Senior Assignments, Winter/Spring 2008

Senior Assignments
Winter/Spring 2008

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 16th, 2008: Grade Distribution and Reflection: semester grades will be distributed and reflections on high school will be discussed. Students will engage in reflective discussion.
  • See you at Graduation!!!
  • Friday, June 13th, 2008: Writing Conferences: Conference with teacher on the final paper. Students will engage in writing conferences to evaluate composition--including development, interpretation, organization and structure.
  • Return all borrowed books by MONDAY, June 16th!!!
  • Thursday, June 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Share speeches--excerpts or entire speeches (student choice) with the class.

    2. HW Evaluations and Writing Conferences: Show all remaining HW (including extra credit) to be evaluated by teacher. Conference with teacher on the final paper.

    Students will work on reading and reciting graduation speeches and engage in writing conferences.
  • Return all borrowed books by MONDAY, June 16th!!!
  • Wednesday, June 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Exchange graduation speeches--reading and commenting on your classmates' speeches. Comments may include answers to the following: What do you agree with? What made you smile? What was a strength of the speech? What new information did you learn about your classmate? When done analyzing classmates' speeches, work on HW owed (tomorrow's the last day to turn in ALL HW). Show speech and extra credit.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share speeches--excerpts or entire speeches (student choice) with the class.

    Students will work on reading and reciting graduation speeches. DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JUNE 12TH:
  • Extra HW Credit: Senior Will (see description in classwork agenda)
  • ALL HW owed NO LATER THAN TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JUNE 12TH (turned in class only!).
  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so by TOMORROW. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Return all borrowed books!!!
  • Tuesday, June 10th, 2008: Work Period: Work on Graduation Speech (due tomorrow), extra credit opportunities including the visual for the speech and the Senior Will--What would you leave your family, friends, school (this may include the teachers, staff, the underclassmen--all students younger than you), and anyone else upon your graduation? See a sample HERE. Write a full page, beginning with: "I, YOUR NAME, being of ________mind and __________body, do hereby bequeath the following on this 9th day of June, 2008:"
  • Work on HW owed (last day to turn in all HW is Thursday!!)
  • Students will work individually on HW assignments--writing and preparing to present. DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11TH:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=THREE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.
  • Extra HW Credit: Create a visual (a graph of graduation statistics, a collage, an artistic representation) to complement your Graduation Speech. This MUST be brought in on Wednesday, June 11th to receive extra credit.
  • Extra HW Credit: Senior Will (see description in classwork agenda)
  • ALL HW owed NO LATER THAN THURSDAY, JUNE 12TH (turned in class only!).


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so by THURSDAY. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Return all borrowed books!!!
  • Monday, June 9th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Senior Will--What would you leave your family, friends, school (this may include the teachers, staff, the underclassmen--all students younger than you), and anyone else upon your graduation? See a sample HERE. Write a full page, beginning with: "I, YOUR NAME, being of ________mind and __________body, do hereby bequeath the following on this 9th day of June, 2008:"

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Work on HW Graduation Speech.

    Students will engage in oral and written expression for understanding and information. DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11TH:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=THREE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.
  • Extra HW Credit: Create a visual (a graph of graduation statistics, a collage, an artistic representation) to complement your Graduation Speech. This MUST be brought in on Wednesday, June 11th to receive extra credit.
  • Extra HW Credit: Senior Will (see description in classwork agenda)
  • ALL HW owed NO LATER THAN THURSDAY, JUNE 12TH (turned in class only!).


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Return all borrowed books!!!
  • Friday, June 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions--do you think that secondary (high school) education in the U.S. is satisfactory? How do you think it compares to other countries? What do you think needs to change in order to make it better in the U.S. (think about what the education system, educators, parents, students and society can do)? Do you think you learned the skills necessary for college and beyond? Why or why not? Use the article on diploma typo and U.S. ranking in education among industrialized nations in literacy, math and science to reference our current state of education in the U.S.

    2. Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Work on HW Graduation Speech.

    Students will engage in oral and written expression for understanding and information. DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11TH:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=THREE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.
  • Extra HW Credit: Create a visual (a graph of graduation statistics, a collage, an artistic representation) to complement your Graduation Speech. This MUST be brought in on Wednesday, June 11th to receive extra credit.
  • ALL HW owed NO LATER THAN THURSDAY, JUNE 12TH.


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Return all borrowed books!!!
  • Wednesday, June 4th, 2008: 1. Work Period: Work on the Graduation Speech and HW owed. Students will write for understanding and information. DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11TH:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=THREE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.
  • ALL HW owed.


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Return all borrowed books!!!
  • Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Exchange paper abstracts. Read and share your impressions. Does your classmate's abstract include the following--the titles and authors of their novels, brief descriptions of the novels, their purpose in writing the paper, and conclusions that were drawn from writing the paper?

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss student impressions of abstracts and the process of writing the abstract. Also, share outcome of student papers. Discussion questions may include the following--Were you satisfied with the final product? What are your strengths? What did you struggle with in the composition of your paper? What makes you most proud in the paper? Did you have any epiphanies during or after writing the paper?

    3. Introduce HW.

    Students will read, write and discuss for understanding and information. Students will engage in metacognitive strategies. DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11TH:
  • Graduation Speech (Value=THREE HW credits)--includes the following requirements: two-three pages, typed, double spaced, 12 point font, proper heading (your full name, my name, class name/period, date and page numbers), original title, attention grabbing opening, your personal story (including struggles and accomplishments) that has led you to graduation, a description of Info Tech (which may include the student community, the teachers, the staff, the activities, your experiences at Info Tech), your personal thank-yous, advice to your fellow graduates, and a great conclusion (that ties everything together and leaves the audience with a final thought). See a sample--2008 Valedictorian Speech from St. Francis College. Be prepared to share with the class.
  • ALL HW owed.


  • If the Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Return all borrowed books!!!
  • Monday, June 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Write an abstract of your paper. Read about abstracts HERE. Turn in Final Paper, which is due today.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss the outcome of student papers. Discussion questions may include the following--Were you satisfied with the final product? What are your strengths? What did you struggle with in the composition of your paper? What makes you most proud in the paper? Did you have any epiphanies during or after writing the paper?

    Students will read, write and discuss for understanding and information. Students will engage in metacognitive strategies.
  • Finish the abstract (about 200 words) classwork and turn in typed (12 point font) tomorrow. Read about abstracts HERE.
  • If today's Final Paper was not turned in, make sure to do so ASAP. Remember, it's -10 points each day late.
  • Return all borrowed books tomorrow!!!
  • Friday, May 30th, 2008: 1. Work Period: Work on the composition of your Final Paper, addressing the prewriting tips and reading your novel #4. Show any HW owed.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss any concerns regarding the Final Paper.

    Students will engage in pre-writing activities (including thesis writing, brainstorming, metacognitive questioning/reflection and discussion) for their final paper.
  • NOTE CHANGE IN FINAL PAPER DUE DATE: The Final Paper's Due Date has changed to MONDAY, JUNE 2ND. Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From the two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Thursday, May 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Introduce Prewriting Methods and discuss as a class. Introduce College Board Tips on Writing a College Paper and discuss as a class.

    2. Work Period: Work on writing your thesis statement (based on the paper question), addressing the prewriting tips in the Do Now and reading your novel #4. Show any HW owed.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss any concerns regarding the Final Paper.

    Students will engage in pre-writing activities (including thesis writing, brainstorming, metacognitive questioning/reflection and discussion) for their final paper.
  • NOTE CHANGE IN FINAL PAPER DUE DATE: The Final Paper's Due Date has changed to MONDAY, JUNE 2ND. Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From the two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Wednesday, May 28th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read and discuss Commonly Misspelled Words.

    2. Work Period: Read 150 More Commonly Misspelled Words. Work on writing your thesis statement (based on the paper question), creating an outline and reading your novel #4. Show any HW owed.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss any concerns regarding the Final Paper.

    Students will engage in pre-writing activities (including thesis writing, brainstorming, language errors and discussion) for their final paper.
  • DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 30th: Finish classic novel #4. Final Paper is due!!! Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From the two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Tuesday, May 27th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Work on answering your essential and subsidiary questions, writing your thesis statement (based on the paper question), and reading your novel #4. Show your essential/subsidiary questions and Works Cited HW.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss Do Now work. Are you finding connections between the accomplishments and mistakes of characters in novel #3 and novel #4? If so, what are they? If not, why not? How many pages of pre-writing materials do you have? How are the beginning stages of composing your final paper proceeding? Is there anything you need from me in order to ensure a successful final paper?

    Students will engage in pre-writing activities (including thesis writing, brainstorming and discussion) for their final paper.
  • DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 30th: Finish classic novel #4. Final Paper is due!!! Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From the two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Friday, May 23rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: What life lessons have you learned or what lessons can you identify that readers can learn from your chosen classic novels #3 and #4? What do you believe the authors want to communicate to their readers? Think about their purpose for writing. What are different reasons that you write? Why do you think it's important to read classic novels? Work on HW due Tuesday. Show your quote analysis HW (five paragraphs) for novel #4.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Discuss Do Now questions and HW.

    Students will engage in pre-writing activities (including understanding themes, author's purpose, and personal connections to novels) for their final paper.
  • DUE TUESDAY, MAY 27th: Create an essential question and five subsidiary questions for Novel #4. Bring in your Works Cited page for both novels.
  • DUE FRIDAY, MAY 30th: Finish classic novel #4. Final Paper is due!!! Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Thursday, May 22nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review basic grammar and mechanic skills at The Elements of Style.

    2. Work Period: Work on HW owed. Read novel #4 and work on identifying quotes on accomplishments and mistakes (due tomorrow!).

    Students will engage in pre-writing activities (freewriting and citations) for their final paper.
  • DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 23rd: Identify a minimum of FIVE quotes on characters that have achieved accomplishments or endured mistakes in novel #4. Use proper citation format. Also, a paragraph interpretation/analysis is required for each quote. THAT MEANS FIVE PARAGRAPHS IN TOTAL. Your analysis should consider how the evidence from the novel contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • DUE TUESDAY, MAY 27th: Create an essential question and five subsidiary questions for Novel #4. Bring in your Works Cited page for both novels.
  • DUE FRIDAY, MAY 30th: Finish classic novel #4. Final Paper is due!!! Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Wednesday, May 21st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Discuss the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.

    2. Work Period: Work on HW owed. Read novel #4 and work on identifying quotes on accomplishments and mistakes (due Friday!).

    Students will engage in pre-writing activities (freewriting and citations) for their final paper.
  • DUE FRIDAY, MAY 23rd: Identify a minimum of FIVE quotes on characters that have achieved accomplishments or endured mistakes in novel #4. Use proper citation format. Also, a paragraph interpretation/analysis is required for each quote. THAT MEANS FIVE PARAGRAPHS IN TOTAL. Your analysis should consider how the evidence from the novel contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • DUE FRIDAY, MAY 30th: Finish classic novel #4. Final Paper is due!!! Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Tuesday, May 20th, 2008: Work Period: Work on HW owed including the freewrite that was due today. Read novel #4 and work on identifying quotes on accomplishments and mistakes (due Friday!). Students will engage in pre-writing activities (freewriting and citations) for their final paper.
  • DUE FRIDAY, MAY 23rd: Identify a minimum of FIVE quotes on characters that have achieved accomplishments or endured mistakes in novel #4. Use proper citation format. Also, a paragraph interpretation/analysis is required for each quote. THAT MEANS FIVE PARAGRAPHS IN TOTAL. Your analysis should consider how the evidence from the novel contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • DUE FRIDAY, MAY 30th: Finish classic novel #4. Final Paper is due!!! Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Monday, May 19th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish reading the Writing in College Resource Page from University of Chicago. Discuss and identify its usefulness for the final paper and transitioning to college.

    2. Discuss: Discuss the final paper requirements.

    3. Work Period: Begin the HW Freewrite on how the accomplishments and/or mistakes of the characters in Novel #3 contribute to the meaning of the novel as a whole. This freewriting opportunity will help students prepare for the final paper.

    Students will read, analyze and discuss the college-level writing resource page. Students will engage in pre-writing activities (discussion and freewriting) for their final paper.
  • DUE TOMORROW (TUESDAY, MAY 20TH): Two-page (handwritten front and back or typed 500 words or more) Freewrite on how the accomplishments and/or mistakes of the characters in Novel #3 contribute to the meaning of the novel as a whole. This freewriting opportunity will help students prepare for the final paper.
  • Read classic novel #4. Finish by May 30th. Final Paper is due May 30th. Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Remember, the FINAL PAPER MUST BE 5-7 PAGES OR 10 PAGES (for extra credit to add +5 to the final semester grade; of course, the extra credit is not guaranteed--it's quality over quantity). Paper Question: From two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Friday, May 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read the Writing in College Resource Page from University of Chicago. Show novel #4 and add the title to the class list.

    2. Discuss: Discuss the Do Now and identify its usefulness for the final paper and transitioning to college.

    Students will read, analyze and discuss the college-level writing resource page.
  • Read classic novel #4. Finish by May 30th. Final Paper is due May 30th. Use the following PAPER REQUIREMENTS to guide you in properly completing this paper. Paper Question: From two approved novels/plays, analyze characters who reveal accomplishments and/or mistakes. Then, in a well-organized paper, illustrate those accomplishments and/or mistakes. Also, explain how those characters' accomplishments and/or mistakes contribute to the meaning of the literary works as a whole. Avoid writing plot summary.
  • Thursday, May 15th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read and identify examples of accomplishments and mistakes in your classic novel. Work on finishing any remaining assignments and reading your novel and/or finding a new one!

    2. Discuss: What will you focus on--accomplishments or mistakes or both? Why did you make this decision? Describe this pre-writing process. Is it helpful? Is it challenging? What's your process in finding classic novels?

    Students will analyze their chosen classic novels, examining accomplishments and mistakes and engage in discussion, examining the pre-writing process.
  • Look for a new classic novel, which you will bring in TOMORROW (this is your 3rd HW assignment; remember, there are only 10 assignments for this final marking period). You may research classic novels on your own, find one in class or you may want to use the following links: "101 Books to Read Before You Go to College", “Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading”, “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", “Ms. Conn’s Favorite Classics”.
  • Wednesday, May 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Exchange your questions, answers and direct quote analysis with a neighbor. Compare each other's strengths and weaknesses. What do you find intriguing to share with the class? What can you learn from your classmate's questions, answers and quote analysis? Share your "Essential Question" on the chart paper, while reading classmates' questions. While working on this Do Now, students will show the Essential Question, Subsidiary Questions and direct quote analysis HW.

    2. Discuss: Share thoughts/reactions from the Do Now. What was challenging from these assignments? Why were these assignments worthwhile? Reflect on the experience of question composition, research and thinking about the answers and identifying appropriate quotes from the novel.

    3. Work Period: If time remains, students can read their novels.

    Students will analyze their chosen classic novels, examining accomplishments and mistakes and composing questions to be answered in written form.
  • Finish your novel by TOMORROW, May 15th! Look for a new classic novel, which you will bring in on Friday. You may research classic novels on your own or you may want to use the following links: "101 Books to Read Before You Go to College", “Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading”, “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", “Ms. Conn’s Favorite Classics”.
  • Tuesday, May 13th, 2008: Work Period: Using the Essential Question and How To Create the Essential Question and Subsidiary Questions, work on your own essential question and five subsidiary questions for your chosen classic novel. Make sure that those questions support the topics of accomplishments and mistakes. Create questions that can be answered in your chosen novel. Provide answers from the novel, composing a minimum of one paragraph answer for each question. Find three more direct quotes that correspond with accomplishments or mistakes. Write a paragraph interpretation for each quote. Students will analyze their chosen classic novels, examining accomplishments and mistakes and composing questions to be answered in written form.
  • DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14TH: Finish creating the essential question and five subsidiary questions. Provide answers from the novel and your own lives, composing a minimum of one paragraph answer for each question. Find three more direct quotes that correspond with accomplishments or mistakes. Write a paragraph interpretation for each quote.
  • Continue to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Remember, YOU MUST FINISH YOUR NOVEL BY MAY 15TH. BEGIN LOOKING FOR A NEW CLASSIC NOVEL TO START READING ON MAY 16TH. BRING IN YOUR NEW NOVEL ON FRIDAY, MAY 16TH.
  • Monday, May 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read and discuss the Essential Question and How To Create the Essential Question and Subsidiary Questions.

    2. Discussion: Discuss and brainstorm sample Essential and Subsidiary Questions. Sample Essential Question for Henry IV Part I=Why do teenagers engage in rebellious acts? Sample Subsidiary Questions (for the topics of accomplishments and mistakes)=Why are these rebellious acts initiated? Who defines these acts as rebellious and why? What resources are needed to engage in these rebellious acts? What are potential benefits? What are potential failures?

    3. Work Period: Work on your own essential question and five subsidiary questions for your chosen classic novel. Make sure that those questions support the topics of accomplishments and mistakes. Create questions that can be answered in your chosen novel.

    Students will analyze their chosen classic novels, examining accomplishments and mistakes and composing questions to be answered in written form.
  • DUE WEDNESDAY, MAY 14TH: Finish creating the essential question and five subsidiary questions. Provide answers from the novel, composing a minimum of one paragraph answer for each question. Find three more direct quotes that correspond with accomplishments or mistakes. Write a paragraph interpretation for each quote.
  • Continue to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Remember, YOU MUST FINISH YOUR NOVEL BY MAY 15TH. BEGIN LOOKING FOR A NEW CLASSIC NOVEL TO START READING ON MAY 16TH. BRING IN YOUR NEW NOVEL ON FRIDAY, MAY 16TH.
  • Friday, May 9th, 2008: Senior Barbecue! No class in session. Students will analyze their chosen classic novels, examining accomplishments and mistakes and the contributing factors to forming those accomplishments and mistakes.
  • Continue to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Remember, YOU MUST FINISH YOUR NOVEL BY MAY 15TH. BEGIN LOOKING FOR A NEW CLASSIC NOVEL TO START READING ON MAY 16TH. BRING IN YOUR NEW NOVEL ON FRIDAY, MAY 16TH.
  • Thursday, May 8th, 2008: Work Period: Read your classic novel, paying close attention to accomplishments and mistakes of the characters and the contributing factors to forming those accomplishments and mistakes. While reading, turn in any HW owed. Students will analyze their chosen classic novels, examining accomplishments and mistakes and the contributing factors to forming those accomplishments and mistakes.
  • Continue to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Remember, you must be finished by May 15th. BEGIN LOOKING FOR A NEW CLASSIC NOVEL TO START READING ON MAY 16TH. Bring in your new novel on May 16th.
  • Wednesday, May 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish identifying the accomplishments and mistakes of society, characters in your novel, and your own life. Also, finish identifying the contributing factors to those accomplishments and mistakes. While working on the Do Now, turn in any HW owed.

    2. Sharing/Analysis: Discuss the contributing factors for the accomplishments and mistakes of society, your lives and your chosen novels. What do these factors all have in common? What are different?

    Students will analyze and find connections between society, their own lives and their novels, examining accomplishments and mistakes and the contributing factors to forming those accomplishments and mistakes. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, May 8th:
  • Make up ALL HW owed--tomorrow is the last day of the 2nd marking period!
  • Continue to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Remember, you must be finished by May 15th. BRING IN YOUR NOVEL TOMORROW. BEGIN LOOKING FOR A NEW CLASSIC NOVEL TO START READING ON MAY 16TH.
  • Tuesday, May 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Identify one major accomplishment and one major mistake in our society today. Then, identify five factors that contributed to that major accomplishment and five factors that contributed to that major mistake. Be prepared to share with the class. While brainstorming the Do Now, turn in the HW--five quotes and corresponding paragraphs analyzing those quotes.

    2. Personal and Textual Analysis: Identify one major accomplishment and one major mistake in your own life. Then, identify five factors that contributed to that major accomplishment and five factors that contributed to that major mistake. Next, identify one major (or potential) accomplishment and one major (or potential) mistake in your novel. Then, identify five factors that contributed to that major (or potential) accomplishment and five factors that contributed to that major (or potential) mistake.

    Students will analyze and find connections between society, their own lives and their novels, examining accomplishments and mistakes and the contributing factors to forming those accomplishments and mistakes. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, May 7th:
  • Research the author of your chosen novel. Identify one accomplishment and one mistake of the author. Identify five contributing factors that you believe affected that accomplishment and five factors that affected that mistake (such as: family).
  • Continue to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Remember, you must be finished by May 15th.
  • Monday, May 5th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Identify a minimum of three direct quotes that illustrate the accomplishments and/or mistakes (or potential accomplishments and mistakes) of characters in your novel.

    2. Discussion/Analysis: Were the direct quotes easy to identify? Why did you choose those particular quotes?

    3. Sharing/Analysis: Exchange those quotes with a partner. Analyze your partner's quotes, explaining what those quotes mean in your own words and analyze the characterization revealed in those quotes, referring directly to accomplishments and mistakes.

    Students will analyze characterization in their independent novels and identify textual evidence to support their analysis. Students will work on close readings of text. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, May 6th:
  • Identify at least FIVE direct quotes that support the themes of accomplishments and mistakes in your novel, using correct citations. For example: "Johnny is eager to help his younger brother with his homework" (Smith, 45). Analyze each quote in one paragraph per quote. In this analysis, you should paraphrase the quote (in your OWN words!) and analyze the characterization, referring directly to accomplishments and mistakes.
  • Continue to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Remember, you must be finished by May 15th.
  • Friday, May 2nd, 2008: Work Period: Read your classic novel, taking notes on post-its (given in class) on characters who have accomplishments or feel accomplished and characters who make mistakes. It's recommended to analyze those accomplishments and mistakes by answering the following questions: What led these characters toward their accomplishments and mistakes? Characterize these characters with regard to their accomplishments and mistakes. Characterization includes their thoughts/feelings, actions, personality traits, and other people's points of view. What are your opinions about the accomplishments and mistakes described in the novel? What was the author's purpose in writing these accomplishments and mistakes? What is the author's attitude toward these characters? While reading, show the five post-its completed and any other HW owed. Students will analyze their independent novels, examining literary devices such as characterization, author's purpose and author's attitude. Due Monday, May 5th:
  • Continue to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Remember, you must be finished by May 15th.
  • Thursday, May 1st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read your classic novel, taking notes on post-its (given in class) on characters who have accomplishments or feel accomplished and characters who make mistakes. It's recommended to analyze those accomplishments and mistakes by answering the following questions: What led these characters toward their accomplishments and mistakes? Characterize these characters with regard to their accomplishments and mistakes. Characterization includes their thoughts/feelings, actions, personality traits, and other people's points of view. What are your opinions about the accomplishments and mistakes described in the novel? What was the author's purpose in writing these accomplishments and mistakes? What is the author's attitude toward these characters? While reading, show the poetry interpretation HW and any other HW owed.

    2. Poetry Analysis Discussion: Finish yesterday's poetry analysis of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 98". Share interpretations of each line. Share literary devices and explain how they are significant to the poet's message.

    3. Holocaust Remembrance Day: Today, May 1st, is Holocaust Remembrance Day, and it's important to remember the victims and survivors of this tragic time in history. It's a day to remember the suffering that all had to endure at the hands of the Nazis. It's also a day to pay attention to the world around us, and not be bystanders while evil acts go on in front of us. This is what Elie Wiesel, author of Night and Nobel Peace Prize winner, said when he share his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech that can be read HERE. An especially profound excerpt from his speech is the following: "There is so much to be done, there is so much that can be done. One person — a Raoul Wallenberg, an Albert Schweitzer, Martin Luther King, Jr. — one person of integrity, can make a difference, a difference of life and death. As long as one dissident is in prison, our freedom will not be true. As long as one child is hungry, our life will be filled with anguish and shame. What all these victims need above all is to know that they are not alone; that we are not forgetting them, that when their voices are stifled we shall lend them ours, that while their freedom depends on ours, the quality of our freedom depends on theirs...Our lives no longer belong to us alone; they belong to all those who need us desperately."

    Students will analyze literature--both in novel form and poetry form, interpreting the text and identifying literary devices and their signficance to the text as a whole. Due TOMORROW:
  • Write FIVE full post-its that address today's Do Now (answer the questions) on accomplishments and mistakes of the characters in your classic novel. In order to write these post-its, you will need to read your new independent classic novel, focusing on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments.
  • Wednesday, April 30th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Poetry Analysis of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 98". Interpret each line. Identify at least three literary devices and explain how they are significant to the poet's message. While working on this Do Now, students will show Ms. Conn the freewrite on personal and societal mistakes and any other HW owed.

    2. Discussion/Reflections: Read aloud "Sonnet 98" and share analysis completed in the Do Now. Reflect on the experience of freewriting on your accomplishments and mistakes. How did you feel as a result of the experience? What did you learn about yourself in doing these reflective freewrites?

    Students will analyze a poem, interpreting the text and identifying literary devices and their signficance to the poem as a whole. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, May 1st:
  • Finish today's classwork--interpreting each line of the poem, Shakespeare's "Sonnet 98". Also, identify at least three examples of literary devices (examples: metaphor, personification, imagery) and explain how they contribute to the signficance of the poem as a whole.
  • Bring in your new independent classic novel. Also, begin reading the novel and focus on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments.
  • Tuesday, April 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Create an original title for yesterday's freewrite on your accomplishments. Compose a two-page freewrite of your past, personal mistakes and/or mistakes of our modern-day society, including how you rectified (fixed) those mistakes (or hope to with your future actions) and how modern-day society can fix mistakes in the future. Create an original title for today's freewrite on mistakes. While working on this Do Now, students will show Ms. Conn the HW articles, responses, and new classic novel title and author.

    2. Discussion/Reflections: Reflect on the experience of freewriting on your accomplishments and mistakes. How did you feel as a result of the experience? What did you learn about yourself in doing this reflective freewrite?

    Students will informally freewrite in order to engage in a personal analysis/self-reflection of their accomplishments and mistakes. Students will prepare to address the same topics in their new classic novels. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, April 29th:
  • Finish today's classwork, the TWO-page freewrite on mistakes in their own lives and in society.
  • Read your new independent classic novel of your choice (it doesn't have to be from the links provided but it MUST be teacher-approved either through e-mail or in person by today, Tues., April 29th). Your new novel MUST be read by May 15th and a corresponding paper will be assigned when you return from vacation. When you begin reading the new classic novel, then focus on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments.
  • Monday, April 28th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Review HW obligations.

    2. Work Period: Compose a two-page freewrite of your past, personal accomplishments and your anticipated, future accomplishments. This freewrite should help you think about your own achievements and hopes for the future and your own perceptions of hopeful accomplishments in our future society. Also, when you begin reading your new classic novel, you should focus on characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments.

    Students will freewrite in order to recognize connections between personal analysis/self-reflection and literary analysis. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, April 29th:
  • Finish today's classwork, the TWO-page freewrite on your accomplishments--both past and anticipated.
  • Bring in THREE news articles (with the newspaper and article titles, author's full name, the full date of the news publication and the URL) on a topic of your choice that addresses a concern you have in society today (suggestions include teen pregnancy, domestic violence, discrimination, etc.). Make sure you read each article and write a 250-word response for each article (THREE RESPONSES MUST BE TURNED IN!) which includes your opinions and hopes for change in the future. You can do the following to research the articles: Do a google news search, using key words. Go to NEW YORK TIMES (login: msconn06, password: power), and go to Newslink to find newspapers and news magazines all over the world.
  • Find a new independent classic novel of your choice (it doesn't have to be from the links provided but it MUST be teacher-approved either through e-mail or in person by Tues., April 29th). Your new novel MUST be read by May 15th and a corresponding paper will be assigned when you return from vacation. When you begin reading the new classic novel, then focus on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Upon return from vacation, students will examine their own mistakes and achievements and compare/contrast them to those revealed in the classic novels of their choice.
  • Friday, April 18th, 2008: Film Viewing of "The Bucket List" N/A Due Tuesday, April 29th (after we return from vacation):
  • Bring in THREE news articles (with the newspaper and article titles, author's full name, the full date of the news publication and the URL) on a topic of your choice that addresses a concern you have in society today (suggestions include teen pregnancy, domestic violence, discrimination, etc.). Make sure you read each article and write a 250-word response for each article (THREE RESPONSES MUST BE TURNED IN!) which includes your opinions and hopes for change in the future. You can do the following to research the articles: Do a google news search, using key words. Go to NEW YORK TIMES (login: msconn06, password: power), and go to Newslink to find newspapers and news magazines all over the world.
  • Find a new independent classic novel of your choice (it doesn't have to be from the links provided but it MUST be teacher-approved either through e-mail or in person by Tues., April 29th). Your new novel MUST be read by May 15th and a corresponding paper will be assigned when you return from vacation. When you begin reading the new classic novel, then focus on the following: the characters' actions/choices that are considered shameful or regretful mistakes and characters' actions/choices that are considered laudatory (praise-worthy) accomplishments. Upon return from vacation, students will examine their own mistakes and achievements and compare/contrast them to those revealed in the classic novels of their choice.
  • Thursday, April 17th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Make a choice--read the newspaper or view the films "Dead Poets Society OR "The Bucket List."

    2. Newspaper or Film Viewing (one-on-one teacher-student writing workshops will go on during this time)

    Students will engage in writing/reading analysis. Due Tuesday, April 29th (after we return from vacation):
  • Bring in THREE news articles (with the newspaper and article titles, author's full name, the full date of the news publication and the URL) on a topic of your choice that addresses a concern you have in society today (suggestions include teen pregnancy, domestic violence, discrimination, etc.). Make sure you read each article and write a 250-word response for each article (THREE RESPONSES MUST BE TURNED IN!) which includes your opinions and hopes for change in the future. You can do the following to research the articles: Do a google news search, using key words. Go to NEW YORK TIMES (login: msconn06, password: power), and go to Newslink to find newspapers and news magazines all over the world.
  • Find a new independent classic novel of your choice (it doesn't have to be from the links provided but it MUST be teacher-approved either through e-mail or in person on Tues., April 29th). Your new novel MUST be read by May 15th and a corresponding paper will be assigned when you return from vacation.
  • Wednesday, April 16th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Write your concerns and/or questions regarding what you need in this English 8 course before graduating high school? What skills would you like Ms. Conn to teach so you feel better suited for college and beyond? Please write on an index card, filling up the all space provided.

    2. Discuss Do Now. Share concerns and questions.

    3. Discuss remaining work for the semester. How can graduation be ensured?

    4. HW reminders.

    Students will engage in self-assessment through written and oral expression. Students will reflect on reading and writing needs for college. Due Tuesday, April 29th (after we return from vacation):
  • Bring in THREE news articles (with the newspaper and article titles, author's full name, the full date of the news publication and the URL) on a topic of your choice that addresses a concern you have in society today (suggestions include teen pregnancy, domestic violence, discrimination, etc.). Make sure you read each article and write a 250-word response for each article (THREE RESPONSES MUST BE TURNED IN!) which includes your opinions and hopes for change in the future. You can do the following to research the articles: Do a google news search, using key words. Go to NEW YORK TIMES (login: msconn06, password: power), and go to Newslink to find newspapers and news magazines all over the world.
  • Find a new independent classic novel of your choice (it doesn't have to be from the links provided but it MUST be teacher-approved either through e-mail or in person on Tues., April 29th). Your new novel MUST be read by May 15th and a corresponding paper will be assigned when you return from vacation.
  • Tuesday, April 15th, 2008: Debate Presentations: All remaining debate speeches MUST present today. Students who have already presented will ask questions and comment on those remaining students who will present today. Students should remember to use eye contact, appropriate gestures, energy and enthusiasm, good posture, and other important public speaking skills found on the rubric provided. Students will present their speeches and apply their learned public speaking/presentation skills. Due Tuesday, April 29th (after we return from vacation):
  • Bring in THREE news articles (with the newspaper and article titles, author's full name, the full date of the news publication and the URL) on a topic of your choice that addresses a concern you have in society today (suggestions include teen pregnancy, domestic violence, discrimination, etc.). Make sure you read each article and write a 250-word response for each article (THRE RESPONSES MUST BE TURNED IN!) which includes your opinions and hopes for change in the future. You can do the following to research the articles: Do a google news search, using key words. Go to NEW YORK TIMES (login: msconn06, password: power), and go to Newslink to find newspapers and news magazines all over the world.
  • Find a new independent classic novel of your choice (it doesn't have to be from the links provided but it MUST be teacher-approved either through e-mail or in person on Tues., April 29th). Your new novel MUST be read by May 15th and a corresponding paper will be assigned when you return from vacation.
  • Monday, April 14th, 2008: Debate Presentation Practice: All remaining debate speeches MUST be practiced today. Students who have already presented will assist those remaining students who have not presented yet (and will present tomorrow!). Be prepared to answer 2-3 cross examination questions. Students should remember to use eye contact, appropriate gestures, energy and enthusiasm, good posture, and other important public speaking skills found on the rubric provided. Students will practice presenting and assisting others who will be presenting their speeches and apply their learned public speaking/presentation skills. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, April 15th:
  • The remaining students will present their speeches (though, these presentations will ONLY be students who turned in their speeches to Ms. Conn on Friday). These speeches MUST be well-rehearsed (that means as close to memorization as possible), including excellent eye contact, gestures, posture, vocalization/articulation, and of course excellent writing composition. Don't forget to dress up! Be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Friday, April 11th, 2008: Debate Presentations: All remaining debate speeches MUST be turned in today! No exceptions. As many students as possible will present their debate speeches today and the remainder will present on Tuesday. Be prepared to answer 2-3 cross examination questions. Students should remember to use eye contact, appropriate gestures, energy and enthusiasm, good posture, and other important public speaking skills found on the rubric provided. Students will present their speeches and apply their learned public speaking/presentation skills. Due Tuesday, April 15th:
  • The remaining students will present their speeches on Tuesday (though, these presentations will ONLY be students who turned in their speeches to Ms. Conn by today). These speeches MUST be well-rehearsed (that means as close to memorization as possible), including excellent eye contact, gestures, posture, vocalization/articulation, and of course excellent writing composition. Don't forget to dress up! Be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Thursday, April 10th, 2008: Debate Presentations in the Courtyard!: Students will present their debate speeches in the courtyard of the school! Be prepared to answer 2-3 cross examination questions. Students should remember to use eye contact, appropriate gestures, energy and enthusiasm, good posture, and other important public speaking skills found on the rubric provided. Students will present their speeches and apply their learned public speaking/presentation skills. Due TOMORROW--the last day of presentations:
  • Debate Speech Presentations! Don't forget to dress up! Memorize your speech and be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Wednesday, April 9th, 2008: Debate Presentations: Students will present their debate speeches and be prepared to answer 2-3 cross examination questions. Students should remember to use eye contact, appropriate gestures, energy and enthusiasm, good posture, and other important public speaking skills found on the rubric provided. Students will present their speeches and apply their learned public speaking/presentation skills. Due TOMORROW AND THE REST OF THIS WEEK--(your exact presentation date is determined in class):
  • Debate Speech Presentations! Don't forget to dress up! Memorize your speech and be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Tuesday, April 8th, 2008: Debate Presentations: Students will present their debate speeches and be prepared to answer 2-3 cross examination questions. Students should remember to use eye contact, appropriate gestures, energy and enthusiasm, good posture, walking durinng transitions, and other important public speaking skills. Students will present their speeches and apply their learned public speaking/presentation skills. Due TOMORROW AND THE REST OF THIS WEEK--(your exact presentation date is determined in class):
  • Debate Speech Presentations! Don't forget to dress up! Memorize your speech and be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Monday, April 7th, 2008: Work Period: Work on debate speech practice, reading aloud to a partner. Remember to practice eye contact, appropriate gestures, energy and enthusiasm, good posture, walking durinng transitions, and other important public speaking skills. If you haven't finished your draft yet, finish it at this time. Ask classmates and teacher for advice/insight. While working, show teacher your draft of the debate speech and the three cross-examination questions, as well as any other HW owed. Students will finish the composition of the debate speech and practice public speaking/presentation skills. Due TOMORROW AND THE REST OF THIS WEEK--Tuesday, April 8th-Friday, April 11th (your exact presentation date is determined in class):
  • Debate Speech Presentations! Memorize your speech and be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Friday, April 4th, 2008: Work Period: Work on finishing your debate speech draft at this time. Ask classmates and teacher for advice/insight. While working, show teacher your draft of the debate speech and the three cross-examination questions, as well as any other HW owed. Students will finish the composition of the debate speech, working to fulfill debate guidelines of organization, interpretation and application of evidence to their debate topics, and editing. Due Tuesday, April 8th-Friday, April 11th (your exact presentation date is determined in class):
  • Debate Speech Presentations! Memorize your speech and be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Thursday, April 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: Choose presentation dates randomly (out of a hat!). Create a minimum of THREE cross-examination questions that you can anticipate and answer for your debate speech.

    2. Work Period: Work on composition of the debate speech, writing the introduction with the problem and your opinion on the debate topic (as your thesis), more elaboration on the outline (including detailed explanation of the sources used) and a conclusion which includes summarizing final thoughts.

    3. If not finished yesterday, analyze the poetry--"To Daffodils" and "To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time" by Robert Herrick. Read aloud as a class, listen to the podcast, and then share literary term analysis!

    Students will work on elaboration of their debate speech outlines. Due TOMORROW, Friday, April 4th:
  • Draft of Debate Speech (as a homework assignment; final, graded speech is due the day of your presentation) : the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.

    Due Tuesday, April 8th-Friday, April 11th (your exact presentation date is determined in class):

  • Debate Speech Presentations! Memorize your speech and be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Wednesday, April 2nd, 2008: 1. Do Now: April is Poetry Month! Poetry reading--"To Daffodils" and "To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time" by Robert Herrick. Read aloud as a class and then listen to the podcast!

    2. Debate Speech Instructions: Read and discuss the Debate Speech Grading Rubric

    3. Work Period: Work on composition of the debate speech, writing the introduction with the problem and your opinion on the debate topic (as your thesis), more elaboration on the outline (including detailed explanation of the sources used) and a conclusion which includes summarizing final thoughts.

    Students will work on elaboration of their debate speech outlines. Due THIS Friday, April 4th:
  • Draft of Debate Speech: the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.

    Due Tuesday, April 8th-Friday, April 11th:

  • Debate Speech Presentations! Memorize your speech and be ready to answer Cross-Examination questions from your classmates and teacher. You must provide a typed speech to Ms. Conn during the speech presentation. Remember, the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide. Use the Debate Speech Grading Rubric to guide you in preparation.
  • Tuesday, April 1st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Find a favorite quote/excerpt from your Literary Analysis #2 paper (or a classmate's) and be ready to share with class.

    2. Read-Aloud: Share and discuss favorite quote/excerpt from the Literary Analysis #2 paper.

    3. Work Period: Work on composition of the debate speech, writing the introduction with the problem and your opinion on the debate topic (as your thesis), more elaboration on the outline (including detailed explanation of the sources used) and a conclusion which includes summarizing final thoughts.

    Students will work on elaboration of their debate speech outlines. Due THIS Friday, April 4th:
  • Draft of Debate Speech: the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide.
  • Monday, March 31st, 2008: Work Period: Work on Literary Analysis #2 paper, offering and obtaining assistance from classmates and teacher on meaning/interpretation/focus, organization, development, and language. SEE HW for details. Students will work on composition and editing of their major paper (Literary Analysis #2) due tomorrow. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, April 1st (Remember, -10 each day the paper is late):
  • Literary Analysis #2 Paper: Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how your chosen classic novel reveals conflicts and resolutions (if the conflicts are unresolved or unclear, provide the reasons for this) and explain how you or people in our modern day society can relate to these conflicts and resolutions. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel regarding how characters deal with conflicts and come to resolutions? What can you apply from the novel to your life? How do people in our society today deal with similar conflicts and resolutions? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' relationships, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pp. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your analysis of the novel and relevance to you and/or society are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.

    Due THIS Friday, April 4th:

  • Draft of Debate Speech: the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide.
  • Friday, March 28th, 2008: Work Period: Work on debate speech composition and Literary Analysis #2 paper. SEE HW for details. Students will work on transferring their outline to their debate speeches, using the sample outline format to follow. They will organize their data to fit the outline's stock issues and compose their speeches. Due Monday, March 31st:
  • Finish your independent classic novel.

    Due Tuesday, April 1st:

  • Literary Analysis #2 Paper: Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how your chosen classic novel reveals conflicts and resolutions (if the conflicts are unresolved or unclear, provide the reasons for this) and explain how you or people in our modern day society can relate to these conflicts and resolutions. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel regarding how characters deal with conflicts and come to resolutions? What can you apply from the novel to your life? How do people in our society today deal with similar conflicts and resolutions? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' relationships, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pp. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your analysis of the novel and relevance to you and/or society are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.

    Due Friday, April 4th:

  • Draft of Debate Speech: the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide.
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March (this coming Monday!). You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Thursday, March 27th, 2008: 1.Do Now: Finish up/edit the debate speech outline. Show outline HW.

    2. Discuss/Analyze: Instructions on debate speech composition and Literary Analysis #2 paper, both of which are due next week.

    3. Work Period: Work on speech composition and Literary Analysis #2 paper.

    Students will work on transferring their outline to their debate speeches, using the sample outline format to follow. They will organize their data to fit the outline's stock issues and compose their speeches. Due Tuesday, April 1st:
  • Literary Analysis #2 Paper: Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how your chosen classic novel reveals conflicts and resolutions (if the conflicts are unresolved or unclear, provide the reasons for this) and explain how you or people in our modern day society can relate to these conflicts and resolutions. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel regarding how characters deal with conflicts and come to resolutions? What can you apply from the novel to your life? How do people in our society today deal with similar conflicts and resolutions? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' relationships, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pp. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your analysis of the novel and relevance to you and/or society are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.

    Due Friday, April 4th:

  • Draft of Debate Speech: the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), using the sample speech outline (provided in class) as a guide.
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March (this coming Monday!). You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Wednesday, March 26th, 2008: Work Period: Work on writing your debate speech outline (instructions provided in class), which is due TOMORROW. Students will work on outlining their debate speeches, using a sample outline format to follow. They will organize their data to fit the outline's stock issues. Due TOMORROW, Thursday, March 27th:
  • SPEECH OUTLINE: Write and turn in your debate speech outline (a minimum of two pages) which follows the sample outline (received in class).
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March (this coming Monday!). You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Tuesday, March 25th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Share your fictional acceptance speech with a neighbor. Were the examples of significance, inherency, solvency and advantages easy to identify? Show acceptance speech to receive HW credit.

    2. Share/Read-Aloud: Share speeches with class. Read aloud as if you are a political official.

    3. Introduce HW instructions and begin writing the outline.

    Students will read their own original speeches, which will model the governor's speech. Their speeches will include the stock issues--signficance, inherency, solvency and advantages. Students will begin outlining their debate speeches. Due Thursday, March 27th:
  • SPEECH OUTLINE: Write and turn in your debate speech outline (a minimum of two pages) which follows the sample outline (received in class).
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March (this coming Monday!). You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Monday, March 24th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Using the inaugural speech of the new governor of New York, David Paterson as a model speech, write your own acceptance speech to a political office that remarks on how you plan to positively influence society, including the Significance (problems that you've encountered around you that you'd like to solve and the impact they've had on society), Inherency (the barriers to solving those problems), Solvency (solutions) and Advantages to those solutions. Write at least TWO full pageS including all of the criteria listed above.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Share and discuss acceptance speeches.

    3. Grade distribution.

    Students will write their own speech, which will model the governor's speech. Their speeches will include the stock issues--signficance, inherency, solvency and advantages.
  • Finish classwork--Your Original Acceptance Speech (TWO full pages-- minimum).
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March. You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Thursday, March 20th, 2008: Reading & Discussion: Read aloud and discuss/analyze the inaugural speech of the new governor of New York, David Paterson. Pay attention to the stock issues (significance, inherency, solvency and advantages), as well as the humor and anecdotes. Students will read the governor's acceptance speech, analyzing its content for the stock issues.
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March. You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Enjoy the Easter holiday weekend!
  • Wednesday, March 19th, 2008: Work Period: Read aloud and analyze the inaugural speech of the new governor of New York, David Paterson. Pay attention to the stock issues (significance, inherency, solvency and advantages), as well as the humor and anecdotes. Students will read the governor's acceptance speech, analyzing its content for the stock issues. DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 20TH:
  • Make up any HW owed (tomorrow is the last day of the 1st marking period).
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March. You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Tuesday, March 18th, 2008: 1. Work Period: Analyze your 20 interviews, finding patterns in the informal poll you conducted. For each question you asked, analyze the 20 answers you collected. You should have a one-two sentence summary of the patterns discovered for each question. You might want to calculate percentages that reveal patterns, such as "75% of my peers believe that criminals should be sent to rehab instead of jail." When finished, work on the Journal #5 HW.

    2. Reflections/Discussion: Reflect on the interview process. What did you find especially enlightening/interesting from your informal poll of your peers? What was challenging in this process? What did you enjoy in conducting the poll? What information do you believe will be most helpful in your debate?

    Students will work on evaluating the results of their informal study, for the purpose of gaining research information for their debates. DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19TH:
  • Interview Analysis: Analyze your 20 interviews, finding patterns in the informal poll you conducted. For each question you asked, analyze the 20 answers you collected. You should have a one-two sentence summary of the patterns discovered for each question. You might want to calculate percentages that reveal patterns, such as "75% of my peers believe that criminals should be sent to rehab instead of jail."
  • Journal #5 on Obstacles--You may want to discuss the obstacles that the characters see that prevent them from achieving their goals or solving their problems or discuss the obstacles you see as the reader only. These obstacles may include the setting, other characters (like the antagonist), events occurring in the plot, etc. Make sure to describe these obstacles in detail. Use textual evidence to support your descriptions. Write 250 words or more. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March. You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Monday, March 17th, 2008: Work Period: After having created FIVE interview questions on your debate topic (which will be asked to your classmates/peers and should help your argument), ask your classmates the interview questions. You will need to obtain 20 interviews from Info Tech. students by TOMORROW. Along with their answers, you need the following information--their full name, grade, and city of residence (where they live; Queens is not specific enough). When finished with the interviews, make up any HW necessary. Suggestions: Create paper copies of the interviews to give out to your friends or send the interview questions on myspace or facebook! Students will work on conducting an informal study, including the composition of questions and the leading of an interview for the purpose of gaining research information for their debates. DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 18TH:
  • Info Tech Interview: Create FIVE interview questions on your debate topic. These interview questions, which will be asked to your classmates/peers, should help your argument. For example, if you are in favor of a draft over a voluntary army, then you should include questions like the following: What are at least two negatives about a voluntary army? What could a draft offer that a voluntary army cannot? You will need to obtain 20 interviews from Info Tech. students. Along with their answers, you need the following information--their full name, grade, and city of residence (where they live; Queens is not specific enough).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19TH:

  • Journal #5 on Obstacles--You may want to discuss the obstacles that the characters see that prevent them from achieving their goals or solving their problems or discuss the obstacles you see as the reader only. These obstacles may include the setting, other characters (like the antagonist), events occurring in the plot, etc. Make sure to describe these obstacles in detail. Use textual evidence to support your descriptions. Write 250 words or more. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March. You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Friday, March 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Create FIVE interview questions on your debate topic. These interview questions, which will be asked to your classmates/peers, should help your argument. For example, if you are in favor of a draft over a voluntary army, then you should include questions like the following: What are at least two negatives about a voluntary army? What could a draft offer that a voluntary army cannot? Meanwhile, show HW due today--Stock Issues (5 paragraphs) and any other HW owed.

    2. Work Period: Begin to ask your classmates the interview questions. You will need to obtain 20 interviews from Info Tech. students by Tuesday. Along with their answers, you need the following information--their full name, grade, and city of residence (where they live; Queens is not specific enough). When finished with the interviews, make up any HW necessary.

    Students will work on conducting an informal study, including the composition of questions and the leading of an interview for the purpose of gaining research information for their debates. DUE TUESDAY, MARCH 18TH:
  • Info Tech Interview: Create FIVE interview questions on your debate topic. These interview questions, which will be asked to your classmates/peers, should help your argument. For example, if you are in favor of a draft over a voluntary army, then you should include questions like the following: What are at least two negatives about a voluntary army? What could a draft offer that a voluntary army cannot? You will need to obtain 20 interviews from Info Tech. students. Along with their answers, you need the following information--their full name, grade, and city of residence (where they live; Queens is not specific enough).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19TH:

  • Journal #5 on Obstacles--You may want to discuss the obstacles that the characters see that prevent them from achieving their goals or solving their problems or discuss the obstacles you see as the reader only. These obstacles may include the setting, other characters (like the antagonist), events occurring in the plot, etc. Make sure to describe these obstacles in detail. Use textual evidence to support your descriptions. Write 250 words or more. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel. You need to be finished by the end of March. You will also be expected to compose a final paper on the novel at that time.
  • Thursday, March 13th, 2008: Work Period: Identify the Significance of your Debate Topic(the problem, its magnitude, and its impact or harm). Identify the Inherence (reason why nothing is being done to solve that problem--the barrier to fixing that problem). Identify the Solvency (plan that can be used to solve the problem--specifying exactly what you want to do to solve the problem and what means to enact this solution, such as funding, enforcement, and administration). Identify the Advantage (the benefits of your solution). Identify the Topicality (asks the question--does the affirmative plan directly support the resolution?). For each Stock Issue, you should write one paragraph (4-6 sentences). That's a total of FIVE paragraphs. Meanwhile, show any HW owed, including the Analysis of Your Findings and Journal #4. Students will learn about and identify their own Stock Issues, which are the starting points in debate preparation. DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 14TH:
  • Finish today's classwork--the Stock Issues.
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel.
  • Wednesday, March 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read about "Stock Issues"--taken from Policy Debate by Cynthia Burgett, a text from the National Forensic League's Library of Public Speaking and Debate. Read about the following: Inherency, Solvency, Advantage, and Topicality.

    2. Work Period: Identify the Significance (the problem, its magnitude, and its impact or harm). Identify the Inherence (reason why nothing is being done to solve that problem--the barrier to fixing that problem). Identify the Solvency (plan that can be used to solve the problem--specifying exactly what you want to do to solve the problem and what means to enact this solution, such as funding, enforcement, and administration). Identify the Advantage (the benefits of your solution). Identify the Topicality (asks the question--does the affirmative plan directly support the resolution?). For each Stock Issue, you should write one paragraph (4-6 sentences). That's a total of FIVE paragraphs. Meanwhile, show HW--Analysis of Your Findings and Journal #4.

    Students will learn about and identify their own Stock Issues, which are the starting points in debate preparation. DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 14TH:
  • Finish today's classwork--the Stock Issues.
  • Continue reading your new independent classic novel.
  • Tuesday, March 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Identify evidence from your articles that support the affirmative side and the negative side. Use a color-code system. Write a one-page (handwritten or typed) "Analysis of your Findings". Questions to answer may include the following: Is your evidence quality material? Why/Why not? Do you have more evidence to support the affirmative side or the negative side? What new information did you learn about your topic from the research? Do you feel more strongly about your position on your topic or has your stance changed as a result of your findings? You may want to include one or two direct quotes from your news articles to support your analysis. Meanwhile, show HW--the three news articles on your debate topic with annotations and one-sentence summary for each.

    2. Discussion/Reflections: Was the process of researching the articles an easy one? Explain. Did the articles easily support your chosen side (affirmative or negative)? Describe the analysis in the "Do Now"--was it an easy task or a difficult one? What did you learn about your own beliefs in the annotations you wrote in the margins? Do you need to engage in additional research?

    3. Begin HW.

    Students will work on initial debate topic analysis, examining current event evidence. DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12TH:
  • Finish today's classwork--the Do Now--"Analysis of your Findings"
  • Journal #4 on Conflicts: Write 250 words or more on the following--Describe the conflict(s) that exist in your new novel and identify/explain which character(s) you support more in the conflict. You may also want to predict which character(s) will come out ahead when the conflict is resolved (of course, this requires some predictive analysis). Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Read at least 50 pages in your new independent classic novel.
  • Monday, March 10th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Write a one-sentence summary of each of the news articles you found and brought in today. In the margins of each article, annotate your opinions/response for each paragraph, in detail. Fill up the entire margin space with your thoughtful opinions. Also, underline any evidence from the articles that you think could be useful for your debate topic. Meanwhile, show HW--the three news articles on your debate topic.

    2. Discussion/Reflections: Was the process of researching the articles an easy one? Explain. Did the articles easily support your chosen side (affirmative or negative)? Describe the analysis in the "Do Now"--was it an easy task or a difficult one? What did you learn about your own beliefs in the annotations you wrote in the margins? Do you need to engage in additional research?

    3. Begin HW.

    Students will work on initial debate topic analysis, examining current event evidence. DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish today's classwork--Write a one-sentence summary of each of the news articles you found and brought in today. In the margins of each article, annotate your opinions/response for each paragraph, in detail. Fill up the entire margin space with your thoughtful opinions. Also, underline any evidence from the articles that you think could be useful for your debate topic.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12TH:

  • Journal #4 on Conflicts: Write 250 words or more on the following--Describe the conflict(s) that exist in your new novel and identify/explain which character(s) you support more in the conflict. You may also want to predict which character(s) will come out ahead when the conflict is resolved (of course, this requires some predictive analysis). Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Read at least 50 pages in your new independent classic novel.
  • Friday, March 7th, 2008: Work Period: Make up any work owed. For those students up to date on the HW, do the following: Read new classic novel, read today's and this past week's newspapers and identify news articles for your debate topic, and meet with teacher to discuss/analyze Paper #1. Show HW--yesterday's Do Now (freewrite analysis), 5-10 "ask an expert" questions, and new classic novel. Students will work on initial debate topic analysis, examining affirmative and negative sides. DUE MONDAY, MARCH 10TH:
  • Bring in THREE news articles (with the newspaper and article titles, author's full name, the full date of the news publication and the URL) on your debate topic. Make sure you read each article and can explain their relevance to your debate topic. You can do the following to research the articles: Do a google news search, using key words. Go to NEW YORK TIMES (login: msconn06, password: power), and go to Newslink to find newspapers and news magazines all over the world.
  • Read at least 25 pages in your new independent classic novel.
  • Thursday, March 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Answer the following questions--What did the freewrite accomplish for you? Did you learn something new about your opinions on the debate topic? How difficult was it to write on the opposing side?

    2. Reflections/Discussion: Discuss the Do Now.

    3. Brainstorming/Questioning: Compose 5-10 "ask an expert" questions, in which you determine information that you feel is necessary to research on your topic.

    4. Identify news articles for your debate topic and your classmates' debate topics. Organize articles into appropriate categories.

    Students will begin initial news research and freewrite on the class debate topics, analyzing current news sources. DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish today's classwork.
  • Select and bring in a new independent classic novel for the month of March. Use the following links to find your novel: "101 Books to Read Before You Go to College", “Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading”, “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", “Ms. Conn’s Favorite Classics”.

  • THIS WEEK: Bring in any current (within the past week) newspapers and news magazines from home to be used in class.

    DUE THIS MONDAY, MARCH 10TH:

  • Bring in THREE news articles (with the news title, author's full name, the full date of the news publication and the URL) on your debate topic. You can do the following to research the articles: Do a google news search, using key words. Go to NEW YORK TIMES (login: msconn06, password: power), and go to Newslink to find newspapers and news magazines all over the world.
  • Read at least 25 pages in your new independent classic novel.
  • Wednesday, March 5th, 2008: 1. Work Period: Freewrite on your chosen debate topic (from one of the following choices). You MUST write ONE full page on the affirmative (in support of the resolution) and ONE full page on the negative (opposed to the resolution). 1.) Resolved that military conscription is a superior alternative to a voluntary army. 2.) Resolved that the restriction of civil liberties in the U.S. for the sake of combating terrorism is justified. 3.) Resolved that affirmative action programs to remedy the effects of discrimination are justified. 4.) Resolved that all U.S. citizens ought to perform a period of national service. 5.) Resolved that communities in the U.S. ought to have the right to suppress pornography. 6.) Resolved that secondary education in the U.S. ought to be a privilege, not a right. 7.) Resolved that terminally ill patients have the right to die when and how they choose. 8.) Resolved that capital punishment is justified. 9.) Resolved that the U.S. has a moral obligation to promote democratic ideals in other nations. 10.) Resolved that rehabilitation ought to be valued above punishment in the U.S. criminal justice system. Students will begin initial news research and freewrite on the class debate topics, analyzing current news sources. DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish today's Freewrite--the Freewrite is on your chosen debate topic (from one of the debate topics provided in the classwork section). You MUST write ONE full page on the affirmative (in support of the resolution) and ONE full page on the negative (opposed to the resolution).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 7TH:

  • Select and bring in a new independent classic novel for the month of March. Use the following links to find your novel: "101 Books to Read Before You Go to College", “Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading”, “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", “Ms. Conn’s Favorite Classics”.

  • THIS WEEK: Bring in any current (within the past week) newspapers and news magazines from home to be used in class.

    DUE MONDAY, MARCH 10TH:

  • Bring in THREE news articles (with the news title, author's full name, the full date of the news publication and the URL) on your debate topic. You can do the following to research the articles: Do a google news search, using key words. Go to NEW YORK TIMES (login: msconn06, password: power), and go to Newslink to find newspapers and news magazines all over the world.
  • Read at least 25 pages in your new independent classic novel.
  • Tuesday, March 4th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Sign up for one of the following debate topics. Provide reasoning for your debate topic selection (write your reasoning in an extra long paragraph--6-8 sentences), referring to your interests, favored side (affirmative or negative), and anticipated news research. 1.) Resolved that military conscription is a superior alternative to a voluntary army. 2.) Resolved that the restriction of civil liberties in the U.S. for the sake of combating terrorism is justified. 3.) Resolved that affirmative action programs to remedy the effects of discrimination are justified. 4.) Resolved that all U.S. citizens ought to perform a period of national service. 5.) Resolved that communities in the U.S. ought to have the right to suppress pornography. 6.) Resolved that secondary education in the U.S. ought to be a privilege, not a right. 7.) Resolved that terminally ill patients have the right to die when and how they choose. 8.) Resolved that capital punishment is justified. 9.) Resolved that the U.S. has a moral obligation to promote democratic ideals in other nations. 10.) Resolved that rehabilitation ought to be valued above punishment in the U.S. criminal justice system.

    2. Identify news articles for your debate topic and your classmates' debate topics. Organize articles into appropriate categories.

    Students will begin initial news research on the class debate topics, analyzing current news sources. DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 7TH:
  • Select and bring in a new independent classic novel for the month of March. Use the following links to find your novel: "101 Books to Read Before You Go to College", “Advanced Placement English Recommended Reading”, “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", “Ms. Conn’s Favorite Classics”.

    Literary Analysis Paper #1 was due TODAY; it's -10 each day late (This is 17% of your grade): The Future and a Classic Novel. Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how you can use your chosen classic novel in the future. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel? What can you apply from the novel to your own future endeavors and goals? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' purposes/goals, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pages, typed, double spaced. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.

  • THIS WEEK: Bring in any current (within the past week) newspapers and news magazines from home to be used in class.
  • Monday, March 3rd, 2008: 1. Do Now: How do you define a debate? Do you think debate skills are useful in your future? If so, why? If not, why not? Briefly write down your responses.

    2.Discussion/Analysis: Introduction to Debate--What is Debate? and Why Debate?.

    3. Debate topics introduced and chosen: 1.) Resolved that military conscription is a superior alternative to a voluntary army. 2.) Resolved that the restriction of civil liberties in the U.S. for the sake of combating terrorism is justified. 3.) Resolved that affirmative action programs to remedy the effects of discrimination are justified. 4.) Resolved that all U.S. citizens ought to perform a period of national service. 5.) Resolved that communities in the U.S. ought to have the right to suppress pornography. 6.) Resolved that secondary education in the U.S. ought to be a privilege, not a right. 7.) Resolved that terminally ill patients have the right to die when and how they choose. 8.) Resolved that capital punishment is justified. 9.) Resolved that the U.S. has a moral obligation to promote democratic ideals in other nations. 10.) Resolved that rehabilitation ought to be valued above punishment in the U.S. criminal justice system.

    4. Paper #1 Reminder/Q & A.

    Students will learn the basics of debate and understand why debate is useful in their lives. Due TOMORROW--Tuesday, March 4th:
  • Literary Analysis Paper #1 (This is 17% of your grade): The Future and a Classic Novel. Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how you can use your chosen classic novel in the future. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel? What can you apply from the novel to your own future endeavors and goals? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' purposes/goals, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pages, typed, double spaced. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.

  • Bring in any current (within the past week) newspapers and news magazines from home to be used in class.
  • Friday, February 29th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Speech Presentations finish today! Presentations will be evaluated based on the Oratory Grading Rubric. Students will also evaluate ther classmates' presentations.

    2. Discussion/Reflection: Reflect on students' speech presentations.

    3. Paper #1 Reminder.

    Students will engage in presentation and listen to speech presentations on current events and evaluate their peers. Due THIS Tuesday, March 4th:
  • Literary Analysis Paper #1 (This is 17% of your grade): The Future and a Classic Novel. Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how you can use your chosen classic novel in the future. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel? What can you apply from the novel to your own future endeavors and goals? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' purposes/goals, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pp. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.
  • Thursday, February 28th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Speech Presentations! Presentations will be evaluated based on the Oratory Grading Rubric. Students will also evaluate ther classmates' presentations.

    2. Discussion/Reflection: Reflect on students' speech presentations. Were the presentations successful? How should others meet or exceed the success (or lack of) their classmates?

    Students will read, write and listen for information. Students will listen to speech presentations on current events and evaluate their peers. Due TOMORROW--ALL REMAINING SPEECHES (it's the last day!):
  • 200 POINTS=33% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE--FINAL DRAFT OF THE ORATORY SPEECH and SPEECH DELIVERY--the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), underlined cited information (whether direct quotes or paraphrases), using the sample oratory as a guide, the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations. The SPEECH DELIVERY should be memorized, following the delivery portion of the grading rubric (look at the link above). Dress appropriately for your speech delivery/presentation. Dress like you're going on a professional interview. Think about these questions: Would you wear jeans? Would you wear a t-shirt? How do you think your appearance affects your speech presentation?

    Due TOMORROW, Friday, February 29th:

  • Finish your chosen classic novel.

    Due THIS Tuesday, March 4th:

  • Literary Analysis Paper #1: The Future and a Classic Novel. Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how you can use your chosen classic novel in the future. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel? What can you apply from the novel to your own future endeavors and goals? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' purposes/goals, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pp. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.
  • Wednesday, February 27th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Speech Presentations! Presentations will be evaluated based on the Oratory Grading Rubric. Students will also evaluate ther classmates' presentations.

    2. Discussion/Reflection: Reflect on students' speech presentations. Were the presentations successful? How should others meet or exceed the success (or lack of) their classmates?
    *Turn in the Freewrite for Literary Analysis Paper #1, which is ONE full page on the connection between your chosen novel and your future.

    Students will read, write and listen for information. Students will listen to speech presentations on current events and evaluate their peers. Due THIS week of Tuesday, February 26th-Friday, February 29th (exact assigned day was given in class yesterday; if you didn't get your due date, ask!!):
  • 200 POINTS=33% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE--FINAL DRAFT OF THE ORATORY SPEECH and SPEECH DELIVERY--the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), underlined cited information (whether direct quotes or paraphrases), using the sample oratory as a guide, the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations. The SPEECH DELIVERY should be memorized, following the delivery portion of the grading rubric (look at the link above). Dress appropriately for your speech delivery/presentation. Dress like you're going on a professional interview. Think about these questions: Would you wear jeans? Would you wear a t-shirt? How do you think your appearance affects your speech presentation?

    Due THIS Friday, February 29th:

  • Finish your chosen classic novel.

    Due NEXT Tuesday, March 4th:

  • Literary Analysis Paper #1: The Future and a Classic Novel. Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how you can use your chosen classic novel in the future. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel? What can you apply from the novel to your own future endeavors and goals? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' purposes/goals, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pp. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.
  • Tuesday, February 26th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Speech Presentations! Presentations will be evaluated based on the Oratory Grading Rubric. Students will also evaluate ther classmates' presentations.

    2. Discussion/Reflection: Reflect on students' speech presentations. Were the presentations successful? How should others meet or exceed the success (or lack of) their classmates?

    3. Freewrite for Literary Analysis Paper #1: Freewrite ONE full page on the connection between your chosen novel and your future.

    Students will read, write and listen for information. Students will listen to speech presentations on current events and evaluate their peers. Due TOMORROW:
  • Finish the classwork freewrite for the Literary Analysis Paper #1 (see paper details below). Freewrite ONE full page on the connection between your chosen novel and your future.

    Due THIS week of Tuesday, February 26th-Friday, February 29th (exact assigned day was given in class yesterday; if you didn't get your due date, ask!!):

  • 200 POINTS=33% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE--FINAL DRAFT OF THE ORATORY SPEECH and SPEECH DELIVERY--the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), underlined cited information (whether direct quotes or paraphrases), using the sample oratory as a guide, the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations. The SPEECH DELIVERY should be memorized, following the delivery portion of the grading rubric (look at the link above). Dress appropriately for your speech delivery/presentation. Dress like you're going on a professional interview. Think about these questions: Would you wear jeans? Would you wear a t-shirt? How do you think your appearance affects your speech presentation?

    Due THIS Friday, February 29th:

  • Finish your chosen classic novel.

    Due NEXT Tuesday, March 4th:

  • Literary Analysis Paper #1: The Future and a Classic Novel. Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how you can use your chosen classic novel in the future. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel? What can you apply from the novel to your own future endeavors and goals? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' purposes/goals, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pp. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.
  • Monday, February 25th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Literary Analysis Paper #1: The Future and a Classic Novel introduced. Introduce and analyze these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS.

    2. Speech Delivery Practice/Group Work: Read aloud your Oratory to 2-3 different people. Pay close attention to timing of speech, eye contact, gesturing (when appropriate), enunciation, clarity, volume and energy. Have him/her evaluate your delivery and content using the Oratory Grading Rubric. You and your group members should then switch roles.

    3. Discussion/Reflection: What do you need to do tonight and in the coming days to successfully prepare your speech and delivery?

    Students will evaluate the essay composition requirements and oratory speech writing process. Students will read, write and listen for information and understanding. Due THIS week of Tuesday, February 26th-Friday, February 29th (exact assigned day was given in class yesterday; if you didn't get your due date, ask!!):
  • 200 POINTS=33% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE--FINAL DRAFT OF THE ORATORY SPEECH and SPEECH DELIVERY--the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), underlined cited information (whether direct quotes or paraphrases), using the sample oratory as a guide, the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations. The SPEECH DELIVERY should be memorized, following the delivery portion of the grading rubric (look at the link above). Dress appropriately for your speech delivery/presentation. Dress like you're going on a professional interview. Think about these questions: Would you wear jeans? Would you wear a t-shirt? How do you think your appearance affects your speech presentation?

    Due THIS Friday, February 29th:

  • Finish your chosen classic novel.

    Due NEXT Tuesday, March 4th:

  • Literary Analysis Paper #1: The Future and a Classic Novel. Follow these ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and explain how you can use your chosen classic novel in the future. Think about the following questions: What can you take with you from reading this novel? What can you apply from the novel to your own future endeavors and goals? You might want to consider the following: the language, the setting, the author's message, the characters' development, the characters' purposes/goals, the author's style/structure. Paper length: 3-5 pp. You must make plentiful references to your novel, citing page numbers. You must make this a personal analysis of the novel in terms of its significance and application to your life. Here's a citation format to follow: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55). Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply. All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced. Appropriate heading should be included and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date. Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.
  • Friday, February 15th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read Public Speaking Helpful Hints--10 Tips for Public Speaking, Overcoming Fear of Public Speaking, and avoid these BIG Public Speaking Mistakes.

    2. Speech Delivery Practice/Group Work: Read aloud your Oratory to 2-3 different people. Pay close attention to timing of speech, eye contact, gesturing (when appropriate), enunciation, clarity, volume and energy. Have him/her evaluate your delivery and content using the Oratory Grading Rubric. You and your group members should then switch roles.

    3. Discussion/Reflection: Discuss the speech delivery and editing process. How is today's speech delivery practice helpful? What do you learn about yourself when reading your speech to your group members? What will you work on over the vacation to improve your speech writing and delivery?

    Students will evaluate the oratory speech writing process and practice the components of speech delivery. Students will read, write and listen for information and understanding. Vacation HW:
  • Revise your speech and make sure it follows the sample oratory and fulfills the Oratory Grading Rubric, your classmates' evaluations and teacher suggestions. Of course, you should practice, practice, practice!

    Due the week of Tuesday, February 26th-Friday, February 29th (exact assigned day was given in class yesterday; if you didn't get your due date, ask!!):

  • 200 POINTS=33% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE--FINAL DRAFT OF THE ORATORY SPEECH and SPEECH DELIVERY--the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), underlined cited information (whether direct quotes or paraphrases), using the sample oratory as a guide, the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations. The SPEECH DELIVERY should be memorized, following the delivery portion of the grading rubric (look at the link above). Dress appropriately for your speech delivery/presentation. Dress like you're going on a professional interview. Think about these questions: Would you wear jeans? Would you wear a t-shirt? How do you think your appearance affects your speech presentation?

    Due Friday, February 29th:

  • Finish your chosen classic novel.

    Due Tuesday, March 4th:

  • Literary Analysis Paper--details to come!
  • Thursday, February 14th, 2008: 1. Do Now--Reading, Listening and Evaluating: Read aloud your Oratory to a different partner. Pay close attention to timing of speech, eye contact, gesturing (when appropriate), enunciation, clarity, volume and energy. Have him/her evaluate your delivery and content using the Oratory Grading Rubric. You and your partner should then switch roles.

    2. Work Period: Work on revising the final draft of your Oratory Speech, using the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations.

    3. Discussion/Reflection: Discuss the speech delivery and editing process. How is the speech delivery practice helpful? What do you learn about yourself when reading your speech to your partner? What will you work on over the vacation to improve your speech writing and delivery? Why are these communication skills useful in college and thereafter?

    Students will evaluate the oratory speech writing process and practice the components of speech delivery. Students will read, write and listen for information and understanding. Due the week of Tuesday, February 26th-Friday, February 29th (exact assigned day will be given in class today):
  • 200 POINTS=33% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE (FINAL DRAFT OF THE ORATORY SPEECH and SPEECH DELIVERY--the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), underlined cited information (whether direct quotes or paraphrases), using the sample oratory as a guide, the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations. The SPEECH DELIVERY should be memorized, following the delivery portion of the grading rubric (look at the link above).

    Due Friday, February 29th:

  • Finish your chosen classic novel.

    Due Tuesday, March 4th:

  • Literary Analysis Paper--details to come!
  • Wednesday, February 13th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish reading your partner's first draft of the Oratory (read a speech with a different topic than your own). Use the Oratory Speech Peer Evaluation, filling out the questions as you read your partner's first draft.

    2. Work Period: Work on composing the final draft of your Oratory Speech, using the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations.

    Students will evaluate the oratory speech writing process and review the components of speech delivery. Students will read and write for information and understanding. Due the week of Tuesday, February 26th-Friday, February 29th (exact assigned day will be given in class):
  • 200 POINTS=33% OF YOUR 1ST MARKING PERIOD GRADE (FINAL DRAFT OF THE ORATORY SPEECH and SPEECH DELIVERY--the written speech must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date), at least TWO full pages (read aloud=5 minutes), underlined cited information (whether direct quotes or paraphrases), using the sample oratory as a guide, the Oratory Grading Rubric and your classmates' evaluations. The SPEECH DELIVERY should be memorized, following the delivery portion of the grading rubric (look at the link above).

    Due Friday, February 29th:

  • Finish your chosen classic novel.

    Due Tuesday, March 4th:

  • Literary Analysis Paper--details to come!
  • Tuesday, February 12th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read a classmate's first draft of the Oratory (read a speech with a different topic than your own). Use the Oratory Speech Peer Evaluation, filling out the questions as you read your classmate's first draft.

    2. Reading, Listening and Evaluating: Read aloud your Oratory to a partner. Have him/her evaluate your delivery and content using the Oratory Speech Peer Evaluation. You and your partner should then switch roles. Also, use the Oratory Grading Rubric, which will identify the detailed requirements for the written speech and the delivery component.

    3. Discussion/Analysis: What were some differences between the act of reading and the act of listening to the speech delivery? What were you most concerned with as the speaker? What were you most concerned with as the evaluator? Was this a helpful process to read and evaluate a peer's speech writing and delivery? Why/Why not? Is it helpful to your own writing and delivery? Explain.

    Students will evaluate the oratory speech writing process and practice the components of speech delivery. Students will read, write and listen for information and understanding. Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, February 13th:
  • Journal Entry #3: Write 250 words or more on the following question--How does the language influence the plot of your novel? You may need evidence from the novel for support. You may want to consider the setting of your novel (time period and place), the characterization of characters, and particular scenes. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Monday, February 11th, 2008: 1. Do Now: How was your speech writing process? Did you follow the sample oratory as a guide? What was easy and what was challenging about composing the oratory speech? Are you satisfied with your first draft? If so, why? If not, why not?

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Discuss the Do Now questions as a class.

    3. Group Analysis: In a group of two-three classmates who don't share the same topic, share the details of your oratory speech (do NOT use the actual speech; instead, share information from memory only). Share your topic, the problem you plan to teach your classmates OR the topic you are trying to persuade your classmates to believe. Stand up, use multiple, natural hand gestures for emphasis, persistent eye contact, smile, and show energy. This is practice for the actual speech delivery, which will happen at a later date.

    4. Introduce Oratory Grading Rubric, which will identify the breakdown of points for the written speech and the delivery component.

    Students will evaluate their speech writing process. Students will work on speech delivery techniques. Students will learn the grading requirements for the Oratory Speech. Due Wednesday, February 13th:
  • Journal Entry #3: Write 250 words or more on the following question--How does the language influence the plot of your novel? You may need evidence from the novel for support. You may want to consider the setting of your novel (time period and place), the characterization of characters, and particular scenes. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Friday, February 8th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Using the sample oratory as a guide, write the attention-getter and thesis statement for your oratory speech. The attention getter best works as an anecdote (story)--either about you, a family member/friend, or our society today. Write your thesis statement, which is the belief statement that you are explaining and supporting throughout your speech. Make sure your attention getter supports the thesis. Share with a neighbor.

    2. Discussion/Sharing: Students share their attention-getters and thesis statements, as determined by their peers and teacher.

    3. Work Period: Work on organizing your freewrite for the oratory speech to fit the outline. Begin researching supportive evidence from the news to include in your speech.

    Students will work on writing the introduction of their oratory speech. Students will think-pair-share. Students will work on organization of their freewrites to fit in the first draft of the oratory speech. Due Monday, February 11th:
  • First Draft (ungraded; final draft will be graded) of the Oratory Speech--2-3 pages, typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date). Your speech should follow the outline and components of the exemplary speech found HERE. You must include researched resources (from the internet, newspapers, magazines, or other print media) which you refer to directly in your paper, underlined or highlighted. Remember, it should not be more than 150 words (whether a direct quote or paraphrase).
  • Thursday, February 7th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read the sample oratory.

    2. Discussion: Discuss and analyze the components of the oratory, referring directly to the sample oratory in the Do Now.

    3. Attention-Getter Composition: Write your attention getter for the introduction and the thesis statement. The attention getter should be an anecdote (story)--either about you, a family member/friend, or our society today. Write your thesis statement, which is the belief statement that you are explaining and supporting throughout your speech. Make sure your attention getter supports the thesis.

    Students will learn the components of an oratory speech by analyzing an exemplary speech. Students will work on writing the introduction of their oratory speech. Due TOMORROW, Friday, February 8th:
  • Read at least 75 pages in your chosen classic novel.
  • Journal Entry #2: Write 250 words or more on the following question--What would you change if you could rewrite your chosen novel? You may need evidence from the novel to support your opinion. You may want to consider the setting (time period and place), characters or relationships between characters, language, particular scenes. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.

    Due Monday, February 11th:

  • First Draft (ungraded; final draft will be graded) of the Oratory Speech--2-3 pages, typed, 12 point font, double spaced, with proper heading (include your name, the course name (Senior English--E8) and period, my name, and the date). Your speech should follow the outline and components of the sample speech found HERE. You must include researched resources (from the internet, newspapers, magazines, or other media) which you refer to directly and underline or highlight in your paper. Remember, it should not be more than 150 words (whether a direct quote or paraphrase).
  • Wednesday, February 6th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read Oratory Description and Outline.

    2. Discussion: Discuss/Review the requirements for the Oratory Speech.

    3. Freewrite on your Oratory topic. Write at least TWO full pages on your topic--either a problem and solution OR the cause you are fighting for and want others to support.

    Students will engage in discussion and analysis of oratory speech requirements. Students will read for information and understanding. Students will freewrite on their chosen topic. Due TOMORROW:
  • If you did not finish the Freewrite (two full pages) on your Oratory topic in class, then you MUST finish it for tomorrow for late credit (late is better than nothing).

    Due Friday, February 8th:

  • Read at least 75 pages in your chosen classic novel.
  • Journal Entry #2: Write 250 words or more on the following question--What would you change if you could rewrite your chosen novel? You may need evidence from the novel to support your opinion. You may want to consider the setting (time period and place), characters or relationships between characters, language, particular scenes. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Tuesday, February 5th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Read an exemplary and informative oratory speech--"Cyberlife". Look for the problem and solution presented in the speech. Remember, informative speeches will explain the problem and offer a solution (your job is to teach!). Why is it exemplary? Find evidence in the speech to support your answers.

    2. Discussion: Discuss/Analyze the exemplary oratory speech in the Do Now.

    3. Read Original Oratory Instructions: Read the Oratory Details and understand what's expected of you in composing and delivering the Oratory Speech.

    4. Share your Oratory Topic: Choose one of these topics--the economy, health care, education, immigration, the environment, medical research, terrorism, foreign relations, military, humanitarianism.

    Students will engage in discussion and analysis of text. Students will read for information and understanding. Due Friday, February 8th:
  • Read at least 75 pages in your chosen classic novel.
  • Journal Entry #2: Write 250 words or more on the following question--What would you change if you could rewrite your chosen novel? You may need evidence from the novel to support your opinion. You may want to consider the setting (time period and place), characters or relationships between characters, language, particular scenes. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Monday, February 4th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Exchange Journal #1 with a classmate and read each other's journal. Find similarities in the goals/dreams of your main characters. Be prepared to share.

    2. Discussion: Share similarities in the goals/dreams of your main characters.

    3. Brainstorm/Review Notes: Review your notes on the President's State of the Union Address and find a topic of interest in his speech. Find a topic that you'd like to research and present to the class--as an Oratory Speech, which is an informative or persuasive speech. An informative speech is designed to explain, instruct, define, clarify, or teach. A persuasive speech influences, convinces, or motivates people to action. Brainstorm your opinions on one topic, such as: the economy, health care, education, immigration, the environment, medical research, terrorism, foreign relations, military, humanitarianism.

    Students will engage in discussion and analysis of text. Students will write informally for information and understanding. Due TOMORROW, Tuesday, February 5th:
  • Choose an Oratory Speech topic (an informative or persuasive speech topic) taken from the President Bush's Final State of the Union Address--January 29th, 2008. Topic suggestions include the following: the economy, health care, education, immigration, the environment, medical research, terrorism, foreign relations, military, humanitarianism. You should also decide if you're going to be informative or persuasive (persuade others to believe the way you do). An informative speech is designed to explain, instruct, define, clarify, or teach. A persuasive speech influences, convinces, or motivates people to action.

    Due Friday, February 8th:

  • Read at least 75 pages in your chosen classic novel.
  • Journal Entry #2: Write 250 words or more on the following question--What would you change if you could rewrite your chosen novel? You may need evidence from the novel to support your opinion. You may want to consider the setting (time period and place), characters or relationships between characters, language, particular scenes. Please include the appropriate heading on every journal, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything. A journal may be handwritten or typed.
  • Friday, February 1st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Finish listening to a reading of President Bush's Final State of the Union Address--January 29th, 2008. Based on his evaluation of the U.S., where do you see our country in the future? Write your predictions for the future of the U.S.

    2. Discussion: With a classmate and then with the whole class, share your predictions based on the President's Final State of the Union Address.

    3. Discussion/Sharing: Introduce and begin HW.

    Students will practice listening skills, analyzing text and making predictions based on the text. Students will listen for information and understanding. Due Monday, February 4th:
  • Find your first classic novel that relates to the course topic of study (see the Senior Syllabus for Spring Semester 2008 for resource links) at the school or local library. Begin reading a minimum of 25 pages. Be able to answer the following questions on Monday: Why did you choose your particular novel? How does it connect to the course topic of dreams, goals and fantasies?
  • Journal Entry #1: Write 250 words or more on the following question--What are the goals/dreams of the main character(s) in your novel? You may need to make predictions based on what you've read so far. You may want to consider the influence of the setting (time period and place), other characters, and government (if this isn't mentioned, make your best guess). Please include the appropriate heading, which must include: your name, the class name (E8), my name (Ms. Conn), and the date. The order is not important, just as long as you include everything.
  • Thursday, January 31st, 2008: 1. Do Now: Listen to a reading of President Bush's Final State of the Union Address--January 29th, 2008. Based on his evaluation of the U.S., where do you see our country in the future? Write your predictions for the future of the U.S.

    2. Discussion: With a classmate and then with the whole class, share your predictions based on the President's Final State of the Union Address.

    3. Discussion/Sharing: Share your initial research for your first classic novel.

    Students will practice listening skills, analyzing text and making predictions based on the text. Students will listen for information and understanding. Due Monday, February 4th:
  • Find your first classic novel that relates to the course topic of study (see the Senior Syllabus for Spring Semester 2008 for resource links) at the school or local library. Begin reading a minimum of 25 pages. Be able to answer the following questions on Monday: Why did you choose your particular novel? How does it connect to the course topic of dreams, goals and fantasies?
  • Wednesday, January 30th, 2008: 1. Do Now: Welcome back! Introduction of Senior Syllabus for Spring Semester 2008.

    2. Discussion of Policies, Procedures and Course Topic: Discussion of personal and societal relevance of the course theme of study--The Future: Dreams, Goals, and Fantasies. Questions to reflect on may include the following: Where do you see yourself after high school graduation? After college graduation? Ten years from now? Where do you see our society/the world around you in five years? In ten years?

    Students will review course syllabus and engage in discussion. Students will read for information and understanding. Due Monday, February 4th:
  • Find your first classic novel that relates to the course topic of study (see the Senior Syllabus for Spring Semester 2008 for resource links) at the school or local library. Begin reading a minimum of 25 pages. Be able to answer the following questions on Monday: Why did you choose your particular novel? How does it connect to the course topic of dreams, goals and fantasies?