Junior English Assignments, Fall Semester, 2018

Junior English Assignments
Fall Semester, 2018

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, October 22nd, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show HW: T-Charts for Chapters 1, 2 and 3 in The Scarlet Letter
  • How can we identify and analyze textual evidence of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 2 and 3 of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY on "Goodness in America" (it was due September 26th): Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story which you received in class today). Highlight/Underline the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original story as well.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)

  • Friday, October 19th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show owed HW
  • How can we identify and analyze textual evidence of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapter 2 of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd:
  • Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO textual examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART for EACH CHAPTER (include page #, paragraph #, and quotation marks) AND ANALYZE each piece of textual evidence. You should analyze the evidence by answering this question: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence? Sentence starters include: Readers can infer that...Readers can conclude from this evidence that...A conclusion/inference is...YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS). THIS IS WORTH THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:

  • REWRITE the VOCABULARY STORY on "Goodness in America" (it was due September 26th): Make the necessary corrections (see the teacher's corrections on your original story which you received in class today). Highlight/Underline the corrections on the rewrite and bring in the original story as well.

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment!)

  • Thursday, October 18th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show HW: portfolio folder
  • How can we understand the symbols of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapter 2 of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd:
  • Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO textual examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART for EACH CHAPTER (include page #, paragraph #, and quotation marks) AND ANALYZE each piece of textual evidence. You should analyze the evidence by answering this question: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence? Sentence starters include: Readers can infer that...Readers can conclude from this evidence that...A conclusion/inference is...YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS). THIS IS WORTH THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment!)

  • Wednesday, October 17th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Show HW: FLASHCARDS for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1.
  • Check out copies of The Scarlet Letter.
  • How can we understand the symbols of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapters 1 and 2 of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18th:
  • Bring in a portfolio folder (a folder in which you will store your tests, quizzes, returned papers, goal sheet, etc.). This is a 10-point homework assignment!

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 22nd:

  • Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 (pages 45-64) in THE SCARLET LETTER (book received in class). In your HOMEWORK SECTION, Identify TWO textual examples of ADVERSITY and TWO EXAMPLES OF OVERCOMING ADVERSITY in a T-CHART for EACH CHAPTER (include page #s, paragraph #s, quotation marks) AND answer this question for each piece of evidence: What inference (conclusion) can you draw from this evidence? Sentence starters include: Readers can infer that...Readers can conclude from this evidence that...A conclusion/inference is...YOU SHOULD HAVE THREE T-CHARTS (SINCE THERE ARE THREE CHAPTERS). THIS IS WORTH THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment!)

  • Tuesday, October 16th, 2018:
  • See TODAY'S AGENDA
  • Introduce The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1
  • How can we understand the symbols of adversity and overcoming adversity in chapter 1 of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17th:
  • FLASHCARDS for The Scarlet Letter Vocabulary List #1. Create flashcards for all 25 words. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition, an original sentence (not the sentences provided on the lists), the chapter and page number on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Bring in a portfolio folder (a folder in which you will store your tests, quizzes, returned papers, goal sheet, etc.). This is a 10-point homework assignment!

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment!)

  • Monday, October 15th, 2018: See TODAY'S AGENDA How can we prepare to read The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment!)
    Friday, October 12th, 2018: See TODAY'S AGENDA How can we understand the acquired skills learned from our war unit study? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment!)
    Thursday, October 11th, 2018: 1. Do Now: See SAT Vocabulary Power Point.

    Show HW: Completed Pablo Neruda Research Handout

    2. Mini-Lesson: Introduce 10 SAT Vocabulary Words in context, using the power point presentation above.

    3. Work Period: 10 point Quiz (for the 2nd marking period) on SAT Vocabulary (prove that you were engaging in today's class activities).

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
  • L.11-12.3: Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different context, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
  • How are we going to assess/evaluate our understanding of newly acquired SAT vocabulary? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment!)
    Wednesday, October 10th, 2018: 1. Do Now: EXAM on the WAR UNIT

    2. Work Period:

  • Access a computer or electronic device. Conduct internet research and work on completing the Pablo Neruda Research Handout. Turn in tomorrow!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we INTERPRET (find meaning and understand) the significance of the literature in the war unit? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11th:
  • Finish and turn in the completed Pablo Neruda Research Handout. This is your first homework for the 2nd marking period!
  • Tuesday, October 9th, 2018: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • How do you INTERPRET the author's purpose for writing the poem, "I'm Explaining a Few Things"?
  • How can you compare and contrast your life to the speaker's life in the poem, "I'm Explaining a Few Things"?

    Show HW: Annotations, answers and textual evidence for the questions on "I'm Explaining a Few Things."

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.
  • Review answers to the questions on "I'm Explaining a Few Things":
    1.) What can you predict about this poem's war plot based on the title?
    2.) How does the imagery contribute to the poet's message to his readers?
    3.) What is the typical, suburban life of the speaker?
    4.) What is the poem's shift that disrupts this typical, suburban life?
    5.) What is the tone (emotion) created in the poem?
    6.) What are examples of personification, hyperbole and repetition? Elaborate (explain in detail) why these literary techniques are used in this poem.
    7.) What are the "few things" the poem is explaining? Why does the speaker explain them?

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading Pablo Neruda's "I'm Explaining a Few Things." FINISH and TURN IN ANY OWED HW--TODAY (In CLASS, today is the last day you can turn in any owed work for the 1st marking period).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we INTERPRET (find meaning and understand) the significance of the poem, "I'm Explaining a Few Things," in the war unit? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:

    WAR STORIES EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice questions). You will be tested on the following (the exam will NOT be open notes; you must review the answers to the following questions): "SOLDIER'S HOME" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one comparison and one contrast.

    "The War Prayer" by Mark Twain:
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story?
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful?
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic?
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story?
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?"
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message?
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story?

    "I'm Explaining A Few Things"-- Poem by Pablo Neruda
    1.) What can you predict about this poem's war plot based on the title?
    2.) How does the imagery contribute to the poet's message to his readers?
    3.) What is the typical, suburban life of the speaker?
    4.) What is the poem's shift that disrupts this typical, suburban life?
    5.) What is the tone (emotion) created in the poem?
    6.) What are examples of personification, hyperbole and repetition? Elaborate (explain in detail) why these literary techniques are used in this poem.
    7.) What are the "few things" the poem is explaining? Why does the speaker explain them?

    Friday, October 5th, 2018: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • How can you compare and contrast your life to Krebs' life? Be ready to share at least two similarities and two differences.
  • What can you predict will happen to Krebs after the story's end?

    Show any owed HW

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.
  • Review answers to the questions on "Soldier's Home":
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    3. Reflections: Reflect on what we learned today and determine the value of reading "Soldier's Home" by Ernest Hemingway. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11.12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story is set, how the actions are ordered, and how the characters are introduced and developed.
  • How can we prepare for our unit exam on the effects of war? TURN IN ALL OWED WORK BY NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9th (DURING CLASS TIME ONLY!):
  • Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
    READ "I'm Explaining A Few Things"-- Poem by Pablo Neruda. ANNOTATE (take summary notes in the margin). Your annotations may be connected to the following questions. Next, you need to ANSWER THE QUESTIONS below (that you will answer in the HW section of your notebook). Remember, you need to CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE (direct quotes and stanza and line #s) to support your answers. This will be the VALUE of THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).

    1.) What can you predict about this poem's war plot based on the title?
    2.) How does the imagery contribute to the poet's message to his readers?
    3.) What is the typical, suburban life of the speaker?
    4.) What is the poem's shift that disrupts this typical, suburban life?
    5.) What is the tone (emotion) created in the poem?
    6.) What are examples of personification, hyperbole and repetition? Elaborate (explain in detail) why these literary techniques are used in this poem.
    7.) What are the "few things" the poem is explaining? Why does the speaker explain them?

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:

    WAR STORIES EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice questions). You will be tested on the following (the exam will NOT be open notes; you must review the answers to the following questions): "SOLDIER'S HOME" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    "The War Prayer" by Mark Twain:
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story?
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful?
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic?
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story?
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?"
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message?
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story?

    "I'm Explaining A Few Things"-- Poem by Pablo Neruda
    1.) What can you predict about this poem's war plot based on the title?
    2.) How does the imagery contribute to the poet's message to his readers?
    3.) What is the typical, suburban life of the speaker?
    4.) What is the poem's shift that disrupts this typical, suburban life?
    5.) What is the tone (emotion) created in the poem?
    6.) What are examples of personification, hyperbole and repetition? Elaborate (explain in detail) why these literary techniques are used in this poem.
    7.) What are the "few things" the poem is explaining? Why does the speaker explain them?

  • Thursday, October 4th, 2018: 1. Do Now: What are two PRINCIPLES (a moral, rule or belief that helps you know what is right or wrong) that you follow and why? For example, Krebs' PRINCIPLE in "Soldier's Home" is honesty because he is tired of the lies being told after war.

    *Show HW due today: Research on Hemingway, Twain, and the Effects of War handout (yesterday's classwork) and any owed HW

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.
  • Volunteers share their Research on Hemingway, Twain, and the Effects of War handout.
  • Review answers to the questions on "Soldier's Home":
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we prepare for our unit exam on the effects of war? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
    READ "I'm Explaining A Few Things"-- Poem by Pablo Neruda. ANNOTATE (take summary notes in the margin). Your annotations may be connected to the following questions. Next, you need to ANSWER THE QUESTIONS below (that you will answer in the HW section of your notebook). Remember, you need to CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE (direct quotes and stanza and line #s) to support your answers. This will be the VALUE of THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).

    1.) What can you predict about this poem's war plot based on the title?
    2.) How does the imagery contribute to the poet's message to his readers?
    3.) What is the typical, suburban life of the speaker?
    4.) What is the poem's shift that disrupts this typical, suburban life?
    5.) What is the tone (emotion) created in the poem?
    6.) What are examples of personification, hyperbole and repetition? Elaborate (explain in detail) why these literary techniques are used in this poem.
    7.) What are the "few things" the poem is explaining? Why does the speaker explain them?

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:

    WAR STORIES EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice questions). You will be tested on the following (the exam will NOT be open notes; you must review the answers to the following questions): "SOLDIER'S HOME" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    "The War Prayer" by Mark Twain:
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story?
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful?
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic?
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story?
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?"
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message?
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story?

    "I'm Explaining A Few Things"-- Poem by Pablo Neruda
    1.) What can you predict about this poem's war plot based on the title?
    2.) How does the imagery contribute to the poet's message to his readers?
    3.) What is the typical, suburban life of the speaker?
    4.) What is the poem's shift that disrupts this typical, suburban life?
    5.) What is the tone (emotion) created in the poem?
    6.) What are examples of personification, hyperbole and repetition? Elaborate (explain in detail) why these literary techniques are used in this poem.
    7.) What are the "few things" the poem is explaining? Why does the speaker explain them?

  • Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018: 1. Do Now: Read Research on Hemingway, Twain, and the Effects of War handout. Access your assigned computer.

    *Show HW due today: "Soldier's Home" Annotations, Questions and Çiting Textual Evidence (value=30 points/3 homework assignments)

    2. Work Period: Conduct internet research and complete the Research on Hemingway, Twain, and the Effects of War handout. If you don't finish in class, then finish it for homework.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we conduct internet research on the authors, Hemingway and Twain, and the psychological effects of war? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • Finish today's classwork: Research on Hemingway, Twain, and the Effects of War handout.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:

  • Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9th:
    READ "I'm Explaining A Few Things"-- Poem by Pablo Neruda. ANNOTATE (take summary notes in the margin). Your annotations may be connected to the following questions. Next, you need to ANSWER THE QUESTIONS below (that you will answer in the HW section of your notebook). Remember, you need to CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE (direct quotes and stanza and line #s) to support your answers. This will be the VALUE of THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).

    1.) What can you predict about this poem's war plot based on the title?
    2.) How does the imagery contribute to the poet's message to his readers?
    3.) What is the typical, suburban life of the speaker?
    4.) What is the poem's shift that disrupts this typical, suburban life?
    5.) What is the tone (emotion) created in the poem?
    6.) What are examples of personification, hyperbole and repetition? Elaborate (explain in detail) why these literary techniques are used in this poem.
    7.) What are the "few things" the poem is explaining? Why does the speaker explain them?

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:

    WAR STORIES EXAM (50% of the 1st marking period; multiple-choice questions). You will be tested on the following (the exam will NOT be open notes; you must review the answers to the following questions): "SOLDIER'S HOME" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway:
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    "The War Prayer" by Mark Twain:
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story?
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful?
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic?
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story?
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?"
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message?
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story?

    "I'm Explaining A Few Things"-- Poem by Pablo Neruda
    1.) What can you predict about this poem's war plot based on the title?
    2.) How does the imagery contribute to the poet's message to his readers?
    3.) What is the typical, suburban life of the speaker?
    4.) What is the poem's shift that disrupts this typical, suburban life?
    5.) What is the tone (emotion) created in the poem?
    6.) What are examples of personification, hyperbole and repetition? Elaborate (explain in detail) why these literary techniques are used in this poem.
    7.) What are the "few things" the poem is explaining? Why does the speaker explain them?

  • Monday, October 1st-Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018: 1. Do Now: Define the following SAT words (you may use your electronic device to search for the definitions): detriment, dexterous, discretion, facetious, gregarious, optimum, ostentatious, scrupulous, sensory, and vicarious.

    Show any owed classwork and homework.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Work Period:

  • PERIODS 6, 7 AND 9: Complete the assignments provided by Mr. Rollon (see his in-class powerpoint). PERIOD 2: Write a detailed, complex sentence for each vocabulary word (underline the SAT vocabulary word in each sentence).
  • READ "SOLDIER'S HOME" by Ernest Hemingway and ANNOTATE (take summary notes in the margin). Your annotations may be connected to the following questions. Next, you need to ANSWER THE QUESTIONS (see the HW section for the questions). Remember, you need to CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE (direct quotes and page #s) to support your answers. This will be the VALUE of THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we improve our SAT vocabulary skills and reading comprehension? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:
  • READ "SOLDIER'S HOME" by Ernest Hemingway and ANNOTATE (take summary notes in the margin). Your annotations may be connected to the following questions. Next, you need to ANSWER THE QUESTIONS below (that you will answer in the HW section of your notebook). Remember, you need to CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE (direct quotes and page #s) to support your answers. This will be the VALUE of THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:

  • Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
  • Friday, September 28th, 2018: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • What do you believe was Hemingway's purpose in writing "In Another Country"?
  • What are valuable lessons about the soldier's experience in the story, "In Another Country"?

    Show any owed classwork and homework.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.
  • Volunteers share your Interview Questions and Answers with the author, Ernest Hemingway

    3. Reflections/Review of HW:
    Share your impressions of "In Another Country." Is it realistic about the war experience? What's the author's main message (theme)?

    ANSWER THE HW QUESTIONS here (in the HW section of your notebook). CITE textual evidence (with page # and paragraph # to support each answer).
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one comparison and one contrast.

    4. Introduce HW

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we understand the purpose for why "we" go to war in the short story, "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3rd:
  • READ "SOLDIER'S HOME" by Ernest Hemingway and ANNOTATE (take summary notes in the margin). Your annotations may be connected to the following questions. Next, you need to ANSWER THE QUESTIONS below (that you will answer in the HW section of your notebook). Remember, you need to CITE TEXTUAL EVIDENCE (direct quotes and page #s) to support your answers. This will be the VALUE of THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points).
    1.) What is the mood of the story and how do the first three paragraphs establish the mood?
    2.) How was Krebs received by his community after the war and why?
    3.) Why did Krebs feel that he needed to lie? Give two examples.
    4.) How does Krebs' commentary on the girls in his town reflect his hopelessness and inaction?
    5.) Compare and contrast Krebs' relationship with his mother and his relationship with his father.
    6.) Describe Krebs' relationship with his sister.
    7.) How does Krebs regard religion? Why do you believe Krebs has these sentiments toward religion?
    8.) How is the reference to Charley Simmons significant to the depiction (portrayal) of Krebs?
    9.) War can desensitize (make less sensitive or lessen emotion to) soldiers. How does Krebs appear desensitized at home, after the war?
    10.) What was Hemingway's purpose in writing this story?

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:

  • Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
  • Thursday, September 27th, 2018: 1. Do Now: VOCABULARY QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary List (20% of the 1st marking period). Prove that you know the definitions of each vocabulary word and how to use each word in a sentence.

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Work Period: With a partner, write an Interview with the author, Ernest Hemingway, in which you do the following:

  • Create 9 Interview questions that begin with the DOK Question Stems. Write three DOK 1 questions, three DOK 2 questions and three DOK 3 questions.
  • Predict the answers to the interview questions. Imagine you are Ernest Hemingway. You may want to refer to "In Another Country" to provide evidence to support your answers.
    *You will earn classwork credit for this activity.

    3. Work Period Sharing: Volunteers will share their questions and answers.

    4. Reflections/Review of HW:
    Share your impressions of "In Another Country." Is it realistic about the war experience? What's the author's main message (theme)?

    ANSWER THE HW QUESTIONS here (in the HW section of your notebook). CITE textual evidence (with page # and paragraph # to support each answer).
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one comparison and one contrast.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we understand the purpose for why "we" go to war in the short story, "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).
  • Wednesday, September 26th, 2018: 1.) Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • Why are people fascinated with war?
  • How do we (our country, the media, family and friends) persuade young men and women to go to war?

    Show HW: Turn in the "Goodness in America" Vocabulary Story. Show the annotations in "In Another Country" and the answers to the story's questions. These are THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Work Period: With a partner, write an Interview with the author, Ernest Hemingway, in which you do the following:

  • Create 9 Interview questions that begin with the DOK Question Stems. Write three DOK 1 questions, three DOK 2 questions and three DOK 3 questions.
  • Predict the answers to the interview questions. Imagine you are Ernest Hemingway. You may want to refer to "In Another Country" to provide evidence to support your answers.
    *You will earn classwork credit for this activity.

    3. Work Period Sharing: Volunteers will share their questions and answers.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we prove our reading and analysis of "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway by focusing on the author's purpose and theme (message to his readers)? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:
  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary List (20% of the 1st marking period). Know the definitions of each vocabulary word and how to use each word in a sentence.

    *Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Monday, September 24th-Tuesday, September 25th, 2018: 1.) Do Now: Choose one of the following questions to answer:
  • What are the wins and losses in a war? You can refer to the wins and losses for the soldiers, the civilians, or the countries.
  • What do you believe are behind the scenes of war (the facts that the media does not reveal!)?
  • Why do you believe it's important to study war in American literature?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Work Period:

  • Work on HW due Wednesday.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we prepare to read "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY: You will write a creative story on the topic of "Goodness in America" Your story must include 20 of the words taken from the Academic Vocabulary List. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Goodness in America." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about the good qualities about your community, education, family, friends, neighbors etc. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about "The Goodness in America" between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write four pages handwritten OR two pages typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Wednesday, September 26th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words from the Academic Vocabulary List correctly in your story. The heading must include your name (at the top), your teachers' names, the date, our class name, period, and assignment title.

  • Read "IN ANOTHER COUNTRY". ANNOTATE the story (each paragraph must have summarizing notes). Do NOT answer the questions at the end of the story. Instead, DO ANSWER THE QUESTIONS here (in the HW section of your notebook). CITE textual evidence (with page # and paragraph # to support each answer).
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one comparison and one contrast.

    LOOKING AHEAD: DUE THIS COMING THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary List (20% of the 1st marking period). Know the definitions of each vocabulary word and how to use each word in a sentence.

    *Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Friday, September 21st, 2018: 1.) Do Now: Fill out the Goal Sheet for the 1st marking period. What are your writing, reading and studying goals? Be as specific and detailed as possible.

    Show HW: Academic Vocabulary List Flashcards

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Work Period:

  • In your LA section, answer the following questions. Write the following title: Preparing to read "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway.
    1.) What can you predict about the next story based on its title "In Another Country?"
    2.) Since this short story fits into the American War Unit, what predictions can you make about this story?
    3.) This story was published in 1927 by Ernest Hemingway. Research three facts about that year in American history and three facts about Ernest Hemingway that you believe likely influenced the composition of this short story. (If you don't have an electronic device to research facts, make an estimated guess or work with a neighbor)

    4. Work Period Sharing: Volunteers will share their answers from the Work Period.

    5. Introduce HW: Listen and read the teacher's detailed instructions on the HW. Begin HW, if time allows.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we prepare to read "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway? LOOKING AHEAD: DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:
  • VOCABULARY STORY: You will write a creative story on the topic of "Goodness in America" Your story must include 20 of the words taken from the Academic Vocabulary List. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Goodness in America." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about the good qualities about your community, education, family, friends, neighbors etc. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about "The Goodness in America" between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write four pages handwritten OR two pages typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Wednesday, September 26th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words from the Academic Vocabulary List correctly in your story. The heading must include your name (at the top), your teachers' names, the date, our class name, period, and assignment title.
  • Read "IN ANOTHER COUNTRY". ANNOTATE the story (each paragraph must have summarizing notes). Do NOT answer the questions at the end of the story. Instead, DO ANSWER THE QUESTIONS here (in the HW section of your notebook). CITE textual evidence (with page # and paragraph # to support each answer).
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one comparison and one contrast.

    LOOKING AHEAD: DUE NEXT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary List (20% of the 1st marking period). Know the definitions of each vocabulary word and how to use each word in a sentence.

    *Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Thursday, September 20th, 2018: 1.) Do Now: What can you predict will happen next for the "aged stranger" and/or the community in "The War Prayer"? Use at least one vocabulary word from the Academic Vocabulary List in your answer.

    Turn in any owed HW

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with this week's captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Work Period:

  • Introduce Academic Vocabulary List and the HW. Why do you believe Academic Vocabulary is important? How is Academic Vocabulary different from SAT Vocabulary?
  • Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we improve our academic vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • Academic Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for Academic Vocabulary List on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (write your own sentence; don't copy from the internet or another source). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    LOOKING AHEAD: DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:

  • VOCABULARY STORY: You will write a creative story on the topic of "Goodness in America" Your story must include 20 of the words taken from the Academic Vocabulary List. You must use 20 of the words correctly and underline them in a story that makes sense and adheres (connects) to the topic of "Goodness in America." You may want to write a non-fiction (true) story about the good qualities about your community, education, family, friends, neighbors etc. You may want to create a fiction (fake) story about "The Goodness in America" between characters in a fantasy world, another country or universe. Write four pages handwritten OR two pages typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman and 1-inch margins). If you type the paper, you must bring in a printed copy to class or e-mail me before class on Wednesday, September 26th (my e-mail is hconn@schools.nyc.gov) to earn on-time credit. Remember, you must use your 20 chosen vocabulary words from the Academic Vocabulary List correctly in your story. The heading must include your name (at the top), your teachers' names, the date, our class name, period, and assignment title.
  • Read "IN ANOTHER COUNTRY". ANNOTATE the story (each paragraph must have summarizing notes). Do NOT answer the questions at the end of the story. Instead, DO ANSWER THE QUESTIONS here (in the HW section of your notebook). CITE textual evidence (with page # and paragraph # to support each answer).
    1.) What does the author, Hemingway, suggest in the first sentence when he states that "we did not go to it (the war) anymore"?
    2.) How would you describe the mood of the story and why?
    3.) What does the doctor tell the narrator that gives him hope for his future? How does the narrator's reality contradict the doctor's hope?
    4.) What is the purpose of the photographs in the story? Why are the significance of the photographs invalidated (not true)?
    5.) What are two examples (one literal and one figurative) that support the title of the story?
    6.) How does the narrator use the "hawk" as a metaphor (comparison between two unlike things without using like or as)?
    7.) The machines keep appearing in this story. How are these machines to make "all the difference"? What is the narrator's attitude toward these machines?
    8.) What's Hemingway's message (theme) to his readers?
    9.) How does setting (time and place) influence the development of the plot?
    10.) How can you COMPARE (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between Mark Twain's "The War Prayer" and Hemingway's "In Another Country"? Find one COMPARISON and one contrast.

    LOOKING AHEAD: DUE NEXT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • QUIZ on Academic Vocabulary List (20% of the 1st marking period). Know the definitions of each vocabulary word and how to use each word in a sentence.

    *Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments), if necessary. You are always encouraged to make up owed work, though you will earn half-credit for late assignments that are unexcused (without a legitimate parent's/doctor's note).

  • Tuesday, September 18th, 2018: 1.) Do Now: "I don't think "The War Prayer" will be published in my time. None but the dead are permitted to tell the truth"--Mark Twain. What does Twain mean in this quote and why do you believe it's a true or false statement?

    Turn in any owed HW

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with the new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Gallery Walk #1: Scan the papers posted around the room with the following quotes from "The War Prayer" listed:

  • "The country was up in arms, the war was on, in every breast burned the holy fire of patriotism..." (paragraph 1).
  • "The proud fathers and mothers and sisters and sweethearts cheering them with voices choked with happy emotion as they swung by..." (paragraph 1).
  • "The half dozen rash spirits that ventured to disapprove of the war and cast a doubt upon its righteousness straightway got such a stern and angry warning..." (paragraph 1).
  • "Bronzed heroes, welcomed, adored, submerged in golden seas of glory" (paragraph 2)!
  • "An aged stranger entered and moved with slow and noiseless step up the main aisle, his eyes fixed upon the minister...pale even to ghastliness" (paragraph 4).
  • "If you would beseech a blessing upon yourself, beware! Lest without intent you invoke a curse upon a neighbor at the same time" (paragraph 7).
  • "Help us to tear their soldiers to bloody shreds with our shells...help us to wring the hearts of their unoffending widows with unavailing grief..." (paragraph 9).
  • "It was believed afterward that the man was a lunatic, because there was no sense in what he said" (paragraph 11).

    *Choose your favorite quote and stand under it. Be ready to explain why it's your favorite quote.

    4. Discuss/Share #1: Everyone will go around the room sharing your most favorite quote and briefly explaining why.

    5. Gallery Walk #2: Walk around the room and choose the quote that you dislike the most. Be ready to explain why you dislike the quote.

    6. Discuss/Share #2: Everyone will go around the room sharing the quote you dislike the most and briefly explain why.

    7. Reflections: Why was it valuable to analyze your preferred and disliked quotes from "The War Prayer"? What is the value in examining small pieces (like quotes) of text instead of looking at the text as a whole?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we identify value in understanding "The War Prayer" through micro-textual analysis? Make up owed HW: THESE ASSIGNMENTS WERE DUE YESTERDAY (if they're not turned in during today's Do Now period during class time, then they will earn late/half credit):
  • Complete the Found Poem handout for "The War Prayer". Follow the same format of the sample poem (same number of words per line). Theme suggestions to focus on in your poem are the following: Patriotism, Religion, War, Heroes, or your own, teacher-approved theme.
  • Write a two-paragraph essay on "The War Prayer" in which you follow the Central Idea Essay Outline. It's recommended that whenever you see "fact from the text" and "analysis" in the outline that you write more than one sentence (2-4 sentences are recommended). Literary device suggestions (only use one!) include the following: characterization, conflict, symbolism and imagery. You must turn it in. You must include the following heading: Your Name, Date, Teacher's Name, Class, Period, and Assignment Title. You may handwrite, type (double-spaced, 12 point font, and Times New Roman font) and print it, or e-mail it (if you don't have a printer) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • Monday, September 17th, 2018: 1.) Do Now: Why is "The War Prayer" a valuable short story to read in high school?

    Turn in HW: found poetry handout and the central idea essay

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with the new captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Whole-Class Sharing/"The War Prayer" Review:
    Volunteers will share answers to the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer.

    4. HW Reflections: Volunteers will share found poems. What was the value in writing the found poetry? What was the value in writing the central idea essay and using the outline to guide you?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we identify value in understanding "The War Prayer" through textual analysis, poetry and essay writing? Make up owed HW: THESE ASSIGNMENTS WERE DUE TODAY (if they're not turned in during today's Do Now period during class time, then they will earn late/half credit):
  • Complete the Found Poem handout for "The War Prayer". Follow the same format of the sample poem (same number of words per line). Theme suggestions to focus on in your poem are the following: Patriotism, Religion, War, Heroes, or your own, teacher-approved theme.
  • Write a two-paragraph essay on "The War Prayer" in which you follow the Central Idea Essay Outline. It's recommended that whenever you see "fact from the text" and "analysis" in the outline that you write more than one sentence (2-4 sentences are recommended). Literary device suggestions (only use one!) include the following: characterization, conflict, symbolism and imagery. You must turn it in. You must include the following heading: Your Name, Date, Teacher's Name, Class, Period, and Assignment Title. You may handwrite, type (double-spaced, 12 point font, and Times New Roman font) and print it, or e-mail it (if you don't have a printer) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • Friday, September 14th, 2018: 1.) Do Now: What is the definition of a theme and what is the purpose of a theme in a story?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with your captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Work Period:

  • Finish working on the Diagnostic.
  • Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How does the diagnostic FUNCTION (work) as an assessment of our reading skills? Due THIS Monday, September 17th:
  • Complete the Found Poem handout for "The War Prayer". Follow the same format of the sample poem (same number of words per line). Theme suggestions to focus on in your poem are the following: Patriotism, Religion, War, Heroes, or your own, teacher-approved theme.
  • Write a two-paragraph essay on "The War Prayer" in which you follow the Central Idea Essay Outline. It's recommended that whenever you see "fact from the text" and "analysis" in the outline that you write more than one sentence (2-4 sentences are recommended). Literary device suggestions (only use one!) include the following: characterization, conflict, symbolism and imagery. You must turn it in. You must include the following heading: Your Name, Date, Teacher's Name, Class, Period, and Assignment Title. You may handwrite, type (double-spaced, 12 point font, and Times New Roman font) and print it, or e-mail it (if you don't have a printer) to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • Thursday, September 13th, 2018: 1.) Do Now:
  • What are strategies for success on the diagnostic (reading passages and multiple-choice questions)?

    Show owed HW (for late/half credit).

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with your captain. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Diagnostic: Continue working on the Diagnostic.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How does the diagnostic FUNCTION (work) as an assessment of our reading skills? Make up HW (this was due yesterday):
  • CLASS SUPPLIES: Bring in a notebook/binder with five labeled sections: DNA (Do Nows and Aims), LA (Literary Analysis), LS (Language Skills), RS (Regents Strategies), and HW (Homework)
  • READ "The War Prayer" and ANSWER the following questions:

    Before reading, do the following: In your LA section of your notebook, ANSWER the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?

    During the reading of "The War Prayer," ANNOTATE each paragraph and ANSWER the following questions:
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic (exaggerated) in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer.

  • Wednesday, September 12th, 2018: 1.) Do Now:
  • What were challenges and successes in completing the homework assignments (text-based questions, annotations, and class supplies)?

    SHOW HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with your new captain. Captains will rotate every Monday. They will represent their table and speak (while standing) on their behalf. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Diagnostic: Listen to the instructions. Begin the Diagnostic.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we be assessed on our first homework assignments and a diagnostic? Make up HW (this was due today):
  • CLASS SUPPLIES: Bring in a notebook/binder with five labeled sections: DNA (Do Nows and Aims), LA (Literary Analysis), LS (Language Skills), RS (Regents Strategies), and HW (Homework)
  • READ "The War Prayer" and ANSWER the following questions:

    Before reading, do the following: In your LA section of your notebook, ANSWER the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?

    During the reading of "The War Prayer," ANNOTATE each paragraph and ANSWER the following questions:
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic (exaggerated) in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer.

  • Friday, September 7th, 2018: 1.) Do Now:
  • What are the top three rules that a teacher should have in order to run an effective classroom?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Share your answers with your captain. Captains will rotate every Monday. They will represent their table and speak (while standing) on their behalf. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Mini-Lesson on Essential Classroom Rules: Read aloud Essential Classroom Rules.

    4. Introduce HW: Discuss HW. Make predictions about the story "The War Prayer." What do you believe is the author's purpose in writing this story in 1916? How does it fit into a college readiness American Literature course?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we understand class expectations? Due Wednesday, September 12th:
  • CLASS SUPPLIES: Bring in a notebook/binder with five labeled sections: DNA (Do Nows and Aims), LA (Literary Analysis), LS (Language Skills), RS (Regents Strategies), and HW (Homework)
  • READ "The War Prayer" and ANSWER the following questions:

    Before reading, do the following: In your LA section of your notebook, ANSWER the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?

    During the reading of "The War Prayer," ANNOTATE each paragraph and ANSWER the following questions:
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic (exaggerated) in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer.

  • Thursday, September 6th, 2018: 1.) Do Now:
  • Go to your designated assigned seat.
  • Read the title of the article "I am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration" ( New York Times). What can you predict about this article? What's the author's purpose in writing this article?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates. Choose a captain. Share your answers with your captain. Captains will rotate every Monday. They will represent their table and speak (while standing) on their behalf. Captains will share their table's answers.

    3. Mini-Lesson on Analysis of the News Article: What are the author's sentiments (feelings)? What is he claiming has OCCURRED (word of the week) in the White House? Focus on underlining, annotating and creating Regents-style questions (specific line # questions, central idea, implication/inference, vocabulary in context, author's tone, etc).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we understand how to analyze a current event article from a Regents-style perspective? Due Wednesday, September 12th:
  • CLASS SUPPLIES: Bring in a notebook/binder with five labeled sections: DNA (Do Nows and Aims), LA (Literary Analysis), LS (Language Skills), RS (Regents Strategies), and HW (Homework)
  • READ "The War Prayer" and ANSWER the following questions:

    Before reading, do the following: In your LA section of your notebook, ANSWER the following questions for "The War Prayer."
    1.) What can you predict about this story's plot based on the title "The War Prayer"?
    2.) What do you believe is Mark Twain's purpose in writing a satire about war and prayer?
    3.) Why do you believe this short story, "The War Prayer," is part of the study of American Literature?

    During the reading of "The War Prayer," ANNOTATE each paragraph and ANSWER the following questions:
    4.) How is the patriotism hyperbolic (exaggerated) in the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and a direct quote) to support your answer.
    5.) Why are anti-war sentiments (feelings) considered shameful? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    6.) When soldiers come home from war, what are people's reactions and why are their reactions hyperbolic? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    7.) Where does the story shift and how does this shift affect the mood of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    8.) According to the stranger, what is the consequence of a "blessing upon yourself?" Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    9.) Why is the paragraph that begins "O Lord our Father, our young patriots..." a satirical message? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quote) to support your answer.
    10.) Why is the stranger considered a "lunatic" at the end of the story? Find textual evidence (paragraph # and direct quotes) to support your answer.

  • Wednesday, September 5th, 2018: 1.) Do Now:
  • Number each of your sticky notes (#1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8; keep the numbers small)
  • Write the following sentence starters for each numbered sticky note:
    1. I want to earn my high school diploma because _______________.
    2. The most effective teachers are the ones who ________________.
    3. The most helpful classmates are the ones who _______________.
    4. One of my areas of strength in English class is _______________.
    5. One of my areas of weakness in English class is ______________.
    6. To read and really understand a challenging story or article, I need ______________.
    7. To produce my best writing, I need______________.
    8. By the end of the year, I plan to achieve the following goal: _______________________.

    2. Work Period: Fill in the sentence starters for each numbered sticky note. Listen to instructions on designated teams #1-8 (based on the sticky note sentence starters). Join your designated team at the matching station. Team #1 starts at sentence #1. Team #2 starts at sentence #2.

    3. Discuss/Share:

  • Teams will discuss their answers (Why is that important? What made you say that?) and post their sticky notes.
  • Whole class discussion: What were the three most common responses used to finish your team's sentence starter? Designated team captains will share their answers.
  • Teams will rotate every 2-3 minutes to each sticky note sentence starter station. Then, they'll repeat the same discussion (8x) until they eventually get back to their original station.. They'll get to see more responses from their classmates and they'll get to see themes emerge.
  • Now that they're back at their first station, they will organize the notes (about 34, depending on the number of students in their class) into similar themes or ideas. Example: If eight people said they want to earn their diploma because they want to get a decent job, group those answers together. If six people said they didn't want to disappoint their families, group those answers together. And so on...

    4. Exit Slip:

  • As a team, decide the single most important thing for me, your teacher, to remember about today's discussion (write on an index card). (Have the kids take down the sticky notes to prepare for the next class)
  • Independently, students will turn in a get-to-know-you handout.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1
  • SL.11-12.4
  • How can we understand our learning styles and goals for success this school year?