writing and language skills? Due TOMORROW, FRIDAY:
  • RETAKE OF VOCAB. LIST #1 QUIZ (only chance!!!)

    Vocab. Story #1 MUST be turned in OR e-mailed (it was due today! It's -10 points each day it's late, and that includes vacation!).

    Due MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22nd (the day we return after vacation):

  • Visit one of the landmarks of the Harlem Renaissance: Apollo Theater (Directions: Take the A, B, C or D trains to 125th Street and walk 1.25 blocks East to the Apollo Theater OR take the 2 or 3 trains to 125th Street and walk 1.75 blocks West to the Apollo Theater), Langston Hughes's home at 20 East 127th Street, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Lenox Lounge (You can take the 2 and 3 train to 125th Street and you would be let off right in front of the Lounge. It's a famous jazz club where Billie Holiday, Miles Davis and other great jazz musicians performed). You can also look up any birthplace of a Harlem Renaissance author or another location that you can argue was important of the time period. You MUST take a picture of yourself standing at that landmark. You and the landmark MUST be clearly in view to earn credit. You then will write a one-page typed (or two-pages handwritten), double-spaced, 12-point font paper in which you will analyze (describe in detail) the landmark today and your impressions, its importance to the Harlem Renaissance (cite sources if used!) and its importance to learn and study today. Use great detail when describing your impressions (refer to the senses--sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touch) and show how your impressions connect to the historical significance of the location. Bring in your picture (digital or print is acceptable) and analytical paper.
  • Wednesday, February 10th, 2010: SNOW DAY! How do we work on improving our writing and language skills? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, February 11th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY (to be graded!) for Vocabulary Story #1 following the grading rubric provided. Write your story on a topic taken from the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Use List #1 completely. You will write a creatively written story on a specific topic. Your story must be a minimum of 300 words (about two pages handwritten or one full page, typed, double-spaced, and 12 point font). You must use all of the vocabulary words correctly from the assigned list in your story. You must underline each vocabulary word in your story. You should develop your ideas with great detail. You should write an organized story in which you transition from one idea to the next. You should use the grading rubric to guide you to earn the best grade possible. Include the following heading: your name and date in the top, right-hand corner and the teacher�s name and the name of the class and the period in the top, left-hand corner. Topics for your story can be taken from any main idea revealed in the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Topic suggestions include the following: Security in America, Cameras Everywhere, Freedoms in America, spies, etc.

    Due TOMORROW, Thursday, February 11th:

  • QUIZ on LIST #1.

  • Tuesday, February 9th, 2010: Work Period: Finish filling out the conference form (when completed, meet with Ms. Conn regarding goals and achievements). Work on the composition of Vocabulary Story #1, using List #1 and following the grading rubric. Study List #1. How do we work on improving our writing and language skills? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, February 10th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY (to be graded!) for Vocabulary Story #1 following the grading rubric provided. Write your story on a topic taken from the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Use List #1 completely. You will write a creatively written story on a specific topic. Your story must be a minimum of 300 words (about two pages handwritten or one full page, typed, double-spaced, and 12 point font). You must use all of the vocabulary words correctly from the assigned list in your story. You must underline each vocabulary word in your story. You should develop your ideas with great detail. You should write an organized story in which you transition from one idea to the next. You should use the grading rubric to guide you to earn the best grade possible. Include the following heading: your name and date in the top, right-hand corner and the teacher�s name and the name of the class and the period in the top, left-hand corner. Topics for your story can be taken from any main idea revealed in the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Topic suggestions include the following: Security in America, Cameras Everywhere, Freedoms in America, spies, etc.

    Due TOMORROW:

  • QUIZ on LIST #1.

  • Monday, February 8th, 2010: Work Period: Fill out the conference form (when completed, meet with Ms. Conn regarding goals and achievements). Work on the composition of Vocabulary Story #1, using List #1 and following the grading rubric. How do we work on improving our writing and language skills? Due THIS Wednesday, February 10th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY (to be graded!) for Vocabulary Story #1 following the grading rubric provided. Write your story on a topic taken from the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Use List #1 completely. You will write a creatively written story on a specific topic. Your story must be a minimum of 300 words (about two pages handwritten or one full page, typed, double-spaced, and 12 point font). You must use all of the vocabulary words correctly from the assigned list in your story. You must underline each vocabulary word in your story. You should develop your ideas with great detail. You should write an organized story in which you transition from one idea to the next. You should use the grading rubric to guide you to earn the best grade possible. Include the following heading: your name and date in the top, right-hand corner and the teacher�s name and the name of the class and the period in the top, left-hand corner. Topics for your story can be taken from any main idea revealed in the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Topic suggestions include the following: Security in America, Cameras Everywhere, Freedoms in America, spies, etc.

  • QUIZ on LIST #1.

  • Friday, February 5th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #1.

    2. Work Period: Work on Vocabulary Story #1 and follow the grading rubric provided. Show your notebook/bind with the three labeled sections (according to the syllabus). Teacher/Student Conferences.

    How do we work on improving our writing and language skills? Due THIS Monday, February 8th:
  • Begin to write Vocabulary Story #1 following the grading rubric provided. Use List #1 completely. Write your story on a topic taken from the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Topic suggestions include the following: Security in America, Cameras Everywhere, Freedoms in America, spies, etc. You should write a creative story on one specific topic (see above). Your story must be a minimum of 300 words (about two pages handwritten or one full page, typed, double-spaced, and 12 point font). You must use all of the vocabulary words correctly from the assigned list in your story. You must underline each vocabulary word in your story. You should develop your ideas with great detail. You should write an organized story in which you transition from one idea to the next. You should use the grading rubric to guide you to earn the best grade possible. Include the following heading: your name and date in the top, right-hand corner and the teacher�s name and the name of the class and the period in the top, left-hand corner.

    Due THIS COMING Wednesday, February 10th:

  • Quiz on List #1.
  • Thursday, February 4th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Turn in all forms to your folder--your contact information form, your student goal/action plan form, the syllabus, the Student Profile Survey and the following Self-Assessment (finish, if necessary)--
    Self-Assessment: Write your answer to each question below in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples.
    1.) Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
    2.) Describe your academic and personal strengths.
    3.) What three characteristics or traits best define you?
    4.) If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself?
    5.) What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
    6.) What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?
    7.) Share three random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

    3. Teacher-Student Conferences: When completed with the self-assessment, meet with teacher for a conference in which we discuss the self-assessment and goals/action plan.

    4. Discuss/Share/Analyze: Discuss your answers to the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Be ready to share your opinions regarding each statement.

    5. Introduce List #1.

    How do we engage in self-assessment for better understanding of our strengths and areas needing improvement? Due TOMORROW, Friday, February 5th:
  • Bring in supplies (notebook/binder with labeled sections) according to the syllabus.

    Due Wednesday, February 10th:

  • Quiz on List #1.
  • Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Turn in all three forms--your contact information form, your student goal/action plan form, and the syllabus.

    2. Work Period: Work on the Student Profile Survey and the following Self-Assessment--
    Self-Assessment: Write your answer to each question below in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples.
    1.) Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
    2.) Describe your academic and personal strengths.
    3.) What three characteristics or traits best define you?
    4.) If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself?
    5.) What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
    6.) What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?
    7.) Share three random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

    3. Teacher-Student Conferences: When completed with the self-assessment, meet with teacher for a conference in which we discuss the self-assessment and goals/action plan.

    4. Work on the Anticipation Guide for 1984. Be ready to share your opinions regarding each statement.

    How do we engage in self-assessment for better understanding of our strengths and areas needing improvement? Due THIS Friday, February 5th:
  • Bring in supplies (notebook/binder with labeled sections) according to the syllabus.
  • Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Fill out contact information and seat assignments

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Introduce syllabus.

    3. Work Period: Work on Student Goal and Action Plan

    How can students prepare for a successful semester? Due TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3rd:
  • Bring in your signed classroom rules/expected behaviors and contact information form.

    Due THIS Friday, February 5th:

  • Bring in supplies (notebook/binder with labeled sections) according to the syllabus.