Senior Assignments, Fall 2007/Winter 2008

Senior Assignments
Fall 2007/Winter 2008

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Friday, January 18th, 2008: Film viewing of As You Like It: Finish film today. Students will engage in film viewing and analysis through discussion. Work on remaining college applications and research scholarships. See you next semester (Wednesday, January 30th).
Thursday, January 17th, 2008: Film viewing of As You Like It: How is this comedic play typical of Shakespearean style? How is it different from the tragic Hamlet and the historical Henry IV Part I? Students will engage in film viewing and analysis through discussion. Work on remaining college applications!
Wednesday, January 16th, 2008: Film viewing of As You Like It: How is this comedic play typical of Shakespearean style? How is it different from the tragic Hamlet and the historical Henry IV Part I? Students will engage in film viewing and analysis through discussion. Work on remaining college applications!
Tuesday, January 15th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Awards Presentation.

2. Film viewing of As You Like It: How is this comedic play typical of Shakespearean style? How is it different from the tragic Hamlet and the historical Henry IV Part I?

Students will engage in film viewing and analysis through discussion. Work on remaining college applications!
Monday, January 14th, 2008: Work Period: Work on your college applications. Peer edit/evaluate. Reearch college scholarships. Students will engage in college application and scholarship research. Work on remaining college applications!
Friday, January 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Class will finish performances and evaluations in order to vote for best actor, best actress, best director, best set design, best costume, and best overall performance.

2. Extra Credit Vocabulary Quiz!

Students will engage in performance evaluations and an extra credit vocabulary opportunity. Work on remaining college applications!
Thursday, January 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Class will evaluate performances in order to vote for best actor, best actress, best director, best set design, best costume, and best overall performance.

2. Prepare for tomorrow's extra credit opportunity and/or make up any owed HW.

Students will make up owed HW and review for extra credit vocabulary opportunity. Due TOMORROW, Friday, January 11th:
  • ALL MAKE-UP HW MUST BE TURNED IN BY TOMORROW (this is the end of the semester).

    Extra-Credit Opportunity--TOMORROW, Friday, January 11th:

  • Review all Vocabulary Lists and take an Extra-Credit Quiz TOMORROW. If you earn a perfect score on the quiz, then you will get 5 extra points on your final semester grade. What a deal!
  • Wednesday, January 9th, 2008: SCENE PERFORMANCES FINISH TODAY FOR HENRY IV PART I!

    Class will evaluate performances in order to vote for best actor, best actress, best director, best set design, best costume, and best overall performance.

    Students will finish performing their chosen scene from Henry IV Part I, in which they will implement oral, visual, and kinesthetic (physical) choices. Extra-Credit Opportunity--Friday, January 11th:
  • Review all Vocabulary Lists and take an Extra-Credit Quiz on Friday. If you earn a perfect score on the quiz, then you will get 5 extra points on your final semester grade. What a deal! So, is it deal or no deal?!

    Due Friday, January 11th:

  • ALL MAKE-UP HW MUST BE TURNED IN BY FRIDAY.
  • Tuesday, January 8th, 2008: SCENE PERFORMANCES FOR HENRY IV PART I!

    Class will evaluate performances in order to vote for best actor, best actress, best director, best set design, best costume, and best overall performance.

    Students will perform their chosen scene from Henry IV Part I, in which they will implement oral, visual, and kinesthetic (physical) choices. Due TOMORROW:
  • Finish remaining Henry IV Part I Scene Performances. Scene Groups (to be chosen on a first come-first serve basis) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Extra-Credit Opportunity--Friday, January 11th:

  • Review all Vocabulary Lists and take an Extra-Credit Quiz on Friday. If you earn a perfect score on the quiz, then you will get 5 extra points on your final semester grade. What a deal! So, is it deal or no deal?!

    Due Friday, January 11th:

  • ALL MAKE-UP HW MUST BE TURNED IN BY FRIDAY.
  • Monday, January 7th, 2008: Work Period--Scene Group FINAL Practice: Groups and characters/actors are arranged. Each group implements the director's vision and interpretation for their scenes. Groups practice their lines aloud, standing up, applying their physical choices, and determining set design/props, costume, sound, and lighting. Group members also finish making necessary edits (especially to long monologues/soliloquys). Students will work on oral and visual scene preparation for their chosen scene from Henry IV Part I. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, January 8th:
  • Henry IV Part I Scene Performances. Scene Groups (to be chosen on a first come-first serve basis) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

    Extra-Credit Opportunity--Friday, January 11th:

  • Review all Vocabulary Lists and take an Extra-Credit Quiz on Friday. If you earn a perfect score on the quiz, then you will get 5 extra points on your final semester grade. What a deal! So, is it deal or no deal?!

    Due Friday, January 11th:

  • ALL MAKE-UP HW MUST BE TURNED IN BY FRIDAY.
  • Friday, January 4th, 2008: Work Period--Scene Group Practice: Groups and characters/actors are arranged. Each group implements the director's vision and interpretation for their scenes. Groups practice their lines aloud, standing up, applying their physical choices, and determining set design/props, costume, sound, and lighting. Group members also begin to make necessary edits (especially to long monologues/soliloquys).

    Turn in Final Paper today!

    Students will work on oral and visual scene preparation for their chosen scene from Henry IV Part I. Important Paper Information:
  • If the Final Paper was not turned in today in class (or before class), then it will be -10 each day it is late. For example, if e-mailed tomorrow to me (hconn28@yahoo.com), it will be -10, on Sunday it will be -20, and turned in on Monday it will be -30.

    Due Tuesday, January 8th:

  • Henry IV Part I Scene Performances. Scene Groups (to be chosen on a first come-first serve basis) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.
  • Thursday, January 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce the Works Cited document to be used in the Final Paper (which is due tomorrow).

    2. Work Period--Scene Group Practice: Groups and characters/actors are arranged. Each group determines the basic understanding/plot summary for their scene. Groups also determine director's vision and interpretation for their scenes. Groups practice their lines aloud and arrange their physical choices, set design/props, costume, sound, and lighting.

    Students will begin scene preparation for their chosen scene from Henry IV Part I. Due TOMORROW, Friday, January 4th:
  • The Final Paper is due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. The paper requirements include the following: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Use my Works Cited at the end of your paper. Of course, you will need to put your name and page # on the Works Cited page, but it's yours to use. You should follow all the requirements in the Grading Rubric in order to earn a good grade. Your paper should examine both plays by addressing one of the following questions: How does Shakespeare reveal the struggles of growing up and finding one's identity in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? How does Shakespeare portray the parent-child relationship in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? You must analyze one of these two questions by including at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "With all my heart I'll sit and hear her sing / By that time will our book, I think, be drawn"(Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221). The slash (/) identifies a break in the line of iambic pentameter. The citation (Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III), Scene (i) and Lines (220-221). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space it. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive analysis of the two plays and present an insightful analysis of how they both answer the question. Remember, you must have a clear thesis (the answer to the question) in the introductory paragraph, body paragraphs which use plentiful evidence from both plays to support your thesis, and a strong conclusion that ties everything together and leaves the reader with a final thought. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities in examining parent-child relationships and identity formation. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one of these topics. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    Due Tuesday, January 8th:

  • Henry IV Part I Scene Performances. Scene Groups (to be chosen on a first come-first serve basis) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.
  • Wednesday, January 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now--Q & A of Final Paper: Discuss remaining Q & A of Final Paper on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. See HW for all the details.

    2. Henry IV Part I Scene Groups: Groups are arranged and instructions reviewed.

    3. Scene Group Practice: Groups are chosen (on a first-come, first-serve basis) and characters/actors are arranged. Each group determines the basic understanding/plot summary for their scene. Groups also determine director's vision and interpretation for their scenes.

    Students will analyze the final paper requirements and begin scene preparation for Henry IV Part I. Due Friday, January 4th:
  • The Final Paper is due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. The paper requirements include the following: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Use my Works Cited at the end of your paper. Of course, you will need to put your name and page # on the Works Cited page, but it's yours to use. You should follow all the requirements in the Grading Rubric in order to earn a good grade. Your paper should examine both plays by addressing one of the following questions: How does Shakespeare reveal the struggles of growing up and finding one's identity in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? How does Shakespeare portray the parent-child relationship in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? You must analyze one of these two questions by including at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "With all my heart I'll sit and hear her sing / By that time will our book, I think, be drawn"(Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221). The slash (/) identifies a break in the line of iambic pentameter. The citation (Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III), Scene (i) and Lines (220-221). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space it. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive analysis of the two plays and present an insightful analysis of how they both answer the question. Remember, you must have a clear thesis (the answer to the question) in the introductory paragraph, body paragraphs which use plentiful evidence from both plays to support your thesis, and a strong conclusion that ties everything together and leaves the reader with a final thought. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities in examining parent-child relationships and identity formation. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one of these topics. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    Due Tuesday, January 8th:

  • Henry IV Part I Scene Performances. Scene Groups (to be chosen on a first come-first serve basis) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience? What's the focus of your scene? What interpretation are you presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? Practiced Emotional Acting (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Clear Conflict, which should be revealed between opposing characters (this can be shown through emotional acting performances and body language), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.
  • Friday, December 21st, 2007: 1. Discussion/Review of Final Paper: Discuss details of Final Paper on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. See HW for all details.

    2. Shakespearean Puzzle of all 38 of his plays and Apples and Honey for a Sweet New Year

    Students will analyze the final paper requirements and enjoy applying their puzzle skills. Due Friday, January 4th:
  • The Final Paper is due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. The paper requirements include the following: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. You should follow all the requirements in the Grading Rubric in order to earn a good grade. Your paper should examine both plays by addressing one of the following questions: How does Shakespeare reveal the struggles of growing up and finding one's identity in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? How does Shakespeare portray the parent-child relationship in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? You must analyze one of these two questions by including at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "With all my heart I'll sit and hear her sing / By that time will our book, I think, be drawn"(Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221). The slash (/) identifies a break in the line of iambic pentameter. The citation (Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III), Scene (i) and Lines (220-221). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space it. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive analysis of the two plays and present an insightful analysis of how they both answer the question. Remember, you must have a clear thesis (the answer to the question) in the introductory paragraph, body paragraphs which use plentiful evidence from both plays to support your thesis, and a strong conclusion that ties everything together and leaves the reader with a final thought. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities in examining parent-child relationships and identity formation. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one of these topics. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.
  • Thursday, December 20th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Discuss the interpretation of the following proverbs which apply to Acts IV and V of Henry IV Part I: Act IV--Scene iii=The best way to destroy an enemy is to make him a friend. Anyone can become angry--that is easy, but to be angry with the right person at the right time and for the right purpose and in the right way--that is not within everyone's power and that is not easy. Scene iv=The whole secret of successful fighting--get your enemy at a disadvantage and never fight him on equal terms. Act V--Scene i="I love the name of honor more than I fear death" (I, i, Brutus). G-d defend me from my friends; from my enemies I can defend myself. Scene ii=Lying is done with words and also with silence. Scene iii=“For the great majority of mankind are satisfied with appearances, as though they were realities, and are more often influenced by the things that ’seem’ than by those that ‘are’.”--Machiavelli Scene iv=He was a great patriot, a humanitarian, a loyal friend--provided, of course, that he really is dead. --Voltaire (French author and philosopher) Scene v=We can evade reality, but we cannot evade the consequences of evading reality.--Ayn Rand (author)

    2. Discussion/Introduction of Final Paper: Discuss details of Final Paper on Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. See HW for all details.

    Students will analyze thematic messages revealed in Acts IV and V in Henry IV Part I. Students will analyze characterization and plot development. Due Friday, January 4th:
  • The Final Paper is due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. The paper requirements include the following: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. You should follow all the requirements in the Grading Rubric in order to earn a good grade. Your paper should examine both plays by addressing one of the following questions: How does Shakespeare reveal the struggles of growing up and finding one's identity in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? How does Shakespeare portray the parent-child relationship in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? You must analyze one of these two questions by including at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "With all my heart I'll sit and hear her sing / By that time will our book, I think, be drawn"(Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221). The slash (/) identifies a break in the line of iambic pentameter. The citation (Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III), Scene (i) and Lines (220-221). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space it. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive analysis of the two plays and present an insightful analysis of how they both answer the question. Remember, you must have a clear thesis (the answer to the question) in the introductory paragraph, body paragraphs which use plentiful evidence from both plays to support your thesis, and a strong conclusion that ties everything together and leaves the reader with a final thought. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities in examining parent-child relationships and identity formation. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one of these topics. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.
  • Wednesday, December 19th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Interpret (paraphrase in your own words) the following proverbs which apply to Act V of Henry IV Part I: Scene i="I love the name of honor more than I fear death" (I, i, Brutus). G-d defend me from my friends; from my enemies I can defend myself. Scene ii=Lying is done with words and also with silence. Scene iii=“For the great majority of mankind are satisfied with appearances, as though they were realities, and are more often influenced by the things that ’seem’ than by those that ‘are’.”--Machiavelli Scene iv=He was a great patriot, a humanitarian, a loyal friend--provided, of course, that he really is dead. --Voltaire (French author and philosopher) Scene v=We can evade reality, but we cannot evade the consequences of evading reality.--Ayn Rand (author)

    2. Discussion: Discuss the interpretation (paraphrase in your own words) and analysis (referring to the play, with real evidence) of the Act IV proverbs for Henry IV Part I: Scene i=He who fears being conquered is sure of defeat (Napoleon I). It is easy to be brave from a safe distance (Aesop). Scene ii=A greedy person tries to get rich quick but it only leads to poverty. Scene iii=The best way to destroy an enemy is to make him a friend. Anyone can become angry--that is easy, but to be angry with the right person at the right time and for the right purpose and in the right way--that is not within everyone's power and that is not easy. Scene iv=The whole secret of successful fighting--get your enemy at a disadvantage and never fight him on equal terms.

    Students will analyze thematic messages revealed in Acts IV and V in Henry IV Part I. Students will analyze characterization and plot development. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, December 19th:
  • Make up any journals owed for previous acts.

    Friday, January 4th--The Final Paper is due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. The paper requirements include the following: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should examine both plays by addressing one of the following questions: How does Shakespeare reveal the struggles of growing up and finding one's identity in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? How does Shakespeare portray the parent-child relationship in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? You must analyze one of these two questions by including at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "With all my heart I'll sit and hear her sing / By that time will our book, I think, be drawn"(Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221). The slash (/) identifies a break in the line of iambic pentameter. The citation (Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III), Scene (i) and Lines (220-221). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space it. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive analysis of the two plays and present an insightful analysis of how they both answer the question. Remember, you must have a clear thesis (the answer to the question) in the introductory paragraph, body paragraphs which use plentiful evidence from both plays to support your thesis, and a strong conclusion that ties everything together and leaves the reader with a final thought. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities in examining parent-child relationships and identity formation. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one of these topics. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question.

  • Tuesday, December 18th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Discuss the interpretation (paraphrase in your own words) and analysis (referring to the play, with real evidence) of the Act III proverbs for Henry IV Part I. Scene i=He that would be a leader must be a bridge (a Welsh proverb). Scene ii=If you want to know your past--look into your present conditions. If you want to know your future--look into your present actions. If you take responsibility for yourself, you will develop a hunger to accomplish your dreams. Scene iii=When the character of a man is not clear to you, look at his friends. A friend hears the song in my heart and sings it to me when my memory fails. Interpret and analyze (referring to the play, with real evidence) the Act IV proverbs for Henry IV Part I: Scene i=He who fears being conquered is sure of defeat (Napoleon I). It is easy to be brave from a safe distance (Aesop). Scene ii=A greedy person tries to get rich quick but it only leads to poverty. Scene iii=The best way to destroy an enemy is to make him a friend. Anyone can become angry--that is easy, but to be angry with the right person at the right time and for the right purpose and in the right way--that is not within everyone's power and that is not easy. Scene iv=The whole secret of successful fighting--get your enemy at a disadvantage and never fight him on equal terms. Students will analyze thematic messages revealed in Acts III and IV in Henry IV Part I. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, December 19th:
  • Read Act V of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act V to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

  • Make up any journals owed for previous acts.

    Friday, January 4th--Henry IV Part I Essay due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet--paper information TBA.

  • Monday, December 17th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Interpret (paraphrase in your own words) and analyze (referring to the play, with real evidence) the Act III proverbs for Henry IV Part I. Scene i=He that would be a leader must be a bridge (a Welsh proverb). Scene ii=If you want to know your past--look into your present conditions. If you want to know your future--look into your present actions. If you take responsibility for yourself, you will develop a hunger to accomplish your dreams. Scene iii=When the character of a man is not clear to you, look at his friends. A friend hears the song in my heart and sings it to me when my memory fails. Interpret and analyze (referring to the play, with real evidence) the Act IV proverbs for Henry IV Part I: Scene i=He who fears being conquered is sure of defeat (Napoleon I). It is easy to be brave from a safe distance (Aesop). Scene ii=A greedy person tries to get rich quick but it only leads to poverty. Scene iii=The best way to destroy an enemy is to make him a friend. Anyone can become angry--that is easy, but to be angry with the right person at the right time and for the right purpose and in the right way--that is not within everyone's power and that is not easy. Scene iv=The whole secret of successful fighting--get your enemy at a disadvantage and never fight him on equal terms.

    2. Work Period: Analyze how both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I convey real-life situations, people, conflicts and themes that everyone can relate to. 3. Discussion: Who can you relate to most--Prince Hal, Hotspur, or Falstaff? Why are these characters people you may encounter in your life? Why is Prince Hal developing into a strong character? What formula did Shakespeare follow in creating this play? How are both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I similar in relating to the world today?

    Students will engage in real-world connections between the world around them and the two plays, Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. Due Wednesday, December 19th:
  • Read Act V of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act V to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Friday, January 4th--Henry IV Part I Essay due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet -->

  • Friday, December 14th, 2007: WORK PERIOD: Work on getting all character journal HW accomplished, including three journals for Act III and two journals for Act IV (which are due on Monday). Also, begin the two journals for Act V (due Wednesday), which is the entire play. Students will work on their own, reading Henry IV Part I, in which they will compose informal character journals. Due Monday, December 17th--Act III (three journals) and Act IV (two journals):
  • The following assignment was due on Wed. 12/12, but since the school had an emergency evacuation, it will be due on Monday, December 17th. Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write THREE character journals (one journal for each scene). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!
  • Read Act IV of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act IV to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Wednesday, December 19th--finish Henry IV Part I:

  • Read Act V of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act V to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Friday, January 4th--Henry IV Part I Essay due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. Essay instructions will be announced shortly.

  • Thursday, December 13th, 2007: NO CLASS DUE TO TRANSFER TO NEWCOMERS HIGH SCHOOL. Students will work on their own, reading Henry IV Part I, in which they will compose informal character journals. Due Monday, December 17th--Act III (three journals) and Act IV (two journals):
  • The following assignment was due on Wed. 12/12, but since the school had an emergency evacuation, it will be due on Monday, December 17th. Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write THREE character journals (one journal for each scene). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!
  • Read Act IV of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act IV to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Wednesday, December 19th--finish Henry IV Part I:

  • Read Act V of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act V to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Friday, January 4th--Henry IV Part I Essay due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. Essay instructions will be announced shortly.

  • Wednesday, December 12th, 2007: NO CLASS DUE TO EMERGENCY EVACUATION DUE TO GAS LEAK. Students will work on their own, reading Henry IV Part I, in which they will compose informal character journals. Due Monday, December 17th--Act III (three journals) and Act IV (two journals):
  • The following assignment was due today (Wed. 12/12), but since the school had an emergency evacuation today, it will be due on Monday, December 17th. Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write THREE character journals (one journal for each scene). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!
  • Read Act IV of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act IV to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Wednesday, December 19th--finish Henry IV Part I:

  • Read Act V of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act V to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Friday, January 4th--Henry IV Part I Essay due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. Essay instructions will be announced shortly.

  • Tuesday, December 11th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Discuss Act II proverbs. Discuss the textual evidence from the play as to why each proverb is appropriate for each scene in Act II. Scene i=A good name is to be chosen rather than great riches; a favorable reputation is better than gold. Scene ii=It takes a thief to catch a thief; it takes one to know one. Scene iii=To whom you tell your secret you surrender your freedom. A woman can't keep a secret nor let anyone else do it. Scene iv=Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune.

    2. Status Exercise: Finish the Status Exercise, if necessary. Five volunteers will improvise a status exercise. Each volunteer is assigned a status. The acting volunteers will not know what their status is, but will know the status of all the other actors. Each actor will try to determine their status based on how other actors treat them. The improv is a public gathering or party. Each actor will make choices about how to interact with the actors based on their status. The class will observe and comment on how status affects the interactions.

    3. Work Period: Work on the HW due tomorrow--Act III journals.

    Students will engage in status analysis for modern-day people and characters in Henry IV Part I and examine overaching themes in Act II. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, December 12th:
  • Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write THREE character journals (one journal for each scene). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Monday, December 17th:

  • Read Act IV of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act IV to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Wednesday, December 19th:

  • Read Act V of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act V to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Friday, January 4th--Henry IV Part I Essay due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet

  • Monday, December 10th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Examine Act II proverbs. Provide an explanation with evidence from the play as to why each proverb is appropriate for each scene in Act II. Scene i=A good name is to be chosen rather than great riches; a favorable reputation is better than gold. Scene ii=It takes a thief to catch a thief; it takes one to know one. Scene iii=To whom you tell your secret you surrender your freedom. A woman can't keep a secret nor let anyone else do it. Scene iv=Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune. Turn in the Status HW on two characters from Henry IV Part I.

    2. Status Exercise: Five volunteers will improvise a status exercise. Each volunteer is assigned a status. The acting volunteers will not know what their status is, but will know the status of all the other actors. Each actor will try to determine their status based on how other actors treat them. The improv is a public gathering or party. Each actor will make choices about how to interact with the actors based on their status. The class will observe and comment on how status affects the interactions.

    Students will engage in status analysis for modern-day people and characters in Henry IV Part I and examine overaching themes in Act II. Due THIS Wednesday, December 12th:
  • Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write THREE character journals (one journal for each scene). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Monday, December 17th:

  • Read Act IV of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act IV to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Wednesday, December 19th:

  • Read Act V of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act V to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Friday, January 4th--Henry IV Part I Essay due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet

  • Friday, December 7th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm factors that identify a person's outer status (how a person is perceived to be upper class, middle class or lower class). Brainstorm factors that identify a person's inner status (how a person reveals his/her inner feelings--whether he/she feels very good with high self-esteem or not). While brainstorming, turn in Act II journals.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and share students' brainstorming on status.

    3. Work Period: Begin working on HW.

    Students will engage in status analysis for modern-day people and characters in Henry IV Part I. Due THIS MONDAY, December 10th:
  • TWO FULL PAGES (250 words or more)--Status Analysis of TWO Characters in Henry IV Part I--Write one full page on the outer status and inner status of one character and another full page on the outer status and inner status of another character. This refers to the work done in class today.

    Due Wednesday, December 12th:

  • Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write THREE character journals (one journal for each scene). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Monday, December 17th:

  • Read Act IV of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act IV to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Wednesday, December 19th:

  • Read Act V of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (choose any characters in Act V to write your journals). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Friday, January 4th--Henry IV Part I Essay due on both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet

  • Thursday, December 6th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Working with a partner, answer the following characterization questions for Act I (using specific references to the text)--
  • Read King Henry's opening speech. What are his major concerns? How have recent events (from Richard II) shaped and informed those concerns and what are his immediate plans?
  • Why does Henry want to go to Jerusalem?
  • What are Henry's feelings about his son, Hal?
  • Describe Falstaff's character. What is he like? What does he seem to care about?
  • What trick do Hal and Poins plan to play on Falstaff?
  • What reasons does Hal give at the end of scene ii for spending his time in a tavern?
  • Why is King Henry's upset with Hotspur?
  • What are Hotspur's feelings toward Henry?
  • What do Hotspur and his uncle plan to do about Henry's being in power?

    2. Work Period: Work on HW journals for Act II.

    3. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the Act I questions (above). Make predictions about Act II. How will Falstaff, Poins and their comrades speak (for example: how will Shakespeare compose their language? Prose, in bawdy words)? How will Hotspur be portrayed in Act II? How will he interact with his wife?

  • Students will engage in analysis of characterization, conflict and plot events revealed in Act I of Henry IV Part I. Due TOMORROW, Friday, December 7th:
  • Read Act II of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (you may choose two journals from the four scenes). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!
  • Wednesday, December 5th, 2007: 1. Do Now: List #11 Quiz

    2. Work Period: Finish interpreting and applying the following proverbs to Act I scenes from Henry IV Part I: Scene i=The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. Scene ii=The reputation of a thousand years may be determined by the conduct of an hour. Scene iii=Anger is often more hurtful than the injury that caused it.

    3. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the Do Now. Take notes. Understand the characterization of the King, Prince Hal, and Hotspur. Discuss your first impressions of Act I. Make predictions. What themes are revealed in Act I? Jealousy, reputation, revenge.

    Students will engage in analysis of characterization, conflict and plot events revealed in Act I of Henry IV Part I. Due THIS Friday, December 7th:
  • Read Act II of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (you may choose two journals from the four scenes). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!
  • Tuesday, December 4th, 2007: 1. Do Now--Interpret and apply the following proverbs to Act I scenes from Henry IV Part I: Scene i=The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. Scene ii=The reputation of a thousand years may be determined by the conduct of an hour. Scene iii=Anger is often more hurtful than the injury that caused it.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the Do Now. Take notes. Understand the characterization of the King, Prince Hal, and Hotspur.

    Students will engage in analysis of characterization, conflict and plot events revealed in Act I of Henry IV Part I. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, December 5th:
  • List #11 Quiz--the last vocabulary quiz! Make it your best!

    Due THIS Friday, December 7th:

  • Read Act II of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write TWO character journals (you may choose two journals from the four scenes). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!
  • Monday, December 3rd, 2007: 1. Do Now--Artistic Interpretation of Henry IV Part I: Read the Intro. to Henry IV Part I and artistically represent (through drawing, newspaper clipping and/or computer images) the relationships and events of the play, based on your introductory analysis. Work with small groups of 2-3.

    2. Work Period: Work on Act I Character Journals (these three journals are due tomorrow!).

    Students will engage in analysis of relationships and events for historical characters, as portrayed in Henry IV Part I. Due TOMORROW--Tuesday, December 4th:
  • Read Act I of Henry IV Part I (the play is provided online at this link or in a hard cover version--given in class) and write a character journal for each scene (that's THREE JOURNALS, ONE FOR EACH SCENE). Don't forget--each journal MUST be 250 words or more!

    Due Wednesday, December 5th:

  • List #11 Quiz--the last vocabulary quiz! Make it your best!
  • Friday, November 30th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #11.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss and analyze the Profile for Henry IV and the Profile for Henry V--aka Prince Hal in the play Henry IV Part I. Discuss the following question: What can you expect from Shakespeare, in terms of his literary style, when you read the play Henry IV Part I, which characterizes the historical figures, Henry IV and Henry V?

    3. Artistic Interpretation of Henry IV Part I: Read the Intro. to Henry IV Part I and artistically represent (through drawing, newspaper clipping and/or computer images) the relationships and events of the play, based on your introductory analysis.

    Students will engage in pre-reading examination of themes, historical characters and literary style in Henry IV Part I. Due Tuesday, December 4th:
  • Read Act I of Henry IV Part I (text is provided in class) and write a character journal for each scene (that's THREE JOURNALS, ONE FOR EACH SCENE).

    Due Wednesday, December 5th:

  • List #11 Quiz--the last vocabulary quiz! Make it your best!

    Make-up HW:

  • Read the Profile for Henry IV and the Profile for Henry V--aka Prince Hal in the play Henry IV Part I. Answer the following question: What can you expect from Shakespeare, in terms of his literary style, when you read the play Henry IV Part I, which characterizes the historical figures, Henry IV and Henry V?
  • Thursday, November 29th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Award Presentations (for best performance, actor, actress, costume and scene design!)

    2. Discuss/Analyze the Theme-Related (for Henry IV Part I) True/False Questions: Choose True or False for each of the statements below. Determine the themes for Henry IV Part I based on these statements. Be prepared to discuss.

  • It is better to avoid going to war than to fight and kill for your country.
  • We should trust our leaders to do what is right for the country's greater good.
  • It is always better to abide by social codes of behavior (e.g. honor and chivalry) than to reject them.
  • Every society occasionally requires war and revolt in order to grow and become stronger.
  • Children should always respect and obey their parents.
  • A good leader is bold and fearless, always ready to use whatever military means are at his disposal in order to accomplish his objectives.
  • A good leader is sober and thoughtful, willing to compromise his own views in order to respect the views of others so that peace can be maintained.
  • People with a great deal of political power are generally good, honest people, concerned about the welfare of those they serve.
  • Gender makes a difference when it comes to effective leadership.
  • It is acceptable to keep secrets from one's closest family members (spouse/parent/sibling).

    3. Homework Analysis: Offer proof that you read the homework reading the Profile for Henry IV and the Profile for Henry V--aka Prince Hal in the play Henry IV Part I. Answer the following question: What can you expect from Shakespeare, in terms of his literary style, when you read the play Henry IV Part I, which characterizes the historical figures, Henry IV and Henry V?

  • Students will engage in pre-reading examination of themes, historical characters and literary style in Henry IV Part I. Due Tuesday, December 4th:
  • Read Act I of Henry IV Part I (text is provided in class) and write a character journal for each scene (that's THREE JOURNALS, ONE FOR EACH SCENE).

    Make-up HW:

  • Read the Profile for Henry IV and the Profile for Henry V--aka Prince Hal in the play Henry IV Part I. Answer the following question: What can you expect from Shakespeare, in terms of his literary style, when you read the play Henry IV Part I, which characterizes the historical figures, Henry IV and Henry V?
  • Wednesday, November 28th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #10 Quiz

    2. Evaluation of Scene Performances: Vote for the "Bests"--Best Overall Performance, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Costume, Best Set Design

    3. Pre-Reading Theme-Related (for Henry IV Part I) True/False Questions: Choose True or False for each of the statements below. Determine the themes for Henry IV Part I based on these statements. Be prepared to discuss.

  • It is better to avoid going to war than to fight and kill for your country.
  • We should trust our leaders to do what is right for the country's greater good.
  • It is always better to abide by social codes of behavior (e.g. honor and chivalry) than to reject them.
  • Every society occasionally requires war and revolt in order to grow and become stronger.
  • Children should always respect and obey their parents.
  • A good leader is bold and fearless, always ready to use whatever military means are at his disposal in order to accomplish his objectives.
  • A good leader is sober and thoughtful, willing to compromise his own views in order to respect the views of others so that peace can be maintained.
  • People with a great deal of political power are generally good, honest people, concerned about the welfare of those they serve.
  • Gender makes a difference when it comes to effective leadership.
  • It is acceptable to keep secrets from one's closest family members (spouse/parent/sibling).
  • Students will engage in evaluations of scenes from Hamlet and pre-reading examination of themes in Henry IV Part I. Due Tomorrow, Thursday, November 29th:
  • Read the Profile for Henry IV and the Profile for Henry V--aka Prince Hal in the play Henry IV Part I. Be prepared to discuss tomorrow.
  • Tuesday, November 27th, 2007: 1. Do Now--Finish Scene Performances: Performances will be graded on the application of Set Design Questions individually and as a group. Groups will be graded on the following: 1.) Physical choices (levels, spacing, and movement), 2.) Costume (color, style and fabric that reflect the characters), 3.) Set (arrangement of furniture and use of props), 4.) Lighting (color, brightness and appropriate use of lighting to reflect the theme and mood), 5.) Music/Sound (sound effects and volume to reflect the theme and mood), 6.) Line familiarity (actors' comfort level with their lines; know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines), and any other choices made to further enhance the overall performance.

    2. Evaluation of Scene Performances: Classmates will evaluate and share strengths and areas needing improvement for each scene performance.

    Students will engage in performances and evaluations of scenes from Hamlet. Vocabulary List #10 Quiz--TOMORROW--Wednesday, November 28th.
    Monday, November 26th, 2007: 1. Do Now--Scene Performances: Performances will be graded on the application of Set Design Questions individually and as a group. Groups will be graded on the following: 1.) Physical choices (levels, spacing, and movement), 2.) Costume (color, style and fabric that reflect the characters), 3.) Set (arrangement of furniture and use of props), 4.) Lighting (color, brightness and appropriate use of lighting to reflect the theme and mood), 5.) Music/Sound (sound effects and volume to reflect the theme and mood), 6.) Line familiarity (actors' comfort level with their lines; know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines), and any other choices made to further enhance the overall performance.

    2. Review Vocabulary List #10.

    Students will engage in performances of scenes from Hamlet. Vocabulary List #10 Quiz--THIS Wednesday, November 28th.

    Scene Performances continue tomorrow, if necessary.

    Wednesday, November 21st, 2007: 1. Do Now--Work Period: Work with your Scene Groups on appropriate characters (many individuals will have to play two characters) and applying the Set Design Questions as a group.

    2. Performance Practice: In your Scene Groups, continue performance practice. Incorporate the Set Design Q & A. Everyone should be up on their feet, practicing their lines, movement, set arrangement, etc.

    Students will engage in performance practice of scenes from Hamlet. Scene Performances Due Monday, November 26th (right after Thanksgiving holiday):
  • In assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Scene Performance Grading: Your groups will be graded on the following: 1.) Physical choices (levels, spacing, and movement), 2.) Costume (color, style and fabric that reflect the characters), 3.) Set (arrangement of furniture and use of props), 4.) Lighting (color, brightness and appropriate use of lighting to reflect the theme and mood), 5.) Music/Sound (sound effects and volume to reflect the theme and mood), 6.) Line familiarity (actors' comfort level with their lines; know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines), and any other choices made to further enhance the overall performance. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Editing: Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.)

    Vocabulary List #10 Quiz--Wednesday, November 28th (after Thanksgiving).

  • Tuesday, November 20th, 2007: 1. Do Now--Work Period: Work with your Scene Groups on appropriate characters (many individuals will have to play two characters) and applying the Set Design Questions as a group.

    2. Performance Practice: In your Scene Groups, begin performance practice. Incorporate the Set Design Q & A. Everyone should be up on their feet, practicing their lines, movement, set arrangement, etc.

    Students will engage in performance practice of scenes from Hamlet. Make-Up HW--Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, November 21st:
  • Make up ALL HW, including character journals for all acts of Hamlet.

    No Vocabulary Quiz this week. Vocabulary List #10 Quiz--Wednesday, November 28th (after Thanksgiving).

    Scene Performances Due Monday, November 26th:

  • In assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Scene Performance Grading: Your groups will be graded on the following: 1.) Physical choices (levels, spacing, and movement), 2.) Costume (color, style and fabric that reflect the characters), 3.) Set (arrangement of furniture and use of props), 4.) Lighting (color, brightness and appropriate use of lighting to reflect the theme and mood), 5.) Music/Sound (sound effects and volume to reflect the theme and mood), 6.) Line familiarity (actors' comfort level with their lines; know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines), and any other choices made to further enhance the overall performance. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Editing: Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.)
  • Monday, November 19th, 2007: 1. Do Now--Work Period: Work with your Scene Groups on appropriate characters (many individuals will have to play two characters) and answering the Set Design Questions as a group. Of course, the question on your particular character can only be answered by individuals. Work on fulfilling grading requirements.

    Students will culminate Hamlet and engage in assessment. Due Tuesday, November 20th:
  • Set Design Questions: You should answer the questions with your group, though the question on your particular character is specific to you only.

    Make-Up HW--Due Wednesday, November 21st:

  • Make up ALL HW, including character journals for all acts of Hamlet.

    No Vocabulary Quiz this week. Vocabulary List #10 Quiz--Wednesday, November 28th (after Thanksgiving).

    Scene Performances Due Monday, November 26th:

  • In assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Scene Performance Grading: Your groups will be graded on the following: 1.) Physical choices (levels, spacing, and movement), 2.) Costume (color, style and fabric that reflect the characters), 3.) Set (arrangement of furniture and use of props), 4.) Lighting (color, brightness and appropriate use of lighting to reflect the theme and mood), 5.) Music/Sound (sound effects and volume to reflect the theme and mood), 6.) Line familiarity (actors' comfort level with their lines; know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines), and any other choices made to further enhance the overall performance. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Editing: Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.)
  • Friday, November 16th, 2007: Work Period: Work with your Scene Groups on appropriate characters (many individuals will have to play two characters) and answering the Set Design Questions as a group. Of course, the question on your particular character can only be answered by individuals. Students will culminate Hamlet and engage in assessment. Due Tuesday, November 20th:
  • Set Design Questions: You should answer the questions with your group, though the question on your particular character is specific to you only.

    Make-Up HW--Due Wednesday, November 21st:

  • Make up ALL HW, including character journals for all acts of Hamlet.

    Scene Performances Due Monday, November 26th:

  • In assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.
  • Thursday, November 15th, 2007: 1. Hamlet EXAM

    2. Introduction of Scene Performance Presentation Assignment

    Students will culminate Hamlet and engage in assessment. Due Tuesday, November 20th:
  • Set Design Questions: You should answer the questions with your group, though the question on your particular character is specific to you only.

    Scene Performances Due Monday, November 26th:

  • In assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.
  • Wednesday, November 14th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #9 Quiz

    2. Discuss Famous Quotes from Hamlet: Interpret Act V Quotes found HERE.

    3. Review HAMLET EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

    Students will examine Hamlet assessment requirements and vocabulary skills. EXAM TOMORROW--THURSDAY (11/15):
  • Hamlet EXAM. Here's a helpful HAMLET EXAM REVIEW SHEET. For the exam, you should interpret the quotes, know the character traits and plot events for every Act found HERE.
  • Tuesday, November 13th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Interpret Act V Quotes found HERE.

    2. Review HAMLET EXAM REVIEW SHEET.

    3. Review List #9.

    Students will examine Hamlet assessment requirements and vocabulary skills. QUIZ TOMORROW--WEDNESDAY (11/14):
  • List #9 Quiz.

    EXAM ON THURSDAY (11/15):

  • Hamlet EXAM. Here's a helpful HAMLET EXAM REVIEW SHEET. For the exam, you should interpret the quotes, know the character traits and plot events for every Act found HERE.
  • Friday, November 9th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Analyze each of the Act IV Quotes found HERE. Analysis includes interpretation of the quotes (paraphrase in your own words), characterization of the characters, and any literary techniques used by Shakespeare.

    2. Finish Discussion/Review of Act III quotes from the famous quote list found HERE. Class note-taking.

    3. Angel/Devil Conflict for Hamlet--a theatrical portrayal. Examine conflict where Hamlet is unsure if he should kill Claudius. Brainstorm arguments on each side of the conflict. Three volunteers--one actor will play the "angel" and try to persuade Hamlet not to kill Claudius. One actor will persuade the "devil" and try to persuade Hamlet to kill Claudius. These actors will stand on opposite sides of the room. Hamlet will stand in the middle and take a step toward the Angel or the Devil when he is persuaded by their argument. The Angel and Devil will take turns presenting their arguments. The class will observe which arguments and actors are most persuasive.

    Students will examine characterization and literary techniques in Act IV of Hamlet. DUE TUESDAY (11/13):
  • Read all of Act V in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scene 1 and one for scene 2). You should only include what happens for the characters in Act V.

    QUIZ ON WEDNESDAY (11/14):

  • List #9 Quiz.

    EXAM ON THURSDAY (11/15):

  • Hamlet EXAM. Here's a helpful HAMLET EXAM REVIEW SHEET. For the exam, you should interpret the quotes, know the character traits and plot events for every Act found HERE.
  • Thursday, November 8th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Review quotes for Act III from the famous quote list found HERE. Class note-taking.

    2. Discussion/Note-taking for Act IV: Identify events that point to Hamlet's downfall--Hamlet's killing of Polonius, Gertrude's support of Claudius's evaluation of Hamlet's insanity, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern's support of Claudius, Claudius's plan to send Hamlet to England, Ophelia's insanity and death.

    3. Work on Act IV Journals.

    Students will determine Hamlet's downfall, as determined in Act IV of Hamlet. DUE TOMORROW--FRIDAY (11/9):
  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scenes 1-3, one journal for scenes 4-5 and one journal for scenes 6-7). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE TUESDAY (11/13):

  • Read all of Act V in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scene 1 and and one for scene 2). You should only include what happens for the characters in Act V.
  • Wednesday, November 7th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #8 Quiz

    2. Examine your assigned quotes for Act III from the famous quote list found HERE. For each character in your assigned quote, determine an animal that's fitting for that character.

    3. Acting Warm-Up Exercises: Hand/Leg shake (8, 4, 2, 1), rub-down (hands, arms, legs, massage shoulders), bubble gum chewing (face muscles, shoulder muscles, arms, legs, whole body), sound passing (with a body movement), animal voices/movements (e.g. cat, lion, pig, horse).

    4. Small Group Read-Aloud/Acting: In small groups, read aloud assigned quotes from Act III as if your character were an animal. Everyone takes turns reading aloud.

    5. Class Sharing: Volunteers perform their animal-version of the characters speaking the famous lines in Act III. Volunteers and whole class determine haracter analysis for the famous quotes in Act III.

    Students will recognize character portrayals through visual representations/theatrical techniques for Act III of Hamlet. DUE THIS FRIDAY (11/9):
  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scenes 1-3, one journal for scenes 4-5 and one journal for scenes 6-7). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE TUESDAY (11/13):

  • Read all of Act V in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scene 1 and and one for scene 2). You should only include what happens for the characters in Act V.
  • Tuesday, November 6th, 2007: NO SCHOOL-ELECTION DAY NO SCHOOL-ELECTION DAY DUE TOMORROW--WEDNESDAY (11/7):
  • List #8 Quiz

    DUE THIS FRIDAY (11/9):

  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scenes 1-3, one journal for scenes 4-5 and one journal for scenes 6-7). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE TUESDAY (11/13):

  • Read all of Act V in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scene 1 and and one for scene 2). You should only include what happens for the characters in Act V.
  • Monday, November 5th, 2007: 1. Do Now: Interpret the assigned quotes for Act III from the famous quote list found HERE. Interpret the quotes in your own words, characterize the speakers, determine any literary techniques used by William Shakespeare (i.e. metaphor, personification).

    2. Finish Discussion/Introduction of List #8.

    Students will recognize themes, character portrayals and internal conflicts in Act III of Hamlet. DUE WEDNESDAY (11/7):
  • List #8 Quiz

    DUE THIS FRIDAY (11/9):

  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scenes 1-3, one journal for scenes 4-5 and one journal for scenes 6-7). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE TUESDAY (11/13):

  • Read all of Act V in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scene 1 and and one for scene 2). You should only include what happens for the characters in Act V.
  • Friday, November 2nd, 2007: 1. Do Now--Themes and Textual Evidence: Identify evidence in Act III that supports the following themes--Loyalty to authority figures is mandatory. People in power are deceptive. Teenagers have confusion, irrational behavior, and sexual frustration. Teenagers do grow up, mature, and show responsibility and assertiveness.

    2. Discuss/Introduce List #8.

    Students will recognize personal connections, themes and character portrayals in Hamlet. DUE MONDAY (11/5):
  • Finish the classwork: Identify evidence in Act III of Hamlet that supports the following themes: Loyalty to authority figures is mandatory. People in power are deceptive. Teenagers have confusion, irrational behavior, and sexual frustration. Teenagers do grow up, mature, and show responsibility and assertiveness. Be ready to share with the class on Monday.

    DUE WEDNESDAY (11/7):

  • List #8 Quiz

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY (11/9):

  • Read all of Act IV in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scenes 1-3, one journal for scenes 4-5 and one journal for scenes 6-7). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE TUESDAY (11/13):

  • Read all of Act V in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (one journal for scene 1 and and one for scene 2). You should only include what happens for the characters in Act V.
  • Thursday, November 1st, 2007: 1. Do Now--Note-Taking and Discussion/Analysis: Finish sharing your interpretations and taking notes on the famous quotes from Act I or Act II found HERE. The interpretation should include the following: interpretation/paraphrase, characterization of the speaker, conflicts existing and themes/messages the author is sharing with these words.

    2. Discussion/Analysis of Act II Scene ii and Act III: Themes to examine are the following--Power Struggle between different classes (superior vs. inferior), respect for authority, and stereotypical adolescent behavior and internal conflict. Survey the class (in written form, then orally) regarding the following: What are stereotypical adolescent behaviors? What are adolescents' typical internal conflicts? Possible answers: sexually inappropriate behaviors, breaking the rules, joking and hanging with friends, trusting friends, plotting against adults. As for internal conflicts: listen to parents vs. disobey parents, break rules vs. follow rules, trust friends vs. not trust friends, stay in relationship vs. break up relationship, confide in parents vs. hide feelings from parents

    Students will recognize personal connections, themes and character portrayals in Hamlet. DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY (11/2):
  • Read all of Act III in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.
  • Wednesday, October 31, 2007--Happy Halloween!: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #7 Quiz

    2. Note-Taking and Discussion/Analysis: Share your interpretations of your assigned famous quote from Act I or Act II found HERE. The interpretation should include the following: interpretation/paraphrase, characterization of the speaker, conflicts existing and themes/messages the author is sharing with these words.

    Students will recognize themes and character portrayals in Hamlet. DUE FRIDAY (11/2):
  • Read all of Act III in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.
  • Tuesday, October 30, 2007: 1. Do Now: Share your character analysis and five objects that your character can become and why (examples: song, animal, fruit, article of clothing, website, book, food). Share your interpretations of your assigned famous quote from Act I or Act II found HERE. The interpretation should include the following: interpretation/paraphrase, characterization of the speaker, conflicts existing and themes/messages the author is sharing with these words.

    2. Circle Activity/Personal Connections to Hamlet: Before the circle activity, the class will do a quick warm-up activity, such as shake out hands and feet--counts of 8, 4, 2, 1. In a large circle, teacher will ask the following questions and each student who answers "yes" must move to a different place in the circle, but must walk uniquely/dramatically: Have you ever been betrayed by someone you trusted? Have you ever had a crush on someone or been in love? Have you ever been rejected by someone you've loved or had a crush on? Have you ever told a lie--even a really super small lie? Have you ever broken a promise? Have you ever disobeyed your parents? Have you ever disagreed with your parent's decision? These questions will help students realize their personal connections to Shakespeare's works.

    Students will recognize personal connections and character portrayals in Hamlet. DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY (10/31):
  • Vocabulary List #7 Quiz

    DUE FRIDAY (11/2):

  • Read all of Act III in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.
  • Monday, October 29, 2007: 1. Do Now: While students show two HW journals for Act II, the rest of the class will do the following--with a partner, interpret an assigned famous quote from Act I or Act II found HERE. The interpretation should include the following: interpretation/paraphrase, characterization of the speaker, conflicts existing and themes/messages the author is sharing with these words. For each student's assigned character, identify the following--three qualities that the character possesses to play his/her role in the play AND five objects that your character can become and why (examples: song, animal, fruit, article of clothing, website, book, food). Be prepared to share.

    2. For periods 5 and 7 only, introduce Vocabulary List #7.

    Students will recognize character portrayals in Hamlet. DUE WEDNESDAY (10/31):
  • Vocabulary List #7 Quiz

    DUE FRIDAY (11/2):

  • Read all of Act III in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.
  • Friday, October 26, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #7.

    2. Discussion/Analysis of Act II Scene i in Hamlet: Examine the characterization of Laertes and Polonius as a "spy" on his son, Laertes. What is Polonius's plan to spy on his son? What does it reveal about Polonius's character? Analyze Hamlet as the "insane" character, as portrayed by Ophelia and her father, Polonius. Why is Hamlet considered "mad"? What does Polonius suggest as the reasons for Hamlet's insanity?

    Students will determine the characterization of Laertes, Polonius and Hamlet in Act II Scene i of Hamlet. Students will analyze relationships and character portrayals in this scene. DUE MONDAY (10/29):
  • Read all of Act II in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.

    DUE WEDNESDAY (10/31):

  • Vocabulary List #7 Quiz
  • Thursday, October 25, 2007: 1. Do Now: Finish Class Discussion/Analysis of Act I Scene v in Hamlet: Examine the significance of the ghost's revelation and how it sets up the major conflict/power struggle for Hamlet in the entire play. Why is the ghost to be trusted? Why is he NOT to be trusted?

    2. Small Group reading of Act II Scene i in Hamlet: Reading aloud in small groups (groups of three). Examine characterization of Hamlet and his "presence" even when he doesn't appear in a scene.

    3. Class Discussion/Analysis: Class discussion/analysis of Act II Scene i and introduction of Scene ii. Examine characterization of Hamlet and his "presence" even when he doesn't appear in a scene.

    Students will determine the significance of the ghost's role in Act I Scene v and Hamlet in Act II as well as the entire play--Hamlet. Due Monday (10/29):
  • Read all of Act II in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.
  • Wednesday, October 24, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    2. Class Discussion/Analysis of Act I Scene v in Hamlet: Examine the significance of the ghost's revelation and how it sets up the major conflict/power struggle for Hamlet in the entire play. Why is the ghost to be trusted? Why is he NOT to be trusted?

    Students will determine the significance of the ghost's role in Act I Scene v and the entire play--Hamlet. Due Monday (10/29):
  • Read all of Act II in Hamlet and compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.
  • Tuesday, October 23, 2007: 1. Do Now: Read-aloud (in small groups of 3-4) Act I Scene iii of Hamlet.

    2. Class Discussion: Discussion of Act I Scene iii. Analyze character identities and conflicts for Laertes, Ophelia, Hamlet, and Polonius. Examine character desires and advice/warnings and identify the author's purpose in introducing these revelations for the characters and plot development.

    Students will determine the deeper meaning of the author's intentions in revealing characters' advice/warnings in Act I Scene iii of Hamlet. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday (10/24):
  • List #6 Quiz
  • Read all of Act I in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.
  • Monday, October 22, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #6.

    2. Read-aloud: Finish reading aloud (in small groups of 3-4) Act I Scene ii of Hamlet.

    3. Class Discussion: Finish discussion of Act I Scene ii. Analyze character identities and conflicts for Hamlet, King Claudius, and Queen Gertrude. Examine language choice--religious references, sexually suggestive word choices, and plot development.

    Students will analyze the introductory elements of Hamlet--character identities and conflicts, author's language choices, and plot development. Due Wednesday (10/24):
  • List #6 Quiz
  • Read all of Act I in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.
  • Friday, October 19, 2007: 1. Do Now: Read-aloud (in small groups of 3-4) Act I Scene ii of Hamlet.

    2. Class Discussion: Discuss Act I Scene ii. Analyze character portrayals and relationships for Hamlet, King Claudius, and Queen Gertrude. Examine language choice--religious references, sexually suggestive word choices, and plot development.

    3. Acting Exercises for Class Period 2: Tableaus (statues).

    4. Introduce List #6 and HW.

    Students will analyze the introductory elements of Hamlet--character identities and relationships, author's language choices, and plot development.

  • DUE MONDAY: "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published!

  • Due Wednesday (10/24): List #6 Quiz AND Read all of Act I in Hamlet and compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages and 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a marble notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.
  • Thursday, October 18, 2007: 1. Do Now: For those who haven't taken the quiz yet, take Vocab. List #5 QUIZ.

    2. Literary Analysis of Act I Scene i of Hamlet: Examine list of characters and opening scene. Read aloud Scene i in small groups of four.

    3. For those classes who met yesterday (periods 5 and 7): Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body. Take up as much or as little space as possible. Archetype portrayals (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight). Conflict concept illustrated. Volunteers will perform 1st scene, if time allows.

    Students will be assessed in vocabulary skills and analyze the introductory elements of Hamlet--character roles and reading and analysis of the opening scene.

  • NOTE DATE CHANGE: Two Teacher Recommendations due October 19th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 17, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocab. List #5 QUIZ.

    2. Hamlet introductory analysis.

    Students will be assessed in vocabulary skills and analyze the introductory elements of Hamlet--character roles and reading and analysis of the opening scene.
  • If YOUR class does NOT meet today, then you will take the Vocab. Quiz #5 TOMORROW (Thursday). Tomorrow, students will NOT have multiple choice questions on the vocabulary quiz. Make sure to study assiduously!

  • NOTE DATE CHANGE: Two Teacher Recommendations due October 19th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 16, 2007: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Analyze "Intro. to Hamlet"--examine themes, characterization of major characters (including character flaws, strengths, and desires), conflicts and predictions about Hamlet.

    2. Vocab. List #5 quiz preparation.

    Students will engage in literary analysis and self-assessment.
  • Vocab. Quiz #5--TOMORROW (Wednesday).

  • NOTE DATE CHANGE: Two Teacher Recommendations due October 19th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, October 15, 2007: 1. Do Now: Exchange and analyze your classmates' "Intro. to Hamlet."

    2. Discuss themes, conflicts and predictions learned from "Intro. to Hamlet."

    3. Grade distribution.

    Students will engage literary analysis and self-assessment.
  • Vocab. Quiz #5--Wednesday.

  • NOTE DATE CHANGE: Two Teacher Recommendations due October 19th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 12, 2007: 1. Do Now: Exchange and analyze each other's sonnets. Edit/Revise errors in rhythm and rhyming patterns.

    2. Reading aloud of exemplary sonnets.

    3. Begin reading HW--"Intro. to Hamlet" essay.

    Students will compose and edit poetry based on English sonnet formula. Due MONDAY, October 15:
  • Read and annotate "Intro. to Hamlet" essay (received in class).

  • NOTE DATE CHANGE: Two Teacher Recommendations due October 19th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 11, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #5.

    2. Write your own English Sonnet on love! Don't forget, follow the patterns that Shakespeare used. You may want to use these resources: Shakespeare's Sonnets, Structure and History of the Shakespearean Sonnets.

    Students will use mnemonic devices to learn new vocabulary and begin to compose original sonnets. Due TOMORROW:
  • Finish your own original sonnet on love! Use these resources to guide you: Shakespeare's Sonnets, Structure and History of the Shakespearean Sonnets. Type it, add visuals/images/decorations, create a nice presentation!

  • DATE CHANGED: Two Teacher Recommendations due October 19th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 10, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #4 Quiz!

    2. EXAM on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Literary Style

    Students will be assessed on vocabulary and Shakespeare's life, times, and style of writing.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 9, 2007: 1. Do Now: Work Period--prepare for Shakespeare Test and List #4 Quiz! Use the Study Guide for Shakespeare Test.

    2. Shakespeare Test preparation.

    Students will prepare for Shakespeare Test on his life, times, and style of writing. Due TOMORROW--Wed. 10/10:
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Shakespeare Test. You should study the following: the Shakespearean Sonnets: Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. You should KNOW the poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times--all notes were reviewed in class, the Origin and the Development of the Sonnet, the Words, Words, Words packet, the Shakespeare and His England, the "Poetry and Rhythm" handout, and the Shakespeare's Life and Times topics. Use this Study Guide.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 5, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce Study Guide for Shakespeare Test on Wednesday, October 10th.

    2. Shakespeare Test preparation.

    Students will prepare for Shakespeare Test on his life, times, and style of writing.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Shakespeare Test=Wed. 10/10. You should study the following: the Shakespearean Sonnets: Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. You should KNOW the poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times--all notes were reviewed in class, the Origin and the Development of the Sonnet, the Words, Words, Words packet, the Shakespeare and His England, the "Poetry and Rhythm" handout, and the Shakespeare's Life and Times topics. Use this Study Guide.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 4, 2007: 1. Do Now: Read and discuss List #4

    2. Finish analysis and discussion of the Sonnet HW: Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Analyze the poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times.

    3. Introduce Shakespeare Test (test date=Wed. October 10th)

    Students will understand and analyze Shakespeare's sonnets, the literary terms used, major themes and similar references to Shakespeare's life and times.
  • Shakespeare Test=Wed. 10/10. You should study the following: the Shakespearean Sonnets: Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. You should KNOW the poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times--all notes were reviewed in class, the Origin and the Development of the Sonnet, the Words, Words, Words packet, the Shakespeare and His England, the "Poetry and Rhythm" handout, and the Shakespeare's Life and Times topics. Use this Study Guide.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 3, 2007: 1. Do Now--Vocabulary Quiz #3

    2. Read, analyze and discuss the Sonnet HW: Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Analyze the poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times.

    Students will understand and analyze Shakespeare's sonnets, the literary terms used, major themes and similar references to Shakespeare's life and times.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 2, 2007: 1. Do Now--Whole Class Discussion/Sharing: Discuss the main points from the HW reading on Sonnets--the origin and development, along with the discussion points from the HW and Do Now group discussions.

    2. Review and begin HW.

    Students will understand Shakespeare's sonnets, their origin and development. Due Wednesday, October 3rd:
    Read and analyze Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Identify poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times. Be ready to discuss on Wednesday.
  • List #3 Quiz

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Monday, October 1, 2007: 1. Do Now: In small, assigned discussion groups, discuss the HW: Shakespearean Sonnets--the origin, format and development. Suggested discussion questions: What surprised or shocked you from the reading? What did you find most interesting? What would you want to learn more about from the reading?

    2. Whole Class Discussion/Sharing: Discuss the main points from the HW reading, along with the discussion points from the HW and Do Now group discussions.

    3. Introduce HW.

    Students will understand Shakespeare's sonnets, their origin and development. Due Wednesday, October 3rd:
    Read and analyze Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Identify poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times. Be ready to discuss on Wednesday.
  • List #3 Quiz

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: You should have already been asking your teachers for recommendations! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Friday, September 28, 2007: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion on Words, Words, Words... and "Poetry and Rhythm" handout. Discuss and share annotations. Main Discussion Point: How is the background information on Shakespearean language helpful in understanding his texts?

    2. Introduce Shakespearean Sonnets--the origin, format and development

    Students will understand Shakespeare's manipulation of language and its style in order to prepare to read his texts. Due Monday, October 1st:
  • Read Shakespearean Sonnets--the origin, format and development. Compose 10 main points in sentence form (use your own original words). Compose 5 discussion points (in sentence form; points of interest that you'd like to discuss).

    Due Wednesday, October 3rd:

  • List #3 Quiz

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Thursday, September 27, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #3.

    2. Discuss Words, Words, Words... and "Poetry and Rhythm" handout. Discuss and share annotations. Main Discussion Point: How is the background information on Shakespearean language helpful in understanding his texts?

    Students will understand the relevance of Shakespeare's manipulation of language in order to prepare to read his texts.
  • Begin studying List #3

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Wednesday, September 26, 2007: 1. Do Now: List #2 Quiz. Turn in resume rewrites.

    2. Discuss Shakespeare and His England. Main Discussion Point: How is background information on England and its rulers at the time in which Shakespeare lived relevant in better understanding Shakespeare's texts?

    Students will understand the relevance of Shakespeare's England history and Shakespeare's manipulation of language in order to prepare to read his texts.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Tuesday, September 25, 2007: 1. Do Now: Discuss Words, Words, Words... and "Poetry and Rhythm" handout. Discuss and share annotations. Main Discussion Point: How is the background information on Shakespearean language helpful in understanding his texts?

    2. Discuss Shakespeare and His England. Main Discussion Point: How is background information on England and its rulers at the time in which Shakespeare lived relevant in better understanding Shakespeare's texts?

    Students will understand the relevance of Shakespeare's England history and Shakespeare's manipulation of language in order to prepare to read his texts. Due TOMORROW--Wednesday, September 26th:
  • Resume rewrite (use teacher corrections to guide your rewrite)
  • List #2 Quiz

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Monday, September 24, 2007: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and annotating packet on Shakespearean Language: Words, Words, Words.... Read "Poetry and Rhythm" handout.

    2. Vocab. Quiz #1 and resume distribution/review

    Students will practice reading strategies, annotations and note-taking skills. Due Wednesday, September 26th:
  • Resume rewrite (use teacher corrections to guide your rewrite)
  • List #2 Quiz

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Friday, September 21, 2007: 1. Do Now: Read and annotate packet on Shakespearean Language: Words, Words, Words....

    2. Presentations: If any Shakespearean presentations remain, students will present and the rest of the class will take notes.

    Students will practice listening skills, reading strategies and note-taking skills. Due Monday, September 24th:
  • Read and include annotations (in the margins, write summary notes, opinions, connections and questions) for the reading packet--Shakespeare and His England. Read carefully and write good, detailed annotations.

    Due Wednesday, September 26th:

  • List #2 Quiz.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Thursday, September 20, 2007: 1. Do Now: Introduce/Review Vocabulary List #2

    2. Finish Shakespeare's Theaters, Life and Times--Note-taking: Take notes and discuss additional information provided by teacher lecture.

    4. Introduction of HW reading--Shakespeare and England.

    Students will practice listening and note-taking skills. Due Monday, September 24th:
  • Read and include annotations (in the margins, write summary notes, opinions, connections and questions) for the reading packet--Shakespeare and England. Read carefully and write good, detailed annotations.

    Due Wednesday, September 26th:

  • List #2 Quiz.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Wednesday, September 19, 2007: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #1 Quiz

    2. Analysis of Map of London Theaters, City Buildings and Churches in 1600: Analysis of the positions/locations, theater names and purposes, city buildings and churches.

    3. Shakespeare's Theaters, Life and Times--Note-taking: Take notes and discuss additional information provided by teacher lecture.

    Students will practice listening and note-taking skills. Due Wednesday, September 26th:
  • List #2 Quiz.

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Tuesday, September 18, 2007: 1. Do Now: Take a few minutes to prepare presentations.

    2. Shakespeare Research Presentations: Presentations continue and will finish today. Students take notes on their classmates' presentations, as everyone will be accountable for the Shakespeare presentation information.

    3. Preparation for Vocabulary List #1 Quiz: Prepare for tomorrow's List #1 quiz, individually or with a partner.

    Students will practice listening and note-taking skills.
  • Vocabulary List #1 Quiz--TOMORROW, Wednesday, September 19th: Study SAT Vocab. List #1. Learn the pronunciations, parts of speech, and definitions. Also, learn how to use the vocabulary words in a sentence. Suggestion: Create flashcards!

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Monday, September 17, 2007: 1. Do Now: Turn in Discipline Code Booklet Handouts.

    2. Shakespeare Research Presentations: Presentations begin today. Students take notes on their classmates' presentations, as everyone will be accountable for the Shakespeare presentation information.

    Students will practice listening and note-taking skills.
  • Vocabulary List #1 Quiz--Wednesday, September 19th: Study SAT Vocab. List #1. Learn the pronunciations, parts of speech, and definitions. Also, learn how to use the vocabulary words in a sentence. Suggestion: Create flashcards!

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Wednesday, September 12, 2007: 1. Do Now: Read (silently and individually) the SAT Vocab. List #1, with the sentences that you composed.

    2. Vocabulary Skill Building: Read aloud SAT Vocab. List #1, paying close attention to pronunciations, parts of speech, definitions and original sentences. Emphasis on the SAT and vocabulary skills necessary for college and careers.

    3.) Class Discussion/Reflections on Shakespearean Knowledge: Sharing of prior knowledge on Shakespeare, his life, times and texts. Were you surprised about how much you know or how little you know about the Bard (Shakespeare)? What did you learn in your brainstorming from yesterday?

    4.) HW Reminders and Discipline Code Booklet/Handouts: Reminders and Q & A regarding the Shakespeare Research and Presentation (due Monday). Introduction of Discipline Code Booklet/Handouts.

    Students will engage in metacognition and vocabulary skill building. Due Monday, September 17th:
  • Read the Discipline Code Booklet (handed out today), sign the attached handouts (and have your parent/guardian sign one handout as well), and fill out the worksheet.

  • Shakespeare Research/Presentation: Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on your assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You are expected to compose 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced and 250-word minimum) per person, and present your findings to the class. You are expected to work with your group members, but compose separate papers that reflect thoughtful research and analysis. This means that each paper should have different research and impressions of the research. You may answer the same questions BUT they should not be the same answers. There are different sides to the same questions. OR you may choose to have different members of the group answer a different question. The point is NO group member has the same research paper as another group member, only the same topic. You should NOT copy from the internet. You MUST write in your own words. In your paper, you should answer at least three of the following five questions: How did your topic influence or shape Shakespeare? How did your topic influence or shape the average person living during his time period? Is/Are your individual(s) typical of the average citizen of the 16th century England? Explain. What are the similarities between Shakespeare's life and times and your own life and modern times? How is your topic relevant and useful in better comprehending Shakespeare's plays?
    Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                        Original Title
    

  • Vocabulary List #1 Quiz--Wednesday, September 19th: Study SAT Vocab. List #1. Learn the pronunciations, parts of speech, and definitions. Also, learn how to use the vocabulary words in a sentence. Suggestion: Create flashcards!

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due October 15th: Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation.
  • Tuesday, September 11, 2007: 1. Do Now: Identify everything you know about Shakespeare, his life, times and texts. Identify what you want to learn--in terms of your topic and your own curiosity. Turn in your work.

    2. Vocabulary Skill Building:
    Compose original sentences for SAT Vocab. List #1--as many as possible in class. Turn in your work.

    3.) Informal Class Review/Discussion: Sharing of prior knowledge on Shakespeare, his life, times and texts.

    Students will engage in metacognition and vocabulary skill building. Due Monday, September 17th:

  • Shakespeare Research/Presentation: Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on your assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You are expected to compose 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced and 250-word minimum) per person, and present your findings to the class. You are expected to work with your group members, but compose separate papers that reflect thoughtful research and analysis. This means that each paper should have different research and impressions of the research. You may answer the same questions BUT they should not be the same answers. There are different sides to the same questions. OR you may choose to have different members of the group answer a different question. The point is NO group member has the same research paper as another group member, only the same topic. You should NOT copy from the internet. You MUST write in your own words. In your paper, you should answer at least three of the following five questions: How did your topic influence or shape Shakespeare? How did your topic influence or shape the average person living during his time period? Is/Are your individual(s) typical of the average citizen of the 16th century England? Explain. What are the similarities between Shakespeare's life and times and your own life and modern times? How is your topic relevant and useful in better comprehending Shakespeare's plays? Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                        Original Title
    
  • Monday, September 10, 2007: 1. Do Now: Examine the Research/Presentation topics on Shakespeare's Life and Times and determine which topic is of interest. The topics are as follows: Shakespeare's wealth and social status--during his lifetime, Records/Documents of William Shakespeare and Shakespeare's immediate family--parents, wife, and children, Shakespeare's education and education for people of his setting, Shakespeare's mother and father, Shakespeare's children, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their relationship, Religion during the Elizabethan Era--the time in which he lived, Religion for Shakespeare and his family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era. During this time, students should turn in resumes and college essays, which were due today.

    2. Class Sharing/Discussion:

  • Reflections on HW--Resume and Colllege Essay: Are you satisfied with your resume? Did you include all of your experiences--work and activities throughout high school? Did you use the sample resumes as models? Did you use the sample college essays and expert advice in composing your college essay? Did you go through an editing/revision process of your college essay? If so, what was it? Are you satisfied with the final product?
  • Requirements for Shakespeare Research/Presentation: Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on your assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You are expected to compose 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced and 250-word minimum) per person, and present your findings to the class. You are expected to work with your group members, but compose separate papers that reflect thoughtful research and analysis. This means that each paper should have different research and impressions of the research. You may answer the same questions BUT they should not be the same answers. There are different sides to the same questions. OR you may choose to have different members of the group answer a different question. The point is NO group member has the same research paper as another group member, only the same topic. You should NOT copy from the internet. You MUST write in your own words. In your paper, you should answer at least three of the following five questions: How did your topic influence or shape Shakespeare? How did your topic influence or shape the average person living during his time period? Is/Are your individual(s) typical of the average citizen of the 16th century England? Explain. What are the similarities between Shakespeare's life and times and your own life and modern times? How is your topic relevant and useful in better comprehending Shakespeare's plays?

    3.) Informal Class Survey: Do you want to preview Hamlet in a 10 scene presentation? If so, the class will learn the main plot points of the play, which will spoil the storyline but will help with the understanding of the play.

    4.) HW introduction/reminder: Check out My Good Deed Website to honor 9/11. Shakespeare Research/Presentation, mentioned in #2.

  • Students will read and write for information and understanding so as to reflect on composed work (resume and college essay) and prepare for future assignment (Shakespeare research/presentation). Due Monday, September 17th:

  • Shakespeare Research/Presentation: Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on your assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You are expected to compose 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced and 250-word minimum) per person, and present your findings to the class. You are expected to work with your group members, but compose separate papers that reflect thoughtful research and analysis. This means that each paper should have different research and impressions of the research. You may answer the same questions BUT they should not be the same answers. There are different sides to the same questions. OR you may choose to have different members of the group answer a different question. The point is NO group member has the same research paper as another group member, only the same topic. You should NOT copy from the internet. You MUST write in your own words. In your paper, you should answer at least three of the following five questions: How did your topic influence or shape Shakespeare? How did your topic influence or shape the average person living during his time period? Is/Are your individual(s) typical of the average citizen of the 16th century England? Explain. What are the similarities between Shakespeare's life and times and your own life and modern times? How is your topic relevant and useful in better comprehending Shakespeare's plays? Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                        Original Title
    
  • Friday, September 7, 2007: 1. Do Now--Read the Writing the Essay: Sound Advice from an Expert: Read and identify helpful hints for writing your college essay. Also, identify things to avoid in your essay.

    2. Class Sharing/Discussion: Class shares important tips in college essay advice article.

    3. Reading and Analysis of Sample College Essays: Read and identify strengths and weaknesses in these samples.

    Students will begin the process of college essay composition through analysis of sample essays and application to their own writings. Students will read and write for information and understanding. Due Monday, September 10th:
  • Professional Resume due; use these sample resumes and resume tips as models.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. p> Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                        Original Title
    
  • Thursday, September 6, 2007: 1. Do Now--Analysis of Sample Resumes: Students individually and collectively analyze the sample resumes. Guiding questions to answer while analyzing: What are the strengths of each resume? What are the weaknesses? What qualities, in terms of formatting, writing style, and word usage, are worth including in your own resume?

    2. Class Sharing of Resume Analysis: Class shares findings in resume analysis.

    3. Resume Composition: Begin drafting your resume, using the samples, brainstorming/notetaking, and professional advice you learned yesterday and today. If you have a resume already, share with teacher/classmate to review.

    Students will begin the process of resume composition through analysis of sample resumes and application to their own resumes. Students will read and write for information and understanding. Due Monday, September 10th:
  • Professional Resume due; use these sample resumes and resume tips as models.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. p> Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                          Original Title 
    
  • Wednesday, September 5, 2007: 1. Do Now--Brainstorming on Resume Components: Individuals/Pairs brainstorm components of a resume. Suggested questions to answer: What should be included toward the top (most important)? What are the rest of the components? What should NOT be included on your resume?

    2. Class Sharing of Resume Components: Class shares brainstorming and students add to their list.

    3. Reading of Resume-Writing 101: Class read-aloud of resume writing tips, along with discussion/analysis.

    Students will begin the process of resume composition through analysis of components of a resume, brainstorming and reading of professional advice. Students will engage in reading for understanding and informal quick writes and note-taking. Due Monday, September 10th:
  • Professional Resume due; use these sample resumes and resume tips as models.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above.
  • Tuesday, September 4, 2007: 1. Emergency cards

    2. Syllabus introduced.

    3. HW assignments

    Students will learn course expectations and course outline. Due Monday, September 10th:
  • Professional Resume due; use these sample resumes and resume tips as models.
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above.

    Heading to be used on all work.

    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title