Senior Assignments, Fall 2008 & Winter 2009

Senior Assignments
Fall 2008 & Winter 2009

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue to watch and analyze the film version of Hamlet--Kenneth Branagh's 1996 modern-day film. Conference with Ms. Conn on the informal reaction paper due today.

2. Discuss/Analyze: Discuss your impressions of the film adaptation versus Shakespeare's original Hamlet.

How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style? Best of luck on your Regents exams! It has been a wonderful semester. I enjoyed teaching all of you!

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Friday, January 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue to watch and prepare to analyze the film version of Hamlet--Kenneth Branagh's 1996 modern-day film.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Examine your final papers (with teacher comments) and grades.

    How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as a typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style? Due Monday: Write two full pages (250 word minimum)--handwritten or typed (since it's an informal reaction paper) in which you identify how the film version of Hamlet is different and similar to Shakespeare's Hamlet. Refer to the director's vision/interpretation, stage directions, costumes, props, musical choice, set design, characters' emotional acting, etc. Refer to how the film version is typical and atypical (not typical) of Shakespeare's style.

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, January 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue to watch and prepare to analyze the film version of Hamlet--Kenneth Branagh's 1996 modern-day film.

    2. Work Period: How is this film version different and similar to the play Hamlet we read and analyzed? Begin to write two full pages (250-word minimum) in which you answer this question. Refer to the director's vision/interpretation, stage directions, costumes, props, musical choice, set design, characters' emotional acting, etc. Refer to how the film version is typical and atypical (not typical) of Shakespeare's style.

    How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as a typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style? *We will finish today's claswork tomorrow in class.

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Wednesday, January 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Reading of Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing".

    2. Film Viewing/Analysis: Watch and prepare to analyze Hamlet--Kenneth Branagh's 1996 modern-day film version. How is this film version different and similar to the play we read and analyzed? Be prepared to discuss.

    3. HW Reminders: college scholarships, college applications and FAFSA.

    How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as a typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style?
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Tuesday, January 20th, 2009 (Presidential Inauguration Day): 1. Do Now: Read the Discussion Guide found at USAService.org on how all of us can engage in community service as a tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and President-elect Obama.

    2. Discussion: Review the Discussion Guide, focusing on areas in our communities that need service and the roles that we can play. Brainstorm service ideas that fit our interests.

    3. HW Reminders: college scholarships, college applications and FAFSA.

    How do we prepare to be productive members of society?
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Friday, January 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: What was worthwhile in studying both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I? Why did we pair those plays in study? Why was it valuable to perform and watch scenes from both plays? What will you most remember about these plays? What do you anticipate about As You Like It--Shakespeare's comedy, based on what you already know about his writing of tragedy and history, his personal background and life and times? What would you have wished we had done this semester? What did you enjoy the most this semester?

    2. Discuss Do Now questions.

    3. Awards presentation!

    How do we culminate our Shakespeare unit?
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, January 15th, 2009: Performance Presentations of your scenes finish today! How do you efficiently perform scenes from Henry IV Part I? All work MUST be turned in by TOMORROW. No exceptions! This includes HW, the major paper, any owed quizzes, etc. If you need my assistance, I'm available by appointment.
    Wednesday, January 14th, 2009: Performance Presentations of your scenes! How do you efficiently perform scenes from Henry IV Part I? All work MUST be turned in by THIS Friday. No exceptions! This includes HW, the major paper, any owed quizzes, etc. If you need my assistance, I'm available during 9th period today (Tues.) or by appointment.

    Learn your character lines! They should be nearly memorized.

    Due TOMORROW, Thursday, January 15th:

  • ALL remaining scenes MUST perform.
  • Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations (each group will be graded as a whole, not as individuals). Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis; practice time will take place during class and outside of class), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.
  • Tuesday, January 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Organize into your performance groups. Read aloud your scenes, standing. Work on staging, physical choices, levels and emotional acting. Implement the acting exercises in your practice. Prepare to present an improvisation of your scene to the class.

    2. Practice Performance Prep: Improvise a part of your scene in modern-day language (2-3 minutes for each scene).

    3. Work Period: Work on final preparations for your performance (to be performed tomorrow!).

    How do you efficiently prepare for performances of scenes from Henry IV Part I? All work MUST be turned in by THIS Friday. No exceptions! This includes HW, the major paper, any owed quizzes, etc. If you need my assistance, I'm available during 9th period today (Tues.) or by appointment.

    Learn your character lines! They should be nearly memorized.

    Due TOMORROW--Wednesday, January 14th-Thursday, January 15th:

  • Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations (each group will be graded as a whole, not as individuals). Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis; practice time will take place during class and outside of class), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.
  • Monday, January 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Organize into your performance groups. Read aloud your scenes, standing. Work on staging, physical choices, levels and emotional acting. Implement the acting exercises in your practice. Prepare to tell another performance group about your scene and do an improvisation of your scene.

    2. Practice Performance Prep: Improvise a part of your scene in modern-day language.

    How do you efficiently prepare for performances of scenes from Henry IV Part I? Learn your character lines! They should be nearly memorized.

    Due THIS Wednesday, January 14th-Thursday, January 15th:

  • Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations (each group will be graded as a whole, not as individuals). Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis; practice time will take place during class and outside of class), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.
  • Friday, January 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises--Vocal Warm-Ups (Rub your hands together. Rub your arms. Massage your shoulders. Pat your legs. Gently pound your chest with a good Tarzan yell. Imagine you're plugged into an electrical socket. Someone comes along and turns up the 'juice' a little bit and makes your whole body vibrate, until your whole body and voice vibrates, shaking you as fast as they can. The juice gets turned down...up again...and down...up...and finally turned off. Imagine you're standing on the stage of a large auditorium. Imagine you're throwing a ball to the back of the auditorium. Say the word "HEY" nice and easy as you throw the ball. Add the words "HEY...HEY RAY...WHADDYA SAY, RAY?" Tongue twisters--Betty bought a batch of bitter butter. Six sharp sharks. Good blood, bad blood, red leather, yellow leather.). Acting Warm-Ups (What animal would your character be? Practice saying 1-2 lines from the play as an animal. Half the class performs while the other half watches and vice versa. Improvise a part of your scene in modern-day language. )

    2. Work/Prep Period: Organize into your performance groups. Read aloud your scenes, standing. Work on staging, physical choices, levels and emotional acting. Implement the acting exercises in your practice.

    How do you efficiently prepare for performances of scenes from Henry IV Part I? Learn your character lines! They should be nearly memorized.

    Due Wednesday, January 14th-Thursday, January 15th:

  • Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations (each group will be graded as a whole, not as individuals). Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis; practice time will take place during class and outside of class), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.
  • Thursday, January 8th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Turn in character analysis HW. Organize into your groups, reading aloud (standing), working on staging, physical choices and emotional acting.

    2. Reflections: How much progress have you made? What are your next steps?

    How do you efficiently prepare for performances of scenes from Henry IV Part I? Due Wednesday, January 14th-Thursday, January 15th:
  • Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations (each group will be graded as a whole, not as individuals). Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis; practice time will take place during class and outside of class), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.
  • Wednesday, January 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Performance group reminders--work on editing, reading aloud with your groups, understanding your scenes, and working on the HW.

    2. Work/Prep Period: Henry IV Part I Performance group preparation. Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.

    How do you efficiently prepare for performances of scenes from Henry IV Part I? Due Tomorrow, Thursday, January 8th:
  • Character Analysis of Your Scene Character--Write one long paragraph (6-8 sentences; handwritten or typed) in which you characterize your character for your performance scene ONLY (do NOT write about your character in other scenes or throughout the play--ONLY in the scene in which you will perform). Characterization includes the following: personality traits (e.g. kind, evil, generous, greedy, etc.), actions, thoughts/feelings, appearance (how will your character appear--costume--and why?), and other people's points of view.

    Due Wednesday, January 14th-Thursday, January 15th:

  • Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations (each group will be graded as a whole, not as individuals). Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis; practice time will take place during class and outside of class), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.
  • Tuesday, January 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Performance group reminders--work on editing, reading aloud with your groups and understanding your scenes.

    2. Henry IV Part I Performance group preparation. Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.

    How do you efficiently prepare for performances of scenes from Henry IV Part I? CHECK OUT HONORS PROJECT BELOW (scroll down)!

    WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS!

    Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 7-10 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices, such as characterization, major events, settings, conflicts and symbolism (for example, language that represents religious or time period references), to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is a college-style essay, you will clarify similarities between the two Shakespearean works. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do NOT include plot summary or focus on just one play.

    You must write a clear thesis statement (the main idea statement, which is the focus of your entire paper) in the introduction. This thesis statement MUST address similarities between BOTH plays. You must also include at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "With all my heart I'll sit and hear her sing / By that time will our book, I think, be drawn"(Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221). The slash (/) identifies a break in the line of iambic pentameter. The citation (Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III), Scene (i) and Lines (220-221). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space it. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. You might choose a topic on parent-child relationships, identity formation, adolescent behaviors, misogyny or another topic of your choice. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one topic. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    HONORS PROJECT--Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Read As You Like It and Compose an Evaluative Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.

    Due Wednesday, January 14th-Thursday, January 15th:

  • Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations (each group will be graded as a whole, not as individuals). Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis; practice time will take place during class and outside of class), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.
  • Monday, January 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Major Paper and Honors Project reminders (both are due on Wednesday)--see HW requirements.

    2. Henry IV Part I Performance group instructions. Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.

    How does Shakespeare reveal similarities in Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? CHECK OUT HONORS PROJECT BELOW (scroll down)!

    WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS!

    Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 7-10 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices, such as characterization, major events, settings, conflicts and symbolism (for example, language that represents religious or time period references), to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is a college-style essay, you will clarify similarities between the two Shakespearean works. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do NOT include plot summary or focus on just one play.

    You must write a clear thesis statement (the main idea statement, which is the focus of your entire paper) in the introduction. This thesis statement MUST address similarities between BOTH plays. You must also include at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "With all my heart I'll sit and hear her sing / By that time will our book, I think, be drawn"(Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221). The slash (/) identifies a break in the line of iambic pentameter. The citation (Henry IV Part I, III, i, 220-221) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III), Scene (i) and Lines (220-221). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space it. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. You might choose a topic on parent-child relationships, identity formation, adolescent behaviors, misogyny or another topic of your choice. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one topic. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    HONORS PROJECT--Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Read As You Like It and Compose an Evaluative Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.

    Due Wednesday, January 14th-Thursday, January 15th:

  • Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations (each group will be graded as a whole, not as individuals). Details found here: Grading Sheet for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Scene Groups (to be assigned in class) are 1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), 3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), 4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), 5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), 6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and 7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Scene performances should include the following: Director's Vision: What message is being conveyed to the audience and what's the interpretation you are presenting and why (refer to genres, such as cowboy/western, horror, soap opera, kung fu, wrestling, etc.)? (clearly practiced and familiar reading of lines, with emotional emphasis; practice time will take place during class and outside of class), Obvious Physical Choices (including various levels--high, middle and low, and varying degrees of space betwewn characters; How will these physical choices convey relationships and characterization?), Costumes to reflect character personality and role in play (make choices about color, style and fabric), Set Design (create a set that is believable and appropriate to the play; reflect the theme and mood of the scene; arrange furniture, background and props), Lighting (How does the lighting help tell the story of the scene? Reveal color of lighting, brightness, darkness, etc.), and Sound ( How will music and/or sound help to tell the story/mood of the scene?). Editing: Some scenes will require editing. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place. Henry IV Part I Performance Presentations will be held in class Wednesday, January 14th, and Thursday, January 15th. This is a graded presentation.
  • Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss the end of Henry IV Part I, focusing on Acts IV and V. Compare/Contrast the resolution to Hamlet.

    2. Q & A for Final Paper and Honors Project

    How does Shakespeare resolve conflicts--as seen in Henry IV Part I and Hamlet?
  • Have a wonderful holiday vacation!

    CHECK OUT HONORS PROJECT BELOW (scroll down)!

    WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS!

    Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 7-10 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices, such as characterization, major events, settings, conflicts and symbolism (for example, language that represents religious or time period references), to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is a college-style essay, you will clarify similarities between the two Shakespearean works. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do NOT include plot summary or focus on just one play.

    HONORS PROJECT--Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Read As You Like It and Compose an Evaluative Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Monday, December 22nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Identify omens in Henry IV Part I, focusing on Acts III and IV. Show HW journals--Acts IV and V.

    2. Discuss Acts III and IV, with a focus on omens that will lead to the downfall of the rebels.

    How can we analyze the literary device, foreshadowing/omens, in Acts III and IV in Henry IV Part I and understand that it's typical Shakespearean style? CHECK OUT HONORS PROJECT BELOW (scroll down)!

    WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS!

    Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 7-10 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices, such as characterization, major events, settings, conflicts and symbolism (for example, language that represents religious or time period references), to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is a college-style essay, you will clarify similarities between the two Shakespearean works. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do NOT include plot summary or focus on just one play.

    HONORS PROJECT--Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Read As You Like It and Compose an Evaluative Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Friday, December 19th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Pick up your assigned computer and continue at www.edperformance.com--make sure to complete both the Reading and Language Arts sections.

    2. Introduce Final Paper and Honors Project.

    3. Discuss Act III of Henry IV Part I.

    How can we be assessed on a Reading/Language Arts exam so as to reveal skills that need to be learned or sharpened before graduation? CHECK OUT HONORS PROJECT BELOW (scroll down)!

    Due THIS Monday, December 22nd:

  • If you did NOT finish in class, go to www.edperformance.com and finish the Reading and Language Arts tests. The SITE ID is 51-8231-1681. They may ask you for your student ID (which is your OSIS #). This must be completed.
  • Read Acts IV and V of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Analysis Journal for each act, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS!

    Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 7-10 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices, such as characterization, major events, settings, conflicts and symbolism (for example, language that represents religious or time period references), to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is a college-style essay, you will clarify similarities between the two Shakespearean works. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do NOT include plot summary or focus on just one play.

    HONORS PROJECT--Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Read As You Like It and Compose an Evaluative Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Thursday, December 18th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Pick up your assigned computer and continue at www.edperformance.com.

    2. Computer testing will finish. Make sure to complete both the Reading and Language Arts sections.

    How can we be assessed on a Reading/Language Arts exam so as to reveal skills that need to be learned or sharpened before graduation? CHECK OUT HONORS PROJECT BELOW (scroll down)!

    Due Monday, December 22nd:

  • Read Acts IV and V of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Analysis Journal for each act, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS!

    Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 7-10 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices, such as characterization, major events, settings, conflicts and symbolism (for example, language that represents religious or time period references), to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is a college-style essay, you will clarify similarities between the two Shakespearean works. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do NOT include plot summary or focus on just one play.

    HONORS PROJECT--Due Wednesday, January 7th:

  • Read As You Like It and Compose an Evaluative Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Wednesday, December 17th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Wait for instructions and obtain your assigned computer. Show your Act III Analysis Journal HW.

    2. Computer testing at www.edperformance.com

    How can we be assessed on a reading exam for an unknown purpose? Due Monday, December 22nd:
  • Read Acts IV and V of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Analysis Journal for each act, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS!
  • Tuesday, December 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Describe your parents' portrayal of the ideal child. Describe Hamlet's parents' portrayal of the ideal son. Describe King Henry's portrayal of the ideal son.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share your portrayals. Connect to Acts II and III.

    How can ideal portrayals of Prince Henry in Henry IV Part I relate to ideal portrayals of Hamlet in Hamlet and ourselves? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, December 17th:
  • Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act III Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Due Monday, December 22nd:

  • Read Acts IV and V of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Analysis Journal for each act, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Monday, December 15th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Identify at least five reasons (or evidence) that you are not ready to be an adult and take on adult responsibilities. Identify at least five reasons (or evidence) that Hamlet was not ready to be an adult and take on "kingly" responsibilities. Identify at least five reasons (or evidence) that Prince Henry is not ready to be an adult and take on "kingly" responsibilities, with a focus on Act II in Henry IV Part I.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Discuss Do Now findings.

    How can youthful and irresponsible behaviors in Henry IV Part I relate to youthful and irresponsible behaviors in Hamlet and our own lives? Due THIS Wednesday, December 17th:
  • Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act III Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Due Monday, December 22nd:

  • Read Acts IV and V of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Analysis Journal for each act, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Friday, December 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Analyze Act II Scenes i-iii of Henry IV Part I.Examine Act II in terms of Hamlet. Examine the themes of dishonesty/deception and misogyny. Analyze Hostpur-Lady Percy marriage (as seen in Act II Scene iii) and how it connects to the marital relationship of Claudius-Gertrude and the young love relationship of Ophelia-Hamlet in Hamlet.

    2. Work Period: Read the play, making up owed HW or moving ahead.

    What college preparatory skills are applied in the analysis journal for Act II of Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare? Due Wednesday, December 17th:
  • Read Act III of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act III Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Due Monday, December 22nd:

  • Read Acts IV and V of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Analysis Journal for each act, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Thursday, December 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Continue discussion of Act I of Henry IV Part I and identify evidence that compares to Hamlet. Comparisons include the following: Hotspur's desire for revenge against King Henry vs. Hamlet's desire for revenge against Claudius, misogynistic language in both plays, theme of honor, King Henry's usurping of the throne vs. Claudius's usurping of King Hamlet's throne, Prince Henry's rebellious actions vs. Hamlet's rebellious actions, King's authoritative appearances, Prince Henry and good pal Falstaff vs. Prince Hamlet and good pal Horatio, King Henry's idolizing of Hotspur vs. Prince Hamlet's idolizing of his father King Hamlet.

    2. Work Period: Read Henry IV Part I--Act II (and Act I, if owed) and take notes, in preparation for the analysis journal due tomorrow.

    What college preparatory skills are applied in the analysis journal for Act I of Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare? Due TOMORROW, Friday, December 12th:
  • Read ACT II of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act II Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Wednesday, December 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Identify a minimum of two textual references in Act I of Henry IV Part I that compares to Hamlet.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discussion will ensue regarding textual references between these two meaningful plays.

    What college preparatory skills are applied in the analysis journal for Act I of Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare? Due Friday, December 12th:
  • Read ACT II of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act II Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Tuesday, December 9th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Assess Vocabulary #11 quizzes.

    2. Lecture/Note-Taking: History and Synopsis of Henry IV Part I continued.

    3. Discussion: Discuss opening of Act I.

    What college preparatory skills are applied in the analysis journal for Act I of Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare?
  • Bring in your Henry IV Part I plays tomorrow and every day for now on.

    Due Friday, December 12th:

  • Read ACT II of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act II Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.

    Check out Magic Johnson Scholarship--this is a GREAT scholarship--everyone who's eligible should apply.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Monday, December 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: In small groups, exchange and read each other's Act I analysis journal. Identify classmates' strengths in analysis of Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. Be ready to share with the class. Show Act I analysis journal HW and recite "To Be or Not To Be" soliloquy to Ms. Conn.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Discuss the analysis journals. Share the strengths of the class journals (including avoiding plot summary and focusing on the objective, which is finding similarities between the two plays) and the qualities needing improvement.

    What college preparatory skills are applied in the analysis journal for Act I of Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare? Due Friday, December 12th:
  • Read ACT II of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act II Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Friday, December 5th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #11 Quiz. Show Story #11 and recitation extra credit.

    2. Mini-Lecture/Note-taking on the history and synopsis of the play.

    3. Recitation practice

    What pre-reading steps do we take to become better equipped to study Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare? Due Monday, December 8th:
  • Read ACT I of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act I Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.
  • Memorize and recite first 10 lines of "To Be or Not To Be" Soliloquy. This is worth TWO HW assignments. If you choose, for extra credit, learn 10 additional lines (below the first 10 lines, which makes it a total of 20 lines), then you will earn two extra HW credits!


  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Thursday, December 4th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing the Opinionnaire--Pre-Reading Theme-Related (for Henry IV Part I) True/False Questions. Share your answers--True or False--for each of the statements below and explain your choice. Determine the themes for Henry IV Part I based on these statements.
    I.) Gender makes a difference when it comes to effective leadership.
    J.) It is acceptable to keep secrets from one's closest family members (spouse/parent/sibling).

    2. Mini-Lecture/Note-taking on the history and synopsis of the play.

    3. Recitation practice

    What pre-reading steps do we take to become better equipped to study Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare? Due TOMORROW, Friday, December 5th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #11 Story (topics: college, Henry IV Part I or a topic of your choice)
  • Date Change: EXTRA CREDIT FOR TOMORROW. DUE FOR FULL CREDIT ON MONDAY: Memorize and recite first 10 lines of "To Be or Not To Be" Soliloquy. This is worth TWO HW assignments. If you choose, for extra credit, learn 10 additional lines (below the first 10 lines, which makes it a total of 20 lines), then you will earn two extra HW credits!
  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!

    Due Monday, December 8th:

  • Read ACT I of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act I Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.
  • Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008: Continue discussing the Opinionnaire--Pre-Reading Theme-Related (for Henry IV Part I) True/False Questions. Share your answers--True or False--for each of the statements below and explain your choice. Determine the themes for Henry IV Part I based on these statements.
    A.) It is better to avoid going to war than to fight and kill for your country.
    B.) We should trust our leaders to do what is right for the country's greater good.
    C.) It is always better to abide by social codes of behavior (e.g. honor and chivalry) than to reject them.
    D.) Every society occasionally requires war and revolt in order to grow and become stronger.
    E.) Children should always respect and obey their parents.
    F.) A good leader is bold and fearless, always ready to use whatever military means are at his disposal in order to accomplish his objectives.
    G.) A good leader is sober and thoughtful, willing to compromise his own views in order to respect the views of others so that peace can be maintained.
    H.) People with a great deal of political power are generally good, honest people, concerned about the welfare of those they serve.
    I.) Gender makes a difference when it comes to effective leadership.
    J.) It is acceptable to keep secrets from one's closest family members (spouse/parent/sibling).
    What pre-reading steps do we take to become better equipped to study Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare? Due Friday, December 5th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #11 Story (topics: college, Henry IV Part I or a topic of your choice)
  • Memorize and recite first 10 lines of "To Be or Not To Be" Soliloquy. This is worth TWO HW assignments. If you choose, for extra credit, learn 10 additional lines (below the first 10 lines, which makes it a total of 20 lines), then you will earn two extra HW credits!
  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!

    Due Monday, December 8th:

  • Read ACT I of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act I Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.
  • Tuesday, December 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Opinionnaire--Pre-Reading Theme-Related (for Henry IV Part I) True/False Questions. Choose True or False for each of the statements below and explain your choice. Determine the themes for Henry IV Part I based on these statements. Be prepared to discuss.
    A.) It is better to avoid going to war than to fight and kill for your country.
    B.) We should trust our leaders to do what is right for the country's greater good.
    C.) It is always better to abide by social codes of behavior (e.g. honor and chivalry) than to reject them.
    D.) Every society occasionally requires war and revolt in order to grow and become stronger.
    E.) Children should always respect and obey their parents.
    F.) A good leader is bold and fearless, always ready to use whatever military means are at his disposal in order to accomplish his objectives.
    G.) A good leader is sober and thoughtful, willing to compromise his own views in order to respect the views of others so that peace can be maintained.
    H.) People with a great deal of political power are generally good, honest people, concerned about the welfare of those they serve.
    I.) Gender makes a difference when it comes to effective leadership.
    J.) It is acceptable to keep secrets from one's closest family members (spouse/parent/sibling).

    2. Henry IV Part I Book Distribution

    3. Discuss the Opinionnaire. What can you expect from Shakespeare's play Henry IV Part I, based on the themes discussed in the Opinionnaire and your knowledge of his life, times and our previously studied play, Hamlet?

    What pre-reading steps do we take to become better equipped to study Henry IV Part I by William Shakespeare? Due Friday, December 5th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #11 Story (topics: college, Henry IV Part I or a topic of your choice)
  • Memorize and recite first 10 lines of "To Be or Not To Be" Soliloquy. This is worth TWO HW assignments. If you choose, for extra credit, learn 10 additional lines (below the first 10 lines, which makes it a total of 20 lines), then you will earn two extra HW credits!
  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!

    Due Monday, December 8th:

  • Read ACT I of Henry IV Part I (the book version was also provided in class).
  • Write an Act I Analysis Journal, which MUST be typed (a full page, typed, double spaced, about 300 words, with the proper heading--which includes your name, date, my name and the class name and period). An Analysis Journal MUST include your analysis of the characters, events, themes, and/or literary devices/elements that link (connect) to Hamlet.
  • Monday, December 1st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review the Hamlet Exam

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #11--the final list!

    3. Introduce the "To Be or Not To Be" Soliloquy assignment.

    How can we effectively culminate the Hamlet unit by reviewing the details of the Hamlet Exam and preparing for the soliloquy assignment? Due Friday, December 5th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #11 Story (topics: college, Henry IV Part I or a topic of your choice)
  • Memorize and recite first 10 lines of "To Be or Not To Be" Soliloquy. This is worth TWO HW assignments. If you choose, for extra credit, learn 10 additional lines (below the first 10 lines, which makes it a total of 20 lines), then you will earn two extra HW credits!
  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Wednesday, November 26th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm a College "To-Do List." Think about the things that need to get done in order to get your college applications out before Christmas break. Be prepared to share.

    2. Share "To-Do List."

    3. Share the "Love for ITHS" sonnet HW.

    How can we effectively prepare for college through personal preparation and writing sophisticated poetry?
  • WORK ON COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! STUDY FOR THE SAT!
  • Tuesday, November 25th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and analyzing Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Share brief summaries about each sonnet. Share literary devices found in the sonnets (such as: personification, alliteration, symbolism, metaphor, repetition, etc.) and explain the purpose for each device. Finally, identify any religious references and references to Shakespeare's life and times in the sonnets.

    2. Work on the "Love for ITHS" sonnet HW.

    How can we effectively analyze literary devices and format of Shakespearean sonnets, and apply this newfound knowledge to our own original sonnets? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, November 26th:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).
  • MAKE UP ALL HW OWED (this is your last chance for the 2nd marking period!).
  • Monday, November 24th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm experiences and other facets of ITHS that you will miss upon graduation. Prepare to write your "Love for ITHS" sonnet.

    2. Review the HW--read and analyze Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Share brief summaries about each sonnet. Share literary devices found in the sonnets (such as: personification, alliteration, symbolism, metaphor, repetition, etc.) and explain the purpose for each device. Finally, identify any religious references and references to Shakespeare's life and times in the sonnets.

    3. Introduce the "Love for ITHS" sonnet HW.

    How can we effectively analyze literary devices, messages and format of Shakespearean sonnets? Due Wednesday, November 26th:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).
  • MAKE UP ALL HW OWED (this is your last chance for the 2nd marking period!).
  • Friday, November 21st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #10 Quiz. Show Vocabulary Story #10.

    2. Period 1 only: finish calculating scene evaluations and vote for Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director, Best Costume, and Best Performance. Period 5 only: Awards presentation.

    3. Sonnet format (iambic pentameter, rhyme scheme--ababcdcdefefgg, and literary devices used) and HW introduced.

    How can we effectively evaluate scenes from Hamlet and prepare to analyze sonnets? Due Monday, November 24th:
  • Read and analyze Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Your analysis must include the following: a brief summary (a paragraph) about each sonnet. You must also identify one literary device (such as: personification, alliteration, symbolism, metaphor, repetition, etc.) and explain the purpose for each device. Finally, you must also identify any religious references and references to Shakespeare's life and times in the sonnets.
  • Thursday, November 20th, 2008: 1. Acting Group Presentations and Evaluations: Acting groups will finish presenting while rest of class grades using this Grading Rubric for Hamlet Scenes.

    2. Calculate and turn in scene evaluations. While doing so, show HW--teacher recommendations.

    3. Vote for Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director, Best Costume, and Best Performance

    4. Prepare for tomorrow's quiz.

    How can we effectively interpret, perform and evaluate scenes from Hamlet? Due TOMORROW, Friday, November 21st:
  • Vocab. List #10 Quiz
  • Vocab. #10 Story on performance of Hamlet or college.
  • Wednesday, November 19th, 2008: Acting Group Presentations and Evaluations: Acting groups will present while rest of class grades using this Grading Rubric for Hamlet Scenes. How can we effectively interpret, perform and evaluate scenes from Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:
  • FINISH Hamlet Scene Performances: THIS WILL BE A GRADE (use the Grading Rubric for Hamlet Scenes). In your assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits).

    Due Friday, November 21st:

  • Vocab. List #10 Quiz
  • Vocab. #10 Story on performance of Hamlet or college.
  • Tuesday, November 18th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocab. List #10.

    2. Acting Group Work: Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse! Use the Grading Rubric for your guide. Tomorrow you're on stage!

    How can we prepare to perform and evaluate scenes from Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH:
  • Hamlet Scene Performances: THIS WILL BE A GRADE (use the Grading Rubric for Hamlet Scenes). In your assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Remind your teachers NOW (if you haven't received the recommendations after requesting for them). Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.

    Due Friday, November 21st:

  • Vocab. List #10 Quiz
  • Vocab. #10 Story on performance of Hamlet or college.
  • Monday, November 17th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review requirements for Hamlet performances in this Grading Rubric for Hamlet Scenes.

    2. Acting Group Work: Read aloud scenes. Choose director's vision (What will your scene focus on? How will you interpret the scene? Think about creative interpretations, such as: 21st century Hamlet, cowboy/western, cartoon version, futuristic Hamlet. The director's vision should be a sentence or two.). Work on staging the scene (include stage directions, including where actors will stand, enter and exit, how the actors will interact, spatial relationships, etc.). Talk about props, costumes, lighting, sound, and editing of the scene.

    How can we prepare to perform and evaluate scenes from Hamlet? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH:
  • Hamlet Scene Performances: THIS WILL BE A GRADE (use the Grading Rubric for Hamlet Scenes). In your assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Remind your teachers NOW (if you haven't received the recommendations after requesting for them). Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, November 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocab. List #9 Quiz. Show Vocab. #9 Story.

    2. Acting Group Work: Choose character roles. Read aloud scenes. Choose director's vision (What will your scene focus on? How will you interpret the scene? Think about creative interpretations, such as: 21st century Hamlet, cowboy/western, cartoon version, futuristic Hamlet. The director's vision should be a sentence or two.). Begin to stage the scene (include stage directions, including where actors will stand, enter and exit, how the actors will interact, spatial relationships, etc.). Start thinking about props, costumes, lighting, sound, and editing of the scene.

    3. Requirements Review for Scene Performances of Hamlet: Requirements include the following--Stage the scenes, use of props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    How can we prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH:
  • Hamlet Scene Performances: THIS WILL BE A GRADE--In your assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, November 13th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Acting Warm-Up/Stretching Exercises--Hand/Leg shake (8, 4, 2, 1), rub-down (hands, arms, legs, massage shoulders), bubble gum chewing (face muscles, shoulder muscles, arms, legs, whole body), sound passing (with a body movement), animal voices/movements (e.g. cat, lion, pig, horse). Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body. Take up as much or as little space as possible. Use different levels (ground, middle, air). Archetype portrayals (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight). Animal versions of a character of your choice in Hamlet.

    2. Angel/Devil Conflict for Hamlet--a theatrical portrayal. Examine conflict where Hamlet is unsure if he should kill Claudius. Brainstorm arguments on each side of the conflict. Three volunteers--one actor will play the "angel" and try to persuade Hamlet not to kill Claudius. One actor will persuade the "devil" and try to persuade Hamlet to kill Claudius. These actors will stand on opposite sides of the room. Hamlet will stand in the middle and take a step toward the Angel or the Devil when he is persuaded by their argument. The Angel and Devil will take turns presenting their arguments. The class will observe which arguments and actors are most persuasive.

    3. Introduction of Scene Performances of Hamlet: Introduce requirements, which include the following--Stage the scenes, use of props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    4. Arrange into scene groups.

    How can we prepare to perform scenes from Hamlet? Due TOMORROW, Friday, November 14th:
  • Vocab. List #9 quiz
  • Vocab. List #9 Story (topic: performance of Hamlet OR a topic of your choice!)

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH:

  • THIS WILL BE A GRADE--In your assigned groups, prepare and perform one of the following assigned scenes: 1. Act I Scene v (4 characters); 2. Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); 3. Act III Scene i (7 characters); 4. Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); 5. Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, November 12th, 2008: EXAM ON HAMLET AND WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (this exam will take the entire period, so students should expect to come to class ON TIME) How can we be well prepared and successful on the exam on Hamlet and William Shakespeare? Due this Friday, November 14th:
  • Vocab. List #9 quiz
  • Vocab. List #9 Story (topic: performance of Hamlet OR a topic of your choice!)

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, November 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #9

    2. Exam Review--See the HAMLET and SHAKESPEARE STUDY GUIDE.

    How can we be well prepared and successful on the exam on Hamlet and William Shakespeare? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • HAMLET & SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE AND TIMES EXAM. Use this HAMLET and SHAKESPEARE STUDY GUIDE.

    Due this Friday, November 14th:

  • Vocab. List #9 quiz
  • Vocab. List #9 Story (topic: performance of Hamlet OR a topic of your choice!)

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, November 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #8 Quiz

    2. Discussion/Exam Review: Finish discussing the end of Hamlet and the following questions-- What literary devices does Shakespeare use to show that the language has to reveal depth (since there are few props, set design, lighting, sound, etc.)? Why are the characters' behaviors in Hamlet typical of human beings today? Why is Hamlet a widely loved play? Why open the final scene with comic relief? What does Hamlet reveal about human beings, in general, in scene i? What foreshadowing is revealed in scene i? How does the play end? How does the interaction between Hamlet and his mother reveal sexual connotation? How does Gertrude die and why is her death ironic? Why is Claudius' death ironic? How does the ending tie back to the beginning? How does Hamlet die? Why does he have a slow death? How does the play have both a religious and militant ending?

    What events and character choices lead to Hamlet's downfall and the climax of the play (Claudius' end)? Why is the play a story about the human experience? DATE CHANGE: DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • HAMLET & SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE AND TIMES EXAM. Use this HAMLET and SHAKESPEARE STUDY GUIDE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, November 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing the following questions on scenes i-vii in Act IV (this was HW, so students will earn HW credit for correctly answering the questions)--How does Hamlet interact with other people to reveal insanity? What does Hamlet say that reveals he still has his sanity? What happens to other characters that will contribute to Hamlet's downfall? Describe the actions/choices of other characters that will also reveal their downfall. Who will help Hamlet keep his sanity and how do you know this person is trustworthy? Why is Ophelia the second character to die? Why is her death significant to the plot? What literary devices does Shakespeare use to show that the language has to reveal depth (since there are few props, set design, lighting, sound, etc.)? Why are the characters' behaviors in Hamlet typical of human beings today? Why is Hamlet a widely loved play?

    2. Discussion: Discuss Act V of Hamlet. Why open the final scene with comic relief? What does Hamlet reveal about human beings, in general, in scene i? What foreshadowing is revealed in scene i? How does the play end? How does the interaction between Hamlet and his mother reveal sexual connotation? How does Gertrude die and why is her death ironic? Why is Claudius' death ironic? How does the ending tie back to the beginning? How does Hamlet die? Why does he have a slow death? How does the play have both a religious and militant ending?

    What events and character choices lead to Hamlet's downfall and the climax of the play (Claudius' end)? Why is the play a story about the human experience? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on the outcome of the election or the outcome of Hamlet.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • HAMLET & SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE AND TIMES EXAM. Use this HAMLET and SHAKESPEARE STUDY GUIDE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, November 5th, 2008 (post-historical election; President-elect Obama): 1. Do Now: Read "Obama Wins Election"--taken from The Learning Network from The New York Times. Write an extra-long paragraph (6-8 sentences on your reflections and feelings about the results of the 2008 presidential election). Be prepared to share/discuss.

    2. Discussion: Discuss outcome of the election.

    3. Brainstorming--with a partner: Identify TEN reasons that President-elect Obama chooses Hamlet as one of his favorite works of literature. Be prepared to share!

    How do we analyze the significance and students' opinions on the results of the 2008 presidential election? DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on the outcome of the election or the outcome of Hamlet.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • HAMLET & SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE AND TIMES EXAM. Use this HAMLET and SHAKESPEARE STUDY GUIDE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, November 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #8.

    2. Discuss the following questions on scenes i-vii in Act IV (this was HW, so students will earn HW credit for correctly answering the questions)--What has Hamlet done that has caused him to be dangerous? How will he be punished? How does Hamlet interact with other people to reveal insanity? What does Hamlet say that reveals he still has his sanity? What happens to other characters that will contribute to Hamlet's downfall? Who will help Hamlet keep his sanity and how do you know this person is trustworthy?

    3. Exam Study Guide Review: Use this HAMLET and SHAKESPEARE STUDY GUIDE.

    4. Begin HW.

    How do we understand the evidence in Act IV of Hamlet that leads the audience to understand Hamlet's downward spiral to a tragic ending? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:
  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose TWO JOURNAL ENTRIES. You will be done with the play!!

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:

  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on Act V of Hamlet or the outcome of the election.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • HAMLET & SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE AND TIMES EXAM. Use this HAMLET and SHAKESPEARE STUDY GUIDE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 31st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions on scenes i-vii in Act IV: What has Hamlet done that has caused him to be dangerous? How will he be punished? How does Hamlet interact with other people to reveal insanity? What does Hamlet say that reveals he still has his sanity? What happens to other characters that will contribute to Hamlet's downfall? Who will help Hamlet keep his sanity and how do you know this person is trustworthy?

    2. Discuss/Share: Groups will discuss scenes from Act IV--analyzing the downward spiral of Hamlet in Act IV. Examine specific evidence.

    How do we understand the evidence in Act IV of Hamlet that leads the audience to understand Hamlet's downward spiral to a tragic ending? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd:
  • Answer the following questions (in your own words) and make references (using specific evidence--direct quotes) to scenes from Act IV: 1.) What has Hamlet done that has caused him to be dangerous? 2.) How will he be punished? 3.) How does Hamlet interact with other people to reveal insanity? 4.) What does Hamlet say that reveals he still has his sanity? 5.) What happens to other characters that will contribute to Hamlet's downfall? 6.) Who will help Hamlet keep his sanity and how do you know this person is trustworthy? You will be asked about your findings on Monday, which will give you HW credit.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose TWO JOURNAL ENTRIES. You will be done with the play!!

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:

  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on Act V of Hamlet or the outcome of the election.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • HAMLET & SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE AND TIMES EXAM. Use this HAMLET and SHAKESPEARE STUDY GUIDE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 30th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz #7

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and analyze the downward spiral of Hamlet in Act IV. Examine specific evidence.

    How do we understand the evidence in Act IV of Hamlet that leads the audience to understand Hamlet's downward spiral to a tragic ending? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act IV of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (IV, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #7 Story. This story's topic is the election, Halloween OR Act IV of Hamlet found HERE.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose TWO JOURNAL ENTRIES. You will be done with the play!!

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:

  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on Act V of Hamlet or the outcome of the election.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • HAMLET & SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE AND TIMES EXAM

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Identify the tools that Shakespeare uses to reveal his mastery of language in Hamlet. Refer to literary devices (such as: alliteration, repetition, similes, metaphors, symbolism, allusion, metatheatricality, etc.) and evidence of Shakespeare's life/times/previous knowledge (like history and theater). Explain the importance/significance of each finding. Identify the act, scene and lines.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share findings with the class.

    How do we understand Shakespeare's mastery of language and the significance of the tools he used Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th (due to Halloween on Friday):
  • Vocabulary Quiz #7
  • Read Act IV in Hamlet.

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31st:

  • Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act IV of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (IV, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #7 Story. This story's topic is the election, Halloween OR Act IV of Hamlet found HERE.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5th:

  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose TWO JOURNAL ENTRIES. You will be done with the play!!

    DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:

  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on Act V of Hamlet or the outcome of the election.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • HAMLET and Shakespeare's Life and Times EXAM

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 28th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing Act III Scenes iii and iv of Hamlet. Discuss the major events in Scene iii--a revelation of Claudius' guilt and Hamlet's decision to delay killing Claudius. Scene iii reveals religious influence over the characters' choices. Why does Shakespeare have Claudius repent to the audience? Why does Shakespeare have Hamlet delay killing Claudius? Scene iv--Hamlet's unwitting and unregretful killing of Polonius, Hamlet's downward spiral toward insanity, and Hamlet's obsession with his mother's sexual acts with Claudius. Why must Polonius die? Why must Hamlet be obsessed with his mother's sexual acts? What ominous language does Shakespeare use to lead the audience to the end of the play?

    2. Work Period Work on making up HW journals or move ahead with the journals due this week (Act IV) for Hamlet. You may also want to work on Vocabulary Story #7. Teacher assistance will also be available.

    How do we ensure success in the reading and analysis of Act III of Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th (due to Halloween on Friday):
  • Vocabulary Quiz #7
  • Read Act IV in Hamlet.
  • Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act IV of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (IV, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #7 Story. This story's topic is the election, Halloween OR Act IV of Hamlet found HERE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, October 27th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing Act III Scenes i and ii of Hamlet. Discuss the themes in Scene i--betrayal, internal conflict and low self esteem (the famous "To Be or Not to Be" monologue), religious influence on decisions, romantic relationships--the trials and tribulations, woman's place/gender roles, foreshadowing, and Hamlet's forced exile to England. Discuss the themes in Scene ii--metatheatricality (the play within a play), trustworthy friendship vs. betrayed friendship.

    2. Work Period Work on making up HW journals or move ahead with the journals due this week (Act IV) for Hamlet. You may also want to work on Vocabulary Story #7. Teacher assistance will also be available.

    How do we ensure success in the reading and analysis of Act III of Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th (due to Halloween on Friday):
  • Vocabulary Quiz #7
  • Read Act IV in Hamlet.
  • Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act IV of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (IV, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #7 Story. This story's topic is the election, Halloween OR Act IV of Hamlet found HERE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 24th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #7.

    2. Work Period Work on making up HW journals or move ahead with the journals due next week (Act IV) for Hamlet. You may also want to work on Vocabulary Story #7. Teacher assistance will also be available.

    How do we ensure success in the reading and analysis of Hamlet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th (due to Halloween on Friday):
  • Vocabulary Quiz #7
  • Read Act IV in Hamlet.
  • Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act IV of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (IV, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #7 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act IV of Hamlet found HERE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 23rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    2. Discuss Act III Scenes i and ii of Hamlet. Discuss the themes in Scene i--betrayal, internal conflict and low self esteem (the famous "To Be or Not to Be" monologue), religious influence on decisions, romantic relationships, woman's place/gender roles, foreshadowing, and Hamlet's forced exile to England. Discuss the themes in Scene ii--metatheatricality (the play within a play), trustworthy friendship vs. betrayed friendship, a revelation of Claudius' guilt.

    How do we understand the power struggle of inferiority vs. authority, using textual evidence in Act III Scenes i and ii of Hamlet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th (due to Halloween on Friday):
  • Read Act IV in Hamlet.
  • Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act IV of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (IV, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #7 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act IV of Hamlet found HERE.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss Act II, using textual references, on topics of authority and inferiority. Examine the relationships between Polonius and Laertes and Polonius and Ophelia, the class structure that creates some characters in authoritative positions and others in inferior positions. How does status affect the play? How does Hamlet reveal his shrewdness and sharp intellect (refer to the arrangement of the play to reveal Claudius's guilt)?

    2. Work Period: Work on HW--read Act III in Hamlet and compose the three journals. Also, prepare for tomorrow's Vocab. #6 quiz.

    How do we understand the power struggle of inferiority vs. authority, using textual evidence in Act I and Act II of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD (due to parent-teacher conferences on Friday):
  • Read Act III in Hamlet.
  • Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (II, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act III of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 21st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review List #6.

    2. Discuss/Share: Finish discussion on Act I, using textual references, on topics of authority, class divisions, gender roles, parent vs. child, self-esteem, and trust issues. How does the audience know that Hamlet is feeling depressed and having low self worth? Why would the audience suspect the ghost is not trustworthy? What important "truths" does the ghost reveal to Hamlet? How does the ghost feel about Queen Gertrude? Why does Hamlet want the ghost to be kept secret? What religious references are used and for what purpose? Discuss Act II, which is filled with the struggle between inferiority and authority, as seen in deception, love, old vs. young, and betrayal.

    How do we understand the power struggle of inferiority vs. authority, using textual evidence in Act I and Act II of Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD (due to parent-teacher conferences on Friday):
  • Read Act III in Hamlet.
  • Bring in THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (II, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act III of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, October 20th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion on Act I, using textual references, on topics of authority, class divisions, gender roles, parent vs. child, self-esteem, and trust issues. How does Hamlet's (and Shakespeare's) misogyny reveal itself in Act I? What's Laertes's advice to his sister Ophelia? What's Polonius's advice to his son Laertes? How does the audience know that Hamlet is feeling depressed and having low self worth? Why would the audience suspect the ghost is not trustworthy? What important "truths" does the ghost reveal to Hamlet? How does the ghost feel about Queen Gertrude? Why does Hamlet want the ghost to be kept secret? What religious references are used and for what purpose?

    2. Begin Act II reflections on the journal entries, if time allows. Act II is filled with the struggle between inferiority and authority, as seen in deception, love, old vs. young, and betrayal.

    How do we understand the power struggle of inferiority vs. authority, using textual evidence in Act I and Act II of Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD (due to parent-teacher conferences on Friday):
  • Read Act III in Hamlet.
  • Bring in THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (II, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act III of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 17th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocbulary List #5 Quiz. Show Story #5 and Hamlet Act II journals.

    2. Discuss/Share: Finish discussion on Act I, using textual references, on topics of authority, gender roles, parent vs. child, self-esteem, and trust issues. Finish answering the following questions--What is Shakespeare's purpose for opening Scene ii with Claudius's monologue? What are the audience's first impressions of Claudius? What does Claudius reveal happened between King Hamlet and King Fortinbras of Norway? Why is this important information for the audience to know? What are the audience's first impressions of Gertrude (look at her first words in Scene ii)? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Claudius and Hamlet? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Queen Gertrude and Hamlet? How does Hamlet's (and Shakespeare's) misogyny reveal itself in Act I? What's Laertes's advice to his sister Ophelia? What's Polonius's advice to his son Laertes? How does the audience know that Hamlet is feeling depressed and having low self worth? Why would the audience suspect the ghost is not trustworthy? What important "truths" does the ghost reveal to Hamlet? How does the ghost feel about Queen Gertrude? What religious references are used and for what purpose?

    3. Begin Act II reflections on the journal entries, if time allows. Act II is filled with the struggle between inferiority and authority, as seen in deception, love, old vs. young, and betrayal.

    3. Review HW requirements.

    How do we understand the power struggle of inferiority vs. authority, using textual evidence in Act I of Hamlet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD (due to parent-teacher conferences next Friday):
  • Read Act III in Hamlet.
  • Bring in THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (II, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act III of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Examine Act I of Hamlet and find exact textual references to answer the following questions. Include at least one direct quote from Act I for each answer. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (II, ii, 50). What is Shakespeare's purpose for opening Scene ii with Claudius's monologue? What are the audience's first impressions of Claudius? What does Claudius reveal happened between King Hamlet and King Fortinbras of Norway? Why is this important information for the audience to know? What are the audience's first impressions of Gertrude (look at her first words in Scene ii)? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Claudius and Hamlet? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Queen Gertrude and Hamlet? How does Hamlet's (and Shakespeare's) misogyny reveal itself in Act I? What's Laertes's advice to his sister Ophelia? What's Polonius's advice to his son Laertes? How does the audience know that Hamlet is feeling depressed and having low self worth? Why would the audience suspect the ghost is not trustworthy? What important "truths" does the ghost reveal to Hamlet? How does the ghost feel about Queen Gertrude? What religious references are used and for what purpose?

    2. Discuss/Share findings for Act I questions in Do Now.

    3. Review HW requirements.

    How do we understand author's purpose and textual evidence in Act I of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17TH:
  • Read Act II in Hamlet.
  • Bring in TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (II, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #5 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act II of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 15th, 2008: No class due to the PSAT. N/A DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17TH:
  • Read Act II in Hamlet.
  • Bring in TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II. Include at least one direct quote from the play for each journal entry. Here's an example: Claudius said, "Oh speak of that. That do I long to hear" (II, ii, 50).
  • Vocabulary List #5 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act II of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Examine Act I Scenes i and ii of Hamlet. Identify the author's purpose in opening the play with minor characters, the guards Bernardo and Francisco. Also, identify religious references and their purpose, evidence of class divisions (Hamlet and Horatio vs. the guards), the ghost's appearance and purpose, reference to other plays (i.e. Julius Caesar). Identify Shakespeare's purpose for opening Scene ii with Claudius's monologue, audience's first impressions of Claudius, audience's first impressions of Gertrude, evidence of fractured relationship between Claudius and Hamlet and Gertrude and Hamlet, and evidence of foreshadowing/omens.

    2. Discuss Do Now findings for Scenes i and ii of Act I.

    How do we understand author's purpose in the exposition of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17TH:
  • Read Act II in Hamlet.
  • Bring in TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act II of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocab. Quiz #4

    2. Introduce List #5.

    3. Show HW--vocabulary story and three character journals for Act I. HW reminders.

    How do you improve your lexicon? :) DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17TH:
  • Read Act II in Hamlet.
  • Bring in TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Act II of Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Story. This story's topic is the election OR Act II of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss and take notes on "Intro to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England" packet. How are these introductory texts helpful in preparing us to read and analyze Shakespeare's works, in particular Hamlet?

    2. Read introductory scene of Act I. Why has the ghost of King Hamlet appeared? What can we expect in the scenes to come?

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Act I of Hamlet? Discipline Code handouts turned in ASAP (for HW credit)--before Friday

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH:

  • All HW owed (this is the last day of the marking period)!
  • Vocabulary Story #4, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR Act I of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read Iambic Pentameter handout.

    2. Lecture/Note-Taking: Discuss and take notes on "Intro to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England" packet. How are these introductory texts helpful in preparing us to read and analyze Shakespeare's works, in particular Hamlet?

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Act I of Hamlet? Discipline Code handouts turned in ASAP (for HW credit)--before Friday

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH:

  • All HW owed (this is the last day of the marking period)!
  • Vocabulary Story #4, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR Act I of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, October 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #4.

    2. Lecture/Note-Taking: Discuss and take notes on "Intro to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England" packet. How are these introductory texts helpful in preparing us to read and analyze Shakespeare's works, in particular Hamlet?

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Hamlet? Discipline Code handouts turned in ASAP (for HW credit)--before Friday

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH:

  • All HW owed (this is the last day of the marking period)!
  • Vocabulary Story #4, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR Act I of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz #3

    2. Lecture/Note-Taking: Discuss and take notes on "Intro to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England" packet. How are these introductory texts helpful in preparing us to read and analyze Shakespeare's works, in particular Hamlet?

    3. Introduce HW.

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Hamlet? Discipline Code handouts turned in ASAP (for HW credit)

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH:

  • Vocabulary Story #4, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR Act I of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the written assessment on your independent novel. Turn in HW--Discipline Code worksheet and contract and show Vocabulary Story #3.

    2. Lecture/Note-Taking: Finish notes on Shakespeare's life and family. Review "Intro to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England" packet.

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3RD:
  • Vocabulary List #3 Quiz.
  • Monday, September 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read Discipline Code Booklet and answer the worksheet questions (just like a scavenger hunt!). This will be due for HW credit on Thurs.

    2. Work Period: Work on HW due Thursday (Vocabulary Story #3 and reading) and Friday.

    How do you better understand school and Department of Education rules/policies? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2ND:
  • Turn in the Discipline Code classwork and contract signed by your parent/guardian (given out in class today).
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (remember, you must write a minimum of 250 words or more; you can work with a partner; you MUST underline or bold the vocabulary words; it can be typed or handwritten) on YOUR CHOSEN NOVEL (anything about your novel; it can be on the character, the plot, the setting, etc.).
  • Finish your independent novel. There will be an in-class WRITTEN ASSESSMENT ON YOUR NOVEL to prove you read and understood your novel (know the main characters and their characterization, plot development--including the introductory event, the rising action, climax, and resolution, and setting). BRING YOUR NOVEL TO CLASS.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3RD:

  • Vocabulary List #3 Quiz.
  • Friday, September 26th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #2 Quiz

    2. Introduce List #3.

    3. Finish Shakespeare Notes on his life and family.

    4. Review "Intro to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England" packet.

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2ND:
  • Turn in the Discipline Code classwork and contract signed by your parent/guardian (given out in class on Monday).
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (remember, you must write a minimum of 250 words or more; you can work with a partner; you MUST underline or bold the vocabulary words; it can be typed or handwritten) on YOUR CHOSEN NOVEL (anything about your novel; it can be on the character, the plot, the setting, etc.).
  • Finish your independent novel. There will be an in-class WRITTEN ASSESSMENT ON YOUR NOVEL to prove you read and understood your novel (know the main characters and their characterization, plot development--including the introductory event, the rising action, climax, and resolution, and setting). BRING YOUR NOVEL TO CLASS.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3RD:

  • Vocabulary List #3 Quiz.
  • Thursday, September 25th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Prepare for Friday's Vocabulary List #2 Quiz and make up any HW owed. Show your Vocabulary Story #2.

    2. Shakespeare Lecture (theater, his life, family and times) and Note-taking

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26TH:
  • Vocabulary List #2 Quiz.

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in class on Thursday, October 2nd.
  • Wednesday, September 24th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Work on Vocabulary Story #2 and prepare for Friday's Vocabulary List #2 Quiz. Show your HW packet annotations.

    2. Shakespeare Lecture (theater, his life, family and times) and Note-taking

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary Story #2 on theater (you can write on Shakespeare's theater, theater today, theater throughout time, an original play, or anything else you can think of on the subject of theater)

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26TH:

  • Vocabulary List #2 Quiz.

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment at that time.
  • Tuesday, September 23rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Listen and take notes on theater of the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's life and his family.

    2. Work on HW--packet, vocabulary story #2 and quiz preparation. Turn in your resume rewrites.

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play?
  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment at that time.

    DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:

  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Vocabulary Story #2 on theater (you can write on Shakespeare's theater, theater today, theater throughout time, an original play, or anything else you can think of on the subject of theater)

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26TH:

  • Vocabulary List #2 Quiz.
  • Monday, September 22nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: List #2 introduced.

    2. Note-taking on theater/actors during Shakespeare's time period.

    3. HW reminders.

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:
  • RESUME REWRITE (edit the teacher corrections)--typed.

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment at that time.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:

  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Vocabulary Story #2 on theater (you can write on Shakespeare's theater, theater today, theater throughout time, an original play, or anything else you can think of on the subject of theater)

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26TH:

  • Vocabulary List #2 Quiz.
  • Friday, September 19th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #1 Quiz. Read when finished with the quiz.

    2. Share excerpts from Vocab. #1 stories.

    3. Discuss yesterday's Do Now questions: Why is the phrase "To be or not to be" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop?

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play?
  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment at that time.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:

  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26TH:

  • Vocabulary List #2 Quiz.
  • Thursday, September 18th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions--Why is the phrase "To be or not to be" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop? Show vocabulary story HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the Do Now answers. Share excerpts of your Shakespearean vocabulary stories.

    3. Introduce HW.

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:
  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment at that time.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:

  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?
  • Wednesday, September 17th, 2008: 1. Finish remaining recitations. With partners, recite memorized song/poem/rap.

    2. Prepare for List #1 vocabulary quiz. Work on HW--create a Shakespearean vocabulary story (minimum of 250 words).

    How do you improve your mastery of new words in your lexicon? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18TH:
  • Partner or Individual HW: Shakespearean Vocabulary Story (250 words or more) using all 30 vocabulary words from List #1 correctly. Underline each vocabulary word used. This will help you prepare for the Vocabulary Quiz!

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment at that time.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Tuesday, September 16th, 2008: 1. With partners, recite memorized song/poem/rap.

    2. Reflect on the recitations. Why was this a useful assignment? What was valuable from this experience--writing, memorizing and reciting? Why was this assignment not enjoyable?

    3. Prepare for List #1 vocabulary quiz. Work on HW--create a Shakespearean vocabulary story (minimum of 250 words).

    How do you present a memorized recitation? DUE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18TH:
  • Partner or Individual HW: Shakespearean Vocabulary Story (250 words or more) using all 30 vocabulary words from List #1 correctly. Underline each vocabulary word used. This will help you prepare for the Vocabulary Quiz!

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment at that time.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Monday, September 15th, 2008: 1. Do Now: With your partner, recite (standing) your song/poem/rap. Use hand gestures, eye contact, and loud, clear voices.

    2. In a group of 4, recite (standing) your song/poem/rap. Use hand gestures, eye contact, and loud, clear voices.

    3. Reflect on the progress achieved in recitations.

    How do you prepare for a class recitation? DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16TH:
  • Memorize your Shakespeare SONG/RAP and be ready to present to the class (TOMORROW). You may want to add dance, gestures, movement, or any other creative addition to the musical presentation!

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Friday, September 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Listen to HW instructions.

    2. Creative Opportunity Work Period: Work on HW with partner. Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP/POEM (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap as your partner), use the most essential facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap/poem (use an existing tune or your own and make sure the beats match).

    3. Reflect on creative opportunity progress.

    How do you identify the essential information from compiled research? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH:
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP/POEM (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap/poem as your partner), use the facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap (use an existing tune or your own and make sure the beats match). Bring in the song/rap to class (typed or handwritten is OK). MEMORIZED PRESENTATION WILL BE DUE ON TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16TH.

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You should expect a writing assignment in the near future. You must finish your novel by September 30th.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Thursday, September 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read over SAT/College Vocabulary List #1. Identify any familiar words and any words you have difficult pronouncing.

    2. Read and discuss List #1. Quiz on Friday, September 19th.

    3. Significance of 9/11 and MY GOOD DEED WEBSITE

    4. Review HW objectives

    How do you prepare for the verbal section of the SAT? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12TH:
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic (determined in class). When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250 word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows: Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You should expect a writing assignment in the near future. You must finish your novel by September 30th.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Wednesday, September 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Reflections on your college essay--Did you use the sample college essays and expert advice in composing your college essay? Did you go through an editing/revision process of your college essay? If so, what was it? Are you satisfied with the final product?

    2. Volunteers share Do Now reflections.

    3. KWL Brainstorming: What do you know about William Shakespeare, his life, his work and his times? What do you want to know? Why is it important to know about him, his life, his work and his times?

    4. Shakespeare Research Presentation introduction and topic sign-up

    What prior knowledge do students have and what interests them regarding William Shakespeare's life, work and times? DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12TH:
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic (determined in class). When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250 word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows: Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You should expect a writing assignment in the near future. You must finish your novel by September 30th.
  • Tuesday, September 9th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Write a paragraph in which you show (using the senses: sight, sound, touch, smell, taste) a personal experience/activity/job that you've been part of during high school. Choose a meaningful one that can be included in your college essay.

    2. Volunteers share Do Now paragraphs with whole class. Why were these paragraphs captivating? Why would a college admissions reader enjoy these pieces of writing?

    3. Finish yesterday's discussion/analysis of "Writing the Essay: Sound Advice from an Expert". Analyze the strengths and useful tips that can be applied in your college essay from the Sample College Essays.

    How will students be able to compose a successful college essay? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness; think of this question--why should the college of your choice accept you???). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Monday, September 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Begin reading the following: "Writing the Essay: Sound Advice from an Expert", marking it with the same code system from Friday--check=I know and understand this, question mark=I don't understand/I'm confused and need to know more, and exclamation point (!)=This is cool. Show HW--independent novel. Turn in academic resume.

    2. Discuss/Review the Do Now.

    3. Read Sample College Essays. What are some strengths in these essays? What tips can you use from these essays?

    How will students be able to compose a successful college essay? DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Friday, September 5th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Scan Resume Writing 101, marking what you know (with a check), what you're confused about/question (with a question mark), and what you think looks cool (with an exclamation point!). Be ready to discuss.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now findings.

    3. Read aloud and discuss the entirety of Resume Writing 101.

    How will students be prepared to write and edit their academic resumes? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH:
  • Bring in independent novel (taken from classroom or selected independently; teacher approval is required). You may also choose a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Academic Resume (first draft is due). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Thursday, September 4th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Analysis of Sample Resumes--Students individually and collectively analyze the sample resumes. Guiding questions to answer while analyzing: What are the strengths of each resume? What are the weaknesses? What qualities, in terms of formatting, writing style, and word usage, are worth including in your own resume?

    2. Class Sharing of Resume Analysis: Class shares findings in resume analysis.

    3. Read-aloud of Resume Writing 101.

    3. Independent Resume Writing: Students will begin the resume writing process and/or the resume editing process.

    How will students be prepared to write and/or edit their academic resumes? What is the initial data gathering and composition process of resume writing? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH:
  • Bring in independent novel (taken from classroom or selected independently; teacher approval is required). You may also choose a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Academic Resume (first draft is due). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Wednesday, September 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Preview the senior syllabus.

    2. Review details of the syllabus.

    3. HW reviewed and this week's HW introduced.

    How will students be prepared for academic success in this course? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH:
  • Bring in independent novel (taken from classroom or selected independently; teacher approval is required). You may also choose a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Academic Resume (first draft is due). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Tuesday, September 2nd 2008: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and fill out the index card, answering the following in complete sentences (when appropriate):
  • your full name (in parentheses, write your first name, which you want to be called in class)
  • Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
  • What did you read this summer? Provide titles of books, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • Identify FIVE colleges you will apply to. Star (*) your #1 choice.
  • What knowledge do you hope to acquire in this English course?
  • What can you contribute to this English course?
  • What are you looking forward to this school year?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share literature read this summer and personal/academic goals.

  • How will students introduce themselves, with reference to recent literary practice and personal and academic goals?
  • Read something (a news article, book, magazine, etc.) tonight and be prepared to share tomorrow.