Senior Honors/AP Prep Assignments, Spring 2009

Senior Honors/AP Prep Assignments
Spring 2009

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 15th, 2009: Yearbook signing and grade returns. How can we effectively finish our last high school English class? I enjoyed teaching all of you! See you at graduation!
Thursday, June 11th, 2009: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS How can we effectively present our graduation speeches? None! The semester is over! See you on Monday to give you final grades and papers. :)
Wednesday, June 10th, 2009: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS How can we effectively present our graduation speeches? Due TOMORROW:
  • If you haven't presented your speech and turned in any owed HW, this is your last chance! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

    All work MUST be turned in by TOMORROW, Thursday, June 11th (by the end of class time)! No exceptions.

    Check out this Senioritis: Goof Off Now: Pay Later article.

  • Tuesday, June 9th, 2009: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS How can we effectively present our graduation speeches? Due THIS Week (June 8th-June 11th (assigned date given in class):
  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

    All work MUST be turned in by THIS Thursday, June 11th (by the end of class time)! No exceptions.

    Check out this Senioritis: Goof Off Now: Pay Later article.

  • Monday, June 8th, 2009: SPEECH PRESENTATIONS How can we effectively present our graduation speeches? Due THIS Week (June 8th-June 11th (assigned date given in class):
  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

    All work MUST be turned in by THIS Thursday, June 11th (by the end of class time)! No exceptions.

    Check out this Senioritis: Goof Off Now: Pay Later article.

  • Friday, June 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Practice your speech in front of multiple classmates. Self-assess and offer feedback for improvement to others.

    2. Work Period: Work on speech composition and/or editing, using the Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

    How can we effectively prepare for our graduation speech? Due NEXT Week (June 8th-June 11th (assigned date given in class):
  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

    All work MUST be turned in by Thursday, June 11th! No exceptions.

  • Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Speech Delivery Practice: Using your speech draft (the one you composed already), join a group of 3-4, present your speech and rate each other on the following questions:
  • What technique does the speaker use to get the audience’s attention in the introduction? Is it successful? Why or why not?
  • Was the volume appropriate?
  • Critique the speaker’s voice control. How was the rate? Were there any filler words? Were there any mispronounced words or vocal stumbles?
  • Did the speaker use gestures? Were they suitable? Did gestures (or the lack of them) add to or detract from the presentation?
  • Critique the speaker’s body control. Was there any nervous movement? Were there any distracting gestures?
  • Did the speaker maintain eye contact?
  • Critique the speaker’s facial expressions. Were they appropriate and expressive?
  • What technique did the speaker use in the conclusion? Was it effective?
  • What do you believe would be the reaction of the audience?
  • Summarize your general impressions of the speech.

    2. Work Period: Work on speech composition and/or editing, using the Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

  • How can we effectively prepare for our graduation speech? Due Week of June 8th-June 12th (assigned date given in class):
  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.
  • Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Speech Delivery Practice: Using your speech draft (the one you composed already), pair up with a partner and rate each other on the following questions:
  • What technique does the speaker use to get the audience’s attention in the introduction? Is it successful? Why or why not?
  • Was the volume appropriate?
  • Critique the speaker’s voice control. How was the rate? Were there any filler words? Were there any mispronounced words or vocal stumbles?
  • Did the speaker use gestures? Were they suitable? Did gestures (or the lack of them) add to or detract from the presentation?
  • Critique the speaker’s body control. Was there any nervous movement? Were there any distracting gestures?
  • Did the speaker maintain eye contact?
  • Critique the speaker’s facial expressions. Were they appropriate and expressive?
  • What technique did the speaker use in the conclusion? Was it effective?
  • What do you believe would be the reaction of the audience?
  • Summarize your general impressions of the speech.

    2. Work Period: Work on speech composition and/or editing, using the Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

  • How can we effectively prepare for our graduation speech? Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:
  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.
  • Monday, June 1st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Choose your speech presentation date.

    2. Speech Delivery Practice: Using your speech draft (the one you composed over the weekend and brought in today), pair up with a partner and rate each other on the following questions:

  • What technique does the speaker use to get the audience’s attention in the introduction? Is it successful? Why or why not?
  • Was the volume appropriate?
  • Critique the speaker’s voice control. How was the rate? Were there any filler words? Were there any mispronounced words or vocal stumbles?
  • Did the speaker use gestures? Were they suitable? Did gestures (or the lack of them) add to or detract from the presentation?
  • Critique the speaker’s body control. Was there any nervous movement? Were there any distracting gestures?
  • Did the speaker maintain eye contact?
  • Critique the speaker’s facial expressions. Were they appropriate and expressive?
  • What technique did the speaker use in the conclusion? Was it effective?
  • What do you believe would be the reaction of the audience?
  • Summarize your general impressions of the speech.

    3. Work Period: Work on speech composition and/or editing, using the Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

  • How can we effectively prepare for our graduation speech? Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:
  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.
  • Friday, May 29th, 2009: Work Period: Work on speech composition, using the Graduation Speech Grading Rubric. Work on owed HW. How can we effectively prepare for our graduation speech? It's HIGHLY recommended that you bring in a draft of your speech on Monday. This is recommended because we will be revising the speeches and practicing.

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.
  • Thursday, May 28th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Introduce Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.

    2. Work Period: Work on speech composition. Work on any owed HW.

    How can we reflect on our high school experiences? Make up any owed HW!

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--Graduation Speech Grading Rubric.
  • Wednesday, May 27th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Finish sharing excerpts from your paper on the most meaningful novel in your life.

    2. Read this sample graduation speech--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College.

    3. Introduce speech requirements (see HW section).

    4. 2019 papers--how can you incorporate yours? What about your self-assessment from the beginning of the semester--how can this be useful for your speech?

    How can we reflect on our high school experiences? Make up any owed HW!

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! Graduation Speech (Value=25% of 3rd marking period)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--The 2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. You will be graded by the following rubric--TBA.
  • Tuesday, May 26th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Reflect on your high school experience--the most influential/meaningful qualities and the things that you wish you did.

    2. Share excerpts from your paper on the most meaningful novel in your life.

    How can we reflect on our high school experiences? Make up any owed HW!

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Friday, May 22nd, 2009: Vocabulary Game (using the SAT/COLLEGE VOCABULARY LISTS #1-11)! Using the vocabulary cards, we will place all vocabulary words and definitions on a large table in class. We will then (in a timed fashion) match the vocab. word with its appropriate definition. The person with the most matches wins! How can we effectively prepare for writing in college? Due THIS Tuesday, May 26th:
  • A 1-2 page paper (typed, double-spaced, 12 point font) on the MOST influential novel in your life. You should discuss the personal meaning of this novel (you may want to refer to specific characters, events, or themes that have great significance to you). Do NOT summarize the book. You MUST write in first person (I, me, my, etc.). You MUST use a minimum of 20 vocabulary words taken from the SAT/COLLEGE VOCABULARY LISTS #1-11. Be ready to share your paper on Tuesday.

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Thursday, May 21st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the answers for the Punctuation Errors Game.

    2. Vocabulary Jeopardy (using the SAT/COLLEGE VOCABULARY LISTS #1-11.

    How can we effectively prepare for writing in college? Read for pleasure!

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Wednesday, May 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing/analyzing the "Pitfalls of Plagiarism" article taken from University of Chicago.

    2. Punctuation Errors Game

    How can we effectively prepare for writing in college? Read for pleasure!

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Tuesday, May 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Prepare for tomorrow's extra credit opportunity.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Read, analyze and discuss "Format Writing for College" and the "Pitfalls of Plagiarism" articles taken from University of Chicago.

    How can we effectively prepare for writing in college? EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (You can earn up to 30 extra points on your final paper; Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, May 20th):
  • In connection with the viewing of The Kite Runner film, write a two-page paper (typed, double-spaced, 12 pt. font, Times New Roman, proper heading--your name, date, course name, and my name) in which you explain how one or more theme(s) (such as: the importance of friendship, the strains of a father-son relationship, the struggles with assimilation, etc.) deeply affect the characters and outcome of the story. Use specific evidence from the film and, in particular, examples that the director implemented (examples may be the actors' portrayals of the characters, the music choices, the images of various settings, the interactions between characters, etc.).

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Monday, May 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Assessment on the reading of "Writing in College" article taken from University of Chicago.

    2. Discussion/Analysis of the Do Now.

    How can we effectively prepare for writing in college? EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (You can earn up to 30 extra points on your final paper; Due THIS Wednesday, May 20th):
  • In connection with the viewing of The Kite Runner film, write a two-page paper (typed, double-spaced, 12 pt. font, Times New Roman, proper heading--your name, date, course name, and my name) in which you explain how one or more theme(s) (such as: the importance of friendship, the strains of a father-son relationship, the struggles with assimilation, etc.) deeply affect the characters and outcome of the story. Use specific evidence from the film and, in particular, examples that the director implemented (examples may be the actors' portrayals of the characters, the music choices, the images of various settings, the interactions between characters, etc.).

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Friday, May 15th, 2009: 1. Film Viewing of The Kite Runner: Analyze character portrayals and determine author/director themes (messages). Be ready to share.

    2. Discussion/Analysis

    How can we evaluate character portrayals and determine how they support the film's messages? Due THIS Monday, May 18th:
  • Read this "Writing in College" article taken from University of Chicago. You will be assessed to determine if you read and understood the information necessary for college.

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (You can earn up to 30 extra points on your final paper; Due Wednesday, May 20th):

  • In connection with the viewing of The Kite Runner film, write a two-page paper (typed, double-spaced, 12 pt. font, Times New Roman, proper heading--your name, date, course name, and my name) in which you explain how one or more theme(s) (such as: the importance of friendship, the strains of a father-son relationship, the struggles with assimilation, etc.) deeply affect the characters and outcome of the story. Use specific evidence from the film and, in particular, examples that the director implemented (examples may be the actors' portrayals of the characters, the music choices, the images of various settings, the interactions between characters, etc.).

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Thursday, May 14th, 2009: 1. Film Viewing of The Kite Runner: Analyze character portrayals and determine author/director themes (messages). Be ready to share.

    2. Discussion/Analysis

    How can we evaluate character portrayals and determine how they support the film's messages?
  • Read for pleasure!

    HW to be given on Friday. Enjoy these free-HW days!

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (You can earn up to 30 extra points on your final paper; Due Wednesday, May 20th):

  • In connection with the viewing of The Kite Runner film, write a two-page paper (typed, double-spaced, 12 pt. font, Times New Roman, proper heading--your name, date, course name, and my name) in which you explain how one or more theme(s) (such as: the importance of friendship, the strains of a father-son relationship, the struggles with assimilation, etc.) deeply affect the characters and outcome of the story. Use specific evidence from the film and, in particular, examples that the director implemented (examples may be the actors' portrayals of the characters, the music choices, the images of various settings, the interactions between characters, etc.).
  • Wednesday, May 13th, 2009: 1. Film Viewing of The Kite Runner: Analyze character portrayals and determine author/director themes (messages). Be ready to share.

    2. Discussion/Analysis

    How can we evaluate character portrayals and determine how they support the film's messages?
  • Read for pleasure!

    HW to be given on Friday. Enjoy these free-HW days!

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Tuesday, May 12th, 2009: 1. Film Viewing of The Kite Runner: Analyze character portrayals and determine author/director themes (messages). Be ready to share.

    2. Discussion/Analysis

    How can we evaluate character portrayals and determine how they support the film's messages?
  • Read for pleasure!

    HW to be given on Friday. Enjoy these free-HW days!

    Due Week of June 8th-June 12th:

  • FINAL SPEECH! MORE DETAILS TO COME!
  • Monday, May 11th, 2009: REFLECTIONS ON AP EXAM How can we reflect on the AP English Literature Exam? None! Read for pleasure!
    Friday, May 8th, 2009: REFLECTIONS ON AP EXAM How can we reflect on the AP English Literature Exam? None! Read for pleasure!
    Thursday, May 7th, 2009: AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM How are we assessed on the AP English Literature Exam? None! Read for pleasure!
    Wednesday, May 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish review of exemplary 2003 prose passage essay.

    2. In small groups, discuss the following questions--What are the skills we should know and apply for tomorrow's AP exam? How can we tackle the difficult questions and texts on the exam? Why are we prepared for this exam? This discussion will capitalize on the positives in terms of preparation and knowledge that will lead to a passing AP score! :)

    3. Whole Class Discussion: Share the positive output from the Discussion Study Groups. Remaining questions and concerns that students want addressed before the exam.

    3. AP Exam Reminders: The AP Exam begins at 8am in Room 207 (music room!). Exam Day Info--MUST READ, AP English Lit. Exam Grade Distribution, Exam Security Policies and Procedures

    How do we effectively prepare for the AP English Literature Exam? THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM IS TOMORROW AT 8:00AM IN THE MUSIC ROOM--ROOM 207! COME TO MS. CONN'S ROOM AT 7:00-7:30am for bagels & cream cheese, juice and moral support!
  • Get your watch ready for tomorrow! Eat a hearty, nutritious meal (don't eat/drink too much sugar or caffeine) and go to sleep early. Tomorrow, eat breakfast and arrive to school early with plenty of pens, pencils and all electronic devices in the 'off' position! Remember, the exam begins at 8am!!
  • DO NOT STRESS. ALL OF YOU HAVE PREPARED THOROUGHLY. BE CONFIDENT AND YOU WILL SUCCEED! :)

    REVIEW THESE USEFUL RESOURCES FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM (TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 7TH at 8:00am):

  • SAT/COLLEGE VOCABULARY
  • Study these AP Exam Strategies.
  • Review the Glossary of Terms packet and index cards.
  • Study this Poetry Essay Study Guide and this Multiple Choice Question Study Guide.
  • Review the Prose Passage Essay Study Guide.
  • Review the Free Response Essay Study Guide.
  • Review 2-3 novels/plays that you will be ready to use (of course, you are only writing about ONE) for the Free-Response Essay. Review literary devices, characters, author's tone/attitude toward the text, plot and previously written papers on the novel/play.
  • Review Literary Movements, exemplary essays, multiple-choice question practice exams, AP multiple-choice question types, time period of genres of literature, poetry annotations, last semester's papers, notes and materials on the Shakespearean plays and Shakespeare's life and times.
  • Find sample exams and other resources at this College Board English Literature Exam Resource: AP Central
  • Tuesday, May 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the Free-Response Study Guide.

    2. Review students' in-class Free-Response Essay on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

    3. Review an exemplary Free-Response Essay.

    4. Review the 2003 Prose Passage Essay Question and students' in-class essays.

    5. Review an exemplary 2003 prose passage essay.

    How do we effectively prepare for the Free-Response Essay and Prose Passage Essay on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Bring in at least one question, section or strategy that you'd like to review or get assistance in to ensure success on the AP English Literature Exam.

    STUDY THESE USEFUL RESOURCES FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM (THIS COMING THURSDAY, MAY 7TH at 8:00am):

  • Study these AP Exam Strategies.
  • Review the Glossary of Terms packet and index cards.
  • Study this Poetry Essay Study Guide and this Multiple Choice Question Study Guide.
  • Review the Prose Passage Essay Study Guide.
  • Review the Free Response Essay Study Guide.
  • Review 2-3 novels/plays that you will be ready to use (of course, you are only writing about ONE) for the Free-Response Essay. Review literary devices, characters, author's tone/attitude toward the text, plot and previously written papers on the novel/play.
  • Review Literary Movements, exemplary essays, multiple-choice question practice exams, AP multiple-choice question types, time period of genres of literature, poetry annotations, last semester's papers, notes and materials on the Shakespearean plays and Shakespeare's life and times.
  • Find sample exams and other resources at this College Board English Literature Exam Resource: AP Central
  • Monday, May 4th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the Multiple Choice Question Study Guide.

    2. Review students' self-made AP-style multiple-choice questions for The Kite Runner.

    3. Review the Free-Response Study Guide.

    4. Review students' in-class Free-Response Essay on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

    How do we effectively prepare for the multiple choice questions and Free-Response Essay on the AP English Literature Exam? STUDY THESE USEFUL RESOURCES FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM (THIS COMING THURSDAY, MAY 7TH at 8:00am):
  • Study these AP Exam Strategies.
  • Review the Glossary of Terms packet and index cards.
  • Study this Poetry Essay Study Guide and this Multiple Choice Question Study Guide.
  • Review the Prose Passage Essay Study Guide.
  • Review the Free Response Essay Study Guide.
  • Review 2-3 novels/plays that you will be ready to use (of course, you are only writing about ONE) for the Free-Response Essay. Review literary devices, characters, author's tone/attitude toward the text, plot and previously written papers on the novel/play.
  • Review Literary Movements, exemplary essays, multiple-choice question practice exams, AP multiple-choice question types, time period of genres of literature, poetry annotations, last semester's papers, notes and materials on the Shakespearean plays and Shakespeare's life and times.
  • Find sample exams and other resources at this College Board English Literature Exam Resource: AP Central
  • Friday, May 1st, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish review of the Prose Passage Essay Study Guide.

    2. Write the Prose Passage Essay (40 minutes!) from the 2003 Question.

    How do we prepare for the prose passage essay on the AP English Literature Exam? STUDY THESE USEFUL RESOURCES FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM (THIS COMING THURSDAY, MAY 7TH at 8:00am):
  • Study these AP Exam Strategies.
  • Review the Glossary of Terms packet and index cards.
  • Study this Poetry Essay Study Guide and this Multiple Choice Question Study Guide.
  • Review the Prose Passage Essay Study Guide.
  • Review the Free Response Essay Study Guide.
  • Review 2-3 novels/plays that you will be ready to use (of course, you are only writing about ONE) for the Free-Response Essay. Review literary devices, characters, author's tone/attitude toward the text, plot and previously written papers on the novel/play.
  • Review Literary Movements, exemplary essays, multiple-choice question practice exams, AP multiple-choice questiont types, time period of genres of literature, poetry annotations, last semester's papers, notes and materials on the Shakespearean plays and Shakespeare's life and times.
  • Find sample exams and other resources at this College Board English Literature Exam Resource: AP Central
  • Thursday, April 30th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the Student Group Presentations of TP-CASTT for Poetry Analysis and apply your assigned poetry analysis strategy to the poem "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds.

    2. Analyze the Poetry Essay Study Guide as a class and the Multiple Choice Question Study Guide.

    3. Introduce the Prose Passage Essay Study Guide. There will be an in-class essay tomorrow for practice and class credit.

    How do we prepare for the poetry essay and the multiple choice questions on the AP English Literature Exam? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Read and review the Prose Passage Essay Study Guide. There will be an in-class essay for practice and class credit. STUDY THESE USEFUL RESOURCES FOR THE AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM (NEXT THURSDAY, MAY 7TH at 8:00am):
  • Review the Glossary of Terms packet.
  • Study this Poetry Essay Study Guide and this Multiple Choice Question Study Guide.
  • Find sample exams and other resources at this College Board English Literature Exam Resource: AP Central
  • Wednesday, April 29th, 2009: 1. Do Now: In table groups, review the TP-CASTT for Poetry Analysis and apply your assigned poetry analysis strategy to the poem "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds.

    2. Student Group Presentations of TP-CASTT (based on the Do Now)

    3. Analyze this Poetry Essay Study Guide as a class.

    How do we prepare for the poetry essay on the AP English Literature Exam?
  • Review the Glossary of Terms packet.
  • Study this Poetry Essay Study Guide and this Multiple Choice Question Study Guide. .
  • Extra Credit opportunity this week based on HW!
  • Find sample exams and other resources at this College Board English Literature Exam Resource: AP Central
  • Tuesday, April 28th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review and discuss the April 22nd HW found here: Read a favorite Shakespearean Sonnet and bring in to read and discuss. Be able to explain why you prefer this sonnet. Say something about Shakespeare's use and significance of literary devices. Here are links to his sonnets: Sonnets 1-50, Sonnets 51-100, and Sonnets 101-154.

    2. Analyze "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds and review the TP-CASTT for Poetry Analysis.

    3. Examine the AP Exemplary Poetry Essay.

    How do we prepare for the poetry essay of the AP English Literature Exam?
  • Review the Glossary of Terms packet.
  • Read this Poetry Essay Study Guide.
  • Extra Credit opportunity this week based on HW!
  • Find sample exams and other resources at this College Board English Literature Exam Resource: AP Central
  • Monday, April 27th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Analyze "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds and make sure you address the TP-CASTT for Poetry Analysis. Make sure you addressed this in your annotations.

    2. Work Period: Write the poetry essay now. Address the essay prompt: In "On the Subway," Sharon Olds brings two worlds into close proximity. Identify the contrasts that develop both portraits in the poem and discuss the insights the narrator comes to as a result of the experience. Refer to such literary techniques as tone, poetic devices, imagery, and organization. You will have 20 minutes to write your essay since you've already read the prompt, read and annotated the poem and prepared to write (outline). You will examine an exemplary poetry essay tomorrow.

    How do we prepare for the poetry essay of the AP English Literature Exam? Due Tuesday, April 28th:
  • Review and prepare to discuss the April 22nd HW found here: Read a favorite Shakespearean Sonnet and bring in to read and discuss. Be able to explain why you prefer this sonnet. Say something about Shakespeare's use and significance of literary devices. Here are links to his sonnets: Sonnets 1-50, Sonnets 51-100, and Sonnets 101-154.


  • Review the Glossary of Terms packet.
  • Read this Poetry Essay Study Guide.
  • Extra Credit opportunity this week based on HW!
  • Find sample exams and other resources at this College Board English Literature Exam Resource: AP Central
  • Friday, April 24th, 2009: Essay Exam on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest taken from the 2001 AP English Literature Exam How do we prepare for the free-response essay of the AP English Literature Exam through our study of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest? Due Monday, April 27th:
  • Re-read the poem "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds and read the following poetry essay prompt: In "On the Subway," Sharon Olds brings two worlds into close proximity. Identify the contrasts that develop both portraits in the poem and discuss the insights the narrator comes to as a result of the experience. Refer to such literary techniques as tone, poetic devices, imagery, and organization.
  • Annotate the poem to prepare to write an essay that follows the above prompt.
  • Write an outline for a 5-6 paragraph essay response to the prompt. Do NOT write the essay. Though, do include specific lines that you would use to support each of your points.
  • Review and prepare to discuss the April 22nd HW found here: Read a favorite Shakespearean Sonnet and bring in to read and discuss. Be able to explain why you prefer this sonnet. Say something about Shakespeare's use and significance of literary devices. Here are links to his sonnets: Sonnets 1-50, Sonnets 51-100, and Sonnets 101-154.

  • Thursday, April 23rd, 2009--Shakespeare's Birthday!: 1.Do Now: Read a favorite Shakespearean Sonnet and explain why you prefer this sonnet. Say something about Shakespeare's use and significance of literary devices. Here are links to his sonnets: Sonnets 1-50, Sonnets 51-100, and Sonnets 101-154.

    2. Discussion: Discuss the signficance of Shakespeare's sonnets to the modern world and people today and his adept skill in using literary devices to help promote the meaning of the poems. Share fun facts about Shakespeare, his life, times, works, messages and meaningful characters.

    How do we pay tribute to The Bard and work on poetry analysis for the AP exam? Due TOMORROW, Friday, April 24th--In-Class Free-Response Essay Exam on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Review the following strategies for success on this essay:
  • Avoid vagueness and plot summary.
  • Go over facts from the novel so you can thoroughly recall or understand.
  • Familiarize yourself with sample free-response prompts (see samples provided in recent days).
  • Anticipate free-response prompts.
  • Develop specific review materials for this novel.
  • Practice applying your knowledge to a variety of prompts.
  • During the essay exam, highlight the prompt to make certain you are addressing the requirements of the question.
  • Plan the essay thoroughly before you begin writing.
  • Briefly chart your response. Fill in with correct details and quotes, if possible.
  • Write an engaging, attention-grabbing introductory paragraph that reflects the question's requirements.
  • Stay on topic.
  • Include transition words (such as: in addition, although, however, as a result, even though, etc.).
  • Review materials provided in class and on this website to prepare you for the free-response essay.
  • Share your ideas with others before the exam.
  • Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009: 1.Do Now: Discuss/Share your HW findings in which you provide at least two works you would use to respond to the below prompts:
  • The journey as a major force in a work.
  • What happens to a dream deferred?
  • Transformation.
  • Descent into madness/hell.
  • An ironic reversal in a character's beliefs or actions.
  • Perception and reality.
  • A child become a force of revelation.
  • Ceremony or ritual plays an important role.
  • The role of the fool, comic character, or wise servant who is a force of revelation.
  • How a minor character is used to develop a major character.
  • Parent/child or sibling relationships and their significance.
  • The analysis of a villain with regard to the meaning of the work.
  • The conflict between passion and responsibility.
  • The conflict between character and society.
  • The use of an unrealistic character or element and its effect on the work.

    Offer your reasons for each literary work. Show HW.

    2. Discussion: Finish discussing with the class the following questions. Reflect on the novel and comment on your opinions of the novel, relevance of the novel to today's world, and overall satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the ending. The patients' purpose? Big Chief's purpose? How would you characterize each of the following characters' roles in the novel--McMurphy, Big Nurse and Big Chief? Why do some people keep living while others choose to end their lives, like Billy Bibbit?

  • How do we prepare for the Free-Response Essay on the AP English Literature Exam? Due TOMORROW, Thursday, April 23rd:
  • Read and review this Glossary of Literary Terms. Be prepared to discuss tomorrow in connection with your chosen Shakespearean Sonnet (see below).
  • Read a favorite Shakespearean Sonnet and bring in to read and discuss tomorrow. Be able to explain why you prefer this sonnet. Say something about Shakespeare's use and significance of literary devices. Here are links to his sonnets: Sonnets 1-50, Sonnets 51-100, and Sonnets 101-154.

    Friday, April 24th--In-Class Free-Response Essay Exam on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

  • Tuesday, April 21st, 2009: 1.Do Now: Discuss with the class the following questions. Reflect on the novel and comment on your opinions of the novel, relevance of the novel to today's world, and overall satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the ending. What do you believe was Ken Kesey's purpose in writing One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest? What was McMurphy's purpose? Big Nurse's purpose? The patients' purpose? Big Chief's purpose? How would you characterize each of the following characters' roles in the novel--McMurphy, Big Nurse and Big Chief? Why do some people keep living while others choose to end their lives, like Billy Bibbit?

    2. HW introduced: Free-Response Essays expect that you demonstrate a mature understanding and defense of the prompt. You do have total freedom to choose the piece of litrature to which you will refer. Your illustrations must be cogent and insightful rather than obvious and superficial. You must bring something specific and relevant from the work of literature you've chosen. The exam graders are looking for literary insights and awareness of the character, comprehension of theme, and the ability to transfer specific ideas and details to a universal concept. You should reveal and understand the relationships among form, content, style, and structure and their effects on the meaning of the work. Here are some topics that could be the basis for a free-response prompt. Provide at least two works you would use to respond to the below prompts:

  • The journey as a major force in a work.
  • What happens to a dream deferred?
  • Transformation.
  • Descent into madness/hell.
  • An ironic reversal in a character's beliefs or actions.
  • Perception and reality.
  • A child become a force of revelation.
  • Ceremony or ritual plays an important role.
  • The role of the fool, comic character, or wise servant who is a force of revelation.
  • How a minor character is used to develop a major character.
  • Parent/child or sibling relationships and their significance.
  • The analysis of a villain with regard to the meaning of the work.
  • The conflict between passion and responsibility.
  • The conflict between character and society.
  • The use of an unrealistic character or element and its effect on the work.
  • How do we prepare for the Free-Response Essay on the AP English Literature Exam? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, April 22nd:
    Here are some topics that could be the basis for a free-response prompt. Provide at least two works you would use to respond to the below prompts:
  • The journey as a major force in a work.
  • What happens to a dream deferred?
  • Transformation.
  • Descent into madness/hell.
  • An ironic reversal in a character's beliefs or actions.
  • Perception and reality.
  • A child become a force of revelation.
  • Ceremony or ritual plays an important role.
  • The role of the fool, comic character, or wise servant who is a force of revelation.
  • How a minor character is used to develop a major character.
  • Parent/child or sibling relationships and their significance.
  • The analysis of a villain with regard to the meaning of the work.
  • The conflict between passion and responsibility.
  • The conflict between character and society.
  • The use of an unrealistic character or element and its effect on the work.

    Friday, April 24th--In-Class Free-Response Essay Exam on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

  • Monday, April 20th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Answer the following questions with a partner and be prepared to share with the class. What do you believe was Ken Kesey's purpose in writing One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest? What was McMurphy's purpose? Big Nurse's purpose? The patients' purpose? Big Chief's purpose? How would you characterize each of the following characters' roles in the novel--McMurphy, Big Nurse and Big Chief? Why do some people keep living while others choose to end their lives, like Billy Bibbit?

    2. Discussion: Discuss the Do Now with the whole class. Reflect on the novel and comment on your opinions of the novel, relevance of the novel to today's world, and overall satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the ending.

    How do we prepare for the Free-Response Essay on the AP English Literature Exam? Friday, April 24th--In-Class Free-Response Essay Exam on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
    Wednesday, April 8th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Review the answers to the following questions:
    1.) How much time is allotted for the multiple choice question section?
    2.) What are the four main kinds of questions on the multiple choice question section?
    3.) Identify two multiple choice question strategies.
    4.) When you are given a prose passage or a poem for an essay, should you use one direct quote, many direct quotes or no direct quotes in your essay?
    5.) What is one quality of a high-range essay?
    6.) What should every opening paragraph contain?
    7.) When given two poems or two ideas in one poem, what should be discussed in the essay?
    8.) How much time is allotted for each essay (remember, there are three essays to write)?
    9.) After identifying literary devices in a prose passage, poem or a novel, what should you do in the essay?
    10.) In the free-response essay on your chosen novel, should you use direct quotes?
    11.) How long should the essays be, in general?
    12.) Should you summarize the plot in your essay?
    13.) What's the meaning of allusion?
    14.) Identify three types of poems and define them.
    15.) Identify three novels/plays that you know well to write about in-depth in the free-response essay.

    2. Review the Literary Movements Quiz

    3. Vacation HW introduced.

    How do we review the essential elements of the AP English Literature Exam? FOR FUN: Check this out. "We Live in Public" movie. This documentary is about the rise and fall of an unknown internet pioneer, Josh Harris, and his prophecy of the world we live today 'in public' (on facebook, myspace, twitter, etc.).

    DUE APRIL 20TH--Read Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (provided in class). Higher Level Thinking and AP Preparation: Using post-its, annotate literary devices (such as: conflicts, themes, characterization, character relationships, setting, irony, etc.) and their significance to the meaning of the entire novel, author's purpose, examine the narrator's tone, and author's message. Identify significant quotes that hold greater meaning to the novel.

    Tuesday, April 7th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Finish the review of the sample exemplary student essay on "The Naked and the Nude." Discuss the similarities and differences between your own essay and the exemplary essay. Identify the qualities needed for an outstanding poetry essay.

    2. Group Work: In a group of three, answer the following questions to determine if you are an expert (all 15 correct=two extra homework credits), a learner (10-14 correct=one extra homework credit), or a novice (5-9 correct=1/2 of an extra homework credit) in the components of the AP English Literature Exam. Here are the questions:
    1.) How much time is allotted for the multiple choice question section?
    2.) What are the four main kinds of questions on the multiple choice question section?
    3.) Identify two multiple choice question strategies.
    4.) When you are given a prose passage or a poem for an essay, should you use one direct quote, many direct quotes or no direct quotes in your essay?
    5.) What is one quality of a high-range essay?
    6.) What should every opening paragraph contain?
    7.) When given two poems or two ideas in one poem, what should be discussed in the essay?
    8.) How much time is allotted for each essay (remember, there are three essays to write)?
    9.) After identifying literary devices in a prose passage, poem or a novel, what should you do in the essay?
    10.) In the free-response essay on your chosen novel, should you use direct quotes?
    11.) How long should the essays be, in general?
    12.) Should you summarize the plot in your essay?
    13.) What's the meaning of allusion?
    14.) Identify three types of poems and define them.
    15.) Identify three novels/plays that you know well to write about in-depth in the free-response essay.

    3. Turn in poetry analysis HW.

    How do we review the essential elements of the AP English Literature Exam? FOR FUN: Check this out. "We Live in Public" movie. This documentary is about the rise and fall of an unknown internet pioneer, Josh Harris, and his prophecy of the world we live today 'in public' (on facebook, myspace, twitter, etc.).

    DUE APRIL 20TH--Read Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (provided in class). Higher Level Thinking and AP Preparation: Using post-its, annotate literary devices (such as: conflicts, themes, characterization, character relationships, setting, irony, etc.) and their significance to the meaning of the entire novel, author's purpose, examine the narrator's tone, and author's message. Identify significant quotes that hold greater meaning to the novel.

    Monday, April 6th, 2009: 1.Do Now: Finish sharing the annotations for the poem, "The Naked and the Nude" by Robert Graves. Share the annotations in terms of the essay question: In a well-organized essay, discuss the distinguishing differences between connotations of the two main words in the title of the poem "The Naked and the Nude" as they are developed in this poem by Robert Graves. Refer to such literary techniques as tone, style, poetic devices, structure and imagery. Refer to the text, using direct quotes often to support your claims.

    2. Discuss/Share: Review the sample exemplary student essay on "The Naked and the Nude." Discuss the similarities and differences between your own essay and the exemplary essay. Identify the qualities needed for an outstanding poetry essay.

    3. HW reminder.

    How do we prepare for the poetry analysis and essay writing for the AP Exam? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, APRIL 7TH--Read and annotate the following ten poems. Your annotations should identify and offer the significance of literary devices, including narrator's tone, author's message and how important literary devices contribute to the meaning of the whole poems. Here are the poems:
  • "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds
  • "A Red, Red Rose" by Robert Burns
  • "Bonny Barbara Allan" by Anonymous
  • "Ode on the Spring" by Thomas Gray
  • "O Captain, My Captain" by Walt Whitman
  • "Porphyria's Lover" by Robert Browning
  • "The Snake" by D.H. Lawrence
  • "The Sick Rose" by William Blake
  • "She Walks in Beauty" by Lord Byron
  • "Sonnet 130" by William Shakespeare
  • Friday, April 3rd, 2009: 1.Do Now: Examine a neighbor's essay and identify (put an asterisk *) an impressive, analytical sentence or two, something worth sharing.

    2. Discuss/Share: Read and share annotations on the poem, "The Naked and the Nude" by Robert Graves. Share the annotations in terms of the essay question: In a well-organized essay, discuss the distinguishing differences between connotations of the two main words in the title of the poem "The Naked and the Nude" as they are developed in this poem by Robert Graves. Refer to such literary techniques as tone, style, poetic devices, structure and imagery. Refer to the text, using direct quotes often to support your claims.

    How do we prepare for the poetry analysis and essay writing for the AP Exam? Due Monday, April 6th:
  • Read a sample exemplary student essay on "The Naked and the Nude." Re-read your own essay and find similarities and differences. Be ready to share on Monday.

    DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 7TH--Read and annotate the following ten poems. Your annotations should identify and offer the significance of literary devices, including narrator's tone, author's message and how important literary devices contribute to the meaning of the whole poems. Here are the poems:

  • "On the Subway" by Sharon Olds
  • "A Red, Red Rose" by Robert Burns
  • "Bonny Barbara Allan" by Anonymous
  • "Ode on the Spring" by Thomas Gray
  • "O Captain, My Captain" by Walt Whitman
  • "Porphyria's Lover" by Robert Browning
  • "The Snake" by D.H. Lawrence
  • "The Sick Rose" by William Blake
  • "She Walks in Beauty" by Lord Byron
  • "Sonnet 130" by William Shakespeare


  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, April 2nd, 2009: 1.Do Now: Read "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost in honor of Poetry Month and our theme of finding meaning in life. Annotate the poem (underlining and writing notes in the margin) and answer the following questions:
  • Why is "The Road Not Taken" considered such a profound poem of great merit?
  • What's Robert Frost's message?
  • How does this poem exhibit the conflict of fate vs. free-will?
  • What is the significance of the poet's use of literary devices?
  • How is this poem personally relevant?

    2. Work Period: Begin to read and annotate "The Naked and the Nude" by Robert Graves. Annotate in terms of the essay question: In a well-organized essay, discuss the distinguishing differences between connotations of the two main words in the title of the poem "The Naked and the Nude" as they are developed in this poem by Robert Graves. Refer to such literary techniques as tone, style, poetic devices, structure and imagery. Refer to the text, using direct quotes often to support your claims.

  • How do we prepare for the poetry analysis and essay writing for the AP Exam? DUE TOMORROW: For HW credit (not graded, though write the best essay you can; remember, this is good practice for the AP exam), write a 5-6 paragraph essay (time yourself for 40 minutes) for the poem, "The Naked and the Nude" by Robert Graves. Read and annotate the poem. In a well-organized essay, discuss the distinguishing differences between connotations of the two main words in the title of the poem "The Naked and the Nude" as they are developed in this poem by Robert Graves. Refer to such literary techniques as tone, style, poetic devices, structure and imagery. Refer to the text, using direct quotes often to support your claims.


  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Wednesday, April 1st, 2009: 1.Do Now: Turn in your AP-style paper on meaning.

    2. Work Period: Work on filling out the AP Exam answer sheets and booklets.

    How do we prepare for the AP Exam? Nothing due tomorrow! Enjoy. Read for pleasure!


  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Tuesday, March 31st, 2009: 1.Do Now: Review AP-style paper details (the paper is due tomorrow!).

    2. Review the Glossary of Terms Exam

    3. If time remains, begin filling out AP Exam booklets.

    How do we ensure success on the AP English literature exam by analyzing literary terms? DUE TOMORROW WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st:
  • Finish reading your chosen classic novel. Take notes on a character's struggles to find meaning and the societal and environmental factors that influence his/her path toward meaning. You should refer to literary devices that contribute to the character's path toward meaning.
  • AP-STYLE FREE RESPONSE (GRADED!) PAPER ON MEANING. Write an AP-style essay on your chosen classic novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work. This is a typed paper, 2-3 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading and summarized references to the text (no direct quotes). Use this AP English Literature Grading Rubric to guide you.


  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Monday, March 30th, 2009: QUIZ ON LITERARY MOVEMENTS How do we ensure success on the AP English literature exam by analyzing the genres of literature and our knowledge of each genre? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st:
  • Finish reading your chosen classic novel. Take notes on a character's struggles to find meaning and the societal and environmental factors that influence his/her path toward meaning. You should refer to literary devices that contribute to the character's path toward meaning.
  • AP-STYLE FREE RESPONSE PAPER ON MEANING. Write an AP-style essay on your chosen classic novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work. This is a typed paper, 2-3 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading and summarized references to the text (no direct quotes). Use this AP English Literature Grading Rubric to guide you.


  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Friday, March 27th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the analysis (reasons why each of the texts fall under classicism, realism, romanticism, impressionism, expressionism and naturalism) of excerpts from Gulliver's Travels (classicism), Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment (realism), William Wordsworth's poem "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" (romanticism), Kate Chopin's The Awakening (impressionism), Kafka's The Metamorphosis (expressionism), and Sinclair's The Jungle (naturalism).

    2. AP-Style Free-Response Essay on Meaning: Discuss the requirements for the following essay question--One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay on your chosen classic novel in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work.

    How do we ensure success on the AP English literature exam by analyzing the genres of literature and our knowledge of each genre? QUIZ THIS MONDAY, MARCH 30th:
  • Literary Movements (as described in the "Suggested Reading Guide" packet and the sample texts)-Classicism, Realism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Expressionism, and Naturalism. Know the qualities of each movement and be able to identify each movement in a sample work of literature (a short story, novel or a poem). Use the excerpts from Gulliver's Travels (classicism), Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment (realism), William Wordsworth's poem "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" (romanticism), Kate Chopin's The Awakening (impressionism), Kafka's The Metamorphosis (expressionism), and Sinclair's The Jungle (naturalism).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st:

  • AP-STYLE FREE RESPONSE PAPER ON MEANING. Write an AP-style essay on your chosen classic novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work. This is a typed paper, 2-3 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading and summarized references to the text (no direct quotes). Use this AP English Literature Grading Rubric to guide you.


  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, March 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the time period analysis for sample authors for each of the literary movements--classicism, realism, romanticism, impressionism, expressionism, and naturalism. Discuss the analysis (reasons why each of the texts fall under classicism, realism, romanticism, impressionism, expressionism and naturalism) of excerpts from Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (classicism), Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment (realism), William Wordsworth's poem "I Wondered Lonely as a Cloud" (romanticism), Kate Chopin's The Awakening (impressionism), Kafka's The Metamorphosis (expressionism), and Sinclair's The Jungle (naturalism). How do we ensure success on the AP English literature exam by analyzing the genres of literature and our knowledge of each genre? QUIZ ON MONDAY, MARCH 30th:
  • Literary Movements (as described in the "Suggested Reading Guide" packet and the sample texts)-Classicism, Realism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Expressionism, and Naturalism. Know the qualities of each movement and be able to identify each movement in a sample work of literature (a short story, novel or a poem).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st:

  • AP-STYLE FREE RESPONSE PAPER ON MEANING. Write an AP-style essay on your chosen classic novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work. This is a typed paper, 2-3 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading and summarized references to the text (no direct quotes). Use this AP English Literature Grading Rubric to guide you.


  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Wednesday, March 25th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Analyze excerpts from Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (classicism), Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment (realism), William Wordsworth's poem "I Wondered Lonely as a Cloud" (romanticism), Kate Chopin's The Awakening (impressionism), Kafka's The Metamorphosis (expressionism), and Sinclair's The Jungle (naturalism).

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and analyze the time periods (birth and death dates) for sample authors for each of the genres of literature--classicism, realism, romanticism, impressionism, expressionism, and naturalism.

    How do we ensure success on the AP English literature exam by analyzing the genres of literature and our knowledge of each genre? Due Wednesday, April 1st:
  • Finish reading your new classic novel! When reading, you should focus (and take notes) on the topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work. This is a typed paper, 2-3 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading and summarized references to the text (no direct quotes). Use this AP English Literature Grading Rubric to guide you.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Tuesday, March 24th, 2009: Work Period: Fill out the lists of works on the "Suggested Reading Guide" that fall under each category-classicism, realism, romanticism, impressionism, expressionism, and naturalism. How do we ensure success on the AP English literature exam by analyzing the genres of literature and our knowledge of each genre? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Research the lifetimes (birth and death dates) of each of the authors in each category (classicism, realism, romanticism, impressionism, expressionism, and naturalism) in the "Suggested Reading Guide" packet.

    Due Wednesday, April 1st:

  • Finish reading your new classic novel! When reading, you should focus (and take notes) on the topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work. This is a typed paper, 2-3 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading and summarized references to the text (no direct quotes). Use this AP English Literature Grading Rubric to guide you.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Monday, March 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read and analyze the "Suggested Reading Guide"--taken from 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature.

    2. Work Period: Fill out the lists of works on the "Suggested Reading Guide" that fall under each category-classicism, realism, romanticism, impressionism, expressionism, and naturalism.

    How do we ensure success on the AP English literature exam by analyzing the genres of literature and our knowledge of each genre? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY:
  • Research the lifetimes (birth and death dates) of each of the authors in each category (classicism, realism, romanticism, impressionism, expressionism, and naturalism) in the "Suggested Reading Guide" packet.

    Due Wednesday, April 1st:

  • Finish reading your new classic novel! When reading, you should focus (and take notes) on the topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work. This is a typed paper, 2-3 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading and summarized references to the text (no direct quotes). Use this AP English Literature Grading Rubric to guide you.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Friday, March 20th, 2009: 1. Do Now: EXAM ON GLOSSARY OF TERMS

    2. Reflections: Reflect on the preparation for the AP English literature exam. How is it going? What do you want to work on in these remaining 6 weeks?

    How do we ensure success on the application of literary terms on the AP English literature exam?
  • Read your new classic novel! You must be finished by April 1st. When reading, you should focus (and take notes) on the topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work. This is a typed paper, 2-3 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with proper heading and summarized references to the text (no direct quotes). Use this AP English Literature Grading Rubric to guide you.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, March 19th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the prose sections in the Practice Exam #2.

    2. Work Period: Prepare for tomorrow's exam on the Glossary of Terms.

    How do we ensure success on the prose portion of the AP English literature exam? TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM!


  • Read your new classic novel! You must be finished by April 1st (two weeks from today). When reading, you should keep in mind (and take notes) the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Wednesday, March 18th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish annotation/analysis of the poems in AP Practice Exam #2. Show your new classic novel.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the poetry analysis.

    3. Finish review of the poetry sections in the Practice Exam #2.

    How do we ensure success on the poetry portion of the AP English literature exam?
  • Read your new classic novel! You must be finished by April 1st (two weeks from today). When reading, you should keep in mind (and take notes) the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel on the following question: One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for meaning. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in a novel or a drama struggles to find meaning and deals with the societal and environmental factors that influence his path toward meaning. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay how the author uses this path toward meaning to enhance the meaning of the work.

    THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Tuesday, March 17th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review the poetry sections in the Practice Exam #1.

    2. Work Period: HW Reminders and time to prepare for Friday's exam.

    How do we ensure success on the poetry portion of the AP English literature exam? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18th:
  • Acquire a new classic novel; you may easily access the novel at our school library or your community library. Select it and bring in your new, independently-chosen classic novel. Once you've selected the novel, begin reading. It MUST be read by April 1st. Use the following links to find your novel: "101 Books to Read Before You Go to College", “Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading”, “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", “Ms. Conn’s Favorite Classics”. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.

    THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Monday, March 16th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review The Kite Runner papers.

    2. Grade distributions

    How do we ensure success on the written portions of the AP English literature exam? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18th:
  • Acquire a new classical novel; you may easily access the novel at our school library or your community library. Select it and bring in your new, independently-chosen classic novel. Once you've selected the novel, begin reading. It MUST be read by April 1st. Use the following links to find your novel: "101 Books to Read Before You Go to College", “Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading”, “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", “Ms. Conn’s Favorite Classics”. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel.

    THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Friday, March 13th, 2009: Work Period: Work on preparing for next week's exam on Glossary of Terms. How do we acquire a broader knowledge of literary terms to ensure success on the AP English literature exam? DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18th:
  • Acquire a new classical novel; you may easily access the novel at our school library or your community library. Select it and bring in your new, independently-chosen classic novel. Once you've selected the novel, begin reading. It MUST be read by April 1st. Use the following links to find your novel: "101 Books to Read Before You Go to College", “Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading”, “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", “Ms. Conn’s Favorite Classics”. When reading, you should keep in mind the marking period topic (Finding a Purpose) and supporting questions: How do societal and environmental factors influence an individual’s purpose? What is the nature of a good life? What methods are employed to attain a good life? Be prepared to write an AP-style essay on your novel. Read for pleasure. Challenge your mind!

    NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, March 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Show index card HW. Prepare for upcoming exam on the Glossary of Terms.

    2. Grade and calculate the scores for AP Practice Exam #1.

    How do we acquire a broader knowledge of literary terms to ensure success on the AP English literature exam? Read for pleasure. Challenge your mind!

    NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Wednesday, March 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue analytical introduction of the Glossary of Terms HW.

    2. Work Period: Work on the index card compilation of the literary terms.

    How do we acquire a broader knowledge of literary terms to ensure success on the AP English literature exam? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 12th:
  • ALL owed HW!
  • Index cards for each of the 100 words on the Glossary of Terms

    NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Tuesday, March 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the review and understanding of the multiple choice questions--specifically for prose analysis. Turn in the AP Practice Exam #1 (take-home quiz).

    2. Introduce the Glossary of Terms HW.

    3. Begin HW.

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? DUE THURSDAY, MARCH 12th:
  • Index cards for each of the 100 words on the Glossary of Terms

    NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Monday, March 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review and understand the multiple choice questions--specifically for prose analysis.

    2. Introduce HW.

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? DUE TOMORROW (Tuesday, March 10th):
  • AP Practice Exam #1 (take-home quiz; value of 12.5% of this marking period grade). Please time yourself 1 hour.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11th:

  • Index cards for each of the 100 words on the Glossary of Terms

    NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH: Glossary of Terms (see take-home quiz packet) EXAM


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Friday, March 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Review and understand the multiple choice questions--specifically for poetry analysis.

    2. If time allows, review the prose section.

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? A weekend of No Homework (amazing!). Read for pleasure. Challenge your mind. Read the newspaper for national and world news. Check out THE NEW YORK TIMES.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, March 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Share current novels and reactions to accessibility to newspapers for the general public. Suggested questions: Why shouldn't The New York Times be free like AM New York or Metro?

    2. Review and understand the multiple choice questions--specifically for poetry analysis.

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? Another day of No Homework (wow!).


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Wednesday, March 4th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish calculation of the AP multiple-choice questions take-home quiz. Turn in the Multiple-Choice Questions for The Kite Runner.

    2. Review/Analysis: Review and understand the multiple choice questions--specifically for poetry analysis.

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? Nothing due tomorrow!


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Check the AP multiple-choice questions take-home quiz.

    2. Work Period: Work on the Multiple-Choice Questions for The Kite Runner HW.

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY (March 4th)
  • Multiple-Choice Questions for The Kite Runner--Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers. Question types must be a variety of factual, technical, analytical, and inferential (see p. 39 of your packet). Questions may refer to the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types. Don't forget to provide a separate paper with the list of the correct answers.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Monday, March 2nd, 2009-SNOW DAY: Work Period: Work on the Multiple-Choice Questions for The Kite Runner HW. How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY (March 4th)
  • Multiple-Choice Questions for The Kite Runner--Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers. Question types must be a variety of factual, technical, analytical, and inferential (see p. 39 of your packet). Questions may refer to the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types. Don't forget to provide a separate paper with the list of the correct answers.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Friday, February 27th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Work on the Multiple-Choice Questions for The Kite Runner HW. Show the pp. 44-48 HW.

    2. Student-Teacher Conferences: Correct and offer insight into creating challenging AP-style questions for the sample prose and poetry passages (pp. 44-48).

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? DUE WEDNESDAY (March 4th)
  • Multiple-Choice Questions for The Kite Runner--Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers. Question types must be a variety of factual, technical, analytical, and inferential (see p. 39 of your packet). Questions may refer to the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types. Don't forget to provide a separate paper with the list of the correct answers.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Thursday, February 26th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Introduce the preparation of multiple-choice question composition (pp. 44-48). Turn in the Multiple Choice Questions packet (answer all questions)--quiz grade value (12.5% of this marking period grade).

    2. Work Period: Work on creating the four types of questions for the sample prose and poetry passages (pp. 44-48).

    3. Discuss/Share: Share questions created with the class.

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish pp. 44-48 in the packet, creating questions for the prose and poetry passages.

    DUE WEDNESDAY (March 4th)

  • Multiple-Choice Questions for The Kite Runner--Homework value (FIVE Homework assignments!): With a classmate, compose 46 questions and answers for The Kite Runner, which model the AP literature exam multiple choice questions and answers. Question types must be a variety of factual, technical, analytical, and inferential (see p. 39 of your packet). Questions may refer to the following: characterization, vocabulary in context, author's tone/attitude, structure, literary elements and their purpose/significance (such as simile, metaphor, imagery, symbolism, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.), mood, inference, main idea, and other similar question types.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Wednesday, February 25th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Multiple Choice Question strategies and introduction of HW (take-home quiz) packet.

    2. Work Period: Brainstorm two reasons for each statement on The Kite Runner--1.) The Kite Runner should NOT be required reading for high school students around the U.S. 2.) The Kite Runner should be required reading for high school students around the U.S.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss your Do Now responses with a neighbor.

    4. Debate: Class Debate on why or why not The Kite Runner should be read in high schools.

    How do we excel on the Multiple Choice Questions section of the AP English Literature exam? DUE TOMORROW (for a grade!):
  • Multiple Choice Questions packet (answer all questions)--quiz grade value (12.5% of this marking period grade). Follow the strategies (read over again) explained in the beginning pages of the packet.


  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships.
  • Tuesday, February 24th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Discuss the composition of your papers with a neighbor. Turn in The Kite Runner Analytical Papers.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the composition of your essay and address the novel on the essay question:
    How do the characters in the novel contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal? How do their relationships to the past contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole?

    How do we reflect on the analytical paper on The Kite Runner? TURN IN THE KITE RUNNER PAPER, WHICH WAS DUE TODAY. REMEMBER, IT'S -10 EACH DAY IT'S LATE!!
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Monday, February 23rd, 2009: 1. Do Now: Identify any concerns and/or questions that you may have regarding the composition of your essay question:
    How do the characters in the novel contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal? How do their relationships to the past contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole?

    2. Discuss/Share: Address the concerns and questions identified in the Do Now.

    3. Essay Reminders:

  • Remember to address multiple characters in your essay.
  • Include plentiful citations.
  • Recognize similarities between characters when addressing your essay question.
  • Show how characters experience transformations. Think about this question: How did these characters change from the historical and political events, define success at different times in their lives, or commit sins at different stages of their lives?
  • Consider how the events (the events that apply to your essay question) affect the story as a whole.
  • Achieve "aha" moments (epiphanies). These will be achieved by thinking deeply about how the novel can answer the essay question.
  • Organize your ideas clearly. Make sure that ideas within and between paragraphs are clearly connected and support the essay question.
  • How do we prepare to compose an analytical paper on The Kite Runner? Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, February 24th:
  • Finish the reading of The Kite Runner and turn in the Analysis Paper (along with an attached list of your essential question and the 10 subsidiary questions). Paper Topic (taken from the 2007 AP English Literature Exam)--In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present actions, attitudes, or values of a character. Focus on The Kite Runner in which characters in the novel must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Write a short essay (2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading) in which you show how characters' relationships to the past contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not summarize the plot. Use and analyze the significance and relevance of literary elements throughout your writing (e.g. characterization, setting, dialogue, flashback, conflict, etc.). Do not use direct quotes; instead, paraphrase in your own words. Grading: To earn a 90% or better, you should offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how a character's relationship to the past affects the character's actions, attitudes, or values, Using apt and specific textual support, your essay should fully explore that relationship and demonstrate what it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Your essay should make a strong case for your interpretation and discuss The Kite Runner with significant insight and understanding. You should reveal more sophisticated analysis and effective control of language. Use this AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC for the paper. A 9/10 is a 90-100%, the 8 is an 80-89%, 6/7 is a 65-79%.

  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Friday, February 13th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Freewrite one full page on the essay question. Focus on the characters (rather than yourself, as you did yesterday) from The Kite Runner. Here's the essay question:
    How do the characters in the novel contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal? How do their relationships to the past contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share their textual insight for the essay question.

    3. Group Work: Instructions on developing subsidiary questions for the essay question can be found HERE. Each group will analyze the essay question together. With your group members, work on developing 10 subsidiary questions that model the questions found in the link above (handout provided in class). Each group member should write the subsidiary questions so that everyone can use the questions for their own essay composition. When finished developing your questions, begin finding answers in the text. You will be expected to attach a copy of your essential question and 10 subsidiary questions to your final paper.

    4. Reflections: Reflect on the composition and answering of the subsidiary questions. How do these steps help your writing process?

    How do we prepare to compose an analytical paper on The Kite Runner by developing personal and textual insight and subsidiary questions to support the essential question? Due Tuesday, February 24th:
  • Finish the reading of The Kite Runner and turn in the Analysis Paper (along with an attached list of your essential question and the 10 subsidiary questions). Paper Topic (taken from the 2007 AP English Literature Exam)--In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present actions, attitudes, or values of a character. Focus on The Kite Runner in which characters in the novel must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Write a short essay (2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading) in which you show how characters' relationships to the past contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not summarize the plot. Use and analyze the significance and relevance of literary elements throughout your writing (e.g. characterization, setting, dialogue, flashback, conflict, etc.). Do not use direct quotes; instead, paraphrase in your own words. Grading: To earn a 90% or better, you should offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how a character's relationship to the past affects the character's actions, attitudes, or values, Using apt and specific textual support, your essay should fully explore that relationship and demonstrate what it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Your essay should make a strong case for your interpretation and discuss The Kite Runner with significant insight and understanding. You should reveal more sophisticated analysis and effective control of language. Use this AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC for the paper. A 9/10 is a 90-100%, the 8 is an 80-89%, 6/7 is a 65-79%.

  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Thursday, February 12th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Freewrite one full page on the essay question. Refer to yourself instead of characters from The Kite Runner.
    Focus on The Kite Runner in which characters in the novel must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Show how characters' relationships to the past contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole. These statements can be easily transformed into questions here: How do the characters in the novel contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal? How do their relationships to the past contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share their personal insight for the essay question.

    3. Group Work: Instructions on developing subsidiary questions for the essay question can be found HERE. Each group will analyze the essay question together. With your group members, work on developing 10 subsidiary questions that model the questions found in the link above (handout provided in class). Each group member should write the subsidiary questions so that everyone can use the questions for their own essay composition. When finished developing your questions, begin finding answers in the text. You will be expected to attach a copy of your essential question and 10 subsidiary questions to your final paper.

    4. Reflections: How was the composition of the subsidiary questions? How does this help your writing process?

    How do we prepare to compose an analytical paper on The Kite Runner by developing personal insight and subsidiary questions to support the essential question? Due Tuesday, February 24th:
  • Finish the reading of The Kite Runner and turn in the Analysis Paper (along with an attached list of your essential question and the 10 subsidiary questions). Paper Topic (taken from the 2007 AP English Literature Exam)--In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present actions, attitudes, or values of a character. Focus on The Kite Runner in which characters in the novel must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Write a short essay (2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading) in which you show how characters' relationships to the past contribute to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not summarize the plot. Use and analyze the significance and relevance of literary elements throughout your writing (e.g. characterization, setting, dialogue, flashback, conflict, etc.). Do not use direct quotes; instead, paraphrase in your own words. Grading: To earn a 90% or better, you should offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how a character's relationship to the past affects the character's actions, attitudes, or values, Using apt and specific textual support, your essay should fully explore that relationship and demonstrate what it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Your essay should make a strong case for your interpretation and discuss The Kite Runner with significant insight and understanding. You should reveal more sophisticated analysis and effective control of language. Use this AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC for the paper. A 9/10 is a 90-100%, the 8 is an 80-89%, 6/7 is a 65-79%.

  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Wednesday, February 11th, 2009: 1. Do Now: In your assigned groups, finish your list of strategies that good readers use to read and analyze literature effectively. If necessary, also finish your analysis of Chapter One of The Kite Runner. If time allows, continue reading and analyzing the text, as an expert reader. Analyze with a purpose (addressing the paper topic--see HW).

    2. Discuss/Share: Finish discussing and taking notes on the Chapter One analysis and strategies of good readers. Introduce The Kite Runner Paper requirements and topic.

    How do we prepare to read and analyze The Kite Runner as expert readers? Due Tuesday, February 24th:
  • Finish the reading of The Kite Runner and turn in the Analysis Paper. Paper Topic (taken from the 2007 AP English Literature Exam)--In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present actions, attitudes, or values of a character. Focus on The Kite Runner in which a character in the novel must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Write a short essay (2-3 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, proper heading) in which you show how a character's relationship to the past contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not summarize the plot. Use and analyze the significance and relevance of literary elements throughout your writing (e.g. characterization, setting, dialogue, flashback, conflict, etc.). Do not use direct quotes; instead, paraphrase in your own words. Grading: To earn a 90% or better, you should offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how a character's relationship to the past affects the character's actions, attitudes, or values, Using apt and specific textual support, your essay should fully explore that relationship and demonstrate what it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Your essay should make a strong case for your interpretation and discuss The Kite Runner with significant insight and understanding. You should reveal more sophisticated analysis and effective control of language. Use this AP ENGLISH LITERATURE GRADING RUBRIC for the paper. A 9/10 is a 90-100%, the 8 is an 80-89%, 6/7 is a 65-79%.

  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Tuesday, February 10th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Continue the analysis of Chapter One of The Kite Runner. Freewrite everything you've ever learned about how to analyze literature, referring only to Chapter One of The Kite Runner. Prove that you are an expert high school student (you are seniors!) in the analysis of literature. You may consider the significance/purpose of the setting, flashback, characterization, repetition, motif, mood, and any other literary elements. Make predictions and identify what led you to those predictions. Use all of your prior knowledge about literary analysis.

    2. Group Work: Share your introductory analysis of The Kite Runner with your assigned group mates. Add to your list. On another sheet of loose leaf, write a list of strategies that good readers use to read and analyze literature effectively. Work with your group mates to come up with a list that all of you agree on.

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your introductory analysis of The Kite Runner and the strategies that good readers use to read effectively.

    How do we prepare to read and analyze The Kite Runner as expert readers? Due Tomorrow:
  • Begin reading The Kite Runner.

    Due Tuesday, February 24th:

  • Finish the reading of The Kite Runner and turn in the Paper (TBA).

  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Monday, February 9th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Read over your "2019" paper. On a post-it, write at least two strengths in your writing. On another post-it, write at least two goals for your writing (what you'd like to improve). If you didn't do the "2019" HW, then take out a piece of loose leaf and write the reasons that prevented you from doing the assignment (1/2 the page) and your writing goals (what you'd like to improve in your writing)

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss Do Now.

    3. Reading/Analysis of Chapter One of The Kite Runner: Read Chapter One (the first two pages) and freewrite everything you've ever learned about how to analyze literature, referring only to the first chapter. Think about setting, flashback, characterization, repetition, motif, mood, and any other literary elements. Make predictions and identify what led you to those predictions. Use all of your prior knowledge about literary analysis. Prove that you are an expert high school student (you are seniors!) in the analysis of literature.

    How do we effectively analyze our own writing and an author's writing in terms of flashback and foreshadowing?
  • Make up any HW owed.
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Friday, February 6th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Discuss skills and strategies needed to be successful on the one-hour multiple-choice question section (average of 55 questions on about four passages/poems). You will be expected to follow sophisticated syntax (sentence structure), respond to diction (author's word choice and style of expression), understand upper-level vocabulary, interpret literary terminology, make inferences, and recognize components of style and structure of the passages. You will not need to refer to prior knowledge about the topics, though it might be helpful. You should be aware of biblical allusions and mythology. Pay attention to time periods and writing styles of authors. Pay attention to question types. Be aware of # of questions and timing. Work at a pace of about one question per minute. Pay attention to all of the information given to you, including the title, author, date of publication and footnotes. Paraphrase stanzas and paragraphs in the margins. Look at the significance of literary elements. Pay attention to the whole passage and the author's message. The questions will be factual, technical, analytical and inferential. Cover up the answer choices and determine your own answer before examining the choices. Eliminate answers that are too narrow or too broad, synonymous and answers that cancel each other out.

    Creative Writing Instructions: Imagine it's 2019 and you're about to go to your 10-year high school reunion. Write a fictional story about yourself in 2019. Describe your life, the people around you, the state of our country and the world, and your community. Include the effects of your childhood/adolescent events and choices. Show (use the five senses--sight, sound, smell, taste, touch); do not tell. Include both direct quotations (where a person's exact words are used and those words are set off with quotation marks: Jack said, "The match won't start on time if it rains.") and indirect quotations (give the meaning of what a person said, but not necessarily his or her exact words: Jack said that the game would start late if it rains tonight.). Write a minimum of 500 words.

    3. Work Period: 2019 Creative Writing piece. Turn in the scholarship freewrite HW in your folders.

    How do we effectively reflect on our pasts and prepare for our future through creative writing? Due Monday:
  • Finish the 2019 Creative Writing piece. Imagine it's 2019 and you're about to go to your 10-year high school reunion. Write a fictional story about yourself in 2019. Describe your life, the people around you, the state of our country and the world, and your community. Include the effects of your childhood/adolescent events and choices. Show (use the five senses--sight, sound, smell, taste, touch); do not tell. Include both direct quotations (where a person's exact words are used and those words are set off with quotation marks: Jack said, "The match won't start on time if it rains.") and indirect quotations (give the meaning of what a person said, but not necessarily his or her exact words: Jack said that the game would start late if it rains tonight.). Write a minimum of 500 words.
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Thursday, February 5th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the Self-Assessment, if necessary. Examine the Scholarships for New York City Students and find scholarship(s) that fit your interests and qualifications.

    2. Freewrite/Brainstorm/Note-Taking: Identify skills and strategies needed to be successful on the one-hour multiple-choice question section (average of 55 questions on about four passages/poems). You will be expected to follow sophisticated syntax (sentence structure), respond to diction (author's word choice and style of expression), understand upper-level vocabulary, interpret literary terminology, make inferences, and recognize components of style and structure of the passages. You will not need to refer to prior knowledge about the topics, though it might be helpful. You should be aware of biblical allusions and mythology. Pay attention to time periods and writing styles of authors. Pay attention to question types. Be aware of # of questions and timing. Work at a pace of about one question per minute. Pay attention to all of the information given to you, including the title, author, date of publication and footnotes. Paraphrase stanzas and paragraphs in the margins. Look at the significance of literary elements. Pay attention to the whole passage and the author's message. The questions will be factual, technical, analytical and inferential. Cover up the answer choices and determine your own answer before examining the choices. Eliminate answers that are too narrow or too broad, synonymous and answers that cancel each other out.

    How do we effectively reflect on our pasts and prepare for our future? Due Tomorrow:
  • Brainstorm one page typed OR two full pages (handwritten) explaining your reasons for choosing specific scholarship(s) that fit you. Use the Scholarships for New York City Students, scholarships listed below and even do a google search on your own.
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Wednesday, February 4th, 2009: 1. Do Now: Finish the Self-Assessment: Write a minimum of one paragraph for each question below. Write in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples.
  • Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
  • Describe your academic and personal strengths.
  • What three characteristics or traits best define you?
  • Choose one: If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself? What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
  • What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?
  • For Fun: Share five random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share any insight and/or random things about themselves.

    3. Book Club Freewrite (two pages-front and back). Choose one: Describe the author's writing style and perspective about the human experience. How did __________________________ (book title) help you better understand your own life or opinions about the world/people around you?

  • How do we gain insight from a self-assessment?
  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!
  • Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009: Do Now: Work on the Self-Assessment: Write a minimum of one paragraph for each question below. Write in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples.
  • Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
  • Describe your academic and personal strengths.
  • What three characteristics or traits best define you?
  • Choose one: If you were writing yourself a recommendation for college, what would you say about yourself? What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects before high school graduation?
  • What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (in college) most interests you and why?
  • For Fun: Share five random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

  • How do we engage in a self-assessment? If NOT completed (it was due today!), finish the Free Response Questions from a sample AP exam. DO NOT USE ANY OUTSIDE RESOURCES (THAT INCLUDES THE INTERNET!). These essays are practice for the AP exam. On the AP exam, you will not be allowed to search on the internet. Time yourself--40 minutes per essay (three essays total!). Write long, in-depth essays. DO NOT SUMMARIZE PLOT. Use the skills I've taught you to help you write college-level essays!
  • Be prepared to be quizzed on your Book Club book tomorrow! Review your discussion questions.

  • Work on remaining college applications!
  • Work on college scholarships! Here are some: Magic Johnson Scholarship (deadline: first Friday in February), List of a wide variety of college scholarships, and Hispanic College Fund, which offers a great deal of scholarships. HERE'S A NEW SCHOLARSHIP JUST FOR NYC STUDENTS AND BIG PRIZE $$ (Deadline: Feb. 15): Random House Creative Writing Contest for NYC Seniors!