Senior HONORS Assignments, Fall 2008 & Winter 2009

Senior HONORS Assignments
Fall 2008 & Winter 2009

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, January 26th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Introduce HW.

2. Semester reflections

How do we effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam by examining the essay portion of the exam? DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3rd (1st day of next semester!):
  • Complete the Free Response Questions from a sample AP exam. DO NOT USE ANY OUTSIDE RESOURCES (THAT INCLUDES THE INTERNET!). These essays are practice for the AP exam. On the AP exam, you will not be allowed to search on the internet. Time yourself--40 minutes per essay (three essays total!). Write long, in-depth essays. DO NOT SUMMARIZE PLOT. Use the skills I've taught you to help you write college-level essays!
  • READ FOR PLEASURE! READ A BOOK TO CHALLENGE YOUR MIND! Read something different, intriguing, eye-opening. :)
  • Be prepared to present your Book Club Discussion questions in a fishbowl discussion format (yes, we've had to put it off until February...but that means it will be SO much better!).

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Friday, January 23rd, 2009: 1.Do Now: Finish analysis of "Sestina" by Elizabeth Bishop.

    2. Grade distribution/Final Paper analysis.

    How do we effectively analyze literature with regard to literary devices, as depicted in the AP English exam?

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, January 22nd, 2009: Work Period: Prepare for tomorrow's Book Club Discussion Fishbowl. Review the essays on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Make sure that you can engage in a 15-20 minute discussion with your group on all questions. How do we effectively analyze literature with regard to literary devices, as depicted in the AP English exam?

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Wednesday, January 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Reading and analysis of Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing.

    2. Discussion: Finish review of "The Habit of Perfection" and "Sestina" by Elizabeth Bishop. Examine the significance of the poetic devices and the corresponding questions in the AP packet.

    3. HW Reminders: college scholarships, college applications and FAFSA.

    How do we effectively analyze poetry for the AP English Literature exam?

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Tuesday, January 20th, 2009 (Inauguration Day): 1. Do Now: Read the Discussion Guide found at USAService.org on how all of us can engage in community service as a tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and President-elect Obama. Show your poetry packets and Book Discussion papers.

    2. Discussion: Review the Discussion Guide, focusing on areas in our communities that need service and the roles that we can play. Brainstorm service ideas that fit our interests.

    3. Review AP poems--"The Habit of Perfection" and "Sestina" by Elizabeth Bishop. Examine the significance of the poetic devices and the corresponding questions in the AP packet.

    4. HW Reminders: college scholarships, college applications and FAFSA.

    How do we prepare to be productive members of society?

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Friday, January 16th, 2009: Book Club Discussion/Preparations How will students improve their reading and analyzing of challenging texts in preparation for college and the AP exam? Due THIS Tuesday, January 20th:
  • Bring in the finished AP poetry packet ("Sestina"), writing summary notes, identifying poetic devices in the margin and answering the questions (with your answer written in the margin--the answer you determined by covering up the answer choices).
  • Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, January 15th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Work on another packet of AP poetry ("Sestina") and questions. Be prepared to analyze the importance of prior knowledge (especially any biblical knowledge) and the significance of poetic devices. Answer the questions, using POE (process of elimination of two or three wrong answers). How will students improve their poetry writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? Due TOMORROW: Finish today's in-class AP poetry packet, writing summary notes, identifying poetic devices in the margin and answering the questions.

    All HW MUST be turned in by TOMORROW--no exceptions. This includes any owed papers, projects, quizzes, etc.

    Read your Book Club selections!

    Due NEXT Tuesday, January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

    Wednesday, January 14th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Show the AP poetry analysis HW. Finish adding summary notes, author's purpose, prior knowledge connections and answer choices to be eliminated.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Examine the sample AP poetry and questions. Discuss the importance of prior knowledge (especially any biblical knowledge) and the significance of poetic devices.

    How will students improve their poetry writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? All HW MUST be turned in by THIS Friday--no exceptions. This includes any owed papers, projects, quizzes, etc.

    Read your Book Club selections!

    Due NEXT Tuesday, January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

    Tuesday, January 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish answering another group's poetry questions. Check answers.

    2. Discussion/Reflection: Was this an easy or challenging assignment? How did you do in answering these questions? What strategies did you use?

    3. Work Period: Work on a sample of AP poetry and questions. Answer the questions using some simple strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine your answer without being distracted by the answers AND do POE (process of elimination) in which you eliminate three wrong answers and get down to 50/50.

    How will students improve their poetry writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? DUE TOMORROW: Finish the in-class AP poetry reading and questions. Make sure to summarize each stanza in the margin, identify poetic devices, author's purpose, significance of each poetic device to the overall meaning of the poem, and strategies for answering the poetry questions (including POE and covering up the answer choices to figure out the answer on your own, without distractions from the answer choices).

    All HW MUST be turned in by THIS Friday--no exceptions. This includes any owed papers, projects, quizzes, etc.

    Read your Book Club selections!

    Due NEXT Tuesday, January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

    Monday, January 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Discuss/share the AP poetry question composition process. Challenges? Reflect on the As You Like It revision and final draft writing process.

    2. Work Period: With your partner(s), work on another poetry group's poetry questions. Then, check your answers. Reflect on this activity.

    How will students improve their poetry writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? Read your Book Club selections!

    Due NEXT Tuesday, January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

    Friday, January 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: With your partner(s), create TEN multiple choice questions for your original poem. Use the AP English Literature Questions Stems to guide you. Turn in today. (Show your Book Club selections and turn in the two drafts of your As You Like It paper.)

    2. Discuss/Share/Reflect: Discuss the AP multiple-choice question-making and answer-making process. Challenges? Book club selections--what was your selection process? As You Like It papers--what was your revision process?

    How will students improve their poetry writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? Read your Book Club selections!

    Due January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

    Thursday, January 8th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Share your original poetry assignments. Why are the poetic devices significant to the entire poem? How do they contribute to the topic's message? How is the contrast of two worlds evident?

    2. Work Period: With your partner(s), create TEN multiple choice questions for your original poem. Use the AP English Literature Questions Stems to guide you. You will have today and tomorrow in class to work on this assignment.

    How will students improve their poetry writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? Due TOMORROW, Friday, January 9th:
  • Bring in your revised/final draft of the As You Like It Paper. Remember, DO NOT make the same mistakes that you made in the first two papers. Please stay focused on ONE topic and make it clear in the introduction. Develop your ideas, thinking of the significance/importance for your claims. Ask yourself the following questions: Why is this significant to the entire play? What is the author's purpose for this? So what?
  • Bring in (and show that you've begun reading) your Book Club selection (Book Club details below) taken from one of these links--101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Wednesday, January 7th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish your original poetry assignment, in which you write a 30-line poem (in a group of 2-3 people) on the topic of adolescent life (you can narrow your topic if you so choose), including at least five poetic devices, and focusing on a contrast of two worlds.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your original poetry assignments. Why are the poetic devices significant to the entire poem? How do they contribute to the topic's message? How is the contrast of two worlds evident?

    How will students improve their poetry writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, January 8th:
  • Bring in the completed, original poem to share tomorrow.

    Due Friday, January 9th:

  • Bring in your revised/final draft of the As You Like It Paper. Remember, DO NOT make the same mistakes that you made in the first two papers. Please stay focused on ONE topic and make it clear in the introduction. Develop your ideas, thinking of the significance/importance for your claims. Ask yourself the following questions: Why is this significant to the entire play? What is the author's purpose for this? So what?
  • Bring in (and show that you've begun reading) your Book Club selection (Book Club details below) taken from one of these links--101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Tuesday, January 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce original poetry assignment. Instructions include the following: write a 30-line poem (in a group of 2-3 people) on the topic of adolescent life (you can narrow your topic if you so choose), including at least five poetic devices, and focusing on a contrast of two worlds.

    2. Work Period: Work on the original poetry assignment.

    How will students improve their poetry writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? Due Friday, January 9th:
  • Bring in your revised/final draft of the As You Like It Paper. Remember, DO NOT make the same mistakes that you made in the first two papers. Please stay focused on ONE topic and make it clear in the introduction. Develop your ideas, thinking of the significance/importance for your claims. Ask yourself the following questions: Why is this significant to the entire play? What is the author's purpose for this? So what?
  • Bring in (and show that you've begun reading) your Book Club selection (Book Club details below) taken from one of these links--101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Monday, January 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Analyze Henry IV Part I/Hamlet Papers, examining teacher edits and grading rubric.

    2. Book Club Discussion Requirements: Introduce the requirements (as outlined in the HW) and the corresponding writing opportunity--General Book Club Discussion Questions.

    3. Self-Test: How many Poetry Terms do you know? Write the definitions of the terms you know.

    How will students improve their writing skills in preparation for college and the AP exam? Due Friday, January 9th:
  • Bring in your revised/final draft of the As You Like It Paper. Remember, DO NOT make the same mistakes that you made in the first two papers. Please stay focused on ONE topic and make it clear in the introduction. Develop your ideas, thinking of the significance/importance for your claims. Ask yourself the following questions: Why is this significant to the entire play? What is the author's purpose for this? So what?
  • Bring in (and show that you've begun reading) your Book Club selection (Book Club details below) taken from one of these links--101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.

    Due January 20th: Book Club-- You MUST read a pre-approved book with a self-selected discussion group of three people (that's you and two classmates) by this due date and turn in one page typed for each category on the General Book Club Discussion Questions List. Each group member should be able to discuss the categories of questions in a fish-bowl discussion format. Your pre-approved book had to be chosen from one of these links: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites. You will be expected to engage in discussion. Read and discuss with your group mates, analyzing setting, themes, character development, author's purpose and tone, worldly (including current and historical) connections, personal connections, and literary devices used.

  • Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008: 1. Performance presentations of As You Like It

    2. Evaluate the performance presentations of As You Like It, using the Grading Sheet.

    How can students effectively analyze and present their own performance interpretations of As You Like It?
  • Have a wonderful holiday vacation!

    Work on your college applications!

    Due Monday, January 5th:

  • As You Like It Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Analyze how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points.
  • Monday, December 22nd, 2008: 1. Performance presentations of As You Like It

    2. Evaluate the performance presentations of As You Like It, using the Grading Sheet.

    How can students effectively analyze and present their own performance interpretations of As You Like It? Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, December 23rd:
  • All remaining As You Like It performances! Arrange in groups according to the four elements (fire, air, earth, water) found HERE. Each group must have at least one person from each of the elements. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.

    Due Monday, January 5th:

  • As You Like It Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Analyze how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points.
  • Thursday, December 18th, 2008: 1. Computer-based Assessment at www.edperformance.com.

    2. Prepare for your performances of As You Like It. Use the Grading Sheet to guide you.

    How can students effectively take a computer-based assessment on reading and language arts skills that are necessary for college? Due Monday, December 22nd-Tuesday, December 23rd:
  • As You Like It performances! Arrange in groups according to the four elements (fire, air, earth, water) found HERE. Each group must have at least one person from each of the elements. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.

    Due Monday, January 5th:

  • As You Like It Paper--reflect on one of the following questions, focusing on As You Like It: How does Shakespeare reveal his understanding of the universal human experience? What techniques does Shakespeare use in As You Like It that are both typical and atypical of his language style, as compared to his other plays? In a well-written 5-7 pp. paper, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric, analyze one of these questions. Include generous textual references to As You Like It in which you explain how the evidence contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Analyze how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points.
  • Wednesday, December 17th, 2008: Computer-based Assessment at www.edperformance.com. How can students effectively take a computer-based assessment with an unknown purpose? Due Monday, December 22nd-Tuesday, December 23rd:
  • As You Like It performances! Arrange in groups according to the four elements (fire, air, earth, water) found HERE. Each group must have at least one person from each of the elements. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.
  • Tuesday, December 16th, 2008: 1. Discussion: Finish discussion on how As You Like It reveals Shakespeare's adept skill in understanding the universal human experience. Also, examine techniques that are both typical and atypical of the Shakespearean style, as seen in his other plays. Finally, share your praise and criticisms of this comedy, our final Shakespearean play.

    2. Performance Preparation: Arrange in your groups and begin to read aloud your scenes, determine directors, roles, and director's vision.

    How can students effectively analyze Shakespeare's universal understanding of the human experience, as determined by examining current events and the plays studied this semester? Due Monday, December 22nd-Tuesday, December 23rd:
  • As You Like It performances! Arrange in groups according to the four elements (fire, air, earth, water) found HERE. Each group must have at least one person from each of the elements. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.
  • Monday, December 15th, 2008: Discussion: Discuss how As You Like It reveals Shakespeare's skill in understanding the universal human experience. Examine techniques that are both typical and atypical of the Shakespearean style, as seen in his other plays. How can students effectively analyze Shakespeare's universal understanding of the human experience, as determined by examining current events and the plays studied this semester? Due Monday, December 22nd-Tuesday, December 23rd:
  • As You Like It performances! Arrange in groups according to the four elements (fire, air, earth, water) found HERE. Each group must have at least one person from each of the elements. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.
  • Friday, December 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read current news articles in the The New York Times and other newspapers provided in class. Identify current events that could fit into a Shakespearean play. Be ready to share evidence and explanation as to why these events are suitable for any of the plays read this semester. Be ready to explain how Shakespeare was so adept at the understanding of the universal human experience. Turn in the As You Like It Dialectical Journal and sign up for a conference day.

    2. Arrange in As You Like It performance groups.

    How can students effectively analyze Shakespeare's universal understanding of the human experience, as determined by examining current events and the plays studied this semester? Due THIS Monday, December 15th:
  • Finish today's Do Now, writing a full page of Shakespearean references in current events. Refer to specific newspapers (i.e. the newspaper provided in class or other available newspapers, such as The New York Times) and articles.

    Due Monday, December 22nd-Tuesday, December 23rd:

  • As You Like It performances! Arrange in groups according to the four elements (fire, air, earth, water) found HERE. Each group must have at least one person from each of the elements. Here are the scenes: Act I Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia and Duke Frederick), Act II Scene vii (Duke Senior, First Lord, Jaques, Orlando, Adam, and Amiens; the same person will play both the First Lord and Adam) and two groups acting out Act III Scene ii (Orlando, Corin, Touchstone, Rosalind, Celia, Jaques) from As You Like It. Act IV Scene i (Jaques, Rosalind, Orlando and Celia), Act IV Scene iii (Rosalind, Celia, Silvius, and Oliver), and Act V Scenes ii, iii and iv (Orlando, Oliver, Rosalind, Phebe, Silvius, Touchstone, Audrey, First Page/Second Page, Duke Senior, Jaques, Hymen, Second Brother). Scene performances should follow the Grading Sheet for As You Like It Scenes. Your scenes should be presented in 5-10 minutes. They should not exceed 10 minutes. For that reason, you might have to edit some lines. Which lines MUST be included? What can be excluded? Keep the iambic pentameter in place.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.
  • Thursday, December 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss Shakespearean techniques that are present in As You Like It (e.g. literary devices and other Shakespearean styles of writing). What's the significance for each technique?

    2. Reflection: Examine the process and value in identifying, analyzing and discussing Shakespearean techniques in As You Like It.

    How can students effectively analyze the Shakespearean techniques in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due TOMORROW, Friday, December 12th: Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting. Compose your final Dialectical Journal. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.
  • Wednesday, December 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss Shakespearean techniques that are present in As You Like It (e.g. literary devices and other Shakespearean styles of writing). What's the significance for each technique?

    2. Reflection: Examine the process and value in identifying, analyzing and discussing Shakespearean techniques in As You Like It.

    How can students effectively analyze the Shakespearean techniques in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due THIS Friday, December 12th: Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting. Compose your final Dialectical Journal. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.
  • Tuesday, December 9th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Assess Vocabulary #11 quizzes.

    2. Finish identifying and analyzing Shakespearean techniques that are present in As You Like It (e.g. literary devices and other Shakespearean styles of writing). What's the significance for each technique?

    How can students effectively analyze the Shakespearean techniques in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due Friday, December 12th: Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting. Compose your final Dialectical Journal. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

  • Check out the Magic Johnson Scholarship.
  • Monday, December 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: In assigned groups of four, identify Shakespearean techniques that are present in As You Like It (e.g. literary devices and other Shakespearean styles of writing). What's the significance for each technique?

    2. Discuss Do Now.

    How can students prepare to analyze the Shakespearean techniques in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due Friday, December 12th: Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting. Compose your final Dialectical Journal. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.
    Friday, December 5th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #11 Quiz. Show Story #11 HW.

    2. Analysis of opening of As You Like It: Read the opening lines spoken by Orlando from As You Like It: "...he [Oliver, his older brother] keeps me rustically at home, or, to speak more properly, stays me here at home unkept; for call you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth that differs not from the stalling of an ox? His horses are bred better, for, besides that they are fair with their feeding, they are taught their manage, and to that end riders dearly hired; but I, his brother, gain nothing under him but growth..."(I, i, 6-14). Interpret Orlando's speech. Why is he upset? What expectations does Orlando have about the type of education which he deserves? What does he imply about his nature as a gentleman? What does he think is the difference between himself and men who are not born as gentlemen?

    3. Brainstorm/Discuss: Where do writers get ideas for romantic comedies and how do they tell a story that makes us laugh and also, at times, learn a lesson about human behavior? What are the essential components of a love story? Think about titles of popular situation comedies on TV or movies that have a strong romantic interest to help guide you.

    How can students prepare to analyze the themes in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due Friday, December 12th: Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting. Compose your final Dialectical Journal. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.
    Thursday, December 4th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Reading and Analysis of opening of As You Like It: Read the opening lines spoken by Orlando from As You Like It: "...he [Oliver, his older brother] keeps me rustically at home, or, to speak more properly, stays me here at home unkept; for call you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth that differs not from the stalling of an ox? His horses are bred better, for, besides that they are fair with their feeding, they are taught their manage, and to that end riders dearly hired; but I, his brother, gain nothing under him but growth..."(I, i, 6-14). Interpret Orlando's speech. Why is he upset? What expectations does Orlando have about the type of education which he deserves? What does he imply about his nature as a gentleman? What does he think is the difference between himself and men who are not born as gentlemen?

    2. Discuss Do Now.

    How can students prepare to analyze the themes in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due Friday, December 5th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #11 Story (topics: college, As You Like It or a topic of your choice)

    Due Friday, December 12th: Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting. Compose your final Dialectical Journal. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

  • Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion and note-taking on Expectations and Restrictions on Gender during Shakespeare's Times and Modern Times. There are descriptions about the nature of women throughout the play, As You Like It, spoken by both female and male characters suggesting there is an essential difference between the two genders. Do you believe there is an essential difference between men and women? What is the nature of this difference? Why do some expectations regarding men and women emerge? When did the idea emerge that women couldn't work as hard as men? How much work did women do during Shakespeare's times? During modern America? How does class affect the stereotypes about men and women? What do these notions tell us about how social class and concepts of gender are intertwined?

    2. As You Like It distribution.

    3. Reading and Analysis of opening of As You Like It: Read the opening lines spoken by Orlando from As You Like It: "...he [Oliver, his older brother] keeps me rustically at home, or, to speak more properly, stays me here at home unkept; for call you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth that differs not from the stalling of an ox? His horses are bred better, for, besides that they are fair with their feeding, they are taught their manage, and to that end riders dearly hired; but I, his brother, gain nothing under him but growth..."(I, i, 6-14). Interpret Orlando's speech. Why is he upset? What expectations does Orlando have about the type of education which he deserves? What does he imply about his nature as a gentleman? What does he think is the difference between himself and men who are not born as gentlemen?

    How can students prepare to analyze the themes in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due Friday, December 5th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #11 Story (topics: college, As You Like It or a topic of your choice)

    Due Friday, December 12th: Read the mature comedy, As You Like It by William Shakespeare, published in 1599. Pay close attention to the thematic conflict of Restriction vs. Freedom. Examine Shakespeare's depictions of restrictions on gender, class, and setting. Compose your final Dialectical Journal. This journal should be the BEST journal composed this semester. It should incorporate all of the teacher suggestions/edits and adherence to the journal requirements.

  • Tuesday, December 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish Note-Taking/Brainstorming on Expectations and Restrictions on Gender during Shakespeare's Times and Modern Times. There are descriptions about the nature of women throughout the play, As You Like It, spoken by both female and male characters suggesting there is an essential difference between the two genders. Do you believe there is an essential difference between men and women? What is the nature of this difference? Why do some expectations regarding men and women emerge? When did the idea emerge that women couldn't work as hard as men? How much work did women do during Shakespeare's times? During modern America? How does class affect the stereotypes about men and women? What do these notions tell us about how social class and concepts of gender are intertwined?

    2. Discuss Do Now. What are some of your expectations regarding Shakespeare's play As You Like It?

    How can students prepare to analyze the themes in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due Friday, December 5th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #11 Story (topics: college, As You Like It or a topic of your choice)
  • Monday, December 1st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #11--the final list!

    2. Note-Taking/Brainstorming on Expectations and Restrictions on Gender during Shakespeare's times and modern times.

    How can students prepare to analyze the themes in As You Like It--Shakespeare's romantic comedy? Due Friday, December 5th:
  • Vocabulary List #11 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #11 Story (topics: college, As You Like It or a topic of your choice)
  • Wednesay, November 26th, 2008: Finish Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations. Evaluate your classmates using this Grading Rubric for Henry IV Part I Scenes. How can students interpret scenes from Henry IV Part I? PAPER DUE DATE CHANGE=DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 1st:
  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower.
  • Tuesday, November 25th, 2008: Henry IV Part I Performance Group Presentations. Evaluate your classmates using this Grading Rubric for Henry IV Part I Scenes. How can students interpret scenes from Henry IV Part I? DueTOMORROW:
  • All HW owed for 2nd marking period.

    PAPER DUE DATE CHANGE=DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 1st:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower.
  • Monday, November 24th, 2008: Henry IV Part I Performance Group Preparation--rehearsals! How can students interpret scenes from Henry IV Part I? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25TH:
  • Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Acting groups will organize according to the first letter of your first name. Scene Groups are--Students' first names that begin with the letter "K"--1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), Students' first names that begin with the letter "J"-- 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), Students' first names that begin with "M, N or O"--3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), Students' first names that begin with "R"--4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "S or T"--5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "G or H"--6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and Students' first names that begin with "A, B, C or D"--7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Use this Grading Rubric for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    PAPER DUE DATE CHANGE=DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 1st:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower.
  • Friday, November 21st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocab. List #10 Quiz

    2. Henry IV Part I Performance Group Preparation

    How can students analyze, edit and interpret scenes from Henry IV Part I? DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25TH:
  • Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Acting groups will organize according to the first letter of your first name. Scene Groups are--Students' first names that begin with the letter "K"--1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), Students' first names that begin with the letter "J"-- 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), Students' first names that begin with "M, N or O"--3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), Students' first names that begin with "R"--4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "S or T"--5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "G or H"--6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and Students' first names that begin with "A, B, C or D"--7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Use this Grading Rubric for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower.
  • Thursday, November 20th, 2008: 1. Reflections on Thematic Discussion Groups

    2. Henry IV Part I Performance Groups arranged and instructions reviewed.

    3. Henry IV Part I and Hamlet Paper instructions reviewed.

    4. Henry IV Part I Performance Groups--read-aloud. Show teacher recommendations.

    How can students choose and examine similar themes in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? Due TOMORROW, FRIDAY, November 21st:
  • Vocab. List #10 Quiz
  • Vocab. List #10 Story on performance of Henry IV Part I or college.

    DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25TH:

  • Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Acting groups will organize according to the first letter of your first name. Scene Groups are--Students' first names that begin with the letter "K"--1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), Students' first names that begin with the letter "J"-- 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), Students' first names that begin with "M, N or O"--3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), Students' first names that begin with "R"--4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "S or T"--5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "G or H"--6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and Students' first names that begin with "A, B, C or D"--7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Use this Grading Rubric for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower.
  • Wednesday, November 19th, 2008: Finish Thematic Discussion Groups for Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: Organize into groups according to your thematic interests. Address your group's one thematic discussion question (in who, what, when or where form) and four follow-up questions (in why or how form) that encourage you group participants to generate a large number of ideas on a single topic in a short space of time. The thematic question should deliberately encourage all kinds of ideas or opinions, while the follow-up questions maintain the range of what is appropriate. Groups will be expected to engage in a discussion, using their main thematic question and follow-up questions to guide them in a vibrant discussion. The rest of the class will review and take notes on the fishbowl discussion. Textual evidence must be addressed. Discussions should last for 10-15 minutes. How can students choose and examine similar themes in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:
  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Remind your teachers NOW (especially if you've requested recommendations and haven't received them). Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.

    Due FRIDAY, November 21st:

  • Vocab. List #10 Quiz
  • Vocab. List #10 Story on performance of Henry IV Part I or college.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24TH:

  • Henry IV Part I performances--details found here: Acting groups will organize according to the first letter of your first name. Scene Groups are--Students' first names that begin with the letter "K"--1.) Act I Scene ii (3 characters), Students' first names that begin with the letter "J"-- 2.) Act I Scene iii (5 characters), Students' first names that begin with "M, N or O"--3.) Act II Scene iv (6 characters), Students' first names that begin with "R"--4.) Act III Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "S or T"--5.) Act IV Scene iii (4 characters), Students' first names that begin with "G or H"--6.) Act V Scene i (4 characters), and Students' first names that begin with "A, B, C or D"--7.) Act V Scenes iii and iv (7 characters). Use this Grading Rubric for Henry IV Part I Scenes. Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, costumes, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father). Make the scene location come to life. Add lighting and/or sound. Speak clearly and with a full voice. Make dynamic vocal choices. Use language/imagery to demonstrate an understanding of the play and characters. Make physical choices to represent characters. Edit to keep your scene 5-7 minutes (what can be excluded? What MUST be included? Do not change iambic pentameter.) Know your lines, where you are NOT staring at the page. You don't need to memorize, but be very familiar with your character's lines.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details found here: Compare/Contrast Essay. 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Your paper should compare and contrast the two works, analyzing how Shakespeare uses literary devices to make his points. In a well-organized essay, offer a persuasive comparison/contrast of the two works and present an insightful analysis of the relationship between them. Your paper should demonstrate convincing analysis, consistent and effective control over the elements of essay composition. Your textual references should be apt and specific. Since this is an AP-style essay, you will be showing how Shakespeare, the playwright, realized themes or the "so what" via literary techniques: imagery, symbolism, setting, characterization, tone, metaphor, etc. Remember, you are always writing about the effect of the literary elements and would never simply mention them without regard to the effect upon the whole work. These plays are paired because of obvious similarities. It will be your job to clarify those similarities and to show also how the stories differ. One thing that makes this type of essay difficult is that there is often too much to write about. The trick is to stick to what seems most significant and narrow your focus accordingly. There are basically two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay: whole to whole (write about one play first, then the second) OR subject to subject (move back and forth between stories, writing about character, then setting, etc. for example). Do not include plot summary or else you are satisfied with a grade of 70 or lower.
  • Tuesday, November 18th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocab. List #10.

    2. Thematic Discussion Groups for Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: Organize into groups according to your thematic interests. Address your group's one thematic discussion question (in who, what, when or where form) and four follow-up questions (in why or how form) that encourage you group participants to generate a large number of ideas on a single topic in a short space of time. The thematic question should deliberately encourage all kinds of ideas or opinions, while the follow-up questions maintain the range of what is appropriate. Thematic Question Examples: "What possibilities are there for refuge in A Farewell to Arms?" "What kinds of things is Hamlet questioning, not just in his soliloquies, but broadly throughout the whole play?" Follow-up Question Examples: "In Act I Scene v, after hearing his dead father's ghost's account of the murder, why does Hamlet ask if hell has played a part in the appearance of his dead father's ghost?" "In A Farewell to Arms, how does the relationship between Henry and Cathereine act as a refuge?" Groups will be expected to engage in a discussion, using their main thematic question and follow-up questions to guide them in a vibrant discussion. The rest of the class will review and take notes on the fishbowl discussion. Textual evidence must be addressed. Discussions should last for 10-15 minutes.

    How can students choose and examine similar themes in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:
  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Remind your teachers NOW (especially if you've requested recommendations and haven't received them). Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.

    Due FRIDAY, November 21st:

  • Vocab. List #10 Quiz
  • Vocab. List #10 Story on performance of Henry IV Part I or college.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24TH:

  • Henry IV Part I performances--details TBA

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details TBA
  • Monday, November 17th, 2008: Thematic Discussion Groups for Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: Organize into groups according to your thematic interests. Address your group's one thematic discussion question (in who, what, when or where form) and four follow-up questions (in why or how form) that encourage you group participants to generate a large number of ideas on a single topic in a short space of time. The thematic question should deliberately encourage all kinds of ideas or opinions, while the follow-up questions maintain the range of what is appropriate. Thematic Question Examples: "What possibilities are there for refuge in A Farewell to Arms?" "What kinds of things is Hamlet questioning, not just in his soliloquies, but broadly throughout the whole play?" Follow-up Question Examples: "In Act I Scene v, after hearing his dead father's ghost's account of the murder, why does Hamlet ask if hell has played a part in the appearance of his dead father's ghost?" "In A Farewell to Arms, how does the relationship between Henry and Cathereine act as a refuge?" Groups will be expected to engage in a discussion, using their main thematic question and follow-up questions to guide them in a vibrant discussion. The rest of the class will review and take notes on the fishbowl discussion. Textual evidence must be addressed. Discussions should last for 10-15 minutes. How can students choose and examine similar themes in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? Due FRIDAY, November 21st:
  • Vocab. List #10 Quiz
  • Vocab. List #10 Story on performance of Henry IV Part I or college.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Remind your teachers NOW (especially if you've requested recommendations and haven't received them). Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24TH:

  • Henry IV Part I performances--details TBA

    DUE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH:

  • Hamlet and Henry IV Part I Paper--details TBA
  • Friday, November 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocab. List #9 Quiz. Show Story #9 HW.

    2. Brainstorming: Finish yesterday's brainstorming on themes from Henry IV Part I.

    3. Thematic Discussion Groups for Henry IV Part Iand Hamlet: Organize into groups according to your thematic interests. Compose one thematic discussion question (in who, what, when or where form) and four follow-up questions (in why or how form) that encourage participants to generate a large number of ideas on a single topic in a short space of time. The thematic question should deliberately encourage all kinds of ideas or opinions, while the follow-up questions maintain the range of what is appropriate. Thematic Question Examples: "What possibilities are there for refuge in A Farewell to Arms?" "What kinds of things is Hamlet questioning, not just in his soliloquies, but broadly throughout the whole play?" Follow-up Question Examples: "In Act I Scene v, after haering his dead father's ghost's account of the murder, why does Hamlet ask if hell has played a part in the appearance of his dead father's ghost?" "In A Farewell to Arms, how does the relationship between Henry and Cathereine act as a refuge?"

    4. Discussion Group Requirements reviewed. Groups will be expected to engage in a discussion, using their main thematic question and follow-up questions to guide them in a vibrant discussion. The rest of the class will review the fishbowl discussion. Discussions will take place on Monday. Textual evidence must be addressed. Discussions should last for 10-15 minutes.

    How can students choose and examine similar themes in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet? Due MONDAY, November 17th:
  • Thematic Discussion Groups for Henry IV Part I and Hamlet: Organize into groups according to your thematic interests. Compose one thematic discussion question (in who, what, when or where form) and four follow-up questions (in why or how form) that will encourage participants to generate a large number of ideas on a single topic in a short space of time. The thematic question should deliberately encourage all kinds of ideas or opinions, while the follow-up questions maintain the range of what is appropriate. Thematic Question Example on Internal Conflict: "What kinds of things is Hamlet questioning, not just in his soliloquies, but broadly throughout the whole play?" Follow-up Question Example: "In Act I Scene v, after hearing his dead father's ghost's account of the murder, why does Hamlet ask if hell has played a part in the appearance of his dead father's ghost?" Discussion Requirements: Groups will be expected to engage in a discussion, using their main thematic question and follow-up questions and ANSWERS TO THE QUESTIONS to guide them in a vibrant discussion. The rest of the class will review the fishbowl discussion. Discussions will take place on Monday (and might run into Tuesday). REAL textual evidence (both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I) must be addressed. Discussions should last for 10-15 minutes.

    DUE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, November 13th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish identifying themes and evidence of human experience in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet. Add your best theme to the chart paper class list.

    2. Identify and brainstorm (one full page) your favorite theme in both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I. What does Shakespeare teach his readers/audience about the human experience from both plays? Refer to specific evidence in the play. You might want to examine the conflicting themes of rebellion vs. responsibility and inferiority vs. superiority. Class Themes: man vs. self, father/son bond, fighting for power, honor, problematic marriage, rebellion, greed, rich vs. poor/class struggle, man vs. man, family betrayal, ambition, poor communication between men and women, father/son conflict, good vs. evil, revenge, trust, deception/lies, denial of love, withdrawal from society, disappointment.

    How can students choose and examine similar themes in both Henry IV Part I and Hamlet?
  • Meet with Ms. Conn (on your chosen date) to analyze your Dialectical Journal for Henry IV Part I.

    Due TOMORROW, Friday, November 14th:

  • Vocabulary List #9 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #9 Story (topic: Henry IV Part I OR a topic of your choice)

    DUE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, November 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish Henry IV Part I Acting Presentations

    2. Identify similar themes in both Hamlet and Henry IV Part I. What does Shakespeare teach his readers/audience about the human experience from Henry IV Part I? Refer to specific evidence in the play. Examine the conflicting themes of rebellion vs. responsibility and inferiority vs. superiority.

    How can students understand the language and major plot events of Henry IV Part I?
  • Meet with Ms. Conn (on your chosen date) to analyze your Dialectical Journal for Henry IV Part I.

    Due Friday, November 14th:

  • Vocabulary List #9 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #9 Story (topic: Henry IV Part I OR a topic of your choice)

    DUE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, November 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #9

    2. Finish preparing for 15 minute summary of Henry IV Part I Acting Presentation

    3. Acting Group Presentation

    How can students understand the language and major plot events of Henry IV Part I? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • Read Henry IV Part I (copies of the novel are available in class or HERE) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    Due Friday, November 14th:

  • Vocabulary List #9 Quiz
  • Vocabulary List #9 Story (topic: Henry IV Part I OR a topic of your choice)

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, November 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #8 Quiz

    2. Introduce 15 minute Henry IV Part I Acting Groups

    2. Acting Group Presentation

    How can students understand the language and major plot events of Henry IV Part I? DUE DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:
  • Read Henry IV Part I (copies of the novel are available in class or HERE) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, November 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Henry IV Part I mini-lecture. Categorize your notes after lecture.

    2. Brainstorm on the qualities of an ideal leader in current events and in Hamlet and Henry IV Part I.

    What makes an ideal leader in society today and in Hamlet and Henry IV Part I? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on Henry IV Part I or the outcome of the election.

    DUE DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read Henry IV Part I (copies of the novel are available in class or HERE) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, November 5th (post-election day; President-elect Obama), 2008: 1. Do Now: Compose a sonnet on the outcome of the election. Be prepared to share. Maybe your sonnet will be published in the yearbook!!

    2. Share sonnets!

    3. Introduce Best Actor/Actress/Director/Costume/Set Design/Performance awards.

    4. Brainstorm/Discuss why President-elect Obama thinks Hamlet is one of his favorite works of literature.

    How can students reflect on the significance of the 2008 presidential election results? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Bring in the sonnet (worked on in class today) on the outcome of the election.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:

  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on Henry IV Part I or the outcome of the election.

    DUE DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12th:

  • Read Henry IV Part I (copies of the novel are available in class or HERE) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, November 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish voting on Best Director, Best Overall Performance, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Set Design, Best Costume. Finish Henry IV Part I book distribution.

    2. Introduce List #8.

    3. Finish reading/sharing "Love for ITHS" sonnets.

    4. Reflect on the experience of performing scenes from Hamlet. What was enjoyable? What did you learn? What would you do differently for the performance of scenes from the next plays? What would you require from the teacher to assist you in better performances and analysis of future plays?

    How do we effectively analyze performance of Hamlet and how do we imitate Shakespeare's language style? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on Henry IV Part I or the outcome of the election.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • Read Henry IV Part I (copies of the novel are available in class or HERE) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 31st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Voting Best Director, Best Overall Performance, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Set Design, Best Costume.

    2. Reading/Sharing "Love for ITHS" sonnets.

    2. Henry IV Part I book distribution.

    How do we effectively analyze performance of Hamlet and how do we imitate Shakespeare's language style? DUE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • Vocab. List #8 Quiz
  • Vocabulary Story #8 on Henry IV Part I or the outcome of the election.

    DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10th:

  • Read Henry IV Part I (copies of the novel are available in class or HERE) and Dialectical Journal. Don't make the same mistakes you made in your Hamlet journal.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 30th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocab. Quiz #7

    2. Performances and Evaluations--Scenes from Hamlet: Finish Performance of Act V and evaluate your classmates' performances.

    How do we effectively perform and evaluate scenes from Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31st:
  • Vocabulary Story #7 on the election, Halloween or the performance of Hamlet
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    2. Performances and Evaluations--Scenes from Hamlet: Perform and evaluate your classmates' performances.

    How do we effectively perform and evaluate scenes from Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th:
  • Vocab. Quiz #7
  • ACT V GROUP MUST BE READY TO PERFORM. Tomorrow we will vote on Best Director, Best Overall Performance, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Set Design, Best Costume.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31st:

  • Vocabulary Story #7 on the election, Halloween or the performance of Hamlet
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 28th, 2008: 1. Do Now: HW reminders/Performance instruction review.

    2. Performance Preparation/Scene Work: Read aloud, standing up, working on staging/scene directions, physical and spatial choices, emotional acting, lighting and sound.

    How do we apply the necessary elements to the performance process of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Perform your Hamlet scene and expect to be graded on the following--strong familiarity with lines (and plenty of eye contact), scene staging (entrances, exits, and physical interactions with characters), body language, emotional reactions, spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (low, center, high) director's vision (a statement that reflects the scene's message and story), editing (What did you exclude? What did you include?), costumes and props. You will perform one of the five scenes assigned--Act I Scene v (4 characters); Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene i (7 characters); Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th:

  • Vocab. Quiz #7

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31st:

  • Vocabulary Story #7 on the election, Halloween or the performance of Hamlet
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, October 27th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Share/discuss students' literary element analysis, themes and references to Shakespeare's life and times on Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Introduce sonnet HW.

    2. Tableaus/Acting Exercises: Acting exercises include limb shake-out, tarzan noise, Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Acting stretches=chewing bubble gum (with whole body) and shake-out of arms and legs, rub-down (hands, arms, legs, massage shoulders), sound passing (with a body movement), animal voices/movements (e.g. cat, lion, pig, horse). Tableaus of character relationships (e.g. Hamlet and Gertrude, Hamlet and Claudius, Ophelia and Hamlet, Gertrude and Claudius, Hamlet and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet and Horatio, etc.).

    3. Scene Work: Read aloud, standing up, working on staging/scene directions, physical and spatial choices, emotional acting, lighting and sound.

    How do we understand the performance process of Hamlet? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
  • Perform your Hamlet scene and expect to be graded on the following--strong familiarity with lines (and plenty of eye contact), scene staging (entrances, exits, and physical interactions with characters), body language, emotional reactions, spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (low, center, high) director's vision (a statement that reflects the scene's message and story), editing (What did you exclude? What did you include?), costumes and props. You will perform one of the five scenes assigned--Act I Scene v (4 characters); Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene i (7 characters); Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th:

  • Vocab. Quiz #7

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31st:

  • Vocabulary Story #7 on the election, Halloween or the performance of Hamlet
  • "Love for ITHS" Sonnet (remember, you must include the following to follow the sonnet requirements: 14 lines, ababcdcdefefgg, 10 syllables per line, poetic techniques such as imagery, personification, alliteration, metaphor, simile, etc.). In this sonnet, reflect on your years at ITHS. Share what you love--friendships, classes, activities--clubs/sports, small school qualities, teachers, etc. If you choose to, you can be serious, comical, sarcastic, and/or reflective. But, most of all, be creative and follow the sonnet requirements! Many sonnets will be submitted to the yearbook. Who knows?? Maybe yours will be published! This MUST be typed and include a proper heading (your name and date in the right hand corner, my name and the course name/period in the left hand corner).

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 24th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce List #7 2. Finish Tableaus: Acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet--statues will include characters as animals in Hamlet, the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Acting stretches=chewing bubble gum (with whole body) and shake-out of arms and legs.

    3. Scene Work: Work with groups, choosing parts and reading aloud. Begin editing process.

    How do we understand the performance process of Hamlet? DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 27TH:
  • Be prepared to share/discuss your literary element analysis, themes and references to Shakespeare's life and times on Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29th:

  • Perform your Hamlet scene and expect to be graded on the following--strong familiarity with lines (and plenty of eye contact), scene staging (entrances, exits, and physical interactions with characters), body language, emotional reactions, spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (low, center, high) director's vision (a statement that reflects the scene's message and story), editing (What did you exclude? What did you include?), costumes and props. You will perform one of the five scenes assigned--Act I Scene v (4 characters); Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene i (7 characters); Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 23rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: List #6 Quiz 2. Scene Work Mini-Lecture: An explanation of the Hamlet scene groups will get together and determine director's vision, character roles, character depictions (including identities, physical, emotional and costume choices), props, stage scenery, spatial choices, music, lighting and sound choices.

    3. Finish Tableaus: Acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet--statues will include characters as animals in Hamlet, the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.

    How do we understand the performance process of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24TH:
  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR performance of Hamlet found HERE.


  • Analyze and be prepared to discuss: Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Analyze the poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29th:

  • Edit (what can be excluded? What MUST be included?) and perform one of the five scenes assigned--Act I Scene v (4 characters); Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene i (7 characters); Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Prepare tomorrow's quiz on List #6. 2. Review the Sonnet introduction HW.

    3. Brainstorm: Who is the pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight in Hamlet? How are these revealed in Hamlet--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster?

    3. Tableaus: Begin tableaus--Statues (acting exercise to mark the characters' journeys over the course of Hamlet). Statues will include archetypes in literature (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, valiant knight) and characters as animals in Hamlet. Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Archetype portrayals (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight).

    How do we understand the greater purpose and modern-day application of Shakespeare's work, Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD (due to parent-teacher conferences next Friday):
  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR performance of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24TH:

  • Analyze and be prepared to discuss: Sonnet 1, Sonnet 18, Sonnet 29, Sonnet 130, Sonnet taken from Act I Scene V from Romeo and Juliet. Analyze the poetic/literary elements used, themes (universal messages the author is trying to share), and references to Shakespeare's life and times.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29TH:

  • Edit (what can be excluded? What MUST be included?) and perform one of the five scenes assigned--Act I Scene v (4 characters); Act II Scene ii until Hamlet's lines "except my life, except my life" (5 characters); Act III Scene i (7 characters); Act III Scene ii--begin Hamlet's "They are coming to the play", skip the player king and queen lines, end at "Come some music" (7 characters); Act V Scene ii--beginning when Claudius enters the scene (8 characters). Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (What is the scene about? What is the conflict? It can be a sentence or a few words. Examples: Love is madness. A daughter's rejection of her father), make the scene location come to life, add lighting and/or sound.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 21st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review List #6

    2. Discuss/Share: Continue discussion on the following questions that reveal Shakespeare's genius and relevance to our world today (referencing the following questions--why is Hamlet a highly regarded Shakespearean play? Why is it timeless?):
    A.) How does Shakespeare reveal the influences of religion and the faiths of characters in Hamlet?
    B.) How are class divisions revealed (upper, middle, lower) in Hamlet?
    C.) What conflicts exist in Hamlet?
    D.) What omens are revealed and what do they foreshadow?
    E.) What language choices does Shakespeare make that help create his characters?
    F.) What themes (messages about the world can apply today) are revealed in Hamlet?
    G.) What literary elements/techniques are employed and what effects do they have on the overall understanding and greater depth to the play?
    H.) Choose three characters to discuss and analyze. Examine their purposes in the play.
    I.) Identify examples of historical references and Shakespeare's play references. How can audience viewers be in "the know"? Be prepared to share in a whole class discussion.

    3. Discuss the Sonnet HW.

    4. Tableaus: If time allows, begin tableaus. Tableaus (statues) for the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible. Archetype portrayals (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, and valiant knight).

    How do we understand the greater purpose and modern-day application of Shakespeare's work, Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD (due to parent-teacher conferences next Friday):
  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR performance of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, October 20th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Share an epiphany or a favorite line from your Hamlet paper. Answer the following questions--why is Hamlet a highly regarded Shakespearean play? Why is it timeless?

    2. Continue discussion on the following questions that reveal Shakespeare's genius and relevance to our world today (you may want to reference your Dialectical Journal as well as the play specifically and in general):
    A.) How does Shakespeare reveal the influences of religion and the faiths of characters in Hamlet?
    B.) How are class divisions revealed (upper, middle, lower) in Hamlet?
    C.) What conflicts exist in Hamlet?
    D.) What omens are revealed and what do they foreshadow?
    E.) What language choices does Shakespeare make that help create his characters?
    F.) What themes (messages about the world can apply today) are revealed in Hamlet?
    G.) What literary elements/techniques are employed and what effects do they have on the overall understanding and greater depth to the play?
    H.) Choose three characters to discuss and analyze. Examine their purposes in the play.
    I.) Identify examples of historical references and Shakespeare's play references. How can audience viewers be in "the know"? Be prepared to share in a whole class discussion.

    How do we understand the greater purpose and modern-day application of Shakespeare's work, Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21ST:
  • Read the The Shakespearean Sonnet: An Overview. Be ready to discuss tomorrow.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD (due to parent-teacher conferences next Friday):

  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR performance of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 17th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    2. Continue discussion on the following questions that reveal Shakespeare's genius and relevance to our world today (you may want to reference your Dialectical Journal as well as the play specifically and in general):
    A.) How does Shakespeare reveal the influences of religion and the faiths of characters in Hamlet?
    B.) How are class divisions revealed (upper, middle, lower) in Hamlet?
    C.) What conflicts exist in Hamlet?
    D.) What omens are revealed and what do they foreshadow?
    E.) What language choices does Shakespeare make that help create his characters?
    F.) What themes (messages about the world can apply today) are revealed in Hamlet?
    G.) What literary elements/techniques are employed and what effects do they have on the overall understanding and greater depth to the play?
    H.) Choose three characters to discuss and analyze. Examine their purposes in the play.
    I.) Identify examples of historical references and Shakespeare's play references. How can audience viewers be in "the know"? Be prepared to share in a whole class discussion.

    How do we understand the greater purpose and modern-day application of Shakespeare's work, Hamlet? DUE THIS UPCOMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 21ST:
  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD (due to parent-teacher conferences next Friday):

  • Vocabulary List #6 Story. This story's topic is the election OR performance of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #6 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce the Grading Rubric.

    2. With a partner, finish answering the following questions that reveal Shakespeare's genius and relevance to our world today (you may want to reference your Dialectical Journal):
    A.) How does Shakespeare reveal the influences of religion and the faiths of characters in Hamlet?
    B.) How are class divisions revealed (upper, middle, lower) in Hamlet?
    C.) What conflicts exist in Hamlet?
    D.) What omens are revealed and what do they foreshadow?
    E.) What language choices does Shakespeare make that help create his characters?
    F.) What themes (messages about the world can apply today) are revealed in Hamlet?
    G.) What literary elements/techniques are employed and what effects do they have on the overall understanding and greater depth to the play?
    H.) Choose three characters to discuss and analyze. Examine their purposes in the play.
    I.) Identify examples of historical references and Shakespeare's play references. How can audience viewers be in "the know"? Be prepared to share in a whole class discussion.

    2. Discuss the questions above.

    How do we understand the greater purpose and modern-day application of Shakespeare's work, Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17TH :
  • Vocabulary Story #5, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR the ending of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE THIS UPCOMING MONDAY, OCTOBER 21ST:

  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 15th, 2008: No class due to the PSAT. N/A DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17TH :
  • Vocabulary Story #5, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR the ending of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 21ST:

  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: With a partner, answer the following questions that reveal Shakespeare's genius and relevance to our world today (you may want to reference your Dialectical Journal):
    A.) How does Shakespeare reveal the influences of religion and the faiths of characters in Hamlet?
    B.) How are class divisions revealed (upper, middle, lower) in Hamlet?
    C.) What conflicts exist in Hamlet?
    D.) What omens are revealed and what do they foreshadow?
    E.) What language choices does Shakespeare make that help create his characters?
    F.) What themes (messages about the world can apply today) are revealed in Hamlet?
    G.) What literary elements/techniques are employed and what effects do they have on the overall understanding and greater depth to the play?
    H.) Choose three characters to discuss and analyze. Examine their purposes in the play.
    I.) Identify examples of historical references and Shakespeare's play references. How can audience viewers be in "the know"? Be prepared to share in a whole class discussion.

    2. Discuss Do Now questions.

    3. Introduce Hamlet paper.

    How do we understand the greater purpose and modern-day application of Shakespeare's work, Hamlet? DUE NEXT MONDAY, OCTOBER 21ST:
  • Hamlet Paper: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, using this Grading Rubric. Choose one of the following paper topics:
    Topic A (taken from the 1988 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Hamlet, as in many other literary works, some of the most significant events are mental or psychological: for example, awakenings, discoveries, changes in consciousness. In a well-organized essay, describe how William Shakespeare manages to give these internal events the sense of purpose, intrigue, and climax usually associated with external action. Do not merely summarize the plot.

    Topic B (taken from the 2005 AP English Lit. Exam)=In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess "That outward existence which conforms, the inward life that questions." In Hamlet, identify characters who outwardly conforms while questioning inwardly. Then write your essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary.

    Topic C (taken from the 2005 Form B AP English Lit. Exam)=One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write your essay in which you discuss how characters in Hamlet struggle to free themselves from the power of others or seek to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the play. Avoid mere plot summary.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17TH :

  • Vocabulary Story #5, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR the ending of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocab. Quiz #4

    2. Introduce List #5.

    3. Show work-in-progress Dialectical Journal. HW reminders.

    How do you improve your lexicon? :) DUE THIS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:
  • Read Hamlet by William Shakespeare. A completed Dialectical Journal MUST be turned in for a grade. Remember to use the teacher's advice/suggestions for improvement offered during the review of your work-in-progress journal.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17TH :

  • Vocabulary Story #5, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR the ending of Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #5 Quiz

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Wednesday, October 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce, read and analyze "Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language" by David Scott Kastan, Columbia Professor of English.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and take notes on the articles read in the Do Now on the application to Hamlet and other Shakespearean texts.

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH (the last day of the 1st marking period):
  • Vocabulary Story #4, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz
  • Bring in your working Dialectical Journal (at least Act I entries).

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • Read Hamlet by William Shakespeare. A completed Dialectical Journal MUST be turned in for a grade.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Tuesday, October 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce, read and analyze Iambic Pentameter basics and "Words, Words, Words: Understanding Shakespeare's Language" by David Scott Kastan, Columbia Professor of English.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and take notes on the articles read in the Do Now on the application to Hamlet and other Shakespearean texts.

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH (the last day of the 1st marking period):
  • Vocabulary Story #4, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • Read Hamlet by William Shakespeare. A completed Dialectical Journal MUST be turned in for a grade.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Monday, October 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List #4.

    2. Lecture/Note-Taking: Discuss and finish taking notes on the "Shakespeare and His England" packet. How is this text helpful in preparing us to read and analyze Shakespeare's works, in particular Hamlet?

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Hamlet? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH (the last day of the 1st marking period):
  • Vocabulary Story #4, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • Read Hamlet by William Shakespeare. A completed Dialectical Journal MUST be turned in for a grade.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Friday, October 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz #3

    2. Lecture/Note-Taking: Discuss and finish taking notes on the "Shakespeare and His England" packet. How is this text helpful in preparing us to read and analyze Shakespeare's works, in particular Hamlet?

    3. Introduce HW.

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Hamlet? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH:
  • Vocabulary Story #4, using the list below. This story's topic is the election OR Hamlet found HERE.
  • Vocabulary List #4 Quiz

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14th:

  • Read Hamlet by William Shakespeare. A completed Dialectical Journal MUST be turned in for a grade.

    DUE NOVEMBER 20TH:

  • Two Teacher Recommendations due (worth TWO homework credits). Start asking your teachers NOW! Only ask teachers that gave you an 80% or higher. Show respect and appreciation. The teacher recommendations should have official school letterhead at the top and the teacher's signature at the bottom.
  • Thursday, October 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the written assessment on your independent novel. Turn in HW--Discipline Code worksheet and contract and show Vocabulary Story #3.

    2. Discussion/Sharing/Note-taking: Continue discussion of packet on "Shakespeare and His England."

    How do you better prepare for the reading and analysis of Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3RD:
  • Vocabulary List #3 Quiz.
  • Monday, September 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read Discipline Code Booklet and answer the worksheet questions (just like a scavenger hunt!). This will be due for HW credit on Thurs.

    2. Work Period: Work on HW due Thursday (Vocabulary Story #3 and reading) and Friday.

    How do you better understand school and Department of Education rules/policies? DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2ND:
  • Turn in the Discipline Code classwork and contract signed by your parent/guardian (given out in class today).
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (remember, you must write a minimum of 250 words or more; you can work with a partner; you MUST underline or bold the vocabulary words; it can be typed or handwritten) on YOUR CHOSEN NOVEL (anything about your novel; it can be on the character, the plot, the setting, etc.).
  • Finish your independent novel. There will be an in-class WRITTEN ASSESSMENT ON YOUR NOVEL to prove you read and understood your novel (know the main characters and their characterization, plot development--including the introductory event, the rising action, climax, and resolution, and setting). BRING YOUR NOVEL TO CLASS.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3RD:

  • Vocabulary List #3 Quiz.
  • Friday, September 26th, 2008: 1. Do Now: List #2 Quiz

    2. Introduce List #3.

    3. Discuss HW readings--"Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England."

    4. Discuss HW/Monday's plan.

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2ND:
  • Turn in the Discipline Code classwork and contract signed by your parent/guardian (given out in class on Monday).
  • Vocabulary Story #3 (remember, you must write a minimum of 250 words or more; you can work with a partner; you MUST underline or bold the vocabulary words; it can be typed or handwritten) on YOUR CHOSEN NOVEL (anything about your novel; it can be on the character, the plot, the setting, etc.).
  • Finish your independent novel. There will be an in-class WRITTEN ASSESSMENT ON YOUR NOVEL to prove you read and understood your novel (know the main characters and their characterization, plot development--including the introductory event, the rising action, climax, and resolution, and setting). BRING YOUR NOVEL TO CLASS.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3RD:

  • Vocabulary List #3 Quiz.
  • Thursday, September 25th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Recite and review Vocabulary List #2. Prepare for tomorrow's Vocab #2 Quiz. Show Vocabulary Story #2 HW.

    2. Discuss HW readings--"Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England."

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:
  • List #2 Quiz

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. A writing assignment will be given in class on October 2nd.

  • Wednesday, September 24th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Literary Elements Quiz (retake)/Work on Vocabulary Story #2/Prepare for Vocab #2 Quiz

    2. Discuss HW readings--"Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England."

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary Story #2 on theater (you can write on Shakespeare's theater, theater today, theater throughout time, an original play, or anything else you can think of on the subject of theater)

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:

  • List #2 Quiz

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. The Dialectical Journal for your independent novel will be due October 2nd.

  • Tuesday, September 23rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss the following questions--What was the most difficult idea or topic in the HW readings? How did you handle the challenging text? How did you conquer your frustrations? Why do you believe the packet will be helpful in better understanding Hamlet and other Shakespeare's works?

    2. Discuss HW readings--"Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England."

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Vocabulary Story #2 on theater (you can write on Shakespeare's theater, theater today, theater throughout time, an original play, or anything else you can think of on the subject of theater)

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:

  • List #2 Quiz

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. The Dialectical Journal for your independent novel will be due October 2nd.

  • Monday, September 22nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions--What was the most difficult idea or topic in the HW readings? How did you handle the challenging text? How did you conquer your frustrations? Why do you believe the packet will be helpful in better understanding Hamlet and other Shakespeare's works?

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share Do Now reactions.

    3. Discuss HW readings--"Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England."

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd:
  • RESUME REWRITE (edit the teacher corrections)

    DUE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:

  • Vocabulary Story #2 on theater (you can write on Shakespeare's theater, theater today, theater throughout time, an original play, or anything else you can think of on the subject of theater)

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th:

  • List #2 Quiz

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. The Dialectical Journal for your independent novel will be due October 2nd.

  • Friday, September 19th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary List #1 Quiz. Read when finished with the quiz.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share excerpts from your Shakespearean vocabulary stories (minimum of 250 words).

    3. Review the answers for the LITERARY ELEMENTS QUIZ

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play and improve your vocabulary skills? DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:
  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. Fo "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.

  • Thursday, September 18th, 2008: 1. Do Now: LITERARY ELEMENTS QUIZ

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share excerpts from your Shakespearean vocabulary stories (minimum of 250 words).

    3. Prepare for Vocabulary #1 Quiz.

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play and improve your vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:
  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:

  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. Fo "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.

  • Wednesday, September 17th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions--Why is the phrase "To be or not to be?" so popular? What can we expect from Shakespeare's plays? What techniques do you believe the Bard (Shakespeare, the ultimate poet) will use to reveal characters' portrayals and relationships? What themes will exist? What conflicts? How do you think the plot will develop?

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share excerpts Shakespearean vocabulary story (minimum of 250 words).

    3. Introduce HW due Monday.

    4. Prepare for Vocabulary #1 Quiz.

    How do you prepare for the reading and analysis of a Shakespearean play?
  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22nd:

  • Handout Readings on "Introduction to Hamlet" and "Shakespeare and His England." Annotate (write notes in the margin) and underline with a purpose. For "Introduction to Hamlet", your purpose could answer the following: What will help me understand the play Hamlet better? What are some main ideas/themes, conflicts, characterization, setting, language, plot development and other literary devices that will appear in the play? Why does Ms. Conn want us to read this? For "Shakespeare and His England", your purpose could answer the following: What happened in Shakespeare's life that might influence his plays?
  • Tuesday, September 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish remaining presentations of memorized song/poem/rap.

    2. Prepare for List #1 vocabulary quiz. Work on HW--create a Shakespearean vocabulary story (minimum of 250 words).

    How do you present a memorized recitation? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17TH:
  • Partner HW: Shakespearean Vocabulary Story (250 words or more) using all 30 vocabulary words from List #1 correctly. Underline each vocabulary word used. This will help you prepare for the Vocabulary Quiz!

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Monday, September 15th, 2008: 1. With partners, recite memorized song/poem/rap.

    2. Reflect on the recitations. Why was this a useful assignment? What was valuable from this experience--writing, memorizing and reciting? Why was this assignment not enjoyable?

    How do you present a memorized recitation?
  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Friday, September 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: With your partner, recite (standing) your song/poem/rap. Use hand gestures, eye contact, and loud, clear voices.

    2. In a group of 4, recite (standing) your song/poem/rap. Use hand gestures, eye contact, and loud, clear voices.

    3. Reflect on the progress achieved in recitations.

    How do you prepare for a class recitation? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH:
  • Memorize your Shakespeare SONG/RAP and be ready to present to the class. You may want to add dance, gestures, movement, or any other creative addition to the musical presentation!

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Thursday, September 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read over SAT/College Vocabulary List #1. Identify any familiar words and any words you have difficult pronouncing.

    2. Read and discuss List #1. Quiz on Friday, September 19th.

    3. Significance of 9/11 and MY GOOD DEED WEBSITE

    4. Partner Presentation Preparation: Shakespeare Research Musical Presentation work time.

    How do you prepare for the verbal section of the SAT? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12TH:
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap as your partner), use the facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap (use an existing tune or your own and make sure the beats match). Bring in the song/rap to class (typed or handwritten is OK).

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH:

  • Memorize your Shakespeare SONG/RAP and be ready to present to the class. You may want to add dance, gestures, movement, or any other creative addition to the musical presentation!

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.

    DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH:

  • List #1 QUIZ. Know the definitions and how to use each vocabulary word in a detailed sentence.
  • Wednesday, September 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Reflections on your college essay--Did you use the sample college essays and expert advice in composing your college essay? Did you go through an editing/revision process of your college essay? If so, what was it? Are you satisfied with the final product?

    2. Volunteers share Do Now reflections.

    3. KWL Brainstorming: What do you know about William Shakespeare, his life, his work and his times? What do you want to know? Why is it important to know about him, his life, his work and his times.

    4. Shakespeare Research Musical Presentation details revealed/discussed.

    What prior knowledge do students have and what interests them regarding William Shakespeare's life, work and times? DUE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12TH:
  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research SONG/RAP (14 lines or more)--with your partner (you can have the same song/rap as your partner), use the facts compiled for your chosen topic and transfer them into a song/rap (use an existing tune or your own and make sure the beats match). Bring in the song/rap to class (typed or handwritten is OK).

    DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH:

  • Memorize your Shakespeare SONG/RAP and be ready to present to the class. You may want to add dance, gestures, movement, or any other creative addition to the musical presentation!

  • READ YOUR INDEPENDENT NOVEL EVERY DAY (at least 10-15 pages per day). You will need to finish by September 30th. You should expect a writing assignment in the near future.
  • Tuesday, September 9th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Write a paragraph in which you show (using the senses: sight, sound, touch, smell, taste) a personal experience/activity/job that you've been part of during high school. Choose a meaningful one that can be included in your college essay.

    2. Volunteers share Do Now paragraphs with whole class. Why were these paragraphs captivating? Why would a college admissions reader enjoy these pieces of writing?

    3. Finish yesterday's discussion/analysis of "Writing the Essay: Sound Advice from an Expert". Analyze the strengths and useful tips that can be applied in your college essay from the Sample College Essays.

    4. HW reminders.

    How will students be able to compose a successful college essay? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness; think of this question--why should the college of your choice accept you???). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. EACH PERSON will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250 word minimum), and present your findings to the class with your partner (do not have the same material). The topics are as follows (REMEMBER--you will be assigned a topic in class; do not choose independently): Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.
  • Monday, September 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Begin reading the following: "Writing the Essay: Sound Advice from an Expert", marking it with the same code system from Friday--check=I know and understand this, question mark=I don't understand/I'm confused and need to know more, and exclamation point (!)=This is cool. Show HW--independent novel. Turn in academic resume.

    2. Discuss/Review the Do Now.

    3. Read Sample College Essays. What are some strengths in these essays? What tips can you use from these essays?

    How will students be able to compose a successful college essay? DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:
  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. EACH PERSON will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250 word minimum), and present your findings to the class with your partner (do not have the same material). The topics are as follows (REMEMBER--you will be assigned a topic in class; do not choose independently): Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.
  • Friday, September 5th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Scan Resume Writing 101, marking what you know (with a check), what you're confused about/question (with a question mark), and what you think looks cool (with an exclamation point!). Be ready to discuss.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now findings.

    3. Read-aloud and analyze Resume Writing 101.

    4. Review the Shakespeare research presentation HW.

    What are the components of exemplary resumes? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH:
  • Bring in independent novel (taken from classroom or selected independently; teacher approval is required). You may also choose a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Academic Resume (first draft is due). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250 word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows (REMEMBER--you will be assigned a topic in class; do not choose independently): Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.
  • Thursday, September 4th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Analysis of Sample Resumes--Students individually and collectively analyze the sample resumes. Guiding questions to answer while analyzing: What are the strengths of each resume? What are the weaknesses? What qualities, in terms of formatting, writing style, and word usage, are worth including in your own resume?

    2. Class Sharing of Resume Analysis: Class shares findings in resume analysis.

    3. Read-aloud of Resume Writing 101.

    3. Independent Resume Writing: Students will begin the resume writing process and/or the resume editing process.

    What are the components of exemplary resumes? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH:
  • Bring in independent novel (taken from classroom or selected independently; teacher approval is required). You may also choose a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Academic Resume (first draft is due). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250 word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows (REMEMBER--you will be assigned a topic in class; do not choose independently): Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.
  • Wednesday, September 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Preview the senior honors syllabus.

    2. Review details of the syllabus.

    3. HW reviewed and this week's HW introduced.

    How will students be prepared for academic success in this course? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH:
  • Bring in independent novel (taken from classroom or selected independently; teacher approval is required). You may also choose a novel from one of the following websites: 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die, Ms. Conn's Favorites.
  • Academic Resume (first draft is due). Use these sample resumes and resume tips as guides.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH:

  • College Essay--Draft #1. Requirements: 500 word minimum, typed, double spaced, topic=your choice (though some topic that reveals your strengths and uniqueness). Use the Sample College Essays and Expert Advice to guide you and examine the sample essays for organization of ideas, supporting details, language/word choices, connection to specific college. Read the advice from the University of Virginia Office of Admissions in the link above. Heading to be used on all work.
    
    Ms. Conn                                Your Name
    Class, Period                           Date
     
          
                         Original Title 
    
    
    

  • Shakespeare's Life and Times Research & Presentation--Conduct internet research and present on an assigned topic. When conducting your internet research, limit your web searches to sites that end with .edu, .gov, or .org. Provide the website addresses where you found evidence for your research topic. You will be expected to find 1-2 pages typed (double-spaced) or handwritten (250 word minimum), and present your findings to the class. The topics are as follows (REMEMBER--you will be assigned a topic in class; do not choose independently): Shakespeare's wealth and social status (during his lifetime), records/documents of Shakespeare's life, records/documents of Shakespeare's immediate family's (parents, wife, and children) lives, Shakespeare's education, Shakespeare's father (John), Shakespeare's mother (Mary), Religion during the Elizabethan Era (the time in which he lived), Religion in Shakespeare's family, Actors during Shakespeare's lifetime, Theater during Shakespeare's lifetime, Health/Disease during the Elizabethan Era, Shakespeare's wife (Anne Hathaway) and their marital relationship, Shakespeare's children.
  • Tuesday, September 2nd 2008: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and fill out the index card, answering the following in complete sentences (when appropriate):
  • your full name (in parentheses, write your first name, which you want to be called in class)
  • Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
  • What did you read this summer? Provide titles of books, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • Identify FIVE colleges you will apply to. Star (*) your #1 choice.
  • What knowledge do you hope to acquire in this English course?
  • What can you contribute to this English course?
  • What are you looking forward to this school year?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share literature read this summer and personal/academic goals.

  • How will students introduce themselves, with reference to recent literary practice and personal and academic goals?
  • Read something (a news article, book, magazine, etc.) tonight and be prepared to share tomorrow.