Senior Assignments, Spring 2007

Senior Assignments
Spring 2007

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Tuesday, June 12th, 2007: Reflections on high school and share plans for the future.

Share resumes, if students choose.

Students will turn in any work owed. See you at graduation!!!
Monday, June 11th, 2007: Film viewing of Pretty Pink--an 80's film that captures the momentous times in high school, including prom and graduation Students will turn in any work owed.
  • Make up any HW due. The last day for late HW to be turned in is TOMORROW, Tuesday, June 12. Remember, though, that your paper will have -10 points deducted each day late.
  • TOMORROW, you may want to bring in your resume to receive teacher assistance since you're about to enter the "real world."
  • Friday, June 8th, 2007: Film viewing of Pretty Pink--an 80's film that captures the momentous times in high school, including prom and graduation Students will turn in any work owed.
  • Make up any HW due. The last day for late HW to be turned in is Tuesday, June 12. Remember, though, that your paper will have -10 points deducted each day late.
  • On Tuesday, you may want to bring in your resume to receive teacher assistance since you're about to enter the "real world."
  • Wednesday, June 6th, 2007: Film viewing of Pretty Pink--an 80's film that captures the momentous times in high school, including prom and graduation Students will turn in any work owed.
  • Make up any HW due. The last day for late HW to be turned in is Tuesday, June 12. Remember, though, that your paper will have -10 points deducted each day late.
  • Tuesday, June 5th, 2007: Film viewing on profanity--the "Four Letter Film"--analysis of the use of profanity by linguists, celebrities, pop culture and history. Students will turn in any work owed.
  • Make up any HW due. The last day for late HW to be turned in is Tuesday, June 12. Remember, though, that your paper will have -10 points deducted each day late.
  • Monday, June 4th, 2007: Film viewing on profanity--the "Four Letter Film"--analysis of the use of profanity by linguists, celebrities, pop culture and history. Students will turn in any work owed.
  • Make up any HW due. The last day for HW to be turned in is Tuesday, June 12. Remember, though, that your paper will have -10 points deducted each day late.
  • Friday, June 1st, 2007: Turn in any work owed!

    Book Fair!

    Students will turn in any work owed.
  • Make up any HW due. The last day for HW to be turned in is Tuesday, June 12. Remember, though, that your paper will have -10 points deducted each day late.
  • Thursday, May 31st, 2007: Turn in your final paper!

    Reflections:

  • Are you satisfied with your final paper? With all work completed this semester?
  • Do you feel prepared for college? Why/Why not?

    *Tomorrow we will go to a Book Fair. Next week we will be watching movies about graduating high school, prom, college and identity!

  • Students will turn in the final paper. Students will analyze their own writing through oral reflections.
  • Make up any HW due. The last day for HW to be turned in is Tuesday, June 12. Remember, though, that your paper will have -10 points deducted each day late.
  • Wednesday, May 30th, 2007: Work Period: Work on final touches/edits on Paper #3 and meet with teacher to check/edit HW due today. Honors students--take assessment of Novel #4. Students will evaluate their own writing process and move forward in finishing all the assignments, including the major paper, due this week.

    DUE TOMORROW: MOST IMPORTANT: FINAL PAPER DUE TOMORROW, THURS., MAY 31!!!!

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Bring the FINAL PAPER RUBRIC/REQUIREMENTS. Make sure to fulfill ALL requirements!
  • Tuesday, May 29th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: How is your writing process proceeding? What kind of assistance do you need to move the process along in a quicker, easier manner? How can your teacher and classmates assist you?

    2.) Discuss the Do Now.

    3.) Work Period: Work on HW due this week and meet with teacher to check/edit HW due today.

    Students will evaluate their own writing process and move forward in finishing all the assignments, including the major paper, due this week. FINAL HW ASSIGNMENTS (that's all folks!): DUE TODAY, TUESDAY (5/29):
  • Paper #3 Plan: Write a 1-page (typed, proper MLA heading, 250 words-minimum) plan on how you will use your chosen classic novel and two articles (of the 4 given out in class) to support your paper topic. Explain how the sources will all support the topic.
  • Works Cited Page (it should include 3 sources--your novel and two articles). Use this guideline/format to assist you. For the articles, you should use the same book, editor (Ed. Gary Goshgarian), publishing location (NY), publishing company (Longman) and year (1998). Of course, the article title, author, and page #s will be different.

    DUE WEDNESDAY (5/30):

  • Find a feature news article (from a newspaper online or in hard copy) on someone you admire and hope to emulate (follow in their footsteps). Bring in the article.
  • Write a 1-page write-up (typed, proper MLA heading, 250 words-minimum), explaining the qualities this person possesses; how this person brings virtue to society, what they teach others, and/or how they use or affect language positively. Explain how you hope to emulate this person and carve out your own future path.
  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by Wednesday and take the assessment paper.

    DUE THURSDAY (5/31): MOST IMPORTANT: FINAL PAPER DUE THURS., MAY 31!!!!

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Bring the FINAL PAPER RUBRIC/REQUIREMENTS. Make sure to fulfill ALL requirements!
  • Friday, May 25th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: How is the article "Word Police" (provided in class ONLY) supportive of the paper topic--Language is the inventory of human experience? Brainstorm.

    2.) Discussion: How can the article be helpful for your final paper? How can the article connect to your chosen classic novel?

    3.) Introduce HW.

    Students will analyze the article "Word Police" and determine its relevance to the final paper topic. FINAL HW ASSIGNMENTS (that's all folks!): DUE TUESDAY (5/29):
  • Paper #3 Plan: Write a 1-page (typed, proper MLA heading, 250 words-minimum) plan on how you will use your chosen classic novel and two articles (of the 4 given out in class) to support your paper topic. Explain how the sources will all support the topic.
  • Works Cited Page (it should include 3 sources--your novel and two articles). Use this guideline/format to assist you. For the articles, you should use the same book, editor (Ed. Gary Goshgarian), publishing location (NY), publishing company (Longman) and year (1998). Of course, the article title, author, and page #s will be different.

    DUE WEDNESDAY (5/30):

  • Find a feature news article (from a newspaper online or in hard copy) on someone you admire and hope to emulate (follow in their footsteps). Bring in the article.
  • Write a 1-page write-up (typed, proper MLA heading, 250 words-minimum), explaining the qualities this person possesses; how this person brings virtue to society, what they teach others, and/or how they use or affect language positively. Explain how you hope to emulate this person and carve out your own future path.
  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by Wednesday and take the assessment paper.

    DUE THURSDAY (5/31): IMPORTANT: FINAL PAPER DUE THURS., MAY 31!!!!

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Bring the FINAL PAPER RUBRIC/REQUIREMENTS. Make sure to fulfill ALL requirements!
  • Thursday, May 24th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Identify an interesting point, opinion, interpretation or question inspired by the article "Word Police" (provided in class ONLY). Finish/fix the notes taken in the margins of the article.

    2.) Begin to discuss student opinions/perceptions about gender-inclusive language. How can the evidence found in the article be helpful for your final paper? How can the article connect to your chosen classic novel?

    Students will analyze and question text, engaging in conversation with the author (figuratively, not literally).
    MAKE UP HW: THIS WAS DUE TODAY--Topical Consideration Questions for the article handout--"Word Police" AND note-taking in the margins of the article (write extensively and profusely on your opinions, analysis, questions, and interpretations of the article).

    MAKE UP ANY OTHER HW, IF NECESSARY:

  • Finish Novel #3. On Monday, May 21st there was an evaluation sheet to determine if students finished the novel. If you did not already do so, take the assessment, which can be taken for 1/2 credit asap.
  • Reflections & Projections--A Self-Analysis Paper (this was due Thursday, May 17th by midnight). It should be 250 words or more (1 page typed, double-spaced): Write your reflections on Paper #2 and projections for future writing (Paper #3 and college writing). You should examine yourself as a writer, specifically referring to your strengths and weaknesses in Paper #2.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

    IMPORTANT: FINAL PAPER DUE THURS., MAY 31!!!!

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Read and discuss the notes from the Lecture Conversation between Alice Walker, Gloria Steinem and Wilma Mankiller

    2.) Introduction of HW.

    Students will work on textual analysis, personal and worldly connections. Students will also discuss how the evolution of language depicts society and human experience overall.
    DUE TOMORROW: Topical Consideration Questions for the article handout--"Word Police" AND note-taking in the margins of the article (write extensively and profusely on your opinions, analysis, questions, and interpretations of the article).

    MAKE UP ANY HW, IF NECESSARY:

  • Finish Novel #3. On Monday, May 21st there was an evaluation sheet to determine if students finished the novel. If you did not already do so, take the assessment, which can be taken for 1/2 credit asap.
  • Reflections & Projections--A Self-Analysis Paper (this was due Thursday, May 17th by midnight). It should be 250 words or more (1 page typed, double-spaced): Write your reflections on Paper #2 and projections for future writing (Paper #3 and college writing). You should examine yourself as a writer, specifically referring to your strengths and weaknesses in Paper #2.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Tuesday, May 22nd, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Read the article handout--"Word Police."

    2.) Discussion on bias-free language: Is it possible? Does it help reduce offensive behaviors? Share personal and worldly connections.

    Students will work on textual analysis, personal and worldly connections. Students will also discuss how the evolution of language depicts society and human experience overall.
    DUE THURSDAY: Topical Consideration Questions for the article handout--"Word Police"

    MAKE UP ANY HW, IF NECESSARY:

  • Finish Novel #3. On Monday, May 21st there was an evaluation sheet to determine if students finished the novel. If you did not already do so, take the assessment, which can be taken for 1/2 credit asap.
  • Reflections & Projections--A Self-Analysis Paper (this was due Thursday, May 17th by midnight). It should be 250 words or more (1 page typed, double-spaced): Write your reflections on Paper #2 and projections for future writing (Paper #3 and college writing). You should examine yourself as a writer, specifically referring to your strengths and weaknesses in Paper #2.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Monday, May 21st, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Assessment of your chosen novel. This assessment will be given to determine if students finished their novel; it's worth 5% of the 3rd marking period grade. If students were not present, they can take it for 1/2 credit tomorrow.

    2.) Review teacher edits of the HW e-mailed last Thursday evening (the Reflections and Projections).

    Students will work on textual analysis. MAKE UP ANY HW, IF NECESSARY:
  • Read your Novel #3 and take an assessment of your reading. On Monday, May 21st there was an evaluation sheet to determine if students finished the novel. If not present today (Monday, 5/21), then the assessment can be taken for 1/2 credit on the day you return.
  • Reflections & Projections--A Self-Analysis Paper (this was due Thursday, May 17th by midnight). It should be 250 words or more (1 page typed, double-spaced): Write your reflections on Paper #2 and projections for future writing (Paper #3 and college writing). You should examine yourself as a writer, specifically referring to your strengths and weaknesses in Paper #2.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Friday, May 18th, 2007: 1.) Work Period: Work on finishing your novel #3--this is due Monday! Students will work on textual analysis.

  • Read your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by THIS MONDAY`, May 21st (note the date change due to the barbecue on Friday, May 18th). On Monday, May 21st there will be an evaluation sheet to determine if students finished the novel.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Thursday, May 17th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Work on the Reflections & Projections paper (due tonight by midnight) or, if finished, read your chosen classic novel, paying close attention to the language/dialogue of the characters that may be helpful for the final paper. Also, work on the introductory paragraph of the final paper, if not already done.

    2.) Discussion: Discuss the paper due tonight!

    Students will work on rough drafts and consult their peers and teacher to obtain insight.
  • DUE BY TONIGHT AT MIDNIGHT (e-mail it to hconn28@yahoo.com, if necessary):Reflections & Projections--A Self-Analysis Paper--250 word minimum (1 page typed, double-spaced): Write your reflections on Paper #2 and projections for future writing (Paper #3 and college writing). You should examine yourself as a writer, specifically referring to your strengths and weaknesses in Paper #2.

  • Read your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by THIS MONDAY`, May 21st (note the date change due to the barbecue on Friday, May 18th). On Monday, May 21st there will be an evaluation sheet to determine if students finished the novel.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Wednesday, May 16th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Discuss/Analyze knowledge papers, looking at exemplary papers and identifying strengths.

    2.) Discussion: Discuss the qualities of exemplary papers.

    3.) Begin HW.

    Students will examine strengths and weaknesses in their peers' writing by looking at the grading rubric and teacher edits.
  • DUE BY THURSDAY AT MIDNIGHT:Reflections & Projections--A Self-Analysis Paper--250 word minimum (1 page typed, double-spaced): Write your reflections on Paper #2 and projections for future writing (Paper #3 and college writing). You should examine yourself as a writer, specifically referring to your strengths and weaknesses in Paper #2.

  • Read your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by Monday, May 21st (note the date change due to the barbecue on Friday, May 18th). On Monday, May 21st there will be an evaluation sheet to determine if students finished the novel.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Tuesday, May 15th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Discuss/Analyze knowledge papers.

    2.) Discussion: Discuss HW.

    Students will examine strengths and weaknesses in their own writing by looking at the grading rubric and teacher edits.
  • DUE BY THURSDAY AT MIDNIGHT:Reflections & Projections--A Self-Analysis Paper--250 word minimum (1 page typed, double-spaced): Write your reflections on Paper #2 and projections for future writing (Paper #3 and college writing). You should examine yourself as a writer, specifically referring to your strengths and weaknesses in Paper #2.

  • Read your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by Monday, May 21st (note the date change due to the barbecue on Friday, May 18th). On Monday, May 21st there will be an evaluation sheet to determine if students finished the novel.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 page minimum--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Monday, May 14th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Brainstorm the following: Language of the Past, Language of the Present, and Language of the Future. Write whatever comes to mind.

    2.) Discussion: Share the class brainstorming. Discuss the use of slang/profanity in your chosen novel. What does the slang/profanity reveal about the characters? Intelligence, Education, Childhood, Environmental influences (family, friends, location), Time Period.

    Through informal writing, students will examine supporting ideas that are relevant to their final paper.

  • Read your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Friday, May 11th, 2007: 1.) Work Period: Read your chosen classic novel, focusing on slang and profanity used by major and minor characters. Students will analyze text, especially dialogue that reveals character development and overall human experience.

  • Read your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Thursday, May 10th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Q & A with Ms. Conn regarding work owed.

    2.) Workshop/Editing: Review writing assignments, including the intro. paragraph for the thesis "Language is the inventory of human experience", slang story, and Q & A for language articles.

    Students will update work owed and edit writing based on teacher recommendations.
  • Make up any HW owed! All HW must be turned in or e-mailed by 2:00pm TODAY--Thursday, May 10th.

  • Continue reading your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Wednesday, May 9th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Q & A with Ms. Conn regarding work owed.

    2.) Workshop/Editing: Review introductory paragraph writing with classmates and with Ms. Conn. What are the key elements of a strong introductory paragraph of any piece of writing? Look at organization of ideas and attention grabbing writing that leads up to the thesis statement.

    Students will update work owed and edit writing based on teacher recommendations.
  • Make up any HW owed! All HW must be turned in or e-mailed by 2:00pm TOMORROW--Thursday, May 10th.

  • Continue reading your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Tuesday, May 8th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Finish your introductory paragraph with a neighboring classmate. Remember, an introductory paragraph that ends with your paper topic statement (aka thesis statement): Language is the inventory of human experience. [Hint: Brainstorm ideas explored in class using the topics of slang and profanity from the articles and your chosen novel. Remember, begin with an attention-grabbing intro. This assignment is the first step in writing your paper; of course, your intro. paragraph will likely change as you write the final draft of your paper.] Identify strengths and suggestions for improvement.

    2.) Workshop/Editing: Review introductory paragraph writing with classmates and with Ms. Conn. What are the key elements of a strong introductory paragraph of any piece of writing? Look at organization of ideas and attention grabbing writing that leads up to the thesis statement.

    Students will begin the pre-writing process and recognize the importance of the introductory paragraph in different genres of writing.
  • Make up any HW owed! All HW must be turned in or e-mailed by 2:00pm on Thursday, May 10th.

  • Continue reading your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Monday, May 7th, 2007: 1.) Do Now: Share your introductory paragraph with a neighboring classmate. Remember, an introductory paragraph that ends with your paper topic statement (aka thesis statement): Language is the inventory of human experience. [Hint: Brainstorm ideas explored in class using the topics of slang and profanity from the articles and your chosen novel. Remember, begin with an attention-grabbing intro. This assignment is the first step in writing your paper; of course, your intro. paragraph will likely change as you write the final draft of your paper.] Identify strengths and suggestions for improvement. If this HW is not complete, finish it now.

    3.) Discussion: What are the key elements of a strong introductory paragraph of any piece of writing? What are the similarities between an introduction in a novel and a formal piece of analytical writing (for an English class, for example)? What are the differences?

    Students will begin the pre-writing process and recognize the importance of the introductory paragraph in different genres of writing.

  • Continue reading your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Friday, May 4th, 2007: 1.) Discuss the following questions:
  • What does slang contribute to the story? Identify its function and use in the story.
  • How would a parent react to reading the story filled with slang? What about a grandparent's reaction? How would a peer react to reading the story filled with slang? Compare and contrast their reactions.

    2.) Share/Discuss your reactions about the creative writing activity of an over-indulgence of slang in writing. Share impressions.

    3.) Introduce HW and brainstorm/reflect on the purpose of slang and profanity.

  • Students will analyze the power of slang and profanity through textual, personal and worldly connections. DUE MONDAY:
  • Write an introductory paragraph that ends with your paper topic statement (aka thesis statement): Language is the inventory of human experience. [Hint: Brainstorm ideas explored in class using the topics of slang and profanity from the articles and your chosen novel. Remember, begin with an attention-grabbing intro. This assignment is the first step in writing your paper; of course, your intro. paragraph will likely change as you write the final draft of your paper.]

  • Continue reading your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Thursday, May 3rd, 2007: 1.) Exchange your 250-word creative story with a classmate. Read your classmate's story, and answer the following questions:
  • What does slang contribute to the story? Identify its function and use in the story.
  • How would a parent react to reading the story filled with slang? What about a grandparent's reaction? How would a peer react to reading the story filled with slang? Compare and contrast their reactions.

    2.) Share/Discuss your reactions about the creative writing activity of an over-indulgence of slang in writing. Share impressions.

  • Students will analyze text and translate standard English into modern slang. Students will determine importance and monitor their understanding of text.

  • Continue reading your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Wednesday, May 2nd, 2007: 1.) Write a 250-word creative story on one of the following topics: My Past, My Present, My Future. Include at least 20 slang words (underline!). You may want to use this resource to assist you: Urban Dictionary of Slang. Be prepared to share.

    2.) Identify at least two characters in Novel #3 who use slang or profanity/dehumanizing language. Find examples of their language in the text of your chosen novel. Be prepared to share.

    Students will analyze text and translate standard English into modern slang. Students will determine importance and monitor their understanding of text. DUE TOMORROW:
  • Finish the claswork: your 250-word creative story of slang!
  • Identify two characters in your novel and examples of their slang or profanity. What do the slang or profanity reveal about these characters and their personal experiences?

  • Continue reading your Novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Tuesday, May 1st, 2007: 1.) Answer the following and prepare to discuss: How did historical and societal influences affect commonly used profanity? Any shocking or interesting findings? Refer to your research on the origin and evolution of profanity found on www.etymonline.com (the HW due yesterday).

    2.) Discuss "It Ain't No Big Thing" Q & A (HW). Discuss the significance of slang, specifically the reasons for slang showing exclusivity to different generations (separating generations by their exclusive understanding of language, such as today's Instant Message language) and simplicity for reasons of laziness in word usage (such as lyin' instead of lying).

    Students will explore their own research on the origin, evolution and use of profanity and slang throughout history and today.

  • Continue reading your classic novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and/or slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit only)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Monday, April 30th, 2007: 1.) Begin reading the 3rd article on language, "It Ain't a Big Thing" (hand-out version only).

    2.) Share personal thoughts on the origin and evolution of profanity researched on www.etymonline.com (the HW due today).

    Students will explore their own research on the origin, evolution and use of profanity and slang throughout history and today.
  • DUE TOMORROW: Read the hand-out article "It Ain't a Big Thing" and answer the following questions: Topical Considerations #1 and 6, Rhetorical Considerations #1 and 3.

  • Continue reading your classic novel #3--be prepared to finish by May 18th, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing, sexually charged and/or slang/dialect language.

  • Novel #3--finish by May 18th. Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit)--finish by May 30th.

  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--Language is the inventory of human experience--L.W. Lockhart. Your paper should use your novel, at least two articles (hand-outs), and personal/worldly references to support the topic. The paper topic should be part of the thesis in your introductory paragraph.
  • Friday, April 27th, 2007: Work Period: Work on the HW (due Monday). Read your classic novel, focusing on the power of language and perceptions of characters based on their use of language. Students will explore their own perceptions about people who use dehumanizing/degrading language through discussion and analysis of text.
  • DUE MONDAY: Go to Online Etymology and search for five commonly used "dirty words." Answer the following questions: When were these words first used? Did they originally mean the same things they mean now or have meanings changed? If meanings have changed, what connections do you see between old meanings and those that we understand the words to mean today? How do you feel about the origins of each word?
  • Continue reading your classic novel #3--at least 25 pages, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing and sexually charged language.
  • Novel #3--finish by May 18th. Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit)--finish by May 30th.
  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--TBA.
  • Thursday, April 26th, 2007: 1.) Discuss the following questions in connection with the article, "What Dirty Words Really Mean" by Dr. Joyce Brothers (in handout version only):
  • What are your perceptions of people who swear sometimes? Frequently? Never?
  • Do "sophisticated people" use profane language?

    2.) Discuss/Share your perceptions and connections to the article.

  • Students will explore their own perceptions about people who use dehumanizing/degrading language through discussion and analysis of text.
  • DUE MONDAY: Go to Online Etymology and search for five commonly used "dirty words." Answer the following questions: When were these words first used? Did they originally mean the same things they mean now or have meanings changed? If meanings have changed, what connections do you see between old meanings and those that we understand the words to mean today? How do you feel about the origins of each word?
  • Continue reading your classic novel #3--at least 25 pages, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing and sexually charged language.
  • Novel #3--finish by May 18th. Novel #4 (for E8 Honors credit)--finish by May 30th.
  • Paper #3 (7-10 pages--E8; 10 pages--E8 Honors)--Due Thursday, May 31st. Paper Topic--TBA.
  • Wednesday, April 25th, 2007: 1.) Discuss the article, "What Dirty Words Really Mean" by Dr. Joyce Brothers (in handout version only). Make references to the text when answering the following:
  • Why do people use profanity?
  • Why is there such an abundance of sexual profanity?
  • Why is profanity considered a stress-reliever and freedom from restraint?
  • What's an antagonist's purpose of using profanity when applied to a race, religion, or culture? How do victims of the obscene language reclaim their power?

    2.) Discuss/Share findings.

  • Students will examine the abundance of profanity in today's society by analyzing a text's assertion that profanity's existence has multiple purposes.
  • Continue reading your classic novel--at least 25 pages, focusing on the power of language, especially dehumanizing and sexually charged language.
  • Tuesday, April 24th, 2007: 1.) Identify (by circling key words and writing in the margin) the words/phrases in which the following questions are answered in the article, "What Dirty Words Really Mean" by Dr. Joyce Brothers (in handout version only):
  • Why do people use profanity?
  • Why is there such an abundance of sexual profanity?
  • Why is profanity considered a stress-reliever and freedom from restraint?
  • What's an antagonist's purpose of using profanity when applied to a race, religion, or culture? How do victims of the obscene language reclaim their power?

    2.) Discuss/Share findings.

    3.) Review "Topical Considerations" Questions and provide opinions, personal and worldly connections.

  • Students will examine the abundance of profanity in today's society by analyzing a text's assertion that profanity's existence has multiple purposes.
  • Continue reading your classic novel--at least 25 pages.
  • Monday, April 23rd, 2007: 1.) Read article "What Dirty Words Really Mean" by Dr. Joyce Brothers (in handout version only) and identify specific words/phrases that support the title and may be offered as discussion points. Write notes in the margin as well, providing your opinions, personal and worldly connections.

    2.) Begin the "Topical Consideration" Questions HW.

    Students will begin reading and analysis of the power of profane language in modern times. DUE TOMORROW:
  • "Topical Consideration" Questions for the article (handout only--given today in class) "What Dirty Words Really Mean" by Dr. Joyce Brothers
  • Begin reading your classic novel.
  • Friday, April 20th, 2007: Prolific Profanity: Keep it, Ignore it, or Change it

    Final Thoughts on the article (handout only) Mind Your Tongue, Young Man by Sandra Flahive Maurer.

    Students will engage in critical analysis of the prevalence of profanity by reading and answering questions (through written and verbal expression) on a Newsweek article. DUE MONDAY:
  • Begin reading your classic novel over the weekend.
  • E8 Honors: Bring in your 4th classic novel (you should have already shown your 3rd novel on Friday).
  • Thursday, April 19th, 2007: Prolific Profanity: Keep it, Ignore it, or Change it

    1.) Finish discussing the article (handout only) Mind Your Tongue, Young Man by Sandra Flahive Maurer.

    2.) Finish Discussion Questions: Should something be done to minimize or eradicate profanity from popular culture? If so, how? Is it possible? What can young people like you do to help pave the way for change, in terms of curbing profanity?

    3.) Discuss the "Topical Considerations" questions.

    Students will engage in critical analysis of the prevalence of profanity by reading and answering questions (through written and verbal expression) on a Newsweek article.
  • DUE TOMORROW: Bring in your new chosen classic novel to read for this class. You MUST obtain teacher approval prior to reading. For E8, this will be your last novel for the year. For E8 Honors, you will need to read this novel and one more novel as well. Consult friends/classmates for novel recommendations and use the following resources: Ms. Conn's Recommendations, 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, Advanced Placement Recommended Reading, and 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die.
  • Wednesday, April 18th, 2007: Prolific Profanity: Keep it, Ignore it, or Change it

    1.) Read article (handout only) Mind Your Tongue, Young Man by Sandra Flahive Maurer.

    2.) Discussion Questions: Should something be done to minimize or eradicate profanity from popular culture? If so, how? Is it possible? What can young people like you do to help pave the way for change, in terms of curbing profanity?

    3.) Begin answering the "Topical Considerations" questions.

    Students will engage in critical analysis of the prevalence of profanity by reading and answering questions (through written and verbal expression) on a Newsweek article.
  • DUE TOMORROW: Answer the "Topical Considerations" questions (these questions can only be found on today's article--in handout form only).
  • DUE FRIDAY: Bring in your new chosen classic novel to read for this class. You MUST obtain teacher approval prior to reading. For E8, this will be your last novel for the year. For E8 Honors, you will need to read this novel and one more novel as well. Consult friends/classmates for novel recommendations and use the following resources: Ms. Conn's Recommendations, 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, Advanced Placement Recommended Reading, and 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die.
  • Tuesday, April 17th, 2007: Reflections on the Past, Changing the Future
    Finish discussion on the following questions:
  • Why had Don Imus been allowed to air his opinions on the radio for so long?
  • Why had Imus been so popular, supported by so many corporations (including CBS, MSNBC, Staples, etc.), and listened to by average citizens and supposedly reputable politicians?
  • Will the Imus scandal be an impetus for change in the ways society/media use and abuse racist and sexist language? If yes, how? If not, what can be an impetus for change?
  • Is the firing of Imus reflective of our changing society, a society that is less racist and sexist than ever before?
  • Is it OK to be an "equal opportunity abuser"--as Imus claims for himself?
  • Is Imus a racist, even though he helps the poor, sick, terminally ill, many of whom are minorities? How can we reconcile these two sides of his personality?
  • What can young people like you do to help pave the way for change, in terms of the media exploitation and endorsement of racist and sexist language?
  • Students will engage in critical analysis of last week's media firing of Don Imus by reading and answering questions (through written and verbal expression) on a Newsweek article concerning race, power and the media.
  • MAKE-UP WORK: Make up any work owed, including paper #2.
  • DUE FRIDAY: Bring in your new chosen classic novel to read for this class. You MUST obtain teacher approval prior to reading. For E8, this will be your last novel for the year. For E8 Honors, you will need to read this novel and one more novel as well. Consult friends/classmates for novel recommendations and use the following resources: Ms. Conn's Recommendations, 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, Advanced Placement Recommended Reading, and 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die.
  • Monday, April 16th, 2007: Reflections on the Past, Changing the Future
    1.) Do Now: Read and discuss the Newsweek article, "The Power That Was" on the Don Imus story concerning race, power and the media.
  • Why had Don Imus been allowed to air his bigoted opinions on the radio for so long?
  • Why had Imus been so popular, supported by so many corporations (including CBS, MSNBC, Staples, etc.), and listened to by average citizens and supposedly reputable politicians?
  • Will the Imus scandal be an impetus for change in the ways society/media use and abuse racist and sexist language? If yes, how? If not, what can be an impetus for change?
  • Is the firing of Imus reflective of our changing society, a society that is less racist and sexist than ever before?
  • Is it OK to be an "equal opportunity abuser"--as Imus claims for himself?
  • Is Imus a racist, even though he helps the poor, sick, terminally ill, many of whom are minorities? How can we reconcile these two sides of his personality?
  • What can young people like you do to help pave the way for change, in terms of the media exploitation and endorsement of racist and sexist language?
  • Students will engage in critical analysis of last week's media scandal by reading and answering questions (through written and verbal expression) on a Newsweek article concerning race, power and the media.
  • DUE TOMORROW: Finish today's Q & A--the answers to the questions listed in today's classwork.
  • DUE FRIDAY: Bring in your new chosen classic novel to read for this class. You MUST obtain teacher approval prior to reading. For E8, this will be your last novel for the year. For E8 Honors, you will need to read this novel and one more novel as well. Consult friends/classmates for novel recommendations and use the following resources: Ms. Conn's Recommendations, 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, Advanced Placement Recommended Reading, and 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die.
  • Friday, April 13th, 2007: ***Turn in Paper #2--Knowledge exists to be imparted.

    Peer review and teacher-student Q & A.

    Students will engage in self-evaluation and questioning to ensure complete, accurate papers are submitted. *Finish reading your classic novel.

    *Paper #2 was due TODAY--Friday, April 13th (REMEMBER--for each day late, 10 points will be deducted from your paper, which is worth 50% of 2nd marking period).

    Thursday, April 12th, 2007: Continue with Analysis and Pre-writing steps for the Paper #2 topic--Knowledge exists to be imparted--Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), essayist, poet, intellectual.
  • What kind of person is deemed "knowledgeable" by American society today? Is this knowledgeable person or group of persons treated with respect in American society today? Why/Why not?
  • Would a knowledgeable person be different in your parents' generation than in your generation? How do YOU define a "knowledgeable person"?
  • Reflecting on your high school years, what knowledge have you acquired in the classroom or outside of the classroom? What knowledge have you acquired shows evidence that you will soon be a high school graduate? What knowledge should all high school graduates acquire to be worthy of the degree?
  • Looking to your future, what knowledge do you hope to attain in your post-high school years (college, job, etc.)?
  • Do you have knowledge that you feel can be imparted? If so, what is this knowledge?
  • Is your knowledge similar or different to the knowledge possessed by characters in your chosen novel? Explain those similarities and/or differences.

    *These questions and answers should help your thinking and writing for Paper #2, which is due TOMORROW.

  • Students will engage in metacognitive thinking and informal writing to assist in the preparation of their upcoming major paper. *Finish reading your classic novel.

    *Paper #2 is due TOMORROW--Friday, April 13th (REMEMBER--for each day late, 10 points will be deducted from your paper, which is worth 50% of 2nd marking period). For Paper #2, use the ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and argue this statement in your paper, using your chosen classic novel as evidence (you may also use Socrates from Great Dialogues of Plato to assist you): Knowledge exists to be imparted--Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), essayist, poet, intellectual.

  • You should identify characters in your chosen novel that act as teachers and learners.
  • Be sure to identify the knowledge which is being imparted (given out).
  • You may also use personal and real world connections to support your paper, but you should focus on evidence from your chosen classic novel.
  • Paper length: 5-7 pp. for E8 and 7-9 pp. for E8H.
  • You must cite page numbers along with your references. Example: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55).
  • Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply.
  • All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced.
  • Appropriate heading should follow the essay requirements link, and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date.
  • Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.

    *Everyone is offered the opportunity to do honors work, though it must be earned by completing the quantity and quality of Honors caliber (honors distinction will be shown at the end of the semester).

  • Wednesday, April 11th, 2007--Welcome Back!: 1.) Finish any remaining Teacher Presentations--due to lack of time on Friday before vacation.

    2.) Examination/Analysis of the Paper #2 topic--Knowledge exists to be imparted--Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), essayist, poet, intellectual.

  • What is Knowledge? Define it. Is all information learned considered knowledge? Can knowledge exist on its own, without being shared?
  • What kind of person is deemed "knowledgeable" by American society today? Would a knowledgeable person be different in your parents' generation than in your generation? How do YOU define a "knowledgeable person"?
    *These questions should help your thinking and writing for Paper #2.
  • Students will engage in oral presentations and evaluations of their classmates' presentations. *Finish reading your classic novel.

    *Paper #2 is due THIS Friday, April 13th. For Paper #2, use the ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and argue this statement in your paper, using your chosen classic novel as evidence (you may also use Socrates from Great Dialogues of Plato to assist you): Knowledge exists to be imparted--Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), essayist, poet, intellectual.

  • You should identify characters in your chosen novel that act as teachers and learners.
  • Be sure to identify the knowledge which is being imparted (given out).
  • You may also use personal and real world connections to support your paper, but you should focus on evidence from your chosen classic novel.
  • Paper length: 5-7 pp. for E8 and 7-9 pp. for E8H.
  • You must cite page numbers along with your references. Example: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55).
  • Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply.
  • All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced.
  • Appropriate heading should follow the essay requirements link, and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date.
  • Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.

    *Everyone is offered the opportunity to do honors work, though it must be earned by completing the quantity and quality of Honors caliber (honors distinction will be shown at the end of the semester).

  • Friday, March 30th, 2007: 1.) Introduction of Paper #2

    2.) Teacher Presentations continue and finish today!

    Students will engage in oral presentations and evaluations of their classmates' presentations. *Finish reading your classic novel.

    *Paper #2 is due two weeks from today--Friday, April 13th. For Paper #2, use the ESSAY REQUIREMENTS and argue this statement in your paper, using your chosen classic novel as evidence (you may also use Socrates from Great Dialogues of Plato to assist you): Knowledge exists to be imparted--Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), essayist, poet, intellectual.

  • You should identify characters in your chosen novel that act as teachers and learners.
  • Be sure to identify the knowledge which is being imparted (given out).
  • You may also use personal and real world connections to support your paper, but you should focus on evidence from your chosen classic novel.
  • Paper length: 5-7 pp. for E8 and 7-9 pp. for E8H.
  • You must cite page numbers along with your references. Example: According to Winston, "Big Brother is watching me at every corner" (Orwell, 55).
  • Be sure to use proper sentence structure, spelling, capitalization, and conventions of standard written English. This is formal writing. E-mail or instant message language should not apply.
  • All papers should be type-written, using 12-point font, and be double spaced.
  • Appropriate heading should follow the essay requirements link, and should always include your name, the teacher's name, the class and period, and date.
  • Your paper should be well-organized and well-written. Your opinion and analysis are essential, so support your ideas with specific evidence from your chosen novel.

    *Everyone is offered the opportunity to do honors work, though it must be earned by completing the quantity and quality of Honors caliber (honors distinction will be shown at the end of the semester).

  • Thursday, March 29th, 2007: Teacher Presentations continue! Students will engage in oral presentations and evaluations of their classmates' presentations.
  • Continue to read your classic novel.
  • The Perfect Lesson Assignment presentations will finish tomorrow!
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due in recent days. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Stay tuned for Paper #2 details.
  • Wednesday, March 28th, 2007: Teacher Presentations continue! Students will engage in oral presentations and evaluations of their classmates' presentations.
  • Continue to read your classic novel--you should have read at least 50 pages at this point.
  • Prepare the Perfect Lesson Assignment.
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due in recent days. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Tuesday, March 27th, 2007: Teacher Presentations begin! Students will engage in oral presentations and evaluations of their classmates' presentations.
  • Continue to read your classic novel--you should have read at least 50 pages at this point.
  • Prepare the Perfect Lesson Assignment--due today, tomorrow and likely will finish on Thursday.
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due in recent days. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Monday, March 26th, 2007: 1.) Introduction of Perfect Lesson Grading Sheet

    2.) Teacher Presentations begin!

    3.) Work Period: Preparation for Perfect Lesson.

    Students will engage in informal writing and early preparation for Perfect Lesson Presentation by using the following resources: philosophy of teaching and learning, their chosen novel, and independent research.
  • Continue to read your classic novel--you should have read at least 50 pages at this point.
  • Prepare the Perfect Lesson Assignment--due today, Tuesday, or Wednesday (depending on your sign-up day; if you were NOT here to sign up, you should assume you present today or tomorrow or Wednesday for late credit).
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due in recent days. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Friday, March 23rd, 2007: 1.) Q & A and Review of Perfect Lesson Assignment

    2.) Work Period: Brainstorming and early preparation for Perfect Lesson.

    Students will engage in informal writing and early preparation for Perfect Lesson Presentation by using the following resources: philosophy of teaching and learning, their chosen novel, and independent research.
  • Continue to read your classic novel--you should have read at least 50 pages at this point.
  • Prepare the Perfect Lesson Assignment--due Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday (depending on your sign-up day; if you were NOT here to sign up, you should assume you will present on Monday).
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due in recent days. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Thursday, March 22nd, 2007: 1.) Introduce Perfect Lesson Assignment: Teacher introduction/explanation of Perfect Lesson Assignment

    2.) Sign up: Each student signs up for Perfect Lesson Teaching Day.

    3.) Work Period: Begin brainstorming and early preparation for Perfect Lesson.

    Students will engage in informal writing and early preparation for Perfect Lesson Presentation by using the following resources: philosophy of teaching and learning, their chosen novel, and independent research.
  • Continue to read your classic novel--you should have read at least 50 pages at this point.
  • Begin preparing for the Perfect Lesson Assignment--due Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday next week (depending on your sign-up day; if you were NOT here to sign up, you should assume you will present on Monday).
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due in recent days. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Wednesday, March 21st, 2007: 1.) Brainstorming: Identify the components of an ideal/perfect class lesson. How does the teacher begin? How do the students act? What does the teacher do to engage the class in the ideal/perfect lesson? Use your philosophy of good teaching and learning to guide you in this brainstorming.

    2.) Share your components of a perfect class lesson. How did your philosophy guide this brainstorming of the perfect class lesson? How did your years of learning from teachers guide you?

    3.) Continue the Q & A on Family History of Teaching and Learning: What do you know about your parents' and grandparents' experiences as students? How are their experiences similar and different to your experiences as students? What do you know about their learning environments? What do you know about their teachers and classroom/school settings?

    Students will engage in analysis of their philosophies and classmates' philosophies for information and understanding.
  • Continue to read your classic novel--you should have read at least 50 pages at this point.
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due in recent days. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Tuesday, March 20th, 2007: 1.) Finish Discussion/Sharing of students' philosophy papers. Suggested questions: What did you learn about yourself and your ideas as you constructed these philosophies? Was anything new revealed about yourself and your opinions as you wrote your philosophy? Do you fit your profile of a good learner? How do you know teaching is "good"? How do you know learning is "good"?

    2.) Q & A on Family History of Teaching and Learning: What do you know about your parents' and grandparents' experiences as students? How are their experiences similar and different to your experiences as students? What do you know about their learning environments? What do you know about their teachers and classroom/school settings?

    Students will engage in analysis of their philosophies and classmates' philosophies for information and understanding.
  • Continue to read your classic novel--you should have read at least 50 pages at this point.
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due in recent days. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Monday, March 19th, 2007: 1.) Read a classmate's philosophy of teaching and learning (the HW due today!) and find at least one similarity in good teaching and one similarity in good learning. Write it down and be prepared to share.

    2.) Discussion/Sharing of students' philosophy papers. Suggested questions: What did you learn about yourself and your ideas as you constructed these philosophies? Was anything new revealed about yourself and your opinions as you wrote your philosophy? Do you fit your profile of a good learner? How do you know teaching is "good"?

    *Tomorrow we will share characters in your chosen novels that fit the profiles of teachers and learners.

    Students will engage in analysis of their philosophies and classmates' philosophies for information and understanding.
  • Continue to read your classic novel--you should have read at least 50 pages at this point.
  • Make up any HW necessary, especially assignments that were due today. Remember, late HW equals 1/2 credit and HW is 50% of your grade.
  • Friday, March 16th, 2007: 1.) Identify flaws in the Socrates-Boy Dialogue, as well as in your own self-created dialogues (which imitate the Socrates-Boy style). What is the Boy's participation (or role) in the dialogue? In general, what are all of the Boy's responses--affirmative or dissenting? How are the Boy's responses typical and expected based on his role as a slave? What could make the Boy a better student? What are Socrates' weaknesses as a teacher? What could make Socrates a better teacher? Can the Socratic method of teaching and learning stand alone or should it be augmented by another model? What does the Socrates-Boy Dialogue suggest about learning? Answer=Socrates means the Slave Boy episode to suggest that learning cannot occur except by means of some kind of prior understanding of what is to be learned. Answers to above questions can be found HERE under the subtitle The Point: Dialectic as Sophistic Practice and A Link to Teacher Education and American Schools. Further reflective question: First, if teachers are to be Socrates to their students, won't it be the case that they have no subject matter to teach them and that it is at least deeply problematic to accept their money (at the college level)?

    2.) Discuss these analytical questions and answers on the Socrates-Boy Dialogue, which examine the roles of teaching and learning.

    3.) Introduction of HW.

    Students will engage in analysis of text for information and understanding. DUE MONDAY:
  • Write one FULL page (typed, single-spaced, 10-12 point font, one inch margins, with MLA heading--see MLA formatting) on YOUR philosophy of teaching and learning. Be sure to explain your opinion of good teaching (by defining a good teacher's role) and your definition of good learning (by defining a student's role).
  • Read your classic novel and identify at least one character who can fit the role of a teacher (be able to explain your reasoning) and one character who can fit the role of a student (be able to explain your reasoning). Be prepared to share your findings on Monday.
  • Thursday, March 15th, 2007: 1.) Finish presenting student-created dialogues (which imitate the Socrates-Boy Dialogue). How are these dialogues imitating the Socrates-Boy Dialogue? Are the students acquiring knowledge at the end of each dialogue? Are the teachers using effective questioning strategies that emulate the Socrates questions? Students will engage in analysis and oral presentation for information and understanding.
  • You should be almost 50 pages into your second classic novel. MAKE UP ANY OF THE FOLLOWING HW (assignments which were due today):
  • Find an unknown topic referenced in your second novel (examples: World War I, Russian Revolution, witch trials) and research this topic online. Find two reliable websites to learn about this topic. WRITE 300 WORDS (ABOUT 1 PAGE TYPED) ON YOUR RESEARCHED TOPIC (include the two websites used), EXPLAINING WHAT YOU LEARNED AND HOW THIS TOPIC APPEARS IN YOUR NOVEL. You may also want to explain how this new knowledge will help you better understand your novel.

  • Read your classic novel.
  • Wednesday, March 14th, 2007: 1.) Continue presenting student-created dialogues (which imitate the Socrates-Boy Dialogue). How are these dialogues imitating the Socrates-Boy Dialogue? Are the students acquiring knowledge at the end of each dialogue? Are the teachers using effective questioning strategies that emulate the Socrates questions? Students will engage in analysis and oral presentation for information and understanding.
  • You should be almost 50 pages into your second classic novel. MAKE UP ANY OF THE FOLLOWING HW (assignments which were due today):
  • Find an unknown topic referenced in your second novel (examples: World War I, Russian Revolution, witch trials) and research this topic online. Find two reliable websites to learn about this topic. WRITE 300 WORDS (ABOUT 1 PAGE TYPED) ON YOUR RESEARCHED TOPIC (include the two websites used), EXPLAINING WHAT YOU LEARNED AND HOW THIS TOPIC APPEARS IN YOUR NOVEL. You may also want to explain how this new knowledge will help you better understand your novel.

  • Read your classic novel.
  • Tuesday, March 13th, 2007: 1.) Read-alouds of student-created dialogues (which imitate the Socrates-Boy Dialogue). How are these dialogues imitating the Socrates-Boy Dialogue? Are the students acquiring knowledge at the end of each dialogue? Are the teachers using effective questioning strategies that emulate the Socrates questions?

    2.) Grade distribution and review of virtue paper grades.

    Students will engage in discussion and oral presentation for information and understanding.
  • You should be almost 50 pages into your second classic novel. MAKE UP ANY OF THE FOLLOWING HW (assignments which were due today):
  • Finish your two-page teacher-student dialogue (see classwork section for all details).
  • Find an unknown topic referenced in your second novel (examples: World War I, Russian Revolution, witch trials) and research this topic online. Find two reliable websites to learn about this topic. WRITE 300 WORDS (ABOUT 1 PAGE TYPED) ON YOUR RESEARCHED TOPIC (include the two websites used), EXPLAINING WHAT YOU LEARNED AND HOW THIS TOPIC APPEARS IN YOUR NOVEL. You may also want to explain how this new knowledge will help you better understand your novel.
  • Monday, March 12th, 2007: 1.) Read-aloud of Socrates-Boy Dialogue (pp. 42-50).

    2.) Discussion Questions answered and discussed: What makes Socrates a good teacher? What questioning strategies does he employ to reveal his teaching skills? What learning strategies does the Boy employ when he responds to Socrates? Do you feel the Boy has knowledge of geometry at the culmination of Socrates' questioning? Why/Why not?

    3.) If time allows, begin read-alouds of student-created dialogues (which imitate the Socrates-Boy Dialogue).

    Students will engage in discussion and oral presentation for information and understanding. DUE TOMORROW:
  • Read at least 20-25 pages in your second classic novel MAKE UP ANY OF THE FOLLOWING HW (assignments which were due today):
  • Finish your two-page teacher-student dialogue (see classwork section for all details).
  • Find an unknown topic referenced in your second novel (examples: World War I, Russian Revolution, witch trials) and research this topic online. Find two reliable websites to learn about this topic. WRITE 300 WORDS (ABOUT 1 PAGE TYPED) ON YOUR RESEARCHED TOPIC (include the two websites used), EXPLAINING WHAT YOU LEARNED AND HOW THIS TOPIC APPEARS IN YOUR NOVEL. You may also want to explain how this new knowledge will help you better understand your novel.
  • Friday, March 9th, 2007: Finish writing a mini-dialogue (2 full pages in length) in which a teacher (you) and a student (anyone of your choice) engage in a learning session on a topic of your choice. The student has no knowledge of this topic (examples: soccer, film, dancing, basketball) and you as the teacher must help teach the student by providing leading questions. Leading questions are meant to extract knowledge that is actually already there in the student's mind, but he is not aware of this unless a teacher helps him recognize it. Look at leading question starters in the Socrates-Meno Dialogue. Students will engage in writing for information and understanding. DUE MONDAY:
  • Read at least 20-25 pages in your second classic novel
  • Finish your two-page teacher-student dialogue (see classwork section for all details).
  • Find an unknown topic referenced in your second novel (examples: World War I, Russian Revolution, witch trials) and research this topic online. Find two reliable websites to learn about this topic. WRITE 300 WORDS (ABOUT 1 PAGE TYPED) ON YOUR RESEARCHED TOPIC (include the two websites used), EXPLAINING WHAT YOU LEARNED AND HOW THIS TOPIC APPEARS IN YOUR NOVEL. You may also want to explain how this new knowledge will help you better understand your novel.
  • Thursday, March 8th, 2007: 1.) Take notes and introduction on the following:
  • The Theory of Recollection: What appears to be learning something new is really recollecting something already known. Plato�� theory is that we already have within our souls the answers to such questions. Thus, arriving at the answers is a matter of retrieving them from within. We recognize them as correct when we confront them (The "Aha!"). Plato certainly thinks he has proved that something is innate, that something can be known a priori. But what? There seem to be three possibilities, in order of decreasing strength: Propositions: They are literally in the soul, unnoticed, and waiting to be retrieved. According to the theory of ��ecollection,��propositions that can be known a priori are literally innate.
    Concepts: such as equality, difference, odd, even, etc. We are born with these - we do not acquire them from experience. We make use of these when we confront and organize our raw experiences. According to the theory of ��ecollection,��there are a priori concepts that we have prior to experience.
    Abilities: such as that of reasoning. We are born with the innate ability to derive the logical consequences of our beliefs. We may form our beliefs empirically, but we do not gain our ability to reason empirically. According to the theory of ��ecollection,��there is no innate knowledge and there are no a priori concepts.
    Essentially, the theory of Recollection is when you can recognize an instance of X when you don't know what X is. In the following sense: you already know implicitly (intuitively) what X is, at least well enough to recognize instances of it. What you lack is an explicit (articulated, formulated) account of what X is.
    *Notes above taken from the Philosophy 320 course at University of Washington.

    2.) Begin writing a mini-dialogue (2 full pages in length) in which a teacher (you) and a student (anyone of your choice) engage in a learning session on a topic of your choice. The student has no knowledge of this topic (examples: soccer, film, dancing, basketball) and you as the teacher must help teach the student by providing leading questions. Leading questions are meant to extract knowledge that is actually already there in the student's mind, but he is not aware of this unless a teacher helps him recognize it. Look at leading question starters at the Socrates-Meno Dialogue.

  • Students will engage in textual analysis. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • DUE TOMORROW: Bring in your second classic novel (if possible) OR the title and author. Be sure to provide a write-up as to why you chose this classic novel to read. Use the following resources: Ms. Conn's Recommendations, 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, Advanced Placement Recommended Reading, and 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die.
  • Wednesday, March 7th, 2007: 1.) Finish the sharing of chapters from your novels. Be sure to give a context to the chapter (background set-up) and provide a clear explanation as to why your chosen chapter can be isolated as a stand-alone chapter. If you hear about a novel that piques your interest, write down the title and author and look into reading it for your classic novel #2.

    Students will engage in textual analysis. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • DUE FRIDAY: Bring in your second classic novel (if possible) OR the title and author. Be sure to provide a write-up as to why you chose this classic novel to read. Use the following resources: Ms. Conn's Recommendations, 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, Advanced Placement Recommended Reading, and 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die.
  • Tuesday, March 6th, 2007: 1.) Choose your meaningful passage from the chapter you chose from your novel. Be prepared to set up the passage, read it to your classmates, and explain why you chose it.

    2.) With a group of your choice, give a 3-sentence context (set up) and then read your passage. If you hear a novel that sounds interesting, write down the title and author. Determine the best passage/novel from your group to share with class.

    3.) Passage and novel sharing with your classmates.

    Students will engage in textual analysis. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • DUE TOMORROW: Bring in yesterday's HW and your classic novel, which is a brief written explanation (about one paragraph long) on which chapter(s) (one or two chapters) from the classic novel you read that you could isolate and use as a lesson by itself. You should explain that it can stand alone and perhaps serve as a taste for reading the rest of the book and why (examples: it offers symbolism, character development, powerful themes, imagery, famous quotes, etc.) and avoid using the first chapter. BE PREPARED TO SHARE YOUR EXPLANATION AND READ AN EXCERPT FROM YOUR CHAPTER.
  • Begin looking for your second classic novel (it is due Friday!!). Use the following resources: Ms. Conn's Recommendations, 101 Books to Read Before You Go to College, Advanced Placement Recommended Reading, and 100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die.
  • Monday, March 5th, 2007: 1.) Identify a meaningful, thoughtfully analytical excerpt (one sentence or multiple sentences) from your virtue paper (which is due today!)--something you'd like to share to show off your analysis. It may be some thoughtful comment about your novel, the Socrates text, or society in general. Write on a notecard, be prepared to share and turn in with your paper.

    2.) Share your excerpt with the class. Classmates will react to various students' excerpts.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • DUE TOMORROW: Bring in a brief written explanation (about one paragraph long) on which chapter(s) (one or two chapters) from the classic novel you read that you could isolate and use as a lesson by itself. You should explain that it can stand alone and perhaps serve as a taste for reading the rest of the book and why (examples: it offers symbolism, character development, powerful themes, imagery, famous quotes, etc.) and avoid using the first chapter. BE PREPARED TO SHARE YOUR EXPLANATION AND READ AN EXCERPT FROM YOUR CHAPTER.
  • Friday, March 2nd, 2007: 1.) Reading of the Socrates-Meno Dialogue (this will allow us one last reading and analysis, which can assist students in final draft of paper).

    2.) Discussion points for Socrates-Meno Dialogue: The following questions are in reference to p. 31 in Great Dialogues of Plato: Why can't a person who acts recklessly and unjustly, even on only one occasion, be considered virtuous? Why MUST a virtuous person act temperately and justly in order to be defined as a virtuous person? The following questions are in reference to pp. 36-41 in Great Dialogues of Plato: Since Meno believes that people who desire superficially beautiful (or handsome) things desire "good things," then does it follow that superficial beauty/attractiveness will equal virtue? Is it true that external goodness is more important/valuable than internal goodness? Socrates believes that people who desire bad actually think their desires are good. Do you agree? How could Socrates' statement be true? Socrates and Meno agree that people will not search to understand things they don't know or things they most definitely know. So, people will search for understanding of things they understand in parts and then seek to understand those things completely. Do you agree? How could their statement be true?

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • FINAL DRAFT OF VIRTUE PAPER DUE MONDAY, MARCH 5TH. Refer to the Virtue Paper Requirements and the Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogues, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the preface of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H. EVERYONE IS OFFERED THE OPPORTUNITY TO DO HONORS WORK, THOUGH IT MUST BE EARNED BY COMPLETING THE QUANTITY AND QUALITY OF HONORS CALIBER.
  • Thursday, March 1st, 2007: 1.) Show your Virtue Paper Draft #1 for HW credit.

    2.) Exchange your Virtue Paper Draft #1 with a classmate and use the Grading Sheet to review his/her paper. Offer comments on post-its. Teacher comments may also be given during this time.

    3.) Teacher advice given on improving the Virtue Paper.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • FINAL DRAFT OF VIRTUE PAPER DUE MONDAY, MARCH 5TH. Refer to the Virtue Paper Requirements and the Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogues, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the preface of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H. EVERYONE IS OFFERED THE OPPORTUNITY TO DO HONORS WORK.
  • Wednesday, February 28th, 2007: 1.) Using the Socrates-Meno Dialogue and your classic novel as textual references, write, answer and be prepared to discuss the following (these questions and answers can be helpful for development/analysis in your paper): According to Meno (the wealthy, young aristocrat who engages in discussion with Socrates), the definition of good=health, wealth, status. What, if anything, should be added to that list of "good" as defined in our American society of 2007? How would the society in the setting of your novel define "good" or "virtue"? How can someone acquire virtue in our society? How can someone acquire virtue in your novel's society? Can virtue be taught or is it inherent? Explain your answers using philosophical analysis and textual references.

    3.) Discuss questions above. These questions can be answered and explored in your Virtue Paper.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • Due TOMORROW, Thursday, March 1st: First Draft (ungraded; reviewed and supported by peers and teacher) of the Virtue Paper. FINAL DRAFT DUE MONDAY, MARCH 5TH. Refer to the Virtue Paper Requirements and the Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogues, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the preface of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.
  • Tuesday, February 27th, 2007: 1.) Survey on iPod theft.

    2.) Write, answer and be prepared to discuss the following (these questions and answers can be helpful for development/analysis in your paper): Discussion Questions (write and prepare to discuss)--According to Meno (the wealthy, young aristocrat who engages in discussion with Socrates), virtue is "the power of justly acquiring good things." Does this definition have universal validity? Does the definition work in today's society? Explain. How is "good" defined in today's society? Meno declares that good=health, wealth, status. Does that still apply today? What, if anything, should be added to that list of "good"?

    3.) Discuss questions above. These questions can be answered and explored in your Virtue Paper.

    4.) Finish review of Virtue Paper Requirements. Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogue, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the preface of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • READ (finish novel by Feb. 28).
  • Due Thursday, March 1st: First Draft (ungraded; reviewed and supported by peers and teacher) of the Virtue Paper. FINAL DRAFT DUE MONDAY, MARCH 5TH. Refer to the Virtue Paper Requirements and the Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogues, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the preface of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.
  • Monday, February 26th, 2007: 1.) Works Cited information for class text on Socrates' life and times and the Socrates-Meno Dialogue HERE (and given in class in the proper format):
    Rouse, Philip G. and Eric H. Warmington, eds. Great Dialogues of Plato. Trans. W.H.D. Rouse. NY, NY: Signet Classic, 1999. vii-ix, 28-31, 36-41.

    2.) SCHOLASTIC SCHOLARSHIP INFO.

    3.) Discussion Questions (write and prepare to discuss): According to Meno (the wealthy, young aristocrat who engages in discussion with Socrates), virtue is "the power of justly acquiring good things." Does this definition have universal validity? Does the definition work in today's society? Explain. How is "good" defined in today's society? Meno declares that good=health, wealth, status. Does that still apply today? What, if anything, should be added to that list of "good"?

    4.) Discuss questions above. These questions can be answered and explored in your Virtue Paper.

    5.) Finish review of Virtue Paper Requirements. Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogue, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the preface of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • READ (finish novel by Feb. 28).
  • Due Thursday, March 1st: First Draft (ungraded; reviewed and supported by peers and teacher) of the Virtue Paper. FINAL DRAFT DUE MONDAY, MARCH 5TH. Refer to the Virtue Paper Requirements and the Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogues, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the preface of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.
  • Friday, February 16th, 2007: 1.) Brainstorm and discuss the Virtue Paper Topic: All people desire virtue.

    2.) Discuss and share your brainstorming.

    3.) Continue introduction of Virtue Paper Requirements. Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogue, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the űreface��of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • Due Monday, Feb. 26th: Five Reader's Log Entries (five written/typed pages total) for E8 and Eight Reader's Log Entries (eight written/typed pages total) for E8H on the Virtue Paper Topic--All people desire virtue. Each Reader's Log Entry should be a freewrite on specific text in your classic novel and our class texts on Socrates that support the Virtue Paper Topic. The Reader's Log will be used as your notes, observations and ideas about your classic text, the texts we read in class and our class discussions.
  • READ (finish novel by Feb. 28).
  • Due Thursday, March 1st: First Draft (ungraded; reviewed and supported by peers and teacher) of the Virtue Paper. FINAL DRAFT DUE MONDAY, MARCH 5TH. Refer to the Virtue Paper Requirements and the Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogues, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the űreface��of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.
  • Thursday, February 15th, 2007: 1.) Read, question, comment, react to your classmates' Dialogue between Socrates and Meno. Imagine you are the teacher analyzing student work. What are Socrates and Meno teaching you about human behavior? How did your classmates react to the dialogue? Are you satisfied with their questions/comments? Why/Why not?

    2.) Discuss and share your analysis.

    3.) Introduction of Virtue Paper Requirements. Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogue, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the űreface��of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • Due Monday, Feb. 26th: Five Reader's Log Entries (five written/typed pages total) for E8 and Eight Reader's Log Entries (eight written/typed pages total) for E8H on the Virtue Paper Topic--All people desire virtue. Each Reader's Log Entry should be a freewrite on specific text in your classic novel and our class texts on Socrates that support the Virtue Paper Topic. The Reader's Log will be used as your notes, observations and ideas about your classic text, the texts we read in class and our class discussions.
  • READ (finish novel by Feb. 28).
  • Due Thursday, March 1st: First Draft (ungraded; reviewed and supported by peers and teacher) of the Virtue Paper. Refer to the Virtue Paper Requirements and the Paper Objective: Argue the following statement: All people desire virtue. In order to argue effectively, use an analysis of Socrates-Meno Dialogues, the life and times of Socrates (as explained in the űreface��of Great Dialogues of Plato), evidence from your classic text, and real world examples. Paper length: 3-5 pp. for E8 and 5-7 pp. for E8H.
  • Wednesday, February 14th, 2007: 1.) Question and comment on your given dialogue between Socrates and Meno. Imagine you are the teacher analyzing student work. Some questions to help your analysis: What does Socrates want to prove in his dialogue? What does Meno want to assert in his response? Also, determine your dialogue supports one of the following statements on virtue: Virtue is knowledge (so it's teachable). Virtue is habit (so it's acquired, if not taught). Virtue is a quality which a person has no control (given by nature/birth).

    2.) Discuss and share your analysis.

    3.) Sharing of the powerful meaning of RED ON VALENTINE'S DAY AND EVERY DAY--reading of article in New York Times, "How Do We See Red? Count the Ways"

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • READ (no page requirement, but you should be at least 75 pages into your novel).
  • Tuesday, February 13th, 2007: 1.) Finish Discussion/Analysis of the following: What can Socrates teach us about achieving our goals/dreams? Refer to the Preface of Great Dialogues of Plato.

    2.) Analysis of Dialogue between Socrates and Meno, a nobleman of his time. The Dialogue is a discussion on the nature of virtue, which is necessary to examine in order to understand the nature of one's dream or goal. Is virtue different for different people? Is health different for different people? Is strength different for different people? Is goodness the same in all people? Are dreams the same for all people? These questions are worth examining and analyzing.

    3.) Question and comment on the dialogue between Socrates and Meno.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • READ (no page requirement, but you should be at least 75 pages into your novel).
  • Monday, February 12th, 2007: 1.) Discussion/Analysis of the following: What can Socrates teach us about achieving our goals/dreams? Refer to the Preface of Great Dialogues of Plato.

    2.) Analysis of Dialogue between Socrates and Meno, a nobleman of his time. The Dialogue is a discussion on the nature of virtue, which is necessary to examine in order to understand the nature of one's dream or goal. Is virtue different for different people? Is health different for different people? Is strength different for different people? Is goodness the same in all people? Are dreams the same for all people? These questions are worth examining and analyzing.

    3.) Question and comment on the dialogue between Socrates and Meno.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • Bring in the phone # and email address for the undergraduate office of admissions for the COLLEGE OF YOUR CHOICE.
  • READ (no page requirement, but you should be at least 75 pages into your novel).
  • Friday, February 9th, 2007: 1.) Discussion/Sharing of the HW Response Paper #1

    2.) Reactions/Analysis from teacher and classmates.

    Students will engage in discussion and higher level analysis for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • HONORS ONLY: Find a local/national/world news article from New York Times or Newsday that relates to your classic novel and write a one page (about 250 words) paper in which you develop connections, using real evidence from each texts.
  • READ THIS WEEKEND (no page requirement, but you should be at least 50 pages into your novel).
  • Thursday, February 8th, 2007: 1.) Philosophical/Socratic Discussion Protocol: We will use the following Questioning Strategies and Prompts.

    2.) Discussion Questions:

  • What�� so great about your protagonist?
  • Does he/she have any integrity and/or virtue?
  • What are your protagonist's life goals? What is he/she living for?
  • Why do you believe you are HERE? What do you believe is your purpose in this world?
  • How does this book help you to understand dreams/goals? Are these same dreams still alive today? Explain your reasons.
  • Students will engage in discussion for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • RESPONSE PAPER #1--DUE TOMORROW (HW grade): Choose one of the discussion questions today or from previous days to expand on in writing. Write a one page, double-spaced response paper (about 250 words) discussing and raising further (connected) questions about YOUR CLASSIC TEXT. This response paper is to be a thoughtful reflection on your text, and it's informal. You can (for example) use this response paper to give personal reactions to the text, synthesize and compare to other texts/current events/history, or to raise questions to discuss in class. REMEMBER, HW COUNTS 50% OF YOUR GRADE.
  • READ TONIGHT (no page requirement, but you should be at least 30-40 pages into your novel).
  • Wednesday, February 7th, 2007: 1.) Philosophical Discussion: Finish discussing/reviewing yesterday's questions--What is a dream? Even if there are many different dreams for different people, what do they all have--one thing, something--which makes them all dreams? Are dreams different for men and women? For young and old? For different races? For people living in 2007 and people living during the 1970s, 1960s, 1940s? What can you identify (or predict) as a dream of your novel's protagonist? What evidence from the novel do you know that can support this dream? You may want to refer to the time period, setting location, the protagonist's race/religion/childhood/previous experiences, storyline, interactions with other characters.

    2.) New topics of discussion: Are all dreams virtuous (morally good)? Why/why not? Who determines if dreams are virtuous or not? How do you define virtue? Does it mean the same to all people? Explain.

    Students will engage in discussion for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • READ TONIGHT (no page requirement, but you should be at least 15-20 pages into your novel). Be prepared to discuss your protagonist's dreams and any characters who may be hindrances to your protagonist's dreams. Also, be ready to explain if his/her dreams are virtuous (morally good). You should be reading your classic novel on a daily basis. You MUST finish your novel by the end of February. You will be inundated with other HW assignments which will supplement your classic text. So budget your time accordingly.
  • Tuesday, February 6th, 2007: 1.) Writing/Brainstorming: Preparing to philosophize (Socrates-style) about the course theme: What is a dream? Even if there are many different dreams for different people, what do they all have--one thing, something--which makes them all dreams? Are dreams different for men and women? For young and old? For different races? For people living in 2007 and people living during the 1970s, 1960s, 1940s? What can you identify (or predict) as a dream of your novel's protagonist? What evidence from the novel do you know that can support this dream? You may want to refer to the time period, setting location, the protagonist's race/religion/childhood/previous experiences, storyline, interactions with other characters.

    2.) Discuss philosophizing questions above and tie in with the HW questions: Why did you choose your particular novel? How does it connect to the course theme of dreams, goals and fantasies?

    Students will write for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • Finish answering today's in-class questions (in #1) and bring the answers in tomorrow for discussion and HW credit. We will focus on discussing your classic novels and your protagonists' dreams or foreseeable dreams.
  • You should be reading your classic novel on a daily basis. You MUST finish your novel by the end of February. You will be inundated with other HW assignments which will supplement your classic text. So budget your time accordingly.
  • Monday, February 5th, 2007: 1.) Work on scholarship HW. If you don't have it, then find one!

    2.) Begin HW: begin to read your chosen classic text (from the links provided on this website and on the syllabus). Then begin to answer the following questions in a 500-word response: Why did you choose your particular novel? How does it connect to the course theme of dreams, goals and fantasies?

    Students will write for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • Bring in your first chosen classic text (taken from the library or purchased from a bookstore) tomorrow. Be ready to explain how it connects to the course theme. You should use either the websites offered in the syllabus, a correction to the syllabus: "100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", and/or Ms. Conn's Recommendations.
  • Finish today's classwork: Answer the following questions in a 500-word response: Why did you choose your particular novel? How does it connect to the course theme of dreams, goals and fantasies? Be descriptive, using detailed, sophisticated language. Show that you are ready for college with your higher level writing.
  • Friday, February 2nd, 2007: 1.) Review of E8 Course Syllabus or E8 Honors Course Syllabus. Correction to syllabus: "100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die".

    2.) Review of policies and procedures.

    3.) Discussion of personal and societal relevance of the course theme of study: The Future--Dreams, Goals, and Fantasies. Questions to reflect on may include the following: Where do you see yourself after high school graduation? After college graduation/five years from now? Ten years from now? Where do you see our society/the world around you in five years? In ten years?

    Students will read the course syllabus for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • Bring in a minimum of one scholarship (preferably completed) application on Monday. You may choose to use the following resources: Minority Scholarships, Scholarships for New York high school seniors.
  • Bring in your first chosen classic text (taken from the library or purchased from a bookstore) on Monday. Be ready to explain how it connects to the course theme. You should use either the websites offered in the syllabus, a correction to the syllabus: "100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die", and/or Ms. Conn's Recommendations.
  • Thursday, February 1st, 2007: 1st Day of Spring Semester 1.) Introduction of E8 Course Syllabus or E8 Honors Course Syllabus.

    2.) Discussion of policies and procedures.

    3.) Discussion of personal and societal relevance of the course theme of study: The Future--Dreams, Goals, and Fantasies. Questions to reflect on may include the following: Where do you see yourself after high school graduation? After college graduation/five years from now? Ten years from now? Where do you see our society/the world around you in five years? In ten years?

    Students will read the course syllabus for information and understanding. E8 and E8 Honors:
  • Bring in a minimum of one completed scholarship application on Monday. You may choose to use the following resources: Minority Scholarships, Scholarships for New York high school seniors.
  • Bring in your first chosen classic text (taken from the library or purchased from a bookstore) on Monday. Be ready to explain how it connects to the course theme.