Ms. Conn's Junior English Assignments, Spring 2014

Ms. Conn's Junior English Assignments
Spring 2014

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 16th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Distribution and review of Hamlet essay papers. Review teacher's comments and English Regents strategies.

2. Q & A. Any questions about the English Regents?

3. Return all remaining Hamlet books. Gifts of Kindness Activity!

How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents and for college? Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, etc.), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: VocabSlam and Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, and so much more!

Read for pleasure and challenge!

It was a great pleasure teaching you!

FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS (students who earned a 74 and below):

HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THIS THURSDAY, JUNE 19th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.


  • Use this great resource packet (it will be provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.
  • Friday, June 13th, 2014: Work Period: Make a Top 10 List for what you've learned this semester in English, including the following: vocabulary, Hamlet, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, and the Native American unit. Be ready to share on Monday. Any questions about the English Regents? Be ready to ask on Monday! How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents and for college? DUE MONDAY: RETURN ALL HAMLET BOOKS!

    Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, etc.), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: VocabSlam and Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

    FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS (students who earned a 74 and below):

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THURSDAY, JUNE 19th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.


  • Use this great resource packet (it will be provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.
  • Thursday, June 12th, 2014: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCES OF SCENES FROM HAMLET!
  • Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
  • Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP. Hamlet performances (extra credit value=up to 20 points extra on your essay exam, which is 50% of your 3rd marking period; if you earn a 90-100, you will earn 20 points on your essay exam, if you earn 80-89, you will earn 10 points on your exam; if you earn 70-79, you will earn 5 points on your exam)

    MAKE SURE YOU ADDRESS the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    2. Regents Review: Use this great resource packet (provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.

    3. Hamlet Book Returns

  • How can we effectively perform scenes from Hamlet and prepare for the English Regents? Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, etc.), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: VocabSlam and Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

    FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS (students who earned a 74 and below):

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THURSDAY, JUNE 19th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.


  • Use this great resource packet (it will be provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.
  • Wednesday, June 11th, 2014: 1. Do Now: PERFORMANCES OF SCENES FROM HAMLET!
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP. Hamlet performances (extra credit value=up to 20 points extra on your essay exam, which is 50% of your 3rd marking period; if you earn a 90-100, you will earn 20 points on your essay exam, if you earn 80-89, you will earn 10 points on your exam; if you earn 70-79, you will earn 5 points on your exam)

    MAKE SURE YOU ADDRESS the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    2. Regents Review: Use this great resource packet (provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively perform scenes from Hamlet and prepare for the English Regents? EXTRA CREDIT DUE TOMORROW (LAST DAY FOR EXTRA CREDIT AND ALL HOMEWORK), THURSDAY, JUNE 12th (Scenes #3 and #4):
  • FOR EXTRA CREDIT, YOU WILL PERFORM WITH YOUR PARTNER OR GROUP IN ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES BELOW. Here are the scene choices:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (EXTRA CREDIT) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Hamlet performances (extra credit value=up to 20 points extra on your essay exam, which is 50% of your 3rd marking period; if you earn a 90-100, you will earn 20 points on your essay exam, if you earn 80-89, you will earn 10 points on your exam; if you earn 70-79, you will earn 5 points on your exam)

    Make up any owed HW! THE LAST DAY I WILL ACCEPT LATE HOMEWORK IS TOMORROW THURSDAY, JUNE 12th!

    FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS (students who earned a 74 and below):

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THURSDAY, JUNE 19th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.


  • Use this great resource packet (it will be provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.
  • Tuesday, June 10th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Read the Regents packets and the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes

    2. Scene Reading: Read your scenes on your feet. All students must get up and incorporate the acting exercises (the ones we did yesterday)--levels (low, medium and high) and physical interactions. Arrange in your scene groups for final rehearsals. Rehearse on your feet, incorporate a modern-day theme, add in stage directions (since Shakespeare had very few stage directions), and determine costumes and props. Incorporate the acting exercises--levels (low, medium and high) and physical interactions. MAKE SURE YOU ADDRESS the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? EXTRA CREDIT DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th (Scenes #1 and #2) and THIS THURSDAY, JUNE 12th (Scenes #3 and #4):
  • FOR EXTRA CREDIT, YOU WILL PERFORM WITH YOUR PARTNER OR GROUP IN ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES BELOW. Here are the scene choices:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (EXTRA CREDIT) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Hamlet performances (extra credit value=up to 20 points extra on your essay exam, which is 50% of your 3rd marking period; if you earn a 90-100, you will earn 20 points on your essay exam, if you earn 80-89, you will earn 10 points on your exam; if you earn 70-79, you will earn 5 points on your exam)

    Make up any owed HW! THE LAST DAY I WILL ACCEPT LATE HOMEWORK IS THIS THURSDAY, JUNE 12th!

    FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS (students who earned a 74 and below):

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THURSDAY, JUNE 19th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.


  • Use this great resource packet (it will be provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.
  • Monday, June 9th, 2014: 1. Do Now: With your partner, read aloud your chosen scene from last week (see the list below).
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")

    2. Acting Exercises: Tableaus--Statues (acting exercise to show relationships. For example: Hamlet and Gertrude and Hamlet and Laertes). Include physical interactions and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.

    3. Scene Reading: Read your scenes on your feet. All students must get up and incorporate the acting exercises (the ones we did today)--levels (low, medium and high) and physical interactions.

    4. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? EXTRA CREDIT DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th (Scenes #1 and #2) and THIS THURSDAY, JUNE 12th (Scenes #3 and #4):
  • FOR EXTRA CREDIT, YOU WILL PERFORM WITH YOUR PARTNER OR GROUP IN ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES BELOW. Here are the scene choices:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (EXTRA CREDIT) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Hamlet performances (extra credit value=up to 20 points extra on your essay exam, which is 50% of your 3rd marking period; if you earn a 90-100, you will earn 20 points on your essay exam, if you earn 80-89, you will earn 10 points on your exam; if you earn 70-79, you will earn 5 points on your exam)

    Make up any owed HW! THE LAST DAY I WILL ACCEPT LATE HOMEWORK IS THIS THURSDAY, JUNE 12th!

    FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS (students who earned a 74 and below):

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THURSDAY, JUNE 19th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.


  • Use this great resource packet (it will be provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.
  • Friday, June 6th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Choose a partner and choose one of the following scenes to read. Start reading aloud.
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")

    2. Introduce Extra Credit Opportunity!

  • FOR EXTRA CREDIT, YOU WILL PERFORM WITH YOUR PARTNER OR GROUP IN ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES BELOW: Here are the scene choices:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.") Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (EXTRA CREDIT) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Hamlet performances (extra credit value=up to 20 points extra on your essay exam, which is 50% of your 3rd marking period; if you earn a 90-100, you will earn 20 points on your essay exam, if you earn 80-89, you will earn 10 points on your exam; if you earn 70-79, you will earn 5 points on your exam)

    3. If you are retaking the English Regents (earned a 74 or below), discuss and take notes (as directed) on the writing sections of the English Regents Exam:

  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12 sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.

    4. If you passed the English Regents with a 75 or higher, continue working on your resume. Compare/Contrast your resume with a neighbor.

  • How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents and college? EXTRA CREDIT DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th (Scenes #1 and #2) and THURSDAY, JUNE 12th (Scenes #3 and #4):
  • FOR EXTRA CREDIT, YOU WILL PERFORM WITH YOUR PARTNER OR GROUP IN ONE OF THE FIVE SCENES BELOW: Here are the scene choices:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")

    Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (EXTRA CREDIT) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Hamlet performances (extra credit value=up to 20 points extra on your essay exam, which is 50% of your 3rd marking period; if you earn a 90-100, you will earn 20 points on your essay exam, if you earn 80-89, you will earn 10 points on your exam; if you earn 70-79, you will earn 5 points on your exam)

    Make up any owed HW! THE LAST DAY I WILL ACCEPT LATE HOMEWORK IS THURSDAY, JUNE 12th!

    FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS (students who earned a 74 and below):

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THURSDAY, JUNE 19th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.


  • Use this great resource packet (it will be provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.
  • Wednesday, June 4th, 2014: 1. Do Now: If you are retaking the English Regents (earned a 74 or below), answer the following questions:
  • What are the four sections of the English Regents Exam?
  • Which section is your weakest and which section is your strongest? Explain.

    If you passed the English Regents with a 75 or higher, answer the following questions:

  • What are the components of a resume?
  • Be ready to write your own resume.

    FOR PERIODS 3, 7 AND 9 ONLY: Discuss the end of Hamlet:

    Act V:

  • Act V opens in a graveyard, building suspense for the end of the play, and also creating a little comic relief.
  • Hamlet, at the graveyard, goes unnoticed to the workers that are there.
  • Hamlet also sees the remains of his old court jester and he remarks that everyone loses their class, status and wealth in death. We are all equal in death, he says.
  • Hamlet sees Laertes at the graveyard and they start to fight because Laertes can't control his rage against Hamlet, especially now that Ophelia is dead and they are planning her funeral (she gets a Christian burial even though she shouldn't because it was suicide).
  • In the last scene of the play, Act V Scene II, Hamlet tells Laertes that Hamlet's insane and that's why he killed Polonius. They still duel. They wound each other.
  • Gertrude drinks the poisonous wine and dies first.
  • Hamlet stabs Claudius and Claudius dies.
  • Laertes dies from stab wound.
  • Then, Hamlet dies, but not before he tells Horatio to tell Hamlet's story and proclaim Fortinbras king of Denmark.
  • Hamlet is honored in death by Fortinbras and Horatio.

    2. For 75 and above students, work on resume writing. For 74 and below students, we will discuss and take notes on the English Regents strategies (see the HW section).

  • How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents and college? Make up any owed HW! THE LAST DAY I WILL ACCEPT LATE HOMEWORK IS THURSDAY, JUNE 12th!

    FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS (students who earned a 74 and below):

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (THURSDAY, JUNE 19th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.


  • Use this great resource packet (it will be provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.
  • Monday, June 2nd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz on HAMLET VOCABULARY

    Show HW: Vocabulary flashcards and anything else you owe. When you're done with the quiz, work on any owed HW.

    2. Discuss the end of Hamlet:

    Act V:

  • Act V opens in a graveyard, building suspense for the end of the play, and also creating a little comic relief.
  • Hamlet, at the graveyard, goes unnoticed to the workers that are there.
  • Hamlet also sees the remains of his old court jester and he remarks that everyone loses their class, status and wealth in death. We are all equal in death, he says.
  • Hamlet sees Laertes at the graveyard and they start to fight because Laertes can't control his rage against Hamlet, especially now that Ophelia is dead and they are planning her funeral (she gets a Christian burial even though she shouldn't because it was suicide).
  • In the last scene of the play, Act V Scene II, Hamlet tells Laertes that Hamlet's insane and that's why he killed Polonius. They still duel. They wound each other.
  • Gertrude drinks the poisonous wine and dies first.
  • Hamlet stabs Claudius and Claudius dies.
  • Laertes dies from stab wound.
  • Then, Hamlet dies, but not before he tells Horatio to tell Hamlet's story and proclaim Fortinbras king of Denmark.
  • Hamlet is honored in death by Fortinbras and Horatio.
  • How can we effectively prove our knowledge of vocabulary from Hamlet and analyze the resolution of the play? Make up any owed HW!
    Friday, May 30th, 2014: ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET (50% of your 3rd marking period grade) How can we effectively understand characters' virtues and flaws in all of Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, JUNE 2nd:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ ON HAMLET VOCABULARY
  • FLASHCARDS for HAMLET VOCABULARY. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not a sentence from the internet). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Thursday, May 29th, 2014: PERIOD 2 ONLY: SCHOOL-WIDE JUNIOR ENGLISH EXAM

    1. Do Now: Write three synonyms for virtues and three synonyms for flaws. Why do people need virtues and flaws? What can people learn from their virtues and flaws? Be ready to share.

    2. Share answers from the Do Now.

    3. The Wisdom in Virtues and Flaws: Let's discuss and analyze why the characters in Hamlet need virtues and flaws and how these character traits help and hurt them.
    Act IV:

  • Act IV builds on the climax (Hamlet's killing of Polonius) in that King and Queen open the act discussing Hamlet's presumed insanity.
  • Of course, they must send him away so he doesn't poison Denmark (irony: King Claudius has already poisoned Denmark, literally and figuratively).
  • Act IV Scene II reveals that Hamlet doesn't trust Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, which leads to Hamlet devising the murder plot against them. Hamlet appears "insane" with his words: "The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body. The King is a thing--" (4.2.23-24). Hamlet plays up his "insanity."
  • Also, in Act IV Scene III, when he explains where Polonius is to Claudius: "Not where he eats, but where 'a' is eaten..." (4.3.19).
  • At the end of Act IV Scene IV, Hamlet feels good that he has his life's purpose (to kill Claudius and revenge his father's death). See the couplet at the end of Act IV Scene IV: "Oh from this time forth, My thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth!" (4.4.62-63).
  • In Act IV Scene V, Ophelia is officially insane with grief over her father's death, singing until her suicide. Laertes also finds out that his father has been murdered by Hamlet, which gives him a mission (to avenge his father's death).
  • In Act IV Scene VI, Hamlet has become a prisoner by a pirate ship on the way to England and he writes a letter to Horatio asking to be saved. Horatio will help him--his only trusted friend (foreshadowing the end).
  • In Act IV Scene VII, Claudius encourages Laertes to go after Hamlet for the killing of Polonius. They create plan A (the poisonous sword for a duel between Hamlet and Laertes) and plan B (a poisonous drink to celebrate Hamlet).

    Act V:

  • Act V opens in a graveyard, building suspense for the end of the play, and also creating a little comic relief.
  • Hamlet, at the graveyard, goes unnoticed to the workers that are there.
  • Hamlet also sees the remains of his old court jester and he remarks that everyone loses their class, status and wealth in death. We are all equal in death, he says.
  • Hamlet sees Laertes at the graveyard and they start to fight because Laertes can't control his rage against Hamlet, especially now that Ophelia is dead and they are planning her funeral (she gets a Christian burial even though she shouldn't because it was suicide).
  • In the last scene of the play, Act V Scene II, Hamlet tells Laertes that Hamlet's insane and that's why he killed Polonius. They still duel. They wound each other.
  • Gertrude drinks the poisonous wine and dies first.
  • Hamlet stabs Claudius and Claudius dies.
  • Laertes dies from stab wound.
  • Then, Hamlet dies, but not before he tells Horatio to tell Hamlet's story and proclaim Fortinbras king of Denmark.
  • Hamlet is honored in death by Fortinbras and Horatio.

    4. Tribute to Maya Angelou:

  • "Phenomenal Woman"
  • "Still I Rise"
  • Her Famous Quote: “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

    5. HW reminders

  • How can we effectively understand the purpose of characters' virtues and flaws in Acts IV and V in Hamlet? ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET WILL BE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 30th (50% of the 3rd marking period grade).: Study all class notes. Make sure you read the entire play. This will be an ESSAY EXAM. If you are taking the English Regents, you will be writing a critical lens essay. Here are the instructions for the critical lens essay:
  • You will be given a famous quote.
  • In the introductory paragraph, interpret the quote above in your own words.
  • In the introductory paragraph , explain whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it.
  • In the introductory paragraph, you will introduce the fact that Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, supports your opinion of the quote.
  • In the body paragraphs, you will explain how Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, supports your opinion of the quote (THREE BODY PARAGRAPHS). Use plentiful details (each body paragraph should focus on different characters that have virtues throughout the play; write 10-12 sentences per paragraph).
  • Throughout the essay, you should avoid plot summary. Instead, use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example: characterization, foreshadowing (omens), setting, point of view) to develop your analysis of the play, Hamlet in support of the quote.
  • Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner (use transition words/phrases to connect each paragraph).
  • Use sophisticated vocabulary (include vocabulary from the lists that we've learned) and proofread for errors in grammar.
  • YOU WILL BE GRADED ON THE FOLLOWING GRADING RUBRIC.

    If you already passed the English Regents with a 75 or higher, you will write an alternative essay in which you focus on flaws in Hamlet by William Shakespeare and how they influence the play as a whole.

  • You will write a well-organized essay (five paragraphs) in which you explain flaws in the characters and how they may be perceived as virtues.
  • You will explain how flaws in characters affect the play as a whole.
  • Do not merely summarize the plot.
  • Include sophisticated vocabulary.
  • Organize your ideas and use transitions.
  • YOU WILL BE GRADED ON THE FOLLOWING GRADING RUBRIC (page 3 only). 5=90+, 4=80-89, 3=70-79, 2=60-69, and 1=59 and below.

    VOCABULARY QUIZ ON HAMLET VOCABULARY THIS COMING MONDAY, JUNE 2nd AND FLASHCARDS ARE DUE. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not a sentence from the internet). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.

  • Wednesday, May 28th, 2014: 1. Do Now: POP QUIZ ON ACT V of HAMLET/Tribute to Maya Angelou:
  • "Phenomenal Woman"
  • "Still I Rise"
  • Her Famous Quote: “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

    SHOW HW: Act V notes and anything else you owe. When done with the quiz, work on owed HW or prepare for Monday's quiz on the vocabulary list.

    2. Review ACT IV (and Act V for Period 2) notes. Take notes as we read and review. Examine the events following the climax (the murder of Polonius). Act IV builds on the climax (Hamlet's killing of Polonius) in that King and Queen open the act discussing Hamlet's presumed insanity. Of course, they must send him away so he doesn't poison Denmark (irony: King Claudius has already poisoned Denmark, literally and figuratively). Act IV Scene II reveals that Hamlet doesn't trust Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, which leads to Hamlet devising the murder plot against them. Hamlet appears "insane" with his words: "The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body. The King is a thing--" (4.2.23-24). Hamlet plays up his "insanity." Also, in Act IV Scene III, when he explains where Polonius is to Claudius: "Not where he eats, but where 'a' is eaten..." (4.3.19). At the end of Act IV Scene IV, Hamlet feels good that he has his life's purpose (to kill Claudius and revenge his father's death). See the couplet at the end of Act IV Scene IV: "Oh from this time forth, My thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth!" (4.4.62-63). In Act IV Scene V, Ophelia is officially insane with grief over her father's death, singing until her suicide. Laertes also finds out that his father has been murdered by Hamlet, which gives him a mission (to avenge his father's death). In Act IV Scene VI, Hamlet has become a prisoner by a pirate ship on the way to England and he writes a letter to Horatio asking to be saved. Horatio will help him--his only trusted friend (foreshadowing the end). In Act IV Scene VII, Claudius encourages Laertes to go after Hamlet for the killing of Polonius. They create plan A (the poisonous sword for a duel between Hamlet and Laertes) and plan B (a poisonous drink to celebrate Hamlet).

    Discuss Act V. Act V opens in a graveyard, building suspense for the end of the play, and also creating a little comic relief. Hamlet, at the graveyard, goes unnoticed to the workers that are there. Hamlet also sees the remains of his old court jester and he remarks that everyone loses their class, status and wealth in death. We are all equal in death, he says. Hamlet sees Laertes at the graveyard and they start to fight because Laertes can't control his rage against Hamlet, especially now that Ophelia is dead and they are planning her funeral (she gets a Christian burial even though she shouldn't because it was suicide). In the last scene of the play, Act V Scene II, Hamlet tells Laertes that Hamlet's insane and that's why he killed Polonius. They still duel. They wound each other. Gertrude drinks the poisonous wine and dies first. Hamlet stabs Claudius and Claudius dies. Laertes dies from stab wound. Then, Hamlet dies, but not before he tells Horatio to tell Hamlet's story and proclaim Fortinbras king of Denmark. Hamlet is honored in death by Fortinbras and Horatio.

    3. HW reminders

  • How can we effectively understand and analyze the falling action and resolution of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW (FOR PERIOD 2 ONLY): SCHOOL-WIDE JUNIOR ENGLISH EXAM TESTING VOCABULARY AND READING COMPREHENSION

    ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET WILL BE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 30th (50% of the 3rd marking period grade).: Study all class notes. Make sure you read the entire play. This will be an ESSAY EXAM. If you are taking the English Regents, you will be writing a critical lens essay. Here are the instructions for the critical lens essay:

  • You will be given a famous quote.
  • In the introductory paragraph, interpret the quote above in your own words.
  • In the introductory paragraph , explain whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it.
  • In the introductory paragraph, you will introduce the fact that Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, supports your opinion of the quote.
  • In the body paragraphs, you will explain how Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, supports your opinion of the quote (THREE BODY PARAGRAPHS). Use plentiful details (each body paragraph should focus on different characters that have virtues throughout the play; write 10-12 sentences per paragraph).
  • Throughout the essay, you should avoid plot summary. Instead, use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example: characterization, foreshadowing (omens), setting, point of view) to develop your analysis of the play, Hamlet in support of the quote.
  • Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner (use transition words/phrases to connect each paragraph).
  • Use sophisticated vocabulary (include vocabulary from the lists that we've learned) and proofread for errors in grammar.
  • YOU WILL BE GRADED ON THE FOLLOWING GRADING RUBRIC.

    If you already passed the English Regents with a 75 or higher, you will write an alternative essay in which you focus on flaws in Hamlet by William Shakespeare and how they influence the play as a whole.

  • You will write a well-organized essay (five paragraphs) in which you explain flaws in the characters and how they may be perceived as virtues.
  • You will explain how flaws in characters affect the play as a whole.
  • Do not merely summarize the plot.
  • Include sophisticated vocabulary.
  • Organize your ideas and use transitions.
  • YOU WILL BE GRADED ON THE FOLLOWING GRADING RUBRIC (page 3 only). 5=90+, 4=80-89, 3=70-79, 2=60-69, and 1=59 and below.

    VOCABULARY QUIZ ON HAMLET VOCABULARY NEXT MONDAY, JUNE 2nd AND FLASHCARDS ARE DUE. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not a sentence from the internet). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.

  • Tuesday, May 27th, 2014: PERIODS 3, 7 AND 9: SCHOOL-WIDE JUNIOR ENGLISH EXAM TESTING VOCABULARY AND READING COMPREHENSION

    PERIOD 2 ONLY: 1. Do Now: Work on studying and making flashcards for the HAMLET VOCABULARY LIST.

    2. Review ACT IV notes. Take notes as we read and review. Examine the events following the climax (the murder of Polonius). Act IV builds on the climax (Hamlet's killing of Polonius) in that King and Queen open the act discussing Hamlet's presumed insanity. Of course, they must send him away so he doesn't poison Denmark (irony: King Claudius has already poisoned Denmark, literally and figuratively). Act IV Scene II reveals that Hamlet doesn't trust Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, which leads to Hamlet devising the murder plot against them. Hamlet appears "insane" with his words: "The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body. The King is a thing--" (4.2.23-24). Hamlet plays up his "insanity." Also, in Act IV Scene III, when he explains where Polonius is to Claudius: "Not where he eats, but where 'a' is eaten..." (4.3.19). At the end of Act IV Scene IV, Hamlet feels good that he has his life's purpose (to kill Claudius and revenge his father's death). See the couplet at the end of Act IV Scene IV: "Oh from this time forth, My thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth!" (4.4.62-63). In Act IV Scene V, Ophelia is officially insane with grief over her father's death, singing until her suicide. Laertes also finds out that his father has been murdered by Hamlet, which gives him a mission (to avenge his father's death). In Act IV Scene VI, Hamlet has become a prisoner by a pirate ship on the way to England and he writes a letter to Horatio asking to be saved. Horatio will help him--his only trusted friend (foreshadowing the end). In Act IV Scene VII, Claudius encourages Laertes to go after Hamlet for the killing of Polonius. They create plan A (the poisonous sword for a duel between Hamlet and Laertes) and plan B (a poisonous drink to celebrate Hamlet).

    3. HW reminders

    How can we effectively understand and analyze the falling action of Hamlet, after which Hamlet killed Polonius FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES (WE'VE HAD TWO POP QUIZZES SO FAR!) ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th:

  • Read all of Act V (the end of the play) in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    FOR PERIOD 2 ONLY: SCHOOL-WIDE JUNIOR ENGLISH EXAM TESTING VOCABULARY AND READING COMPREHENSION

    ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET WILL BE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 30th (50% of the 3rd marking period grade).: Study all class notes. Make sure you read the entire play. This will be an ESSAY EXAM. If you are taking the English Regents, you will be writing a critical lens essay. Here are the instructions for the critical lens essay:

  • You will be given a famous quote.
  • In the introductory paragraph, interpret the quote above in your own words.
  • In the introductory paragraph , explain whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it.
  • In the introductory paragraph, you will introduce the fact that Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, supports your opinion of the quote.
  • In the body paragraphs, you will explain how Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, supports your opinion of the quote (THREE BODY PARAGRAPHS). Use plentiful details (each body paragraph should focus on different characters that have virtues throughout the play; write 10-12 sentences per paragraph).
  • Throughout the essay, you should avoid plot summary. Instead, use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example: characterization, foreshadowing (omens), setting, point of view) to develop your analysis of the play, Hamlet in support of the quote.
  • Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner (use transition words/phrases to connect each paragraph).
  • Use sophisticated vocabulary (include vocabulary from the lists that we've learned) and proofread for errors in grammar.

    If you already passed the English Regents with a 75 or higher, you will write an alternative essay in which you focus on flaws in Hamlet by William Shakespeare and how they influence the play as a whole.

  • You will write a well-organized essay (five paragraphs) in which you explain flaws in the characters and how they may be perceived as virtues.
  • You will explain how flaws in characters affect the play as a whole.
  • Do not merely summarize the plot.
  • Include sophisticated vocabulary.
  • Organize your ideas and use transitions.

    VOCABULARY QUIZ ON HAMLET VOCABULARY NEXT MONDAY, JUNE 2nd AND FLASHCARDS ARE DUE. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not a sentence from the internet). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.

  • Friday, May 23rd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Compose detailed, complex sentences for at least five of the vocabulary words from HAMLET VOCABULARY LIST.

    Show HW: Act IV notes.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now sentences. Introduce the HAMLET VOCABULARY LIST.

    3. Begin reviewing ACT IV notes. Take notes as we read and review. Examine the events following the climax (the murder of Polonius). Act IV builds on the climax (Hamlet's killing of Polonius) in that King and Queen open the act discussing Hamlet's presumed insanity. Of course, they must send him away so he doesn't poison Denmark (irony: King Claudius has already poisoned Denmark, literally and figuratively). Act IV Scene II reveals that Hamlet doesn't trust Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, which leads to Hamlet devising the murder plot against them. Hamlet appears "insane" with his words: "The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body. The King is a thing--" (4.2.23-24). Hamlet plays up his "insanity." Also, in Act IV Scene III, when he explains where Polonius is to Claudius: "Not where he eats, but where 'a' is eaten..." (4.3.19). At the end of Act IV Scene IV, Hamlet feels good that he has his life's purpose (to kill Claudius and revenge his father's death). See the couplet at the end of Act IV Scene IV: "Oh from this time forth, My thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth!" (4.4.62-63). In Act IV Scene V, Ophelia is officially insane with grief over her father's death, singing until her suicide. Laertes also finds out that his father has been murdered by Hamlet, which gives him a mission (to avenge his father's death). In Act IV Scene VI, Hamlet has become a prisoner by a pirate ship on the way to England and he writes a letter to Horatio asking to be saved. Horatio will help him--his only trusted friend (foreshadowing the end). In Act IV Scene VII, Claudius encourages Laertes to go after Hamlet for the killing of Polonius. They create plan A (the poisonous sword for a duel between Hamlet and Laertes) and plan B (a poisonous drink to celebrate Hamlet).

    4. HW reminders

    How can we effectively understand and analyze the falling action of Hamlet, after which Hamlet killed Polonius DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, MAY 27th:
  • SCHOOL-WIDE JUNIOR ENGLISH EXAM (value of a quiz grade). PLEASE BRING A #2 PENCIL. YOU WILL BE TESTED ON READING AND LISTENING SKILLS.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES (WE'VE HAD TWO POP QUIZZES SO FAR!) ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th:

  • Read all of Act V (the end of the play) in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    ESSAY EXAM ON HAMLET WILL BE ON FRIDAY, MAY 30th (50% of the 3rd marking period grade).: Study all class notes. Make sure you read the entire play. This will be an ESSAY EXAM. If you are taking the English Regents, you will be writing a critical lens essay. Here are the instructions for the critical lens essay:

  • You will be given a famous quote.
  • In the introductory paragraph, interpret the quote above in your own words.
  • In the introductory paragraph , explain whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it.
  • In the introductory paragraph, you will introduce the fact that Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, supports your opinion of the quote.
  • In the body paragraphs, you will explain how Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, supports your opinion of the quote (THREE BODY PARAGRAPHS). Use plentiful details (each body paragraph should focus on different characters that have virtues throughout the play; write 10-12 sentences per paragraph).
  • Throughout the essay, you should avoid plot summary. Instead, use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example: characterization, foreshadowing (omens), setting, point of view) to develop your analysis of the play, Hamlet in support of the quote.
  • Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner (use transition words/phrases to connect each paragraph).
  • Use sophisticated vocabulary (include vocabulary from the lists that we've learned) and proofread for errors in grammar.

    If you already passed the English Regents with a 75 or higher, you will write an alternative essay in which you focus on flaws in Hamlet by William Shakespeare and how they influence the play as a whole.

  • You will write a well-organized essay (five paragraphs) in which you explain flaws in the characters and how they may be perceived as virtues.
  • You will explain how flaws in characters affect the play as a whole.
  • Do not merely summarize the plot.
  • Include sophisticated vocabulary.
  • Organize your ideas and use transitions.

    VOCABULARY QUIZ ON HAMLET VOCABULARY ON MONDAY, JUNE 2nd AND FLASHCARDS ARE DUE. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not a sentence from the internet). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.

  • Thursday, May 22nd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions:
  • Why does Hamlet tell Ophelia to "get thee to a nunnery"?
  • Why does Claudius end Act III, Scene I saying the following: "It shall be so / Madness in great ones must not unwatched go"?
  • Hamlet has an opportunity to kill Claudius in Act III, Scene III, but he chooses not to. Why doesn't Hamlet kill Claudius?
  • Why does Hamlet kill Polonius in Act III, Scene IV? How does Gertrude react to Hamlet's murder of Polonius?

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers.

    3. Finish reviewing the rest of ACT III. Take notes as we read and review. In Act III, Scene I, discuss the rest of Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy and Hamlet's and Ophelia's discourse. We see Hamlet's rude demeanor toward Ophelia in which he tells her "go to a nunnery!" Examine the events leading up to the climax where Hamlet commits a tragic mistake--the first tragedy of the play.

    4. HW reminders

  • How can we effectively understand and analyze the rising action of Hamlet, leading up to the first murder, which is the climax of the play? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 23rd:
  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it. You MUST provide specific details from Act IV ONLY.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES (WE'VE HAD TWO POP QUIZZES SO FAR!) ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th:

  • Read all of Act V (the end of the play) in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    EXAM ON HAMLET WILL BE ON FRIDAY, MAY 30th (50% of the 3rd marking period grade). STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

    VOCABULARY QUIZ ON HAMLET VOCABULARY ON MONDAY, JUNE 2nd AND FLASHCARDS ARE DUE. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not a sentence from the internet). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.

  • Wednesday, May 21st, 2014: 1. Do Now: What predictions can you make regarding the upcoming acts of Hamlet? Be ready to share at least two predictions.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now predictions.

    3. Finish reviewing the rest of Act II NOTES AND BEGIN DISCUSSING ACT III. Take notes as we read and review. Act II, Scene II: Claudius and Gertrude confronting Hamlet's childhood friends, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, to spy on Hamlet and find out about his activities. Polonius doesn't trust Hamlet either. Hamlet finds out that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern have turned on him and are siding with Claudius and Gertrude. Hamlet is determined to reveal Claudius' guilt and prove that the ghost is right. In Act III, Scene I, begin to discuss Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy and Hamlet's and Ophelia's discourse.

    4. HW reminders

    How can we effectively understand and analyze the rising action of Hamlet, leading up to the first murder of the play? DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, MAY 23rd:
  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th:

  • Read all of Act V (the end of the play) in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    EXAM ON HAMLET WILL BE ON FRIDAY, MAY 30th (50% of the 3rd marking period grade). STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

  • Tuesday, May 20th, 2014: 1. Do Now: POP QUIZ ON ACT III IN HAMLET.

    SHOW HW: ACT III NOTES (5 post-its OR 5 1/4 pages of notes) AND THE ADVICE POEM.

    2. Finish reviewing the rest of Act II NOTES AND BEGIN DISCUSSING ACT III. Take notes as we read and review. Act II, Scene II: Claudius and Gertrude confronting Hamlet's childhood friends, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, to spy on Hamlet and find out about his activities. Polonius doesn't trust Hamlet either. Hamlet finds out that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern have turned on him and are siding with Claudius and Gertrude. Hamlet is determined to reveal Claudius' guilt and prove that the ghost is right. In Act III, Scene I, begin to discuss Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy and Hamlet's and Ophelia's discourse.

    3. HW reminders

    How can we effectively understand and analyze the rising action of Hamlet, leading up to the first murder of the play? DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, MAY 23rd:
  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th:

  • Read all of Act V (the end of the play) in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    EXAM ON HAMLET WILL BE ON FRIDAY, MAY 30th (50% of the 3rd marking period grade). STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

  • Monday, May 19th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish composing the ADVICE POEM TO A NEWBIE: Using Polonius' speech as a model in Act I, Scene III, write an advice poem to a new student at your school. How do you navigate the social scene? What foods should you avoid in the cafeteria? Example: "Neither a slacker nor an overachiever be…" Add in "thy" or "thine" (your), "thou" or "thee" (you), "oft" (often), and more. Write in iambic pentameter (unrhymed, 10 syllables per line). Write 14 lines. YOU MUST TURN IT IN TOMORROW (Tuesday).

    SHOW ANY OWED HW.

    2. Finish reviewing the rest of Act II NOTES. Take notes as we read and review. Act II, Scene II: Claudius and Gertrude confronting Hamlet's childhood friends, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, to spy on Hamlet and find out about his activities. Polonius doesn't trust Hamlet either. Hamlet finds out that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern have turned on him and are siding with Claudius and Gertrude. Hamlet is determined to reveal Claudius' guilt and prove that the ghost is right.

    3. HW reminders

    How can we effectively understand Shakespearean language from Hamlet by composing an advice poem in Shakespeare's style AND analyze the rising action of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MAY 20th:
  • Read all of Act III in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link). Know the answers to the following questions: What does Claudius discover from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern? What famous soliloquy is present in Act III and what is the message? How has Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia changed and what is their discourse? How does Hamlet intend to discover Claudius' guilt and does he achieve this intention? What is Claudius' revelation and how does Hamlet react? Who dies in Act III and how does this person die? How is the relationship between Hamlet and Gertrude (his mother) changing in this act?
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • FINISH THE CLASSWORK: ADVICE TO A NEWBIE: Using Polonius' speech as a model in Act I, Scene III, write an advice poem to a new student at your school. How do you navigate the social scene? What foods should you avoid in the cafeteria? Example: "Neither a slacker nor an overachiever be…" Add in "thy" or "thine" (your), "thou" or "thee" (you), "oft" (often), and more. Write in iambic pentameter (unrhymed, 10 syllables per line). Write 14 lines.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, MAY 23rd:

  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th:

  • Read all of Act V in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    EXAM ON HAMLET WILL BE ON FRIDAY, MAY 30th (50% of the 3rd marking period grade). STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

  • Friday, May 16th, 2014: 1. Do Now: ADVICE TO A NEWBIE: Using Polonius' speech as a model in Act I, Scene III, write an advice poem to a new student at your school. How do you navigate the social scene? What foods should you avoid in the cafeteria? Example: "Neither a slacker nor an overachiever be…" Add in "thy" or "thine" (your), "thou" or "thee" (you), "oft" (often), and more. Write in iambic pentameter (unrhymed, 10 syllables per line). Write 14 lines. Finish by this coming Tuesday.

    SHOW HW: 5 POST-IT NOTES FOR ACT II VIRTUES AND FLAWS AND ANY OTHER OWED HW.

    2. Finish reviewing the rest of Act I and the beginning of Act II. Read over the ACT I and Act II NOTES. Take notes as we read and review.

    3. HW reminders

    How can we effectively understand Shakespearean language from Hamlet by composing an advice poem in Shakespeare's style? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, MAY 20th:
  • Read all of Act III in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • FINISH THE CLASSWORK: ADVICE TO A NEWBIE: Using Polonius' speech as a model in Act I, Scene III, write an advice poem to a new student at your school. How do you navigate the social scene? What foods should you avoid in the cafeteria? Example: "Neither a slacker nor an overachiever be…" Add in "thy" or "thine" (your), "thou" or "thee" (you), "oft" (often), and more. Write in iambic pentameter (unrhymed, 10 syllables per line). Write 14 lines.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MAY 23rd:

  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th:

  • Read all of Act V in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

  • Thursday, May 15th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the rest of Act I and read over the ACT I NOTES.

    2. Take notes as we read and review Act I.

    3. HW reminders

    How can we effectively analyze the characterization of the minor characters and the major ones, including Hamlet and Claudius, Shakespearean language and other examples of figurative language, including foreshadowing and imagery, in Act I of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 16th:
  • Read all of Act II in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, MAY 20th:

  • Read all of Act III in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

  • Wednesday, May 14th, 2014: 1. Do Now: POP QUIZ on Act I of Hamlet

    2. When finished with the quiz, begin reading Act II in Hamlet.

    Show HW: 5 post-its/notes (1/4 page in size) on Act I.

    3. Review the rest of Act I and read over the ACT I NOTES.

    4. HW reminders

    How can we effectively analyze the characterization of the minor characters and the major ones, including Hamlet and Claudius, Shakespearean language and other examples of figurative language, including foreshadowing and imagery, in Act I of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 16th:
  • Read all of Act II in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.

    FYI: YOU WILL HAVE THREE POP QUIZZES ON HAMLET. YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO DROP YOUR LOWEST QUIZ GRADE.

  • Tuesday, May 13th, 2014: 1. Do Now:
  • Continue reading the introductory scene of Act I of Hamlet.
  • Why has the ghost of King Hamlet appeared?
  • How do we characterize Horatio?
  • How is the ghost's appearance described and why?
  • How is Shakespearean style revealed in scene I?
  • How do we characterize Claudius?
  • How do we characterize Hamlet?
  • What important roles do Laertes and Polonius offer to this play?
  • What about Horatio's role in the play--how is he important to Hamlet?
  • Why is the ghost's message significant at the end of Act I?
  • What is Shakespeare's style? How does Shakespeare's biography (his life during the 1500's in England) reveal itself in the opening scene?
  • What are the strengths and flaws of these characters?

    2. HW reminders

  • How can we effectively analyze the characterization of the minor characters and the major ones, including Hamlet and Claudius, Shakespearean language and other examples of figurative language, including foreshadowing and imagery, in Act I of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14th:
  • Read all of Act I in Hamlet (play given in class or you can read it online at this link). Know the answers to the following questions:
    1.) Why has the ghost of King Hamlet appeared?
    2.) How do we characterize Horatio?
    3.) How is the ghost's appearance described and why?
    4.) How is Shakespearean style revealed in scene I?
    5.) How do we characterize Claudius?
    6.) How do we characterize Hamlet?
    7.) What important roles do Laertes and Polonius offer to this play?
    8.) What about Horatio's role in the play--how is he important to Hamlet?
    9.) Why is the ghost's message significant at the end of Act I?
    10.) What is Shakespeare's style? How does Shakespeare's biography (his life during the 1500's in England) reveal itself in the opening scene?
    11.) What are the strengths and flaws of these characters?
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 16th:

  • Read all of Act II in Hamlet (play given in class).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.
  • Monday, May 12th, 2014: 1. Do Now:
  • Look at the first pages of Hamlet and identify any unknown words.
  • How does Hamlet begin (read the first page)? What can you foreshadow?

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers.

    3. Finish introducing iambic pentameter, the heartbeat rhythmic pattern that Shakespeare used to show romance and music to his words. This pattern also helped the actors remember their lines.

    4. HW reminders

  • How can we effectively prepare for our study of Act I of Hamlet? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 14th:
  • Read all of Act I in Hamlet (play given in class).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 16th:

  • Read all of Act II in Hamlet (play given in class).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.
  • Friday, May 9th, 2014: 1. Do Now:
  • Identify two childhood songs that you can recall. Write as many of the lyrics as you can.
  • Then, look at the first pages of Hamlet and identify any unknown words.
  • How does Hamlet begin (read the first page)? What can you foreshadow?

    Check out a copy of Hamlet and turn in any owed HW.

    2. Discuss the following questions--
    1. What would it feel like to return home after being away for the summer to discover that your father is dead and your mother had already remarried?
    2. What if the man your mother remarried was a lowlife and took over all of your father’s affairs and successes? How would you feel and what, if anything, would you do about it?
    3. What if someone gave you reason to believe that your new stepfather murdered your father?
    4. How would you go about getting your stepfather to confess to the murder of your father?
    5. If you wanted to make people believe you’re insane, how would you do it?
    6. How would you feel and what would you do if you found out that a close friend has been spying on you?
    7. What makes life challenging? What makes it worth living? Describe a few examples that help to show your thinking about how people should value life.

    3. Finish facts sheet on Shakespeare's life, times and works. Take additional notes.

    4. Introduce iambic pentameter, the heartbeat rhythmic pattern that Shakespeare used to show romance and music to his words. This pattern also helped the actors remember their lines.

    5. Review the Native American Unit Exam questions/answers.

    6. Introduce HW.

  • How can we effectively prepare for our study of Hamlet? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 14th:
  • Read all of Act I in Hamlet (play given in class).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MAY 16th:

  • Read all of Act II in Hamlet (play given in class).
  • Compose FIVE post-its (equivalent to 1/4 of a piece of loose-leaf paper) of evidence of virtues (admirable qualities) and flaws (weaknesses) in any of the characters. Fill each post-it (1/4 of a page) with great detail. If you choose a quote, then you must interpret the quote in your own words and explain how it supports a virtue or a flaw of a character. You also must identify the Act and the Scene for each post-it.
  • POP (SURPRISE) READING QUIZZES ON HAMLET MAY BE GIVEN AT ANY TIME TO PROVE THAT YOU ARE DOING THE READING.
  • Thursday, May 8th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Choose two of the following questions to answer--
    1. What would it feel like to return home after being away for the summer to discover that your father is dead and your mother had already remarried?
    2. What if the man your mother remarried was a lowlife and took over all of your father’s affairs and successes? How would you feel and what, if anything, would you do about it?
    3. What if someone gave you reason to believe that your new stepfather murdered your father?
    4. How would you go about getting your stepfather to confess to the murder of your father?
    5. If you wanted to make people believe you’re insane, how would you do it?
    6. How would you feel and what would you do if you found out that a close friend has been spying on you?
    7. What makes life challenging? What makes it worth living? Describe a few examples that help to show your thinking about how people should value life.

    2. Finish facts sheet on Shakespeare's life, times and works. Take additional notes.

    3. Introduce iambic pentameter, the heartbeat rhythmic pattern that Shakespeare used to show romance and music to his words. This pattern also helped the actors remember their lines.

    How can we effectively prepare for our study of Hamlet? Make up any owed HW! The last day of the 2nd marking period is THIS FRIDAY.
    Wednesday, May 7th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Share student-generated facts on Shakespeare and what they want to learn--taken from their K-W-L on Shakespeare--his life, times and works

    2. Introduce facts sheet on Shakespeare's life, times and works. Take additional notes.

    3. Introduce iambic pentameter, the heartbeat rhythmic pattern that Shakespeare used to show romance and music to his words. This pattern also helped the actors remember their lines.

    How can we effectively prepare for our study of Hamlet? Make up any owed HW! The last day of the 2nd marking period is THIS FRIDAY.
    Tuesday, May 6th, 2014: 1. Do Now: EXAM ON THE NATIVE AMERICAN UNIT

    2. K-W-L on Shakespeare--his life, times and works

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively prove our knowledge of the Native American Unit Make up any owed HW! The last day of the 2nd marking period is THIS FRIDAY.
    Monday, May 5th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Continue viewing the film: Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Focus on the following questions:
  • What conflict is presented in the exposition of the film?
  • How are the leaders of the Indians characterized?
  • Analyze the setting and its significance to the history of the Indians.
  • How does faith play a role in the Indians' lives?
  • How does assimilation play a role in the Indians' lives?
  • How is the author's tone revealed in these opening scenes of the film?

    2. HW Reminders

  • How can we effectively understand chapter one as it comes to life in the film version of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MAY 6th (Bring a #2 pencil! If you don't have one, it's -10 points):
    NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period grade) TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MAY 6th: KNOW CHAPTER ONE IN BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE, THE NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE AND NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE VOCABULARY LIST #2. YOU NEED TO KNOW/REVIEW THE FOLLOWING:

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 1-3 questions
    1.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    2.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    3.) What themes (messages the author is expressing) exist in these pages? A theme can be the importance of family. Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 4-6 questions
    1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 7-9 questions
    1.) How does the author, Dee Brown, characterize the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) How does the author characterize the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) How does the author characterize the Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 10-12 questions
    1.) What is a valued character trait in a leader of the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) What is a theme (the author's message; examples: the importance of manners, the value of peace, etc.) presented? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) What's the author's tone toward the white Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • Article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

  • Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2
  • Friday, May 2nd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Watch the exposition of the film: Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Focus on the following questions:
  • What conflict is presented in the exposition of the film?
  • How are the leaders of the Indians characterized?
  • Analyze the setting and its significance to the history of the Indians.
  • How does faith play a role in the Indians' lives?
  • How does assimilation play a role in the Indians' lives?
  • How is the author's tone revealed in these opening scenes of the film?

    2. HW Reminders

  • How can we effectively understand chapter one as it comes to life in the film version of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee? NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period grade) THIS COMING TUESDAY, MAY 6th: KNOW CHAPTER ONE IN BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE, THE NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE AND NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE VOCABULARY LIST #2. YOU NEED TO KNOW/REVIEW THE FOLLOWING:

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 1-3 questions
    1.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    2.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    3.) What themes (messages the author is expressing) exist in these pages? A theme can be the importance of family. Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 4-6 questions
    1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 7-9 questions
    1.) How does the author, Dee Brown, characterize the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) How does the author characterize the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) How does the author characterize the Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 10-12 questions
    1.) What is a valued character trait in a leader of the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) What is a theme (the author's message; examples: the importance of manners, the value of peace, etc.) presented? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) What's the author's tone toward the white Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • Article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

  • Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2
  • Thursday, May 1st, 2014: 1. Do Now: Review for Tuesday's EXAM. Review Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee questions/answers/notes, Article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology", and Native American Vocabulary List #2.

    2. Review midterm questions/answers and understand how to be better test-takers.

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively improve our Regents-style multiple-choice question skills? NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period grade) NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 6th: KNOW CHAPTER ONE IN BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE, THE NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE AND NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE VOCABULARY LIST #2. YOU NEED TO KNOW/REVIEW THE FOLLOWING:

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 1-3 questions
    1.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    2.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    3.) What themes (messages the author is expressing) exist in these pages? A theme can be the importance of family. Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 4-6 questions
    1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 7-9 questions
    1.) How does the author, Dee Brown, characterize the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) How does the author characterize the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) How does the author characterize the Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 10-12 questions
    1.) What is a valued character trait in a leader of the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) What is a theme (the author's message; examples: the importance of manners, the value of peace, etc.) presented? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) What's the author's tone toward the white Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • Article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

  • Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2
  • Wednesday, April 30th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish reading pages 10-12 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Answer the following questions for pages 10-12 only. You must finish this today and show for classwork credit.
    1.) What is a valued character trait in a leader of the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) What is a theme (the author's message; examples: the importance of manners, the value of peace, etc.) presented? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) What's the author's tone toward the white Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

    *SHOW HOMEWORK: FLASHCARDS for Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2.

    2. Work Period: Compose two Regents-style multiple-choice questions (with four answer choices) for Tuesday's exam. Refer to Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, the Article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology", and Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2. MAKE SURE TO CIRCLE THE CORRECT ANSWER.

    3. Review the Do Now questions/answers, and make the necessary changes.

    How can we effectively improve our Regents-style multiple-choice question skills? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!

    LOOKING AHEAD: NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period grade) NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 6th: KNOW CHAPTER ONE IN BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE, THE NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE AND NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE VOCABULARY LIST #2. YOU NEED TO KNOW/REVIEW THE FOLLOWING:

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 1-3 questions
    1.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    2.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    3.) What themes (messages the author is expressing) exist in these pages? A theme can be the importance of family. Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 4-6 questions
    1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 7-9 questions
    1.) How does the author, Dee Brown, characterize the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) How does the author characterize the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) How does the author characterize the Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 10-12 questions
    1.) What is a valued character trait in a leader of the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) What is a theme (the author's message; examples: the importance of manners, the value of peace, etc.) presented? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) What's the author's tone toward the white Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • Article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

  • Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2
  • Tuesday, April 29th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Read pages 10-12 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Answer the following questions for pages 10-12 only. If you don't finish today, you must finish in class tomorrow.
    1.) What is a valued character trait in a leader of the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) What is a theme (the author's message; examples: the importance of manners, the value of peace, etc.) presented? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) What's the author's tone toward the white Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

    2. Work on HW, using the Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2.

    How can we effectively improve our vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30th:
  • Flashcards for Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!

    LOOKING AHEAD: NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE EXAM (50% of the 2nd marking period grade)NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 6th: KNOW CHAPTER ONE IN BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE, THE NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE AND NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE VOCABULARY LIST #2. YOU NEED TO KNOW/REVIEW THE FOLLOWING:

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 1-3 questions
    1.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    2.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    3.) What themes (messages the author is expressing) exist in these pages? A theme can be the importance of family. Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 4-6 questions
    1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).
    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 7-9 questions
    1.) How does the author, Dee Brown, characterize the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) How does the author characterize the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) How does the author characterize the Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE: pages 10-12 questions
    1.) What is a valued character trait in a leader of the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    2.) What is a theme (the author's message; examples: the importance of manners, the value of peace, etc.) presented? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.
    3.) What's the author's tone toward the white Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

  • Article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

  • Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2
  • Monday, April 28th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Read "First they came for..." poem. Write your own "First they came for..." poem. This is to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day, which is today.

    2. Introduce Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2.

    How can we effectively improve our vocabulary skills? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30th:
  • Flashcards for Native American Literature Vocabulary List #2. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!

    LOOKING AHEAD: NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE EXAM NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 6th: KNOW CHAPTER ONE IN BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE, THE NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE AND NATIVE AMERICAN ARTICLE VOCABULARY LIST #2.

  • Friday, April 25th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Read the HW article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment and review notes on respect, lack of respect and the need for a solution: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • Discuss the answers for the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

    2. Midterm returns and review.

  • How can we effectively identify textual evidence and improve test-taking skills? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!
    Thursday, April 24th, 2014: 1. Do Now: With a partner, choose one of the following:
  • Challenge: Create a "Top Ten" list: ten reasons that Native Americans are role models for respect (you must include evidence from the HW article or Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee)
  • Find ten unknown words from the HW article and define them. Then, compose your own, original sentence for each of the unknown words.

    2. Show your Do Now classwork (for classwork credit on jupitergrades) "Top Ten" list or ten unknown words, definitions and original sentences.

    3. HW reminders.

  • How can we effectively identify textual evidence and improve vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, APRIL 25th:
  • FINISH TODAY'S CLASSWORK (this includes 2nd period and anyone who was absent from class): Choose one of the following:
  • Challenge: Create a "Top Ten" list: TEN reasons that Native Americans are role models for respect (you must include evidence from the HW article or Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee)
  • Find ten unknown words from the HW article and define them. Then, compose your own, original sentence for each of the unknown words.

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK:

  • VACATION HOMEWORK DUE YESTERDAY, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23rd (SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHDAY!):
  • Read the following article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!

  • Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Read "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy. What can we anticipate in the play, Hamlet? Begin to paraphrase each line in today's modern language. Identify literary terms. Cookies and juice for Shakespeare's birthday!

    Show HW assignment #1 (paragraph summaries) and assignment #2 (questions).

    2. Discuss Do Now.

    3. If time allows, discuss the HW.

    How can we effectively the famous "To Be or Not to Be" Shakespearean soliloquy? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
  • VACATION HOMEWORK DUE TODAY, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23rd (SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHDAY!):
  • Read the following article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!

  • Friday, April 11th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Discuss pages 7-9 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.
    Discuss the answers to the following questions:

    1.) How does the author, Dee Brown, characterize the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer.

    2.) How does the author characterize the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

    3.) How does the author characterize the Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

    2. HW Reminders

    3. Spelling Bee on the Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee and compete for a chance to be the top three winners! You can earn extra credit (up to 20 points!) on the vocabulary quiz that was just taken on these words.

    How can we effectively analyze our listening and reading skills? VACATION HOMEWORK DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23rd (SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHDAY!):
  • Read the following article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!

  • Thursday, April 10th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Listening Section of the Midterm-Part I

    2. Reading and Multiple-Choice Questions-Part II of Midterm

    How can we effectively analyze our listening and reading skills? EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, APRIL 11th ONLY:
  • Review the spelling of each of the vocabulary words in the Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee and compete for a chance to be the top three winners in a SPELLING BEE!! You can earn extra credit (up to 20 points!) on the vocabulary quiz that was just taken on these words.

    VACATION HOMEWORK DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23rd:

  • Read the following article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!

  • Wednesday, April 9th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Read pages 7-9 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.
    Answer the following questions:

    1.) How does the author, Dee Brown, characterize the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer.

    2.) How does the author characterize the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

    3.) How does the author characterize the Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

    SHOW DO NOW ANSWERS FOR CLASSWORK CREDIT.

    2. Review answers for pages 4-6 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Discuss the following questions:

    1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    Review answers for pages 7-9 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.
    Discuss the answers for the following questions:

    1.) How does the author, Dee Brown, characterize the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer.

    2.) How does the author characterize the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

    3.) How does the author characterize the Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and analyze how the quote supports your answer.

    3. Review Do Now, multiple-choice question, note-taking and listening strategies, and HW Reminders

    How can we effectively improve our literary analysis through native american study? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, APRIL 10th:
  • MIDTERM on reading and listening skills (10% of the 2nd marking period). Be ready to take good notes, annotate (take good notes while you read), and answer multiple-choice questions (using good strategies that we will review in class). BRING A #2 PENCIL. Remember the following strategies: take A LOT of notes while you listen to the listening passage and while you read the passages being given to you. Preview the multiple-choice questions before reading/listening, and underline line #s in the reading passages before you read so you know that there will be questions on those line #s. When answering the multiple-choice questions, cover up the answer choices and figure out the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices. Then, choose the correct answer from the choices provided.

    VACATION HOMEWORK DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23rd:

  • Read the following article on the Native Americans' respect for the environment: "Probing the Relationship Between Native Americans and Ecology".
  • ASSIGNMENT #1: Take notes (for each paragraph) on evidence of respect, including problems with lack of respect and the need for a solution.
  • ASSIGNMENT #2: Answer the following questions for the article:
    1.) How do people disrespect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.
    2.) How do Native Americans respect the environment? Answer the question. Identify a quote from the article to support your answer. Analyze the quote and explain how the quote supports the answer.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (SEE PREVIOUS DAYS' ASSIGNMENTS AND JUPITERGRADES.COM)!!!

  • Tuesday, April 8th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Write down the following: For pages 4-6 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, answer the following questions:

    1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    2. Make up any owed classwork or homework, including questions for pages 1-3 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee:
    Finish answering the following questions (for classwork grade/stamp):
    1.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    2.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    3.) What themes (messages the author is expressing) exist in these pages? A theme can be the importance of family. Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).

    *SHOW CLASSWORK QUESTIONS FOR PAGES 4-6 (see DO NOW)

    3. Review Do Now and HW Reminders

    How can we effectively improve our literary analysis through native american study? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9th:
  • Go to VOCABSLAM, login (with your username from Friday's class). Look up the word "tactful" (click on "t" to find the word) and find msconn2014 (Ms. Conn). Follow Ms. Conn. Then, make sure that you compose TEN sentences (for TEN different vocabulary words). Compose detailed, sophisticated sentences! HERE'S MORE DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:
  • A) Instructions for Students to log in.

    1. Create a Disqus account if you have not done so already. Click any word on Vocabslam, click “Login” near the comment box, click “Disqus”, click “Need an account” and create an account.

    2. Edit profile to include class period #. After you’ve created an account, click the person avatar icon (where Login was) and click “Your Profile” then “Edit profile”. In the “About Yourself” box, type your period number. Be sure that your user has your first and last name (or last initial) so Ms. Conn can grade your work. Also don’t forget to upload an avatar image!

    3. Follow Ms. Conn. Go to the word “tactful” and find MsConn2014. Click her name then click “Follow”

    DUE THURSDAY, APRIL 10th:

  • MIDTERM on reading and listening skills (10% of the 2nd marking period). Be ready to take good notes, annotate (take good notes while you read), and answer multiple-choice questions (using good strategies that we will review in class)
  • Monday, April 7th, 2014: 1. Do Now: VOCABULARY QUIZ on Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

    Show flashcard HW and turn in the vocabulary story.

    2. Work Period: Write down the following: For pages 4-6 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, answer the following questions:

    1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).


  • Begin reading pages 4-6 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, and answer the questions above.

    3. HW reminder

  • How can we effectively improve our SAT vocabulary skills? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9th:
  • Go to VOCABSLAM, login (with your username from Friday's class). Look up the word "tactful" (click on "t" to find the word) and find msconn2014 (Ms. Conn). Follow Ms. Conn. Then, make sure that you compose TEN sentences (for TEN different vocabulary words). Compose detailed, sophisticated sentences!
  • Friday, April 4th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Introduce VOCABSLAM and the founders will present their website.

    2. Work Period: Work on VOCABSLAM

    3. If time allows, work on HW.

    How can we effectively improve our SAT vocabulary skills? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, APRIL 7th:
  • Flashcards for Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.
  • Vocabulary Story, using all words from Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. You must underline ALL of the vocabulary words in a creative story that you write about one of the following topics: Native Americans (American Indians), My Goals, College Life, A Day in My Life or Junior Year.
  • QUIZ (10% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Know the definitions and how to compose sentences for each of the words. The quiz will not be matching or multiple-choice. You MUST know the definitions well.

    FOR A CHALLENGE (not homework), ENJOY THIS: Watch the TED TALK with Shawn Achor.

  • Thursday, April 3rd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish reading pages 1-3 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Finish answering the following questions (for classwork grade/stamp):
    1.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    2.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).
    3.) What themes (messages the author is expressing) exist in these pages? A theme can be the importance of family. Identify one direct quote to support your answer (include page #).

    *SHOW CLASSWORK (DO NOW) FOR A GRADE (MUST RECEIVE A STAMP FOR CREDIT).

    2. Discuss the answers for questions 1-3.

    3. Work Period: Write down the following: For pages 4-6 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, answer the following questions: 1.) How do the Europeans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    2.) How do the Americans resolve conflict with the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    3.) How do the Indians resolve conflict with the Europeans and/or Americans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer and explain how the quote supports your answer (include page #).

    4. If time allows, begin reading pages 4-6 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, and answer the questions above.

    How can we effectively study Native American history, focusing on author's tone, themes and conflicts? DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 7th:
  • Flashcards for Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.
  • Vocabulary Story, using all words from Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. You must underline ALL of the vocabulary words in a creative story that you write about one of the following topics: Native Americans (American Indians), My Goals, College Life, A Day in My Life or Junior Year.
  • QUIZ (10% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Know the definitions and how to compose sentences for each of the words. The quiz will not be matching or multiple-choice. You MUST know the definitions well.

    FOR A CHALLENGE (not homework), ENJOY THIS: Watch the TED TALK with Shawn Achor.

  • Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Distribute Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (for in-class use only). Examine its packaging (illustration, back cover summary, author, copyright page, etc.). Discuss and share your predictions for this text.

    2. Read/Analyze: Begin the following: Read pages 1-3 in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Answer the following questions (for classwork grade/stamp):
    1.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Indians? Identify one direct quote to support your answer.
    2.) What's the author's tone (feeling/attitude) toward the Europeans? Identify one direct quote to support your answer.
    3.) What themes (messages the author is expressing) exist in these pages? A theme can be the importance of family.

    3. If time allows, discuss the answers for questions 1-3.

    4. If finished early, work on the HW.

    How can we effectively begin our Native American Unit, focusing on author's tone and themes? DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 7th:
  • Flashcards for Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.
  • Vocabulary Story, using all words from Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. You must underline ALL of the vocabulary words in a creative story that you write about one of the following topics: Native Americans (American Indians), My Goals, College Life, A Day in My Life or Junior Year.
  • QUIZ (10% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Know the definitions and how to compose sentences for each of the words. The quiz will not be matching or multiple-choice. You MUST know the definitions well.

    FOR A CHALLENGE (not homework), ENJOY THIS: Watch the TED TALK with Shawn Achor.

  • Tuesday, April 1st, 2014: 1. Do Now: PERIODS 2 AND 3: Work on HW: flashcards or vocabulary story for the Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

    2. PERIODS 7 AND 9: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS and introduce the Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

    How can we effectively prepare for our Native American Unit? DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 7th:
  • Flashcards for Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.
  • Vocabulary Story, using all words from Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. You must underline ALL of the vocabulary words in a creative story that you write about one of the following topics: Native Americans (American Indians), My Goals, College Life, A Day in My Life or Junior Year.
  • QUIZ (10% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Know the definitions and how to compose sentences for each of the words. The quiz will not be matching or multiple-choice. You MUST know the definitions well.

    FOR A CHALLENGE (not homework), ENJOY THIS: Watch the TED TALK with Shawn Achor.

  • Monday, March 31st, 2014: 1. Do Now: PERIODS 2 AND 3: Introduce Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Check any words that you already know, put a dash (-) next to words that look familiar, and put a question mark (?) next to words that you've never seen before.

    2. Review the Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

    *Turn in extra credit assignments (today's the last day to turn them in!).

    PERIODS 7 AND 9: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS

    How can we effectively prepare for our Native American Unit? DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 7th:
  • Flashcards for Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). Using a flashcard app is also acceptable.
  • Vocabulary Story, using all words from Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. You must underline ALL of the vocabulary words in a creative story that you write about one of the following topics: Native Americans (American Indians), My Goals, College Life, A Day in My Life or Junior Year.
  • QUIZ (10% of the 2nd marking period) on Chapter One Vocabulary List from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Know the definitions and how to compose sentences for each of the words. The quiz will not be matching or multiple-choice. You MUST know the definitions well.

    FOR A CHALLENGE (not homework), ENJOY THIS: Watch the TED TALK with Shawn Achor.

  • Friday, March 28th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Watch the TED TALK with Shawn Achor. Answer the following questions:
  • Why aren't students at Harvard happy?
  • How is your happiness determined?
  • How is job success attained?
  • Is it true that success will lead to happiness (according to Shawn Achor's research)?
  • What are some new ways to create lasting positive change?

    2. Discuss and share discussion questions for the TED Talk.

    3. Begin one of the activities that will create lasting positive change.

  • How can we effectively understand the means of being happier in work/school? DUE THIS MONDAY, MARCH 31st: ALL OF THE CLASSWORK COMPLETED DURING MS. CONN'S ABSENCES WILL BE ELIGIBLE FOR EXTRA HW CREDITS FOR THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD! YOU MAY TURN IN ALL CLASSWORK ASSIGNMENTS NO LATER THAN MONDAY, MARCH 31st TO EARN THE POSSIBILITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT! ATTENTION TO PERIODS 7 AND 9: ALL SPEECHES MUST BE PRESENTED BY MONDAY, MARCH 31st. ONLY STUDENTS WHO WERE SCHEDULED TO PRESENT LAST THURSDAY (AND STUDENTS WHO'VE SPOKEN TO MS. CONN) MAY PRESENT.

    FOR A CHALLENGE (not homework), ENJOY THIS: Watch the TED TALK with Shawn Achor.

    Thursday, March 27th, 2014: 1. Do Now:
  • Which classwork assignment over the past week was your favorite (the Native American questions, your autobiography as a reader, or your wisdom life story) and why?
  • Did your view on the importance of education change since Ms. Conn's absence? If so, explain. If not, why not?

    *Return your Frederick Douglass books.

    2. Periods 2 and 3: Review the Do Now and review the answers to the Native American questions:

    1.) Which is correct--"Native American" or "American Indian"?
    2.) How does the U.S. government recognize an Amerian Indian?
    3.) What are Indian reservations and why are they called Indian reservations?
    4.) Do all American Indians live on reservations?
    5.) Is there an American Indian religion?
    6.) What is the significance of eagle feathers to Native American Indians?
    7.) How many federally recognized tribes of American Indians are there?
    8.) How many American Indians live in the U.S.?
    9.) What is a pow wow?
    10.) Identify one interesting fact or question that you have regarding Native American Indians.

    Periods 7 and 9: Finish presenting the Importance of Education speeches.

    3. Turn in all extra credit assignments (all classwork since Ms. Conn's absence will be accepted as extra credit HW).

  • How can we effectively understand the importance of education and prepare for the Native American unit? DUE BY MONDAY, MARCH 31st: ALL OF THE CLASSWORK COMPLETED DURING MS. CONN'S ABSENCES WILL BE ELIGIBLE FOR EXTRA HW CREDITS FOR THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD! YOU MAY TURN IN ALL CLASSWORK ASSIGNMENTS NO LATER THAN MONDAY, MARCH 31st TO EARN THE POSSIBILITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT! ATTENTION TO PERIODS 7 AND 9: ALL SPEECHES MUST BE PRESENTED BY MONDAY, MARCH 31st. ONLY STUDENTS WHO WERE SCHEDULED TO PRESENT LAST THURSDAY (AND STUDENTS WHO'VE SPOKEN TO MS. CONN) MAY PRESENT.
    Wednesday, March 26th, 2014: WORK PERIOD: Write your own WISDOM FROM YOUR LIFE STORY. Write 1-2 pages on the wisdom from your own life experiences (just like Frederick Douglass did in his memoir) that you'd like to share with others. You may include answers to the following questions:
  • What did you learn in your childhood that could help others?
  • What struggles have you endured that have made you a stronger person?
  • If you could go back in time and speak to your younger self (perhaps your 10-year-old self? 14-year-old self? Or another age?), what would you say or what advice would you give and why?
  • What accomplishment are you most proud of and how could that accomplishment help inspire others?
  • How can we effectively analyze our own autobiographies and share wisdom from our lives? IF YOU WERE SCHEDULED TO PRESENT YOUR SPEECH (PERIODS 7 AND 9 ONLY), YOU SHOULD BE READY TO PRESENT AS SOON AS MS. CONN RETURNS (AS YOU KNOW, MS. CONN HAS BEEN SICK. SHE HOPES TO RETURN AS SOON AS SHE CAN. THANK YOU FOR COOPERATING!)

    BE READY TO RETURN FREDERICK DOUGLASS' BOOKS WHEN MS. CONN RETURNS. ALL OF THE CLASSWORK COMPLETED DURING MS. CONN'S ABSENCES WILL BE ELIGIBLE FOR EXTRA HW CREDITS FOR THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD!

    Tuesday, March 25th, 2014: WORK PERIOD: Write a 1-2 page autobiography of your life experience as a reader. Include the following: how old you were when you first started reading, your interest and experiences reading as a child (elementary school years) at home and in school, your interest and experiences reading as a pre-teen (middle school years) at home and in school, and your interest and experiences as a teenager (high school years) at home and in school. How can we effectively do a self-assessment of our lives as readers? IF YOU WERE SCHEDULED TO PRESENT YOUR SPEECH (PERIODS 7 AND 9 ONLY), YOU SHOULD BE READY TO PRESENT AS SOON AS MS. CONN RETURNS (AS YOU KNOW, MS. CONN HAS BEEN SICK. SHE HOPES TO RETURN AS SOON AS SHE CAN. THANK YOU FOR COOPERATING!)

    BE READY TO RETURN FREDERICK DOUGLASS' BOOKS WHEN MS. CONN RETURNS. ALL OF THE CLASSWORK COMPLETED DURING MS. CONN'S ABSENCES WILL BE ELIGIBLE FOR EXTRA HW CREDITS FOR THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD!

    Monday, March 24th, 2014: WORK PERIOD: CHOOSE ONE OF THE PRE-READING QUESTIONS BELOW (from Friday) and write ONE full page in which you answer one or all of the following questions: What is your prior knowledge on this topic? What are stereotypes that exist? What do you want to learn/research about this topic?

    1.) Which is correct--"Native American" or "American Indian"?
    2.) How does the U.S. government recognize an Amerian Indian?
    3.) What are Indian reservations and why are they called Indian reservations?
    4.) Do all American Indians live on reservations?
    5.) Is there an American Indian religion?
    6.) What is the significance of eagle feathers to Native American Indians?
    7.) How many federally recognized tribes of American Indians are there?
    8.) How many American Indians live in the U.S.?
    9.) What is a pow wow?
    10.) Identify one interesting fact or question that you have regarding Native American Indians.

    How can we effectively prepare for our Native American unit? IF YOU WERE SCHEDULED TO PRESENT YOUR SPEECH (PERIODS 7 AND 9 ONLY), YOU SHOULD BE READY TO PRESENT TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 25th. Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    RETURN FREDERICK DOUGLASS' BOOKS TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 25th! ON TUESDAY, MARCH 25th, TURN IN TODAY'S AND FRIDAY'S CLASSWORK QUESTIONS FOR EXTRA HW CREDITS FOR THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD!

    Friday, March 21st, 2014: WORK PERIOD: Pre-reading questions (you may not know the correct answers; do your best) for our next unit of study on Native Americans:
    1.) Which is correct--"Native American" or "American Indian"?
    2.) How does the U.S. government recognize an Amerian Indian?
    3.) What are Indian reservations and why are they called Indian reservations?
    4.) Do all American Indians live on reservations?
    5.) Is there an American Indian religion?
    6.) What is the significance of eagle feathers to Native American Indians?
    7.) How many federally recognized tribes of American Indians are there?
    8.) How many American Indians live in the U.S.?
    9.) What is a pow wow?
    10.) Identify one interesting fact or question that you have regarding Native American Indians.
    How can we effectively prepare for our Native American unit? TODAY IS THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD! YOU MUST TURN IN ANY OWED HOMEWORK BY MIDNIGHT VIA E-MAIL (hconn@schools.nyc.gov). NO EXCEPTIONS. IF YOU WERE SCHEDULED TO PRESENT YOUR SPEECH (PERIODS 7 AND 9 ONLY), YOU SHOULD BE READY TO PRESENT ON MONDAY. Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    RETURN FREDERICK DOUGLASS' BOOKS ON MONDAY! ON MONDAY, TURN IN TODAY'S CLASSWORK QUESTIONS FOR AN EXTRA HW CREDIT FOR THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD!

    Thursday, March 20th, 2014: 1. PERIODS 2 AND 3: Speech Presentations: Students with last names N-Z will present their speeches today. They will be graded on the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric.

    2. HW Reminders

    PERIODS 7 AND 9: Make up any owed HW and prepare for speech presentations. Note: Ms. Conn had to leave early because she wasn't feeling well. More info. coming.

    How can we effectively present speech presentations? TOMORROW IS THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD! Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Wednesday, March 19th, 2014: 1. Speech Presentations: Students with last names A-M will present their speeches today. They will be graded on the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric.

    2. Reflections: What were the strengths of the presenters today? If the presenters had more time, what could they work on in the future?

    3. HW Reminders

    How can we effectively present speech presentations? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 20th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH N-Z) and, if time allows, any students who owe presentations from today (-10 points):

    The PERSUASIVE SPEECH PRESENTATION ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION (FINAL COPY; BRING ROUGH DRAFT, TOO):

    FYI:

  • IF YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED YOUR ROUGH DRAFT, WITH CORRECTIONS, FROM MS. CONN, THEN YOU MAY BE ABLE TO PRESENT ON THURSDAY, WITHOUT POINTS DEDUCTED.
  • IF YOU'RE READY TO PRESENT EARLIER THAN YOUR ASSIGNED DAY, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO EARN +10 POINTS!


  • You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    YOUR SPEECHES will be presented Wednesday, March 19th (assigned students: A-M) or Thursday, March 20th (assigned students: N-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. You will be graded, using this Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric.

    IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED ON THE DAY OF YOUR PRESENTATION, YOU WILL EARN A ZERO. THERE ARE NO OPPORTUNITIES FOR MAKE-UP FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Tuesday, March 18th, 2014: 1. Speech Delivery Practice: With a partner, deliver one paragraph. Make sure to speak loudly, enunciate, use eye contact, hand gestures when emphasizing important points, and enthusiasm. Next, deliver one paragraph to a group of 3 people (you should be in a group of 4). Make sure to speak loudly, enunciate, use eye contact, hand gestures when emphasizing important points, and enthusiasm.

    2. Reflections: How was this speech delivery practice useful and effective? What did you learn? What do you need to work on for your presentations this week?

    How can we prepare for our speech presentations? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH A-M) OR THURSDAY, MARCH 20th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH N-Z):

    The PERSUASIVE SPEECH PRESENTATION ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION (FINAL COPY; BRING ROUGH DRAFT, TOO):

    FYI:

  • IF YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED YOUR ROUGH DRAFT, WITH CORRECTIONS, FROM MS. CONN, THEN YOU MAY BE ABLE TO PRESENT ON THURSDAY, WITHOUT POINTS DEDUCTED.
  • IF YOU'RE READY TO PRESENT EARLIER THAN YOUR ASSIGNED DAY, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO EARN +10 POINTS!


  • You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    YOUR SPEECHES will be presented Wednesday, March 19th (assigned students: A-M) or Thursday, March 20th (assigned students: N-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. You will be graded, using this Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric.

    IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED ON THE DAY OF YOUR PRESENTATION, YOU WILL EARN A ZERO. THERE ARE NO OPPORTUNITIES FOR MAKE-UP FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Monday, March 17th, 2014: 1. Do Now: What are your public speaking strengths? What are your public speaking areas needing improvement? What are your writing strengths? What are your writing areas needing improvement? Provide at least one for each.

    2. Speech Delivery Practice: With a partner, deliver one paragraph. Make sure to speak loudly, enunciate, use eye contact, hand gestures when emphasizing important points, and enthusiasm. Next, deliver one paragraph to a group of 3 people (you should be in a group of 4). Make sure to speak loudly, enunciate, use eye contact, hand gestures when emphasizing important points, and enthusiasm.

    3. Reflections: How was this speech delivery practice useful and effective? What did you learn? What do you need to work on for your presentations this week?

    4. HW Reminder

    How can we prepare for our speech presentations? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH A-M) OR THURSDAY, MARCH 20th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH N-Z):

    The PERSUASIVE SPEECH PRESENTATION ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION (FINAL COPY; BRING ROUGH DRAFT, TOO):

    IF YOU'RE READY TO PRESENT EARLIER THAN YOUR ASSIGNED DAY, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO EARN +10 POINTS!


  • You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    YOUR SPEECHES will be presented Wednesday, March 19th (assigned students: A-M) or Thursday, March 20th (assigned students: N-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. You will be graded, using this Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric.

    IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED ON THE DAY OF YOUR PRESENTATION, YOU WILL EARN A ZERO. THERE ARE NO OPPORTUNITIES FOR MAKE-UP FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Friday, March 14th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's Interview Presentations

    2. Part 2 Interviews to improve public speaking:

  • Divide class into pairs (pair with a new classmate that you don't know so well).
  • Each person interviews the other in turn. The information gained forms the basis of a brief introduction speech they'll give when the interviewing process is complete.
  • Here are the new questions:
    1.) List at least two superstitions that you know.
    2.) Next, categorize these superstitions. For example, which ones relate to good luck, bad luck, death, happiness, etc.
    3.) Finally, who is your role model and why?

    3. Part 2 Interview Presentations

    4. Fun Fact for Today: In Julius Caesar, a soothsayer warns Caesar to "Beware the Ides of March." Caesar ignores the warning and is, in fact, murdered on March 15, called "the Ides" on the Roman calendar. Over time, the date has become associated with doom and momentous events-particularly ones with disastrous effects.

    5. HW Reminder

  • How can we prepare for our speech presentations? THIS MONDAY (MARCH 17th) IS THE LAST CHANCE TO TURN IN THE ROUGH DRAFT OF THE PERSUASIVE SPEECH ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION. If you don't turn it in, you can (and should still present on your presentation day (either Wednesday or Thursday).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH A-M) OR THURSDAY, MARCH 20th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH N-Z):

    The PERSUASIVE SPEECH PRESENTATION ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION (FINAL COPY; BRING ROUGH DRAFT, TOO):

  • You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    YOUR SPEECHES will be presented Wednesday, March 19th (assigned students: A-M) or Thursday, March 20th (assigned students: N-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. You will be graded, using this Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric.

    IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED ON THE DAY OF YOUR PRESENTATION, YOU WILL EARN A ZERO. THERE ARE NO OPPORTUNITIES FOR MAKE-UP FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Thursday, March 13th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Interviews to improve public speaking:
  • Divide class into pairs (pair with a classmate that you don't know so well).
  • Each person interviews the other in turn. The information gained forms the basis of a brief introduction speech they'll give when the interviewing process is complete.
  • Ask them to find out their partner's name, where they live, what hobbies they have, what their favorite book, movie, and song is, what they're most proud of (an achievement perhaps), what career they want to pursue, and a unique/surprising fact about them.

    2. Interview Presentation: When the class comes back together the introductions begin: "This is Mary from Elmhurst. When she's not at school, she's playing guitar. Her other hobbies are ..."

    3. Reflections (how was this interview helpful in improving speech delivery practice?) and HW Reminders

  • How can we prepare for our speech presentations? DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH A-M) OR THURSDAY, MARCH 20th (YOUR LAST NAME BEGINNING WITH N-Z):

    The PERSUASIVE SPEECH PRESENTATION ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION (FINAL COPY; BRING ROUGH DRAFT, TOO):

  • You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    YOUR SPEECHES will be presented Wednesday, March 19th (assigned students: A-M) or Thursday, March 20th (assigned students: N-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. You will be graded, using this Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric.

    IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED ON THE DAY OF YOUR PRESENTATION, YOU WILL EARN A ZERO. THERE ARE NO OPPORTUNITIES FOR MAKE-UP FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Wednesday, March 12th, 2014: 1. Do Now: If you completed the paper, what were your strengths and weaknesses? List TWO FOR EACH. If you did NOT complete the paper, what was holding you back and why? Write ONE paragraph (4-6 sentences).

    TURN IN YOUR PAPERS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION. 2. Introduce the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric.

    3. Speech Delivery Practice: With a partner, deliver one paragraph. Make sure to speak loudly, enunciate, use eye contact, hand gestures when emphasizing important points, and enthusiasm. Next, deliver one paragraph to a group of 3 people (you should be in a group of 4). Make sure to speak loudly, enunciate, use eye contact, hand gestures when emphasizing important points, and enthusiasm. 4. Reflections: How was this speech delivery practice useful and effective? What did you learn? What do you need to work on for your presentations next week?

    5. HW Reminder

    How can we reflect on our writing and prepare for our speech presentation? This speech will be presented Wednesday, March 19th (assigned students: A-M) or Thursday, March 20th (assigned students: N-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade.

    IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED ON THE DAY OF YOUR PRESENTATION, YOU WILL EARN A ZERO. THERE ARE NO OPPORTUNITIES FOR MAKE-UP FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    Tuesday, March 11th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Work on brainstorming (1/2 page) your personal opinions on why you believe education is valuable. Brainstorm (1/2 page) why Frederick Douglass believes education is valuable. Brainstorm (1/2 page) why President Obama believes education is valuable.

    2. Review Ms. Conn's Writing Standards and HW details.

    3. Work Period: Work on completing all sections of the persuasive speech outline/diagram.

    3. HW reminders

    How can we prepare to write a persuasive speech by composing an outline? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12th:
    Persuasive Speech Assignment (ROUGH DRAFT): You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    PERIOD 7 ONLY: Watch ABC (channel 7) news at 6:30-7pm OR go to cnn.com and find a news story that supports the topic of your essay: the importance of education. Bring in one-paragraph (4-6 sentences are acceptable) analysis of the news story in connection to the importance of education. Explain the news story's focus and connection to the essay topic.

    This speech will be presented Wednesday, March 19th (assigned students TBA) or Thursday, March 20th (assigned students TBA) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    Monday, March 10th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Write your thesis statement and enter it in the "position" space in the persuasive speech outline/diagram. An easy tip: include the word "should" in your thesis statement, and you create a persuasive statement. Also, your thesis statement expresses your opinion (without using 1st person) on the importance of education. For example: People today should value education because...

    2. Work Period: Work on completing other sections of the persuasive speech outline/diagram.

    Show HW: three index cards with the summaries and quotes from the news article.

    How can we prepare to write a persuasive speech by composing the thesis statement and outline? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12th:
    Persuasive Speech Assignment (ROUGH DRAFT): You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    This speech will be presented Tuesday, March 18th (A-L), Wednesday, March 19th (M-P), or Thursday, March 20th (R-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    Friday, March 7th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Copy the persuasive speech outline/diagram format.

    2. Finish reviewing the summaries (in 1-2 sentences) of your assigned paragraph(s) in the following news article: "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times. Take notes on all paragraph summaries.

    3. Introduce HW. Introduce the persuasive speech outline/diagram.

    4. Work on the persuasive speech outline/diagram. Finish in class on Monday.

    How can we prepare to write a persuasive speech, using a news article and a memoir? DUE MONDAY, MARCH 10th:
  • Using the index cards provided (or your own, if you weren't in class), identify three paragraphs from the news article: "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times that will support the persuasive speech (see details below) on the importance of education. Fill the three index cards (one side for each) with the summaries and quotes from the article. You may also want to explain why the chosen paragraphs support the argument why education is important/valuable.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12th:
    Persuasive Speech Assignment (ROUGH DRAFT): You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    This speech will be presented Tuesday, March 18th (A-L), Wednesday, March 19th (M-P), or Thursday, March 20th (R-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

  • Thursday, March 6th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Summarize in your own words (in 1-2 sentences) your assigned paragraph(s) in the following news article: "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times.

    2. Share Do Now answers, and copy the class-composed summaries for each paragraph.

    3. Discussion: Finish answering the following questions, if necessary.
    1.) What program is President Obama announcing and why?
    2.) What are the statistics that create challenges for young, black men (according to President Obama)?
    3.) What does President Obama challenge young, black men to do?
    4.) Who does President Obama want to join in his "call for action"?
    5.) How would Frederick Douglass feel about President Obama's initiative? Include both positive and negative opinions that Douglass may have, based on his memoir, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass?

    4. Introduce HW.

    5. If time allows, begin your thesis statement for the Persuasive Speech.

    How can we prepare to write a persuasive speech, using a news article and a memoir? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12th:
    Persuasive Speech Assignment (ROUGH DRAFT): You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    This speech will be presented Tuesday, March 18th (A-L), Wednesday, March 19th (M-P), or Thursday, March 20th (R-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    Wednesday, March 5th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Read the following news article: "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times.

    2. Discussion: Answer questions in groups:
    1.) What program is President Obama announcing and why?
    2.) What are the statistics that create challenges for young, black men (according to President Obama)?
    3.) What does President Obama challenge young, black men to do?
    4.) Who does President Obama want to join in his "call for action"?
    5.) How would Frederick Douglass feel about President Obama's initiative? Include both positive and negative opinions that Douglass may have, based on his memoir, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass?

    3. Finish review of answers to the questions on the entire memoir: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Check your answers.

    4. Introduce HW.

    How can we find modern connections to the memoir, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12th:
    Persuasive Speech Assignment (ROUGH DRAFT): You will write 2-3 typed pages (five paragraphs, which includes an introduction of 4-6 sentences, three body paragraphs of 10-12 sentences each and a conclusion of 4-6 sentences) speech on the following persuasive topic: The Importance of Education. You will persuade your audience that education is valuable. You MUST include examples from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, from the article "Obama Starts Initiative for Young Black Men, Noting Statistics and His Own Experience" from The New York Times and from your own personal experiences. You MUST include a minimum of two direct quotes (including page numbers) from Douglass' memoir and a minimum of one direct quote from the news article. You must introduce the quotes and explain why the quotes support the topic. You must follow the Persuasion Speech Grading Rubric and Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    This speech will be presented Tuesday, March 18th (A-L), Wednesday, March 19th (M-P), or Thursday, March 20th (R-Z) (depending on your last name). This will be 25% of the 2nd marking period grade.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    Tuesday, March 4th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish review of answers to the questions on the entire memoir: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Check your answers.

    2. Distribution of exams on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and review of answers.

    How can we analyze the literary devices, including characterization, symbolism and plot structure, in the memoir, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Monday, March 3rd, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish review of answers to the questions on the entire memoir: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Check your answers.

    2. Discuss Do Now.

    How can we analyze the literary devices, including characterization, symbolism and plot structure, in the memoir, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Friday, February 28th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Finish answering the following questions (and be prepared to discuss)--
    1.) What are five facts in the news this past week?
    2.) Who are five people in the news this past week?
    3.) When was the last time that you read or watched the news?
    4.) Where have you received the news in this past week--newspaper, TV, internet or radio?
    5.) Why or why not do you read or listen to the news?
    6.) How would Frederick Douglass feel about the answers to your questions above? Explain your answer with evidence from The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
    7.) How would your parents feel about your answers to questions #1-5?
    8.) If you are asked these questions next week, do you want to make any changes in your answers? Explain.
    9.) How would your parents' answers to questions #1-5 differ from your answers?
    10.) What did you most learn about yourself from your answers above? Why were these questions valuable in understanding your relationship to current events?

    2. Discuss Do Now questions.

    3. Quiz distribution and review of answers to the Quiz on Chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

    4. Review answers to the questions on the entire memoir: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Check your answers.

    How can we make the memoir, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass, personally relevant to our lives? Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Thursday, February 27th, 2014: 1. Do Now: EXAM on The Narrative of Frederick Douglass

    Show HW: questions and 20 post-its.

    2. Work Period:
    1.) What are five facts in the news this past week?
    2.) Who are five people in the news this past week?
    3.) When was the last time that you read or watched the news?
    4.) Where have you received the news in this past week--newspaper, TV, internet or radio?
    5.) Why or why not do you read or listen to the news?
    6.) How would Frederick Douglass feel about the answers to your questions above? Explain your answer with evidence from The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
    7.) How would your parents feel about your answers to questions #1-5?
    8.) If you are asked these questions next week, do you want to make any changes in your answers? Explain.
    9.) How would your parents' answers to questions #1-5 differ from your answers?
    10.) What did you most learn about yourself from your answers above? Why were these questions valuable in understanding your relationship to current events?

    How can we make the memoir, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass, personally relevant to our lives? Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments).
    Wednesday, February 26th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Write about A TIME WHEN I FELT ENSLAVED:
  • Students will write a short story (a minimum of a 1/2 page) on a time when they've felt enslaved (based on the theme in The Narrative of Frederick Douglass). The short story must have a beginning, middle and an end.

    2. Work Period: Prepare for tomorrow's EXAM (finish reading, writing post-its and answering the questions).

    3. HW Reminders: EXAM TOMORROW! Questions and post-its are due!

  • How can we make the memoir, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass, personally relevant to our lives?
  • DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27th:
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period) on the book. You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization, humanization and questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. BRING IN #2 PENCILS TOMORROW!
  • Read the entire memoir, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Compose a total of 20 post-its (buy the post-its or make your own, fill the entire post-its) with notes on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. You can have some notes on humanization and some notes on dehumanization (just mix it up!). Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Use plenty of evidence from the pages to support dehumanization and humanization. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. Challenge: For each post-it, explain why the evidence of dehumanization or humanization is important to the story as a whole.
  • Answer all of the questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Tuesday, February 25th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Find what's wrong with the following facebook posting:
    HOW TO WRITE GOOD
    1.) Avoid Alliteration. Always.
    2.) Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.
    3.) Avoid cliches like the plague. They're old hat.
    4.) Comparisons are as bad as cliches.
    5.) Be more or less specific.
    6.) Writes should never generalize.
    Seven: Be consistent!
    8.) Don't be redundant; don't use more words than necessary; it's highly superfluous.
    9.) Who needs rhetorical questions?
    10.) Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

    2. Reflections: How are chapters 1 and 2 revealing of Douglass' later accomplishments in his adult life? How did you feel about chapters 1 and 2--was it engaging? Explain. These are the first two questions in the questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Discuss the evidence of dehumanization and humanization in chapters 1 and 2.

    3. Reality Improv Game based on The Narrative of Frederick Douglass:

  • Students will write a short story (a minimum of a 1/2 page) on a time when they've felt enslaved (based on the theme in The Narrative of Frederick Douglass). The short story must have a beginning, middle and an end.
  • Students will put their short stories in a container/box. Then a volunteer actor #1 will pull a short story out of the container. Then the volunteer actor will choose a volunteer actor #2 with whom he will act.
  • Volunteer actor #1 will know the story and volunteer actor #2 will have to follow actor #1's lead. Students in the class will watch, but no one will share whose story was performed. Acting should be no more than 1 minute.
  • If there's time, we will repeat this a few times.
  • At the end, students who wrote the stories performed will share who they are and if their stories were performed accurately.
  • How can we analyze the dehumanization and humanization in chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of Frederick Douglass?
  • DUE THIS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27th:
  • Read the entire memoir, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Compose a total of 20 post-its (buy the post-its or make your own, fill the entire post-its) with notes on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. You can have some notes on humanization and some notes on dehumanization (just mix it up!). Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Use plenty of evidence from the pages to support dehumanization and humanization. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. Challenge: For each post-it, explain why the evidence of dehumanization or humanization is important to the story as a whole.
  • Answer all of the questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Be ready for an exam (25% of the 1st marking period) on the book. You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization, humanization and questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Monday, February 24th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Quiz on chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

    Show HW: 5 post-its of dehumanization and humanization in chapters 1 and 2.

    2. Reflections: How are chapters 1 and 2 revealing of Douglass' later accomplishments in his adult life? How did you feel about chapters 1 and 2--was it engaging? Explain. These are the first two questions in the questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Discuss the evidence of dehumanization and humanization in chapters 1 and 2.

    How can we analyze the dehumanization and humanization in chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of Frederick Douglass?
  • DUE THIS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27th:
  • Read the entire memoir, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Compose a total of 20 post-its (buy the post-its or make your own, fill the entire post-its) with notes on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. You can have some notes on humanization and some notes on dehumanization (just mix it up!). Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Use plenty of evidence from the pages to support dehumanization and humanization. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. Challenge: For each post-it, explain why the evidence of dehumanization or humanization is important to the story as a whole.
  • Answer all of the questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Be ready for an exam (25% of the 1st marking period) on the book. You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization, humanization and questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Friday, February 14th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Review answers to the Literary Terms Quiz.

    2. Reading and analysis of Shakespeare's greatest love poem: "Sonnet 18". Why is this poem one of the greatest love poems of all time? What makes this poem unique to Shakespeare?

    3. If time allows, work on the HW.

  • Read chapters 1 and 2, finding evidence of dehumanization and humanization (use the synonyms determined in yesterday's brainstorming).
  • With the teacher's guidance, compose post-its for both dehumanization and humanization, introducing direct quotes and analyzing them in connection to those themes.
  • How can we analyze the dehumanization and humanization in chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of Frederick Douglass? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24th (after the winter vacation):
  • Read chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Take notes (a minimum of 5 post-its) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. Challenge: For each post-it, explain why the evidence of dehumanization or humanization is important to the story as a whole.
  • Be ready for a reading quiz on chapters 1 and 2 (between 5-10% of the 1st marking period). You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization and humanization and how chapters 1 and 2 are revealing Douglass' later accomplishments in his adult life.
  • DUE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27th:
  • Read the entire memoir, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Compose a total of 20 post-its (buy the post-its or make your own, fill the entire post-its) with notes on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. You can have some notes on humanization and some notes on dehumanization (just mix it up!). Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Use plenty of evidence from the pages to support dehumanization and humanization. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. Challenge: For each post-it, explain why the evidence of dehumanization or humanization is important to the story as a whole.
  • Answer all of the questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Be ready for an exam (25% of the 1st marking period) on the book. You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization, humanization and questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Thursday, February 13th, 2014: Work Period: Work on the HW.
  • Read chapters 1 and 2, finding evidence of dehumanization and humanization (use the synonyms determined in yesterday's brainstorming).
  • With the teacher's guidance, compose post-its for both dehumanization and humanization, introducing direct quotes and analyzing them in connection to those themes.
  • How can we analyze the dehumanization and humanization in chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of Frederick Douglass? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24th (after the winter vacation):
  • Read chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Take notes (a minimum of 5 post-its) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. Challenge: For each post-it, explain why the evidence of dehumanization or humanization is important to the story as a whole.
  • Be ready for a reading quiz on chapters 1 and 2 (between 5-10% of the 1st marking period). You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization and humanization and how chapters 1 and 2 are revealing Douglass' later accomplishments in his adult life.
  • DUE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27th:
  • Read the entire memoir, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Compose a total of 20 post-its (buy the post-its or make your own, fill the entire post-its) with notes on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. You can have some notes on humanization and some notes on dehumanization (just mix it up!). Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Use plenty of evidence from the pages to support dehumanization and humanization. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. Challenge: For each post-it, explain why the evidence of dehumanization or humanization is important to the story as a whole.
  • Answer all of the questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Be ready for an exam (25% of the 1st marking period) on the book. You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization, humanization and questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Wednesday, February 12th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Distribution of copies of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Students can have the option of reading the memoir online here: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

    2. Discuss Douglass' bio (take notes) and the Introduction (pp. XIII-XXXIII) of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Take notes on Frederick Douglass as a man of faith. Take notes on why we should read this book: a famous saying--'If we don't know our past, then we are doomed to repeat it.'

    3. Brainstorm: what is dehumanization? What is humanization?

    4. HW introduced.

    How can we prepare to read The Narrative of Frederick Douglass? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24th (after the winter vacation):
  • Read chapters 1 and 2 in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Take notes (a minimum of 5 post-its) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization.
  • Be ready for a reading quiz on chapters 1 and 2 (between 5-10% of the 1st marking period). You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization and humanization and how chapters 1 and 2 are revealing Douglass' later accomplishments in his adult life.
  • DUE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27th:
  • Read the entire memoir, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Compose a total of 20 post-its (buy the post-its or make your own, fill the entire post-its) with notes on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities) of the slaves. You can have some notes on humanization and some notes on dehumanization (just mix it up!). Identify which note is dehumanization and which note is humanization. Identify the page # for each note. Use plenty of evidence from the pages to support dehumanization and humanization. Also, if you write a direct quote, analyze the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization.
  • Answer all of the questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Be ready for an exam (25% of the 1st marking period) on the book. You will be assessed on evidence of dehumanization, humanization and questions on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Tuesday, February 11th, 2014: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on literary terms.

    2. Read the Introduction (pp. XIII-XXXIII) of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Take notes on Frederick Douglass as a truth-teller, a man of faith, a fighter against the hardships of slavery, a seeker of literacy and freedom from slavery, a survivor of the tricksters, a witness, a denier of victimization, an orator and an inspirational role model for all people.

    3. Finish read-aloud of "The Go-Nowhere Generation" in The New York Times. Using evidence from the article, is this depiction (characterization) of today's generation true or false? Explain your answer.

    How can we prepare to read The Narrative of Frederick Douglass? Make up any owed HW (see previous days).
    Monday, February 10th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Share answers to the following questions (from Friday) in at least 2-3 sentences per question--

    1.) Why are adults calling your generation the "go-nowhere generation" as described in this article: "The Go-Nowhere Generation" in The New York Times? Why is it true? Why is it false?

    2.) How would you describe America's teenagers today?

    3.) Define the "American Dream" in your own words. If you have parents or other relatives who moved to the U.S. for a better life, how would they define the "American Dream?"

    4.) Are there any slaves in the U.S. today? If so, explain.

    5.) What do you know about Frederick Douglass? What is the purpose of reading his memoir?

    2. Read aloud "The Go-Nowhere Generation" in The New York Times. Using evidence from the article, is this depiction (characterization) of today's generation true or false? Explain your answer.

    3. HW Reminder: prepare for tomorrow's quiz.

    How can we prepare to read The Narrative of Frederick Douglass? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • QUIZ ON Literary Assessment. Make sure you know the definitions of each of the literary terms identified in the literary assessment above (handout provided in class). The answers are the following: 1.) H, 2.) R, 3.) G, 4.) C, 5.) D, 6.) J, 7.) M, 8.) I, 9.) N, 10.) B, 11.) A, 12.) E, 13.) Q, 14.) L, 15.) F, 16.) O, 17.) T, 18.) S, 19.) P, 20.) K
  • Friday, February 7th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions in at least 2-3 sentences per question--

    1.) Why are adults calling your generation the "go-nowhere generation" as described in this article: "The Go-Nowhere Generation" in The New York Times? Why is it true? Why is it false?

    2.) How would you describe America's teenagers today?

    3.) Define the "American Dream" in your own words. If you have parents or other relatives who moved to the U.S. for a better life, how would they define the "American Dream?"

    4.) Are there any slaves in the U.S. today? If so, explain.

    5.) What do you know about Frederick Douglass? What is the purpose of reading his memoir?

    2. Prepare for Tuesday's quiz.

    What is our knowledge of college writing? DUE THIS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10th:
  • Be ready to discuss today's questions and share your answers.

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:

  • QUIZ ON Literary Assessment. Make sure you know the definitions of each of the literary terms identified in the literary assessment above (handout provided in class). The answers are the following: 1.) H, 2.) R, 3.) G, 4.) C, 5.) D, 6.) J, 7.) M, 8.) I, 9.) N, 10.) B, 11.) A, 12.) E, 13.) Q, 14.) L, 15.) F, 16.) O, 17.) T, 18.) S, 19.) P, 20.) K
  • Thursday, February 6th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Seat Assignments and Reminders about the upcoming quiz on the Literary Assessment.

    Turn in Turn in the last page (with parent and student signatures) of the Junior English Syllabus.

    2. Brainstorm the Qualities of College Writing: What are the essential components of a college paper? What are pre-writing steps? What are post-writing steps? This should fill a full page in your notebook/binder.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss and take notes on the qualities of college writing.

    4.) Introduce Ms. Conn's Writing Standards.

    What is our knowledge of college writing? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • QUIZ ON Literary Assessment. Make sure you know the definitions of each of the literary terms identified in the literary assessment above (handout provided in class). The answers are the following: 1.) H, 2.) R, 3.) G, 4.) C, 5.) D, 6.) J, 7.) M, 8.) I, 9.) N, 10.) B, 11.) A, 12.) E, 13.) Q, 14.) L, 15.) F, 16.) O, 17.) T, 18.) S, 19.) P, 20.) K
  • Wednesday, February 5th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Literary Assessment

    2. Review answers (exchange with a neighbor) to the Literary Assessment

    3. Exit Slip:
    1.) What literary term did you learn from the literary assessment today?
    2.) How do you define that literary term in your own words?
    3.) Give textual evidence of that newly acquired/refreshed literary term from the most recent work of literature that you've read.

    What is our literary term knowledge and what literary terms should be honed? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6th:
  • Turn in the last page (with parent and student signatures) of the Junior English Syllabus.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:

  • QUIZ ON Literary Assessment. The answers are the following: 1.) H, 2.) R, 3.) G, 4.) C, 5.) D, 6.) J, 7.) M, 8.) I, 9.) N, 10.) B, 11.) A, 12.) E, 13.) Q, 14.) L, 15.) F, 16.) O, 17.) T, 18.) S, 19.) P, 20.) K
  • Tuesday, February 4th, 2014: 1. Do Now: Begin reading Junior English Syllabus.

    2. Discuss/Elaborate on the Do Now.

    3. HW Reminder

    How will students understand the contents of the syllabus? DUE THIS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6th:
  • Turn in the last page (with parent and student signatures) of the Junior English Syllabus.