Senior Assignments, Fall 2009

Senior Assignments
Fall 2009

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 25th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Film viewing of Hamlet.

2. Discuss/Share: Share your impressions of the film. Reflect on the grades for the final paper and final grades.

How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style? How does the film version add and/or detract from Shakespeare's vision and our own readers' vision? Best of luck to everyone! It was a pleasure teaching you!

Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, January 22nd, 2010: 1. Do Now: Film viewing of Hamlet.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your impressions of the film. Reflect on the final assignment, comparing and contrasting the film to the Shakespearean version. Address the film's director's choices, as contrasted with Shakespeare's.

    How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style? How does the film version add and/or detract from Shakespeare's vision and our own readers' vision? NO HW! Semester grades will be distributed and papers will be returned on Monday!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, January 21st, 2010: 1. Do Now: Film viewing of Hamlet. Take notes to prepare for your final assignment. Review the final classwork/homework assignment: How is this film version different and similar to the play Hamlet we read and analyzed? Begin to write two full pages handwritten/one page typed (300-word minimum) in which you answer this question. Refer to the director's vision/interpretation, stage directions, costumes, props, musical choice, set design, characters' emotional acting, etc. Refer to how the film version is typical and atypical (not typical) of Shakespeare's style.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your impressions of the film. See above assignment to prompt discussion.

    How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style? How does the film version add and/or detract from Shakespeare's vision and our own readers' vision? Due TOMORROW, Friday:
  • Film Analysis of Hamlet: How is this film version different and similar to the play Hamlet we read and analyzed? Write two full pages handwritten/one page typed (300-word minimum) in which you answer this question. Refer to the director's vision/interpretation, stage directions, costumes, props, musical choice, set design, characters' emotional acting, etc. Refer to how the film version is typical and atypical (not typical) of Shakespeare's style.

    Make up ALL HW owed (especially the final paper)!!!!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, January 20th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Review the final classwork/homework assignment: How is this film version different and similar to the play Hamlet we read and analyzed? Begin to write two full pages handwritten/one page typed (300-word minimum) in which you answer this question. Refer to the director's vision/interpretation, stage directions, costumes, props, musical choice, set design, characters' emotional acting, etc. Refer to how the film version is typical and atypical (not typical) of Shakespeare's style.

    2. Film viewing of Hamlet. Take notes to prepare for your final assignment.

    How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style? How does the film version add and/or detract from Shakespeare's vision and our own readers' vision? Due THIS Friday:
  • Film Analysis of Hamlet: How is this film version different and similar to the play Hamlet we read and analyzed? Write two full pages handwritten/one page typed (300-word minimum) in which you answer this question. Refer to the director's vision/interpretation, stage directions, costumes, props, musical choice, set design, characters' emotional acting, etc. Refer to how the film version is typical and atypical (not typical) of Shakespeare's style.

    Make up ALL HW owed!!!!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, January 19th, 2010: 1. Do Now: Introduce final classwork/homework assignment: How is this film version different and similar to the play Hamlet we read and analyzed? Begin to write two full pages handwritten/one page typed (300-word minimum) in which you answer this question. Refer to the director's vision/interpretation, stage directions, costumes, props, musical choice, set design, characters' emotional acting, etc. Refer to how the film version is typical and atypical (not typical) of Shakespeare's style.

    2. Film viewing of Hamlet. Take notes to prepare for your final assignment.

    How do we analyze the film version of Hamlet as typical and atypical of Shakespeare's style? How does the film version add and/or detract from Shakespeare's vision and our own readers' vision? Due Friday:
  • Film Analysis of Hamlet: How is this film version different and similar to the play Hamlet we read and analyzed? Write two full pages handwritten/one page typed (300-word minimum) in which you answer this question. Refer to the director's vision/interpretation, stage directions, costumes, props, musical choice, set design, characters' emotional acting, etc. Refer to how the film version is typical and atypical (not typical) of Shakespeare's style.

    Make up any HW owed!!!!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, January 15th, 2010: Vocabulary Jeopardy! How can students work on vocabulary skill building? Make up any HW owed!!!!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, January 14th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Set up the word wall for the SAT/college vocabulary words learned this semester.

    3. Prepare for Vocabulary Game (which will be tomorrow!)

    How can students engage in analysis and vocabulary skill building? Due TOMORROW, Friday, January 15th:
  • Extra Credit Vocabulary Game! Earn up to 5 points on your final semester grade! Study all of the Lists 1-11!

    Make up any HW owed!!!!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, January 13th, 2010: SENIOR ASSEMBLY How can students prepare for college? Due THIS Friday, January 15th:
  • Extra Credit Vocabulary Game! Earn up to 5 points on your final semester grade! Study all of the Lists 1-11!

    Make up any HW owed!!!!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, January 12th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Continue the study/analysis of Sonnet 130. Analyze the iambic pentameter, rhyme scheme, imagery, appeal to the senses, and other literary devices. Introduce the "Love for ITHS" Sonnet.

    2. Work Period: Work on the "Love for ITHS" Sonnet HW.

    How can students engage in poetry analysis and writing? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, January 13th:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    Due THIS Friday, January 15th:

  • Extra Credit Vocabulary Game! Earn up to 5 points on your final semester grade! Study all of the Lists 1-11!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Monday, January 11th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Share excerpts from your memoir pieces.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Introduce Sonnet 130. Analyze the iambic pentameter, rhyme scheme, imagery, appeal to the senses, and other literary devices. Introduce the "Love for ITHS" Sonnet.

    How can students engage in reflective analysis of a creative memoir piece? Due Wednesday, January 13th:
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, January 8th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Continue writing about that one significant moment on your timeline. Write at least four handwritten pages that describe that moment in great detail. Appeal to all the senses when describing this moment (sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch). Now add more sophisticated vocabulary (you may refer to our vocabulary lists).

    2. Discuss/Share: Share excerpts from your memoir pieces.

    3. HW introduced.

    How can students engage in pre-writing for a creative memoir piece? Due Monday, January 11th:
  • Your Memoir: You should continue where you began in class with your memoir writing. This is a writing piece about one significant moment from your life. You must appeal to all the sense in describing this significant moment. You must add sophisticated vocabulary (a minimum of 10 vocabulary words, preferably from the vocabulary lists). It's recommended that you reveal how this significant moment made your life better, opened your eyes to something new, and/or enlightened you. It must be 3-4 pages typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, number each page (with your last name at the top and the number), and a heading that only includes your name, date and school name. Include the following title: Personal Essay/Memoir. This memoir will be entered in a scholarship for Random. House!

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, January 7th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Finish your Life Timeline (identifying signficant moments in your life). This is preparation for a short memoir piece. Include special accomplishments, important moments, life-changing dates (both positive and negative), etc. Include 5 years, 10 years and 20 years into the future.

    2. Share/Discuss: Share your Life Timeline special moments.

    3. Work Period: Choose one significant moment on your timeline and write one paragraph that describes that moment in great detail. Appeal to all the senses when describing this moment (sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch).

    How can students engage in pre-writing for a creative memoir piece? Scholarships:
  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, January 6th, 2010: 1.Do Now: Works Cited composition (see The Owl at Purdue MLA Works Cited Guide.

    3. Work Period: Life Timeline (identifying signficant moments in your life). This is preparation for a short memoir piece.

    4. Return your As You Like It plays.

    How can students understand the Works Cited format for their final paper and prepare for their memoir creative writing piece? Scholarships:
  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, January 5th, 2010: TURN IN YOUR FINAL PAPER and reflect on the process. How can students reflect on the process of composition of their final paper? Scholarships:
  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Monday, January 4th, 2010: Welcome back and welcome to a new decade!

    1.Do Now: Final Paper requirements reviewed.

    2. Discuss/Share: Introduce the composition of subsidiary questions that support the main essay question. These subsidiary questions should fall in the who, what, when, where, why, and how question categories.

    3. Work Period: Work on composing subsidiary questions to guide your essay writing.

    How can students effectively prepare for the composition and final touches of their final paper? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:
  • FINAL PAPER--Choose one question to explore in your final paper: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal (timeless and relatable to people all over the world) human experience in both As You Like It and Hamlet? How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between both of these plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric (also given in class; please change the "novels for paper" section to the following: "plays for paper." Each category is listed as follows: "Not Yet There"-Both plays were not addressed in your paper, "Acceptable"--Both plays were appropriately addressed in your paper, and "Successful"--Both plays were addressed with insight and sophistication), analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to both plays in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the answer of one of your chosen questions. You should include plentiful references to Shakespearean style and literary techniques such as the following: symbolism, characterization, mood, imagery, prose vs. poetry, etc. Do NOT summarize the plot. Stay focused on the essay question.

    Further Paper Instructions: You must write a clear thesis statement (the main idea statement, which is the focus of your entire paper and the answer to the essay question) in the introduction. This thesis statement MUST address BOTH plays. You must also include at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "To be, or not to be: that is the question"(Hamlet, III, I). The citation (Hamlet, III, I) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III) and Scene (I). The lines are not referenced because they are not available in the online version). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space the quote. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. You might choose a topic on love relationships, identity formation, misogyny or another topic of your choice. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one topic. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009: 1.Do Now: Awards Presentation of Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Performance.

    2. HW Reminders.

    3. Work Period: Work on any owed HW and prepare for the Final Paper.

    4. Gift giving! We will give each other the gift of flattery!

    How can students reflect on their interpretations of the scenes from the play, As You Like It? Have a wonderful holiday and restful vacation!

    DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:

  • FINAL PAPER--Choose one question to explore in your final paper: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal (timeless and relatable to people all over the world) human experience in both As You Like It and Hamlet? How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between both of these plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric (also given in class; please change the "novels for paper" section to the following: "plays for paper." Each category is listed as follows: "Not Yet There"-Both plays were not addressed in your paper, "Acceptable"--Both plays were appropriately addressed in your paper, and "Successful"--Both plays were addressed with insight and sophistication), analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to both plays in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the answer of one of your chosen questions. You should include plentiful references to Shakespearean style and literary techniques such as the following: symbolism, characterization, mood, imagery, prose vs. poetry, etc. Do NOT summarize the plot. Stay focused on the essay question.

    Further Paper Instructions: You must write a clear thesis statement (the main idea statement, which is the focus of your entire paper and the answer to the essay question) in the introduction. This thesis statement MUST address BOTH plays. You must also include at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "To be, or not to be: that is the question"(Hamlet, III, I). The citation (Hamlet, III, I) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III) and Scene (I). The lines are not referenced because they are not available in the online version). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space the quote. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. You might choose a topic on love relationships, identity formation, misogyny or another topic of your choice. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one topic. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009: 1.Do Now: Reflections and Voting on Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director and Best Performance.

    2. HW Reminders.

    3. Work Period: Work on any owed HW and prepare for the Final Paper.

    How can students reflect on their interpretations of the scenes from the play, As You Like It? DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th:
  • FINAL PAPER--Choose one question to explore in your final paper: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal (timeless and relatable to people all over the world) human experience in both As You Like It and Hamlet? How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between both of these plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric (also given in class; please change the "novels for paper" section to the following: "plays for paper." Each category is listed as follows: "Not Yet There"-Both plays were not addressed in your paper, "Acceptable"--Both plays were appropriately addressed in your paper, and "Successful"--Both plays were addressed with insight and sophistication), analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to both plays in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the answer of one of your chosen questions. You should include plentiful references to Shakespearean style and literary techniques such as the following: symbolism, characterization, mood, imagery, prose vs. poetry, etc. Do NOT summarize the plot. Stay focused on the essay question.

    Further Paper Instructions: You must write a clear thesis statement (the main idea statement, which is the focus of your entire paper and the answer to the essay question) in the introduction. This thesis statement MUST address BOTH plays. You must also include at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "To be, or not to be: that is the question"(Hamlet, III, I). The citation (Hamlet, III, I) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III) and Scene (I). The lines are not referenced because they are not available in the online version). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space the quote. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. You might choose a topic on love relationships, identity formation, misogyny or another topic of your choice. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one topic. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Monday, December 21st, 2009: 1.Do Now: As You Like It performances. Here are the scenes: Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, and Adam) and Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. After each performance, groups will offer their director's vision and take audience questions.

    2. HW Reminders.

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? LOOKING AHEAD:
  • FINAL PAPER DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th--Choose one question to explore in your final paper: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal (timeless and relatable to people all over the world) human experience in both As You Like It and Hamlet? How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between both of these plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric (to be given), analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to both plays in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the answer of one of your chosen questions. You should include plentiful references to Shakespearean style and literary techniques such as the following: symbolism, characterization, mood, imagery, prose vs. poetry, etc. Do NOT summarize the plot. Stay focused on the essay question.

    Further Paper Instructions: You must write a clear thesis statement (the main idea statement, which is the focus of your entire paper and the answer to the essay question) in the introduction. This thesis statement MUST address BOTH plays. You must also include at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "To be, or not to be: that is the question"(Hamlet, III, I). The citation (Hamlet, III, I) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III) and Scene (I). The lines are not referenced because they are not available in the online version). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space the quote. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. You might choose a topic on love relationships, identity formation, misogyny or another topic of your choice. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one topic. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Friday, December 18th, 2009: 1.Work Period: Work on your scene for As You Like It performances. Here are the scenes: Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes.

    2. Scene Prep Q & A

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 21st (NOTE THE DATE CHANGE!!!):
  • Performance Presentation (VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE!): You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    LOOKING AHEAD:

  • FINAL PAPER DUE TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th--Choose one question to explore in your final paper: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal (timeless and relatable to people all over the world) human experience in both As You Like It and Hamlet? How can you compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) between both of these plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric (to be given), analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to both plays in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the answer of one of your chosen questions. You should include plentiful references to Shakespearean style and literary techniques such as the following: symbolism, characterization, mood, imagery, prose vs. poetry, etc. Do NOT summarize the plot. Stay focused on the essay question.

    Further Paper Instructions: You must write a clear thesis statement (the main idea statement, which is the focus of your entire paper and the answer to the essay question) in the introduction. This thesis statement MUST address BOTH plays. You must also include at least three direct references, which means providing direct quotes. A direct quote from a Shakespearean play looks like this: "To be, or not to be: that is the question"(Hamlet, III, I). The citation (Hamlet, III, I) includes the title of the play because there are two Shakespearean plays referenced in this paper. It also includes the Act (III) and Scene (I). The lines are not referenced because they are not available in the online version). If your direct quote is more than 4 lines, then you must center and single space the quote. Whenever you include a direct quote, you must always introduce it and analyze it afterwards. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. You might choose a topic on love relationships, identity formation, misogyny or another topic of your choice. It will be your job to provide a great deal of evidence in support of one topic. Do not include plot summary. Instead, analyze the plays in terms of your chosen question. DO NOT USE ANY FORM OF "YOU" OR "I" IN YOUR WRITING. THAT INCLUDES YOU, US, WE, OURS, I, MY, MINE, ETC. Instead, you should write "readers" or "people" when referring to people who read and analyze Shakespeare's plays.

    Scholarships:

  • Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors! This is a fabulous scholarship opportunity (up to $10,000 in prize money) just for NYC seniors (Deadline: February 12, 2010). Recent Info Tech grads have won! Let's keep the tradition going!
  • Magic Johnson Scholarship (February 5th, 2010 deadline)
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships: Specific scholarships available for senior students who will study business, health care, hospitality, science, technology, mathematics, and other majors. Deadlines are generally in February as well.
  • Thursday, December 17th, 2009: 1.Work Period: Work on your scene for As You Like It performances. Here are the scenes: Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes.

    2. Scene Performance Excerpt Review

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 21st (NOTE THE DATE CHANGE!!!):
  • Performance Presentation (VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE!): You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.
  • Wednesday, December 16th, 2009: 1.Work Period: Work on your scene for As You Like It performances. Here are the scenes: Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes.

    2. Reflections: How is the process going? What are your next steps?

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 21st (NOTE THE DATE CHANGE!!!):
  • Performance Presentation (VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE!): You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.
  • Tuesday, December 15th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises. Tableaus of character relationships (e.g. Orlando and Adam, Rosalind and Orlando, Rosalind and Celia, Duke Senior and Jaques). Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Tongue twisters to help with diction(She thrusts her fists against the post, and still insists she sees the ghost). Act out the following lines: "Men are April when they woo, December when they wed: maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives" (Rosalind, IV, I). "All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances..." (Jaques, II, VII).

    2. Work Period: Work on your scene for As You Like It performances. Here are the scenes: Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes.

    3. Arrange in your groups and work on reading aloud your scenes, incorporating the acting exercises (enunciation, body language, spacing, staging and facial expressions) and director's vision/interpretation.

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18th:
  • Performance Presentation (VALUE OF A QUIZ GRADE!): You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.
  • Monday, December 14th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Acting Exercises. Tableaus of character relationships (e.g. Orlando and Adam, Rosalind and Orlando, Rosalind and Celia, Duke Senior and Jaques). Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Tarzan yells, tongue twisters to help with diction(Betty bought a batch of bitter butter, six sharp sharks, good blood, bad blood, red leather, yellow leather)

    2. Work Period: Go over the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Work on your scene for As You Like It performances. Here are the scenes: Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes.

    3. Arrange in your groups and work on reading aloud your scenes, determining your director, roles, and director's vision/interpretation.

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18th:
  • Performance Presentation: You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.
  • Friday, December 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce the scenes for As You Like It performances and review the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes Here are the scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes.

    2. Work Period: Arrange in your groups and begin to read aloud your scenes, determine director, roles, and director's vision/interpretation.

    How can students effectively interpret scenes from the play, As You Like It in a performance presentation? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18th:
  • Performance Presentation: You and your group mates will perform one of these (assigned) scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 4:30-5:30 minutes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is your scene's interpretation? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father. A gangster's duel. A musical version of a robbery.). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 4:30-5:30 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.
  • Thursday, December 10th, 2009: AS YOU LIKE IT EXAM How can students effectively prove their knowledge of the play, As You Like It in a final exam?
  • Make up any HW owed--all previous journals, if necessary.
  • Wednesday, December 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Analyze Act V.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Prepare for tomorrow's exam by reviewing the important quotes in the As You Like It Exam Review Questions and Quotes.

    How can students effectively culminate the play, As You Like It? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10th:
  • EXAM ON AS YOU LIKE IT! Use this As You Like It Exam Review Questions and Quotes. We have gone over all of these questions in class throughout our study of the play! You should know the quotes, who said them, and what they are telling us, the readers/audience.
  • Make up any HW owed--all previous journals, if necessary.
  • Tuesday, December 8th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Discuss/Analyze the Act IV questions--
    1.) Celia accuses Rosalind of misusing "our sex in your love-prate." How has Rosalind defamed women in her speeches to Orlando?
    2.) How does Rosalind respond to the sight of Orlando's blood? What does this say about her nature?

    2. Work Period: Reading of Act V (due tomorrow) and journal composition.

    How can students effectively analyze love relationships, courtship and the stereotypes of women and men in Act IV of As You Like It? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9th:
  • Read Act V and compose a journal for Act V of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. A journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Make up any HW owed--all previous journals, if necessary.
  • EXAM ON THURSDAY ON AS YOU LIKE IT.
  • Monday, December 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish answering/discussing/analyzing the Act III questions--
    1.) What are the truisms that the shepherd Corin tells Touchstone? What are some truisms that a modern day student might speak?
    2.) If you were the director of this play, how would you direct the scene between Corin and Touchstone? Would Corin be an innocent who is all seriousness in his "wisdom," or would you have him act the role of a "smart alec" who is speaking in mockery trying to outdo Touchstone? Explain your reasons for your choice.
    3.) Contrast the rhyme that Touchstone wrote about Rosalind with the one written by Orlando and read by Celia. How do the two characterizations differ?
    4.) How is Orlando's view of the world different from that of Jaques (Monsieur Melancholy)?
    5.) Why does Rosalind decide to "play the knave" to Orlando?
    6.) When Rosalind tells Orlando that he does not look like a lover, he says that he wants to make her believe it is true. Is this why he agrees to pretend she is Rosalind and woo her even though he thinks she is a man? Are there any other possible reasons?
    7.) Rosalind in the guise of a man reveals some of the ways that women differ from men. List these differences and judge whether a modern audience would consider them as true.
    8.) In Touchstone's speech to Audrey, he refers to the inevitability of horns for a married man, suggesting that all wives are unfaithful. Even so, he says that it is better to be married than not. Why might he think so?
    9.) How would you describe Touchstone's attraction to Audrey? Does he express romantic love or some other kind of feeling?
    10.) Contrast Phebe's feeling for Silvius compared to her feeling for Rosalind disguised as Ganymede.

    2. Work Period: Answer the following questions for Act IV (show your HW: Act IV journal)--
    1. Celia accuses Rosalind of misusing "our sex in your love-prate." How has Rosalind defamed women in her speeches to Orlando?
    2. How does Rosalind respond to the sight of Orlando's blood? What does this say about her nature?

    How can students effectively analyze love relationships, courtship and the women's roles in Acts III and IV of As You Like It? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9th:
  • Read Act V and compose a journal for Act V of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. A journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Make up any HW owed--all previous journals, if necessary.
  • Friday, December 4th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Work on finishing the Act III questions--
    1.) What are the truisms that the shepherd Corin tells Touchstone? What are some truisms that a modern day student might speak?
    2.) If you were the director of this play, how would you direct the scene between Corin and Touchstone? Would Corin be an innocent who is all seriousness in his "wisdom," or would you have him act the role of a "smart alec" who is speaking in mockery trying to outdo Touchstone? Explain your reasons for your choice.
    3.) Contrast the rhyme that Touchstone wrote about Rosalind with the one written by Orlando and read by Celia. How do the two characterizations differ?
    4.) How is Orlando's view of the world different from that of Jaques (Monsieur Melancholy)?
    5.) Why does Rosalind decide to "play the knave" to Orlando?
    6.) When Rosalind tells Orlando that he does not look like a lover, he says that he wants to make her believe it is true. Is this why he agrees to pretend she is Rosalind and woo her even though he thinks she is a man? Are there any other possible reasons?
    7.) Rosalind in the guise of a man reveals some of the ways that women differ from men. List these differences and judge whether a modern audience would consider them as true.
    8.) In Touchstone's speech to Audrey, he refers to the inevitability of horns for a married man, suggesting that all wives are unfaithful. Even so, he says that it is better to be married than not. Why might he think so?
    9.) How would you describe Touchstone's attraction to Audrey? Does he express romantic love or some other kind of feeling?
    10.) Contrast Phebe's feeling for Silvius compared to her feeling for Rosalind disguised as Ganymede.

    2. Discuss Act III.

    How can students effectively analyze love relationships, courtship and the 'masculine' women in Act III of As You Like It? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 7th (NOTE THE DATE CHANGE):
  • Read Act IV and compose a journal for Act IV of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. A journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9th:

  • Read Act V and compose a journal for Act V of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. A journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Thursday, December 3rd, 2009: SENIOR ASSEMBLY How can students prepare for graduation and beyond? DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 7th (NOTE THE DATE CHANGE):
  • Read Act IV and compose a journal for Act IV of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. A journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.
  • Make up any owed HW! Read Acts I, II, and III (if you are behind!) and compose a journal for each act.
  • Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue discussing the following questions on ACT II:
    1.) How is life different in the Forest of Arden from the Court? Do you think the life in the woods is better and why? Or would you prefer to live in the court and why?
    2.) How do the woods change with the arrival of the Duke and his lords? How do they disturb nature? Is this right or wrong?
    3.) How does Adam characterize the plan of Oliver to harm his brother? How is Adam's behavior towards Orlando used as a contrast to Oliver's? What is Shakespeare telling us about the right order of relationships?
    4.) What are the characteristics of romantic love? How does Silvius identify himself as a romantic lover? When is love foolish? When is love true?
    5.) Is Rosalind truly in love with Orlando? What is her love based on? Is Orlando truly in love with Rosalind?
    6.) What are the seven ages of man described by Jacques in his speech? Is this description still relevant or how else should the stages of life be described? What stages has the average high school student gone through?
    7.) Why does the Duke offer food to Orlando? If he is not impressed with Orlando's show of force, what does move him to be generous to Orlando?

    ***Discuss the following main ideas revealed in Act II: The Luxuries of Life in Nature, The Importance of Sidekicks (Touchstone and Adam), The Contrast of Old vs. Young (Adam vs. Orlando and Corin vs. Silvius), The Power of Music (peace, catharsis, love, rejuvenation), Father-Son Relationships (Adam-Orlando), Metatheatricality (references to the theatre: "This wide and universal theatre presents more woeful pageants than the scene wherein we play in"), Philosophy of Life ("All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players...")

    2. Work Period: Work on answering the Act III questions--
    1.) What are the truisms that the shepherd Corin tells Touchstone? What are some truisms that a modern day student might speak?
    2.) If you were the director of this play, how would you direct the scene between Corin and Touchstone? Would Corin be an innocent who is all seriousness in his "wisdom," or would you have him act the role of a "smart alec" who is speaking in mockery trying to outdo Touchstone? Explain your reasons for your choice.
    3.) Contrast the rhyme that Touchstone wrote about Rosalind with the one written by Orlando and read by Celia. How do the two characterizations differ?
    4.) How is Orlando's view of the world different from that of Jaques (Monsieur Melancholy)?
    5.) Why does Rosalind decide to "play the knave" to Orlando?
    6.) When Rosalind tells Orlando that he does not look like a lover, he says that he wants to make her believe it is true. Is this why he agrees to pretend she is Rosalind and woo her even though he thinks she is a man? Are there any other possible reasons?
    7.) Rosalind in the guise of a man reveals some of the ways that women differ from men. List these differences and judge whether a modern audience would consider them as true.
    8.) In Touchstone's speech to Audrey, he refers to the inevitability of horns for a married man, suggesting that all wives are unfaithful. Even so, he says that it is better to be married than not. Why might he think so?
    9.) How would you describe Touchstone's attraction to Audrey? Does he express romantic love or some other kind of feeling?
    10.) Contrast Phebe's feeling for Silvius compared to her feeling for Rosalind disguised as Ganymede.

    How can students effectively analyze love relationships and courtship in Acts II and III of As You Like It? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
  • Read Act IV and compose a journal for Act IV of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. A journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.
  • Tuesday, December 1st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue answering the following questions on ACT II (with a partner):
    1.) How is life different in the Forest of Arden from the Court? Do you think the life in the woods is better and why? Or would you prefer to live in the court and why?
    2.) How do the woods change with the arrival of the Duke and his lords? How do they disturb nature? Is this right or wrong?
    3.) How does Adam characterize the plan of Oliver to harm his brother? How is Adam's behavior towards Orlando used as a contrast to Oliver's? What is Shakespeare telling us about the right order of relationships?
    4.) What are the characteristics of romantic love? How does Silvius identify himself as a romantic lover? When is love foolish? When is love true?
    5.) Is Rosalind truly in love with Orlando? What is her love based on? Is Orlando truly in love with Rosalind?
    6.) What are the seven ages of man described by Jacques in his speech? Is this description still relevant or how else should the stages of life be described? What stages has the average high school student gone through?
    7.) Why does the Duke offer food to Orlando? If he is not impressed with Orlando's show of force, what does move him to be generous to Orlando?

    2. Discuss/Share: Review the answers for the Act II questions. Discuss the following main ideas revealed in Act II: The Luxuries of Life in Nature, The Importance of Sidekicks (Touchstone and Adam), The Contrast of Old vs. Young (Adam vs. Orlando and Corin vs. Silvius), The Power of Music (peace, catharsis, love, rejuvenation), Father-Son Relationships (Adam-Orlando), Metatheatricality (references to the theatre: "This wide and universal theatre presents more woeful pageants than the scene wherein we play in"), Philosophy of Life ("All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players...")

    How can students effectively analyze the life cycle and the effects of nature in Act II of As You Like It? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4th:
  • Read Act IV and compose a journal for Act IV of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. A journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.
  • Monday, November 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #11 Quiz (your last vocabulary quiz!)

    2. Discussion/Analysis/Note-Taking:

  • Finish answering the following questions:
    5.) How is Orlando affected when Rosalind gives him a chain to wear as a reward and token of esteem?
    6.) Why does Duke Frederick banish Rosalind from the court? Why does he think Celia should be glad that she is leaving?
    7.) What does Celia's response to her father's treatment of Rosalind show about her character? Is her love stronger than Rosalind's as she claims?


  • Act I: How are these main ideas revealed in Act I? The social hierarchy (Oliver vs. Orlando, Duke Frederick vs. Duke Senior, Celia vs. Rosalind, etc.), Men are from Mars and Women are from Venus (the differences between men and women: sports--love/gossip/romance vs. wrestling, physical fighting, etc.), Love at First Sight (Orlando sees Rosalind; fate?!), The Court vs. Nature, Strong-willed Characters (Orlando, Duke Frederick, Celia)

    3. Work Period: Answer the following questions on ACT II (with a partner):
    1.) How is life different in the Forest of Arden from the Court? Do you think the life in the woods is better and why? Or would you prefer to live in the court and why?
    2.) How do the woods change with the arrival of the Duke and his lords? How do they disturb nature? Is this right or wrong?
    3.) How does Adam characterize the plan of Oliver to harm his brother? How is Adam's behavior towards Orlando used as a contrast to Oliver's? What is Shakespeare telling us about the right order of relationships?
    4.) What are the characteristics of romantic love? How does Silvius identify himself as a romantic lover? When is love foolish? When is love true?
    5.) Is Rosalind truly in love with Orlando? What is her love based on? Is Orlando truly in love with Rosalind?
    6.) What are the seven ages of man described by Jacques in his speech? Is this description still relevant or how else should the stages of life be described? What stages has the average high school student gone through?
    7.) Why does the Duke offer food to Orlando? If he is not impressed with Orlando's show of force, what does move him to be generous to Orlando?

  • How can students effectively analyze status and relationships in As You Like It? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
  • Read Acts II and III and compose a journal for each act of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II or Act III.

    DUE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4th:

  • Read Act IV and compose a journal for Act IV of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. A journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.
  • Wednesday, November 25th, 2009: Work Period: Finish reading and analysis of Act I, answering the Analysis Questions for ACT I:
    1.) Is Orlando justified in his quarrel with his older brother Oliver? Does Oliver owe him access to an education fitting for a gentleman?
    2.) Why does Oliver plot to harm Orlando?
    3.) Why is Rosalind sad? Why hasn't she left the court since her father was banished by the present Duke? Should she have left the court?
    4.) Why does Orlando want to challenge Charles the wrestler?
    5.) How is Orlando affected when Rosalind gives him a chain to wear as a reward and token of esteem?
    6.) Why does Duke Frederick banish Rosalind from the court? Why does he think Celia should be glad that she is leaving?
    7.) What does Celia's response to her father's treatment of Rosalind show about her character? Is her love stronger than Rosalind's as she claims?

    When finished with the reading and analysis of Act I, go ahead and work on the homework: reading of Acts II and III and composing a journal for each.

    How can students effectively analyze status and relationships in As You Like It? Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • List #11 Quiz--last quiz!!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:

  • Read Acts II and III and compose a journal for each act of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II or Act III.
  • Tuesday, November 24th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #11.

    2. Reading/Analysis: Read and Analyze Act I, answering the Analysis Questions for ACT I:
    1.) Is Orlando justified in his quarrel with his older brother Oliver? Does Oliver owe him access to an education fitting for a gentleman?
    2.) Why does Oliver plot to harm Orlando?
    3.) Why is Rosalind sad? Why hasn't she left the court since her father was banished by the present Duke? Should she have left the court?
    4.) Why does Orlando want to challenge Charles the wrestler?
    5.) How is Orlando affected when Rosalind gives him a chain to wear as a reward and token of esteem?
    6.) Why does Duke Frederick banish Rosalind from the court? Why does he think Celia should be glad that she is leaving?
    7.) What does Celia's response to her father's treatment of Rosalind show about her character? Is her love stronger than Rosalind's as she claims?

    *Make predictions regarding the storyline for Acts II and III.

    How can students effectively analyze Act I of As You Like It? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:
  • List #11 Quiz--last quiz!!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:

  • Read Acts II and III and compose a journal for each act of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II or Act III.
  • Monday, November 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: List #10 Quiz

    2. Analysis Questions for ACT I:
    1.) Is Orlando justified in his quarrel with his older brother Oliver? Does Oliver owe him access to an education fitting for a gentleman?
    2.) Why does Oliver plot to harm Orlando?
    3.) Why is Rosalind sad? Why hasn't she left the court since her father was banished by the present Duke? Should she have left the court?
    4.) Why does Orlando want to challenge Charles the wrestler?
    5.) How is Orlando affected when Rosalind gives him a chain to wear as a reward and token of esteem?
    6.) Why does Duke Frederick banish Rosalind from the court? Why does he think Celia should be glad that she is leaving?
    7.) What does Celia's response to her father's treatment of Rosalind show about her character? Is her love stronger than Rosalind's as she claims?

    *Show your Act I journal HW.

    How can students analyze Act I of As You Like It? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:
  • List #11 Quiz--last quiz!!

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st:

  • Read Acts II and III and compose a journal for each act of As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II or Act III.
  • Friday, November 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion on the following questions--
  • What can you anticipate in the comedy by William Shakespeare?
  • How does the title affect your prediction?
  • How do you expect Shakespeare to address women?
  • Do you believe there is an essential difference between men and women?
  • If so, what is the nature of the difference?
  • Why are there some expectations regarding men's roles and women's roles? What are these expectations?
  • How does social class affect the roles of men and women?

    2. Begin reading/analysis of As You Like It.

  • How can students prepare for the study of As You Like It? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:
  • List #10 Quiz.
  • Read Act I and compose an Act I Journal for As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.
  • Thursday, November 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Book Distributions of As You Like It.

    2. Note-Taking/Brainstorming:

  • What can you anticipate in the comedy by William Shakespeare?
  • How does the title affect your prediction?
  • How do you expect Shakespeare to address women?
  • Do you believe there is an essential difference between men and women?
  • If so, what is the nature of the difference?
  • Why are there some expectations regarding men's roles and women's roles? What are these expectations?
  • How does social class affect the roles of men and women?

    3. Discuss/Share reactions to the Do Now and the Brainstorming.

  • How can students prepare for the study of As You Like It? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • ALL HW OWED MUST BE TURNED IN TODAY (THE LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD).

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd:

  • List #10 Quiz.
  • Read Act I and compose an Act I Journal for As You Like It. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, As You Like It. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Orlando's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.
  • Wednesday, November 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review Hamlet Exam and Hamlet Performance grades.

    2. Awards Presentation for Best Performance, Best Actor, and Best Actress.

    3. Introduce List #10.

    4. HW reminders and time allowed to conference with teacher regarding work owed.

    How can students evaluate their understanding of the assessments on Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • ALL HW OWED MUST BE TURNED IN TODAY (THE LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD).
  • Tuesday, November 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Scene Performances!

    2. Reflections: What was valuable in preparing and performing your scene? What will you do differently in the next production?

    3. Vote for Best Performance, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Director.

    How can students effectively interpret and self-assess their scene from Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th:
  • ALL HW OWED MUST BE TURNED IN TODAY (THE LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD).
  • Monday, November 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocab. Quiz #9

    2. Work Period: Scene practice on one of these scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters) and Act III Scene I (7 characters). Read aloud, characterize your character roles, and time the scene. Student performers should also stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    3. Reflections: What do you need to accomplish in order to be prepared for tomorrow's performance? What are your final steps?

    How can students effectively work on their interpretation of scenes from Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:

  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?) Act I Scene V (4 characters) OR Act III Scene I (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (as a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Friday, November 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Scene practice on one of these scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters) and Act III Scene I (7 characters). Read aloud, characterize your character roles, and time the scene. Student performers should also stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    3. Reflections: What do you need to accomplish in order to be prepared for Monday's performance? What are your final steps?

    How can students effectively work on their interpretation of scenes from Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • List #9 Quiz!

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th:


  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?) Act I Scene V (4 characters) OR Act III Scene I (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (as a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • Thursday, November 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review List #9.

    2. Work Period: Scene practice on one of these scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters) and Act III Scene I (7 characters). Read aloud, characterize your character roles, and time the scene. Student performers should also stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    3. Reflections: How is this scene practice going so far? What do you need to work on? What are your next steps?

    How can students effectively work on their interpretation of scenes from Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?) Act I Scene V (4 characters) OR Act III Scene I (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED (as a quiz grade) AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • List #9 Quiz!
  • Tuesday, November 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Begin practice of one of these scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters) and Act III Scene I (7 characters). Read aloud, determine character roles, and time the scene. Student performers should also stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    2. Acting Exercises: Continue tableaus--Statues (acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet). Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.

    3. Reflections: How is this scene practice going so far? What do you need to work on? What are your next steps?

    How can students effectively begin their interpretation of scenes from Hamlet? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?) Act I Scene V (4 characters) OR Act III Scene I (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • List #9 Quiz!
  • Monday, November 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: List #8 Quiz

    2. Scene Work Mini-Lecture: Introduce Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. An explanation of the Hamlet scene groups. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene V (4 characters) and Act III Scene I (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    3. Acting Exercises: Begin tableaus--Statues (acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet). Statues will include archetypes in literature (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, valiant knight) and characters as animals in Hamlet. Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Archetype portrayals (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight).

    How can students effectively begin their interpretation of scenes from Hamlet? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • PERFORM YOUR CHOSEN SCENE (Editing must be part of the process; what should be included and what should be excluded?) Act I Scene V (4 characters) OR Act III Scene I (7 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED AS A GROUP ON THE FOLLOWING: GRADING SHEET FOR YOUR HAMLET SCENE.
  • List #9 Quiz!
  • Friday, November 6th, 2009: HAMLET EXAM How can students effectively prove their knowledge/analysis of Hamlet? List #8 Quiz on MONDAY!
    Thursday, November 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review List #8 for Quiz on MONDAY!

    2.Discussion/Analysis/Review: Review the Hamlet Study Guide.

    How can students effectively prepare for their assessment on Hamlet? Hamlet Exam TOMORROW (Friday)! Know the characterization of major characters, including Hamlet, Claudius, Ophelia, Polonius, Horatio, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Gertrude, Laertes, and Fortinbras. Know the conflicts, the plot development, themes (main ideas that are lessons to the audience), and Shakespeare's life, times and theater (see class notes). We will be reviewing the play in depth this week so attend class regularly and on time! Use this Hamlet Study Guide to assist you in your exam preparation. Use the packet on "Intro. to Hamlet", "Shakespeare and His England" and "Words, Words, Words" to guide you in your exam preparation as well.

    List #8 Quiz on MONDAY!

    Wednesday, November 4th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion of the following questions on Scenes I-VII in Act IV: What has Hamlet done that has caused him to be dangerous? How will he be punished? How does Hamlet interact with other people to reveal insanity? What does Hamlet say that reveals he still has his sanity? What happens to other characters that will contribute to Hamlet's downfall? Who will help Hamlet keep his sanity and how do you know this person is trustworthy?

    2. Discuss Act V of Hamlet. Why open the final scene with comic relief? What does Hamlet reveal about human beings, in general, in Scene I? What foreshadowing is revealed in Scene I? How does the play end? How does the interaction between Hamlet and his mother reveal sexual connotation? How does Gertrude die and why is her death ironic? Why is Claudius' death ironic? How does the ending tie back to the beginning? How does Hamlet die? Why does he have a slow death? How does the play have both a religious and militant ending?

    3. Introduce the Hamlet Study Guide.

    How can students identify and understand the evidence in Acts IV and V of Hamlet that lead to the characters' tragic endings? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED!

    Hamlet Exam THIS Friday! Know the characterization of major characters, including Hamlet, Claudius, Ophelia, Polonius, Horatio, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Gertrude, Laertes, and Fortinbras. Know the conflicts, the plot development, themes (main ideas that are lessons to the audience), and Shakespeare's life, times and theater (see class notes). We will be reviewing the play in depth this week so attend class regularly and on time! Use this Hamlet Study Guide to assist you in your exam preparation. Use the packet on "Intro. to Hamlet", "Shakespeare and His England" and "Words, Words, Words" to guide you in your exam preparation as well.

    List #8 Quiz on MONDAY!

    Monday, November 2nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: List #7 Quiz

    2. Discuss/Share: Finish discussion of the following questions on Scenes I-VII in Act IV: What has Hamlet done that has caused him to be dangerous? How will he be punished? How does Hamlet interact with other people to reveal insanity? What does Hamlet say that reveals he still has his sanity? What happens to other characters that will contribute to Hamlet's downfall? Who will help Hamlet keep his sanity and how do you know this person is trustworthy? Discuss Act V of Hamlet. Why open the final scene with comic relief? What does Hamlet reveal about human beings, in general, in Scene I? What foreshadowing is revealed in Scene I? How does the play end? How does the interaction between Hamlet and his mother reveal sexual connotation? How does Gertrude die and why is her death ironic? Why is Claudius' death ironic? How does the ending tie back to the beginning? How does Hamlet die? Why does he have a slow death? How does the play have both a religious and militant ending?

    How can students identify and understand the evidence in Acts IV and V of Hamlet that lead to the characters' tragic endings? MAKE UP ANY HW OWED!

    Hamlet Exam on Friday! Know the characterization of major characters, including Hamlet, Claudius, Ophelia, Polonius, Horatio, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Gertrude, Laertes, and Fortinbras. Know the conflicts, the plot development, themes (main ideas that are lessons to the audience), and Shakespeare's life, times and theater (see class notes). We will be reviewing the play in depth this week so attend class regularly and on time!

    Friday, October 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue discussion of the following questions on Scenes I-VII in Act IV: What has Hamlet done that has caused him to be dangerous? How will he be punished? How does Hamlet interact with other people to reveal insanity? What does Hamlet say that reveals he still has his sanity? What happens to other characters that will contribute to Hamlet's downfall? Who will help Hamlet keep his sanity and how do you know this person is trustworthy?

    2. Work Period: Work on journals owed and journals due on Monday.

    How can students identify and understand the evidence in Act IV of Hamlet that lead the audience to understand Hamlet's downward spiral to a tragic ending? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:
  • List #7 QUIZ
  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Thursday, October 29th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Show your Act IV journals (three journals!). Discuss the following questions on Scenes I-VII in Act IV: What has Hamlet done that has caused him to be dangerous? How will he be punished? How does Hamlet interact with other people to reveal insanity? What does Hamlet say that reveals he still has his sanity? What happens to other characters that will contribute to Hamlet's downfall? Who will help Hamlet keep his sanity and how do you know this person is trustworthy?

    2. Introduce List #7.

    How can students identify and understand the evidence in Act IV of Hamlet that leads the audience to understand Hamlet's downward spiral to a tragic ending? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:
  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Wednesday, October 28th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Show your journal entries for Act IV due TODAY.

    SENIOR ASSEMBLY

    How do students prepare the college application process? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd:
  • Read Act V of Hamlet. Compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act V.
  • Tuesday, October 27th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the Discussion/Analysis of Act III Scenes iii and iv of Hamlet. Discuss the major events in Scene iii--a revelation of Claudius' guilt and Hamlet's decision to delay killing Claudius. Scene iii reveals religious influence over the characters' choices. Why does Shakespeare have Claudius repent to the audience? Why does Shakespeare have Hamlet delay killing Claudius? Scene iv--Hamlet's unwitting and unregretful killing of Polonius, Hamlet's downward spiral toward insanity, and Hamlet's obsession with his mother's sexual acts with Claudius. Why must Polonius die? Why must Hamlet be obsessed with his mother's sexual acts? What ominous language does Shakespeare use to lead the audience to the end of the play?

    2. Work Period: Work on making up HW journals or move ahead with the journals due tomorrow (Act IV) for Hamlet. Teacher assistance will also be available.

    How do students effectively understand author's purpose in Act III of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (three homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.
  • Monday, October 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary #6 Quiz

    2. Discussion/Analysis of Act III Scenes iii and iv of Hamlet. Discuss the major events in Scene iii--a revelation of Claudius' guilt and Hamlet's decision to delay killing Claudius. Scene iii reveals religious influence over the characters' choices. Why does Shakespeare have Claudius repent to the audience? Why does Shakespeare have Hamlet delay killing Claudius? Scene iv--Hamlet's unwitting and unregretful killing of Polonius, Hamlet's downward spiral toward insanity, and Hamlet's obsession with his mother's sexual acts with Claudius. Why must Polonius die? Why must Hamlet be obsessed with his mother's sexual acts? What ominous language does Shakespeare use to lead the audience to the end of the play?

    How do students effectively understand author's purpose in Act III of Hamlet? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.
  • Friday, October 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Show Act III journals and vocabulary story #6. Peer review Act III journals. Identify strengths and areas needing improvement in your peer's journals. Analytical questions include the following: Are the character's feelings, actions, and interactions apparent in the journals? What could be added to strengthen the journals? What new information did you learn from your peer's journals?

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Finish discussion/analysis of Act III Scene ii of Hamlet. Discuss the themes in Scene ii--metatheatricality (the play within a play), trustworthy friendship vs. betrayed friendship, a revelation of Claudius' guilt.

    3. Begin discussion of Act III Scenes iii and iv of Hamlet. Discuss the major events in Scene iii--a revelation of Claudius' guilt and Hamlet's decision to delay killing Claudius. Scene iii reveals religious influence over the characters' choices. Why does Shakespeare have Claudius repent to the audience? Why does Shakespeare have Hamlet delay killing Claudius? Scene iv--Hamlet's unwitting and unregretful killing of Polonius, Hamlet's downward spiral toward insanity, and Hamlet's obsession with his mother's sexual acts with Claudius. Why must Polonius die? Why must Hamlet be obsessed with his mother's sexual acts? What ominous language does Shakespeare use to lead the audience to the end of the play?

    How do students effectively understand author's purpose in Act III of Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th:
  • List #6 Quiz DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28th:
  • Read Act IV of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act IV.
  • Thursday, October 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Work on your vocabulary story.

    2. Discussion/Share: Share vocabulary story with class.

    How do students effectively improve their language skills? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Finish today's in-class vocabulary story for List #6.
  • Read Act III of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th:

  • List #6 Quiz
  • Wednesday, October 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read Act III Scene i and analyze the characterization of Hamlet in the famous "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy.

    2. Introduce List #6.

    3. Work Period: Work on vocabulary story for list #6 with a partner. Story topic suggestions include: Hamlet, Shakespeare, college, or a topic of your choice.

    How do students effectively improve their language skills? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Read Act III of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.
  • Tuesday, October 20th, 2009: Finish Act II discussion/analysis. Act II is filled with the struggle between inferiority and authority, as seen in deception, love, old vs. young, and betrayal. Examine the relationships between Polonius and Laertes and Polonius and Ophelia, the class structure that creates some characters in authoritative positions and others in inferior positions. How does status affect the play? How does Hamlet reveal his shrewdness and sharp intellect (refer to the arrangement of the play to reveal Claudius's guilt)? . How do students effectively analyze Act II of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Read Act III of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.
  • Monday, October 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: List #5 quiz

    2. Act II discussion/analysis (continued). Act II is filled with the struggle between inferiority and authority, as seen in deception, love, old vs. young, and betrayal. Examine the relationships between Polonius and Laertes and Polonius and Ophelia, the class structure that creates some characters in authoritative positions and others in inferior positions. How does status affect the play? How does Hamlet reveal his shrewdness and sharp intellect (refer to the arrangement of the play to reveal Claudius's guilt)?

    How do students effectively analyze Act II of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Read Act III of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.
  • Friday, October 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review List #5 for Monday's quiz. Show Act II journals and any other HW owed.

    2. Act II discussion/analysis. Act II is filled with the struggle between inferiority and authority, as seen in deception, love, old vs. young, and betrayal. Examine the relationships between Polonius and Laertes and Polonius and Ophelia, the class structure that creates some characters in authoritative positions and others in inferior positions. How does status affect the play? How does Hamlet reveal his shrewdness and sharp intellect (refer to the arrangement of the play to reveal Claudius's guilt)?

    How do students effectively analyze Act II of Hamlet? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • Study for Monday's Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:

  • Read Act III of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act III.
  • Thursday, October 15th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Analysis of the rest of Act I, using textual references, on topics of authority, gender roles, parent vs. child, self-esteem, and trust issues. Answer the following questions--What are the audience's first impressions of Gertrude (look at her first words in Scene ii)? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Claudius and Hamlet? What's evidence of the fractured relationship between Queen Gertrude and Hamlet? How does Hamlet's (and Shakespeare's) misogyny reveal itself in Act I? What's Laertes's advice to his sister Ophelia? What's Polonius's advice to his son Laertes? How does the audience know that Hamlet is feeling depressed and having low self worth? Why would the audience suspect the ghost is not trustworthy? What important "truths" does the ghost reveal to Hamlet? How does the ghost feel about Queen Gertrude? What religious references are used and for what purpose?

    2. Begin Act II introduction. Act II is filled with the struggle between inferiority and authority, as seen in deception, love, old vs. young, and betrayal.

    3. HW reminders.

    How do students effectively analyze the opening scenes of Act I of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • Read Act II of Hamlet. Compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz
  • Wednesday, October 14th, 2009: NO CLASS DUE TO PSAT. How do students effectively analyze the opening scenes of Act I of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • Read Act II of Hamlet. Compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.
  • Tuesday, October 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #4 Quiz

    2. Analysis of Act I Scenes i and ii.

    How do students effectively analyze the opening scenes of Act I of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • Read Act II of Hamlet. Compose TWO CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (two homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act II.
  • Friday, October 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue reading and analyzing the introductory scenes of Act I of Hamlet. How do we characterize Claudius? How do we characterize Hamlet? What can we expect in the scenes to come? How are these opening scenes typical of Shakespeare's style and time period?

    2. Introduce List #4 for the upcoming quiz.

    How do students effectively analyze the opening scenes of Act I of Hamlet and examine the powerful influence of foreshadowing? DUE THIS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:
  • Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES (three homework credits!). A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.
  • Vocab. List #4 Quiz!
  • Thursday, October 8th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue reading and analyzing the introductory scene of Act I of Hamlet. Why has the ghost of King Hamlet appeared? What can we expect in the scenes to come?

    2. Discuss HW journals.

    How do students prepare to read Hamlet and examine the powerful influence of foreshadowing? DUE THIS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:
  • Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.
  • Vocab. List #4 Quiz!
  • Wednesday, October 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion of Shakespearean language. Read Iambic Pentameter handout.

    2. Read the introductory scene of Act I of Hamlet. Why has the ghost of King Hamlet appeared? What can we expect in the scenes to come?

    How do students prepare to read Hamlet and examine the powerful influence of foreshadowing? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13th:
  • Read Act I of Hamlet. Compose THREE CHARACTER JOURNAL ENTRIES. A character journal entry is a "dear diary" in which you write as if you are a character in the play, Hamlet. Each journal entry should be a minimum of 250 words (that's about 1-2 handwritten pages or 1 typed page). It is recommended that you put journal entries in a notebook. The journal entry should have the character's name at the top. For example, "Gertrude's Journal." You should write in 1st person (using forms of "I"). You should include the character's thoughts/feelings, actions, interactions with other characters and perceptions of other characters. You should only include what happens for that character in Act I.
  • Vocab. List #4 Quiz!
  • Tuesday, October 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the analysis of the handout readings. Add to your annotations. Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose should focus on the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose should answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

    2. Read Iambic Pentameter handout.

    How will the study of Shakespeare's life, times and language influence our preparation for the study Hamlet? MAKE UP HW:
  • Make up any HW owed. See previous days for HW listed.
  • Monday, October 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #3 Quiz. Show any owed HW, including Story #3 and your annotations on the handout readings.

    2. Discuss/Share: Analyze the handout readings. Add to your annotations. Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose should focus on the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose should answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

    How will the study of Shakespeare's life, times and language influence our preparation for the study Hamlet? MAKE UP HW:
  • Make up any HW owed. See previous days for HW listed.
  • Friday, October 2nd, 2009: Work Period: Work on owed HW--annotations and anything else owed. Prepare your vocabulary story #3 (due Monday). Prepare Monday's vocabulary quiz on list #3. How do students expand their knowledge of Shakespeare's life, times and influences on his works? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
  • Vocabulary Story #3. You must write a minimum of 250 words or more. You MUST underline or bold the vocabulary words. It can be typed or handwritten, and the topic is on Shakespeare, College, My Future or a topic of your choice.

    Quiz on List #3 on Monday.

  • Thursday, October 1st, 2009: Work Period: Work on owed HW--annotations and anything else owed. Prepare your vocabulary story #3 (due tomorrow). How do students expand their knowledge of Shakespeare's life, times and influences on his works? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2nd:
  • Vocabulary Story #3. You must write a minimum of 250 words or more. You MUST underline or bold the vocabulary words. It can be typed or handwritten, and the topic is on Shakespeare, College, My Future or a topic of your choice.

    Quiz on List #3 on Monday.

  • Wednesday, September 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Pop Reading Quiz. Show your annotations on the handout readings.

    2. Discuss/Share: Analyze the handout readings. Add to your annotations.

    How do students expand their knowledge of Shakespeare's life, times and influences on his works? DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2nd:
  • Vocabulary Story #3. You must write a minimum of 250 words or more. You MUST underline or bold the vocabulary words. It can be typed or handwritten, and the topic is on Shakespeare, College, My Future or a topic of your choice.
  • Tuesday, September 29th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Vocabulary List #2

    2. Discuss/Share: Introduce List #3. Read aloud the annotations of the readings due tomorrow and discuss/analyze teacher expectations.

    How do students expand their knowledge of Shakespeare's life, times and influences on his works? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th:
  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose should focus on the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose should answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?
  • Friday, September 25th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Why is the phrase "To be or not to be" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop?

    2. HW instructions

    3. Work Period: Begin the HW.

    How do students expand their knowledge of Shakespeare's life, times and influences on his works? QUIZ #2, THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th:

  • Handout Packet (received in class) on "Introduction to Hamlet," "Shakespeare and His England" and "Words, Words, Words." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose should focus on the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose should answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays? For "Words, Words, Words," you purpose should answer the following: What will help me understand the language?
  • Thursday, September 24th, 2009: SENIOR ASSEMBLY How do students prepare for college? QUIZ #2, THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th:

  • Handout Packet on "Introduction to Hamlet," "Shakespeare and His England" and "Words, Words, Words." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose should focus on the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose should answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays? For "Words, Words, Words," you purpose should answer the following: What will help me understand the language?
  • Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Share your Vocabulary Story #2--due today (using List #2 on My Future or Life at ITHS.

    2. Brainstorming/Predictions: Why is the phrase "To be or not to be" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop?

    3. Discussion/Sharing: Discuss answers to the brainstorming/predictions.

    How do students effectively improve their lexicon and prepare to study Shakespeare's life, times and works? QUIZ #2, NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Presentations of Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP/POEM (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap/poem as your partner), use the most essential facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap/poem (use an existing tune or your own and make sure the beats match).

    2. Work Period: Introduce List #2. Begin to work on Vocabulary Story #2 (using List #2 on My Future or Life at ITHS.

    How do students effectively present their creative writing pieces? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:
  • Vocabulary Story #2 (using List #2 on My Future or Life at ITHS. Be ready to share tomorrow.

    QUIZ #2, NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Monday, September 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Vocabulary List #1 Show any HW owed (including e-mail addresses for you and your parents/guardians).

    2. Work Period:

  • Work on discipline code paperwork.
  • Work on HW (due tomorrow!) with a partner. Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP/POEM (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap/poem as your partner), use the most essential facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap/poem (use an existing tune or your own and make sure the beats match). In a group of four, practice presenting. Focus on eye contact, projection, hand gestures, posture, confidence and energy.

    3. Introduce List #2.

  • How do students improve their creative writing and lexicon? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP/POEM (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap/poem as your partner), use the facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap/poem. Bring in the song/rap to class (typed or handwritten is OK). THIS WILL BE A PRESENTATION.
  • Discipline Code Paperwork.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:

  • Vocabulary Story #2 (using List #2 on My Future or Life at ITHS. Be ready to share.

    QUIZ #2, NEXT TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #2. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Friday, September 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Listen to HW instructions. Show research HW.

    2. Creative Opportunity Work Period: Work on HW with a partner. Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP/POEM (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap/poem as your partner), use the most essential facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap/poem (use an existing tune or your own and make sure the beats match). 3. Reflect on creative opportunity progress.

    How do students improve their creative writing? QUIZ #1, THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.

    DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:

  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP/POEM (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap/poem as your partner), use the facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap/poem. Bring in the song/rap to class (typed or handwritten is OK). THIS WILL BE A PRESENTATION.
  • Thursday, September 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read over Vocabulary List #1. Identify any familiar words and any words you have difficult pronouncing.

    2. Work Period: With a partner, write a Shakespearean vocabulary story. Use all 30 vocabulary words from list #1. You can write anything about Shakespeare, his life, times, or works.

    How do students improve their knowledge of vocabulary and William Shakespeare? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:
  • Finish today's classwork--the Shakespearean vocabulary story. Bring in tomorrow and be ready to share!
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic (determined in class). When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250-word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows: Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.

    QUIZ #1, THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Wednesday, September 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Turn in your resume. K-W-L: What do you know about William Shakespeare, his life, his work and his times? What do you want to know? Why is it important to know about him, his life, his work and his times?

    2. Shakespeare Research Presentation introduction and topic sign-up.

    What prior knowledge do students have and what interests them regarding William Shakespeare's life, work and times? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th:
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic (determined in class). When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250-word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows: Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.

    QUIZ #1, THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Tuesday, September 15th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #1.

    2. Begin discussion/analysis of Resume Writing 101.

    3. Independent Resume Writing: Students will continue the resume writing process and/or the resume editing process.

    How will students be prepared to write or edit their academic resumes? What is the initial data gathering and composition process of resume writing? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:
  • Academic Resume (first draft is due--it MUST be typed). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    QUIZ #1, NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Monday, September 14th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Turn in your College Essay. Reflections on your college essay--Did you use the sample college essays and expert advice in composing your college essay? Did you go through an editing/revision process of your college essay? If so, what was it? Are you satisfied with the final product?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share Do Now reflections.

    3. Analysis of Sample Resumes--Students individually and collectively analyze the sample resumes. Guiding questions to answer while analyzing: What are the components of an academic resume? What are the strengths of each resume? What are the weaknesses? What qualities, in terms of formatting, writing style, and word usage, are worth including in your own resume?

    4. HW reminders. Briefly introduce Vocabulary List #1.

    How will students be prepared to write or edit their academic resumes? What is the initial data gathering and composition process of resume writing? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Bring in a rough draft of your resume. It can be handwritten or typed.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th:

  • Academic Resume (first draft is due--it MUST be typed). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    QUIZ #1, NEXT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • Quiz on Vocabulary List #1. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Friday, September 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and discussing the following: "Writing the Essay: Sound Advice from an Expert", marking it with the following code system--check=I know and understand this, question mark=I don't understand/I'm confused and need to know more, and exclamation point (!)=This is cool.

    2. Read Sample College Essays. What are some strengths in these essays? What tips can you use from these essays? Take notes.

    3. College essay pre-writing. Brainstorm, compose a graphic organizer, start an outline, and work on your attention grabber. How will you show, not tell, in your essay?

    How will students be able to compose a successful college essay? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14TH:
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum (about two pages), typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Thursday, September 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Begin reading the following: "Writing the Essay: Sound Advice from an Expert", marking it with the following code system--check=I know and understand this, question mark=I don't understand/I'm confused and need to know more, and exclamation point (!)=This is cool.

    2. Discuss/Review the Do Now.

    How will students be able to compose a successful college essay? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • E-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Introduce yourself. What should I know about you? Put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."
  • Have your parent/guardian e-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Your parent/guardian can just say a brief hello and explain how he/she is related (father, mother, guardian, aunt, uncle, etc.). Please have him/her put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14TH:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum (about two pages), typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    
  • Wednesday, September 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and fill out the index card, answering the following in complete sentences (when appropriate):
  • your full name (in parentheses, write your first name, which you want to be called in class)
  • Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
  • What did you read this summer? Provide titles of books, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • Identify FIVE colleges you will apply to. Star (*) your #1 choice.
  • What career do you plan to pursue and why?
  • What knowledge do you hope to acquire in this English course?
  • What can you contribute to this English course?
  • What are you looking forward to this school year?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share responses.

    3. Senior Syllabus introduced.

    4. HW introduced.

  • How will students introduce themselves, with reference to recent literary practice and personal and academic goals? DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • E-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Introduce yourself. What should I know about you? Put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."
  • Have your parent/guardian e-mail me at hconn28@yahoo.com. Your parent/guardian can just say a brief hello and explain how he/she is related (father, mother, guardian, aunt, uncle, etc.). Please have him/her put your first and last name in the subject. I will respond with a "Thank you."

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title