Ms. Conn's Senior English (Regents Prep) Class Assignments, Spring 2011

Ms. Conn's Senior English (Regents Prep) Class Assignments
Spring 2011

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Final review of the components and strategies of the English Regents Exam--
1st section: Listening Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; Take Notes on the 5 W's and 1 H (both times the passage is read aloud); Preview the multiple-choice questions before and during the reading of the listening passage; cover the answer choices and write your own answer in the margins; finally, choose the answer that best resembles your own, written answer
2nd section: Fiction Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; underline the line #s provided in the fiction passage; Read the fiction passage while taking summary notes on the margin; look for literary terms and the author's purpose for those literary terms (WHY the author uses them); look above and below the line #s (from the multiple-choice questions) for the answer and determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
  • Non-fiction Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; underline the line #s provided in the non-fiction passage; Read the non-fiction passage while taking summary notes on the margin; look for 5 W's and the 1 H (who, what, when, where, why and how) and the author's purpose for those 5 W's and 1 H (WHY the author uses them); look above and below the line #s (from the multiple-choice questions) for the answer and determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
    3rd section: Short-Response Questions; Read two passages (most likely they will be a fiction passage and a fiction poem); preview the multiple-choice questions and underline the line #s in the passages, before reading; preview the controlling idea in the first short-response question; read the passages, taking notes in the margin on the literary terms, author's purpose (WHY the author used those literary terms) and evidence of the controlling idea; pay attention to the line #s and the lines above and below to determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
    4th section: Critical Lens Essay; circle key words in the critical lens quote (use those key words repeatedly throughout your essay); introductory paragraph=B-REAL (Big attention grabber, Restate the quote, Explain the quote in your own words, Agree with the quote, and include two works of Literature and Literary elements that support the quote); body paragraph #1=first work of literature that supports the quote; include a lot of evidence from that first work of literature to support the quote; body paragraph #2=second work of literature that supports the quote; include a lot of evidence from that second work of literature to support the quote; body paragraph #3=compare both works of literature to each other and the quote; conclusion=summarize your essay, restate the quote in your own words, and leave the reader with final thoughts

    2. Q & A

  • How will students effectively prepare for all of the components of the English Regents? THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 17th=ENGLISH REGENTS at 8:15am:
  • Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 17TH at 8:15am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY AND 8-10 SENTENCES PER PARAGRAPH. FOR PART 3, EACH PARAGRAPH SHOULD BE 8-10 SENTENCES. If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov.
  • Friday, June 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the components and strategies of the English Regents Exam--
    1st section: Listening Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; Take Notes on the 5 W's and 1 H (both times the passage is read aloud); Preview the multiple-choice questions before and during the reading of the listening passage; cover the answer choices and write your own answer in the margins; finally, choose the answer that best resembles your own, written answer
    2nd section: Fiction Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; underline the line #s provided in the fiction passage; Read the fiction passage while taking summary notes on the margin; look for literary terms and the author's purpose for those literary terms (WHY the author uses them); look above and below the line #s (from the multiple-choice questions) for the answer and determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
  • Non-fiction Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; underline the line #s provided in the non-fiction passage; Read the non-fiction passage while taking summary notes on the margin; look for 5 W's and the 1 H (who, what, when, where, why and how) and the author's purpose for those 5 W's and 1 H (WHY the author uses them); look above and below the line #s (from the multiple-choice questions) for the answer and determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
    3rd section: Short-Response Questions; Read two passages (most likely they will be a fiction passage and a fiction poem); preview the multiple-choice questions and underline the line #s in the passages, before reading; preview the controlling idea in the first short-response question; read the passages, taking notes in the margin on the literary terms, author's purpose (WHY the author used those literary terms) and evidence of the controlling idea; pay attention to the line #s and the lines above and below to determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
    4th section: Critical Lens Essay; circle key words in the critical lens quote (use those key words repeatedly throughout your essay); introductory paragraph=B-REAL (Big attention grabber, Restate the quote, Explain the quote in your own words, Agree with the quote, and include two works of Literature and Literary elements that support the quote); body paragraph #1=first work of literature that supports the quote; include a lot of evidence from that first work of literature to support the quote; body paragraph #2=second work of literature that supports the quote; include a lot of evidence from that second work of literature to support the quote; body paragraph #3=compare both works of literature to each other and the quote; conclusion=summarize your essay, restate the quote in your own words, and leave the reader with final thoughts

    2. Make up any owed HW: FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school.

  • Work on new assignment (taken from January 2009 exam)--Choose a specific literary element (e.g., theme, characterization, structure, point of view, etc.) or literary technique (e.g., symbolism, irony, figurative language, etc.) used by oneof the authors (from passages I or II). Using specific details from that passage, in a well-developed paragraph, show how the author uses that element or technique to develop the passage.
  • Work on any other owed HW assignments.
  • How will students effectively prepare for all of the components of the English Regents? NEXT FRIDAY, JUNE 17th=ENGLISH REGENTS at 8:15am:
  • Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS NEXT FRIDAY, JUNE 17TH at 8:15am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY AND 8-10 SENTENCES PER PARAGRAPH. FOR PART 3, EACH PARAGRAPH SHOULD BE 8-10 SENTENCES. If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. THIS MONDAY WILL BE MORE REVIEW, SO MAKE SURE YOU ATTEND CLASS.
  • Wednesday, June 8th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the components and strategies of the English Regents Exam--
    1st section: Listening Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; Take Notes on the 5 W's and 1 H (both times the passage is read aloud); Preview the multiple-choice questions before and during the reading of the listening passage; cover the answer choices and write your own answer in the margins; finally, choose the answer that best resembles your own, written answer
    2nd section: Fiction Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; underline the line #s provided in the fiction passage; Read the fiction passage while taking summary notes on the margin; look for literary terms and the author's purpose for those literary terms (WHY the author uses them); look above and below the line #s (from the multiple-choice questions) for the answer and determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
  • Non-fiction Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; underline the line #s provided in the non-fiction passage; Read the non-fiction passage while taking summary notes on the margin; look for 5 W's and the 1 H (who, what, when, where, why and how) and the author's purpose for those 5 W's and 1 H (WHY the author uses them); look above and below the line #s (from the multiple-choice questions) for the answer and determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
    3rd section: Short-Response Questions; Read two passages (most likely they will be a fiction passage and a fiction poem); preview the multiple-choice questions and underline the line #s in the passages, before reading; preview the controlling idea in the first short-response question; read the passages, taking notes in the margin on the literary terms, author's purpose (WHY the author used those literary terms) and evidence of the controlling idea; pay attention to the line #s and the lines above and below to determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
    4th section: Critical Lens Essay; circle key words in the critical lens quote (use those key words repeatedly throughout your essay); introductory paragraph=B-REAL (Big attention grabber, Restate the quote, Explain the quote in your own words, Agree with the quote, and include two works of Literature and Literary elements that support the quote); body paragraph #1=first work of literature that supports the quote; include a lot of evidence from that first work of literature to support the quote; body paragraph #2=second work of literature that supports the quote; include a lot of evidence from that second work of literature to support the quote; body paragraph #3=compare both works of literature to each other and the quote; conclusion=summarize your essay, restate the quote in your own words, and leave the reader with final thoughts

    2. Make up any owed HW: FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school.

  • Work on new assignment (taken from January 2009 exam)--Choose a specific literary element (e.g., theme, characterization, structure, point of view, etc.) or literary technique (e.g., symbolism, irony, figurative language, etc.) used by oneof the authors (from passages I or II). Using specific details from that passage, in a well-developed paragraph, show how the author uses that element or technique to develop the passage.
  • Work on any other owed HW assignments.
  • How will students effectively prepare for all of the components of the English Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 10th:
  • ALL WORK OWED (it's the LAST day of the semester!!! (see this website--previous days--and snapgrades!)
  • Tuesday, June 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the components and strategies of the English Regents Exam--
    1st section: Listening Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; Take Notes on the 5 W's and 1 H (both times the passage is read aloud); Preview the multiple-choice questions before and during the reading of the listening passage; cover the answer choices and write your own answer in the margins; finally, choose the answer that best resembles your own, written answer
    2nd section: Fiction Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; underline the line #s provided in the fiction passage; Read the fiction passage while taking summary notes on the margin; look for literary terms and the author's purpose for those literary terms (WHY the author uses them); look above and below the line #s (from the multiple-choice questions) for the answer and determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
  • Non-fiction Passage & Multiple-Choice Questions; underline the line #s provided in the non-fiction passage; Read the non-fiction passage while taking summary notes on the margin; look for 5 W's and the 1 H (who, what, when, where, why and how) and the author's purpose for those 5 W's and 1 H (WHY the author uses them); look above and below the line #s (from the multiple-choice questions) for the answer and determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
    3rd section: Short-Response Questions; Read two passages (most likely they will be a fiction passage and a fiction poem); preview the multiple-choice questions and underline the line #s in the passages, before reading; preview the controlling idea in the first short-response question; read the passages, taking notes in the margin on the literary terms, author's purpose (WHY the author used those literary terms) and evidence of the controlling idea; pay attention to the line #s and the lines above and below to determine WHY the author thought those line #s were important
    4th section: Critical Lens Essay; circle key words in the critical lens quote (use those key words repeatedly throughout your essay); introductory paragraph=B-REAL (Big attention grabber, Restate the quote, Explain the quote in your own words, Agree with the quote, and include two works of Literature and Literary elements that support the quote); body paragraph #1=first work of literature that supports the quote; include a lot of evidence from that first work of literature to support the quote; body paragraph #2=second work of literature that supports the quote; include a lot of evidence from that second work of literature to support the quote; body paragraph #3=compare both works of literature to each other and the quote; conclusion=summarize your essay, restate the quote in your own words, and leave the reader with final thoughts

    2. Make up any owed HW: FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school.

  • Work on new assignment (taken from January 2009 exam)--Choose a specific literary element (e.g., theme, characterization, structure, point of view, etc.) or literary technique (e.g., symbolism, irony, figurative language, etc.) used by oneof the authors (from passages I or II). Using specific details from that passage, in a well-developed paragraph, show how the author uses that element or technique to develop the passage.
  • Work on any other owed HW assignments.
  • How will students effectively prepare for all of the components of the English Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 10th:
  • ALL WORK OWED (it's the LAST day of the semester!!! (see this website--previous days--and snapgrades!)
  • Monday, June 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Make up any owed HW: FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school.
  • Work on new assignment (taken from January 2009 exam)--Choose a specific literary element (e.g., theme, characterization, structure, point of view, etc.) or literary technique (e.g., symbolism, irony, figurative language, etc.) used by oneof the authors (from passages I or II). Using specific details from that passage, in a well-developed paragraph, show how the author uses that element or technique to develop the passage.
  • Work on any other owed HW assignments.
  • How will students effectively prepare for all of the components of the English Regents? Make up all HW owed (see this website--previous days--and snapgrades!)
    Friday, June 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now:
  • Turn in HW (due today!): FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school.
  • Work on new assignment (taken from January 2009 exam)--Choose a specific literary element (e.g., theme, characterization, structure, point of view, etc.) or literary technique (e.g., symbolism, irony, figurative language, etc.) used by oneof the authors (from passages I or II). Using specific details from that passage, in a well-developed paragraph, show how the author uses that element or technique to develop the passage.
  • Work on any other owed HW assignments.

    2. English Regents Strategy Reminders

  • How will students effectively prepare for all of the components of the English Regents? Make up all HW owed (see this website--previous days--and snapgrades!)
    Thursday, June 2nd, 2011: Work Period:
  • Work on HW (due tomorrow!): FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school.
  • Work on the extra credit: the new controlling idea packet (taken from January 2009 exam)--the annotations (in the margins), the underlining of line numbers (from the multiple-choice questions) and the answers to the multiple-choice questions.
  • Work on any other owed HW assignments.
  • How will students effectively prepare for all of the components of the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JUNE 3rd:
  • FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school! Time will be given in class to complete these four sheets. These review sheets will be helpful tools for success on the critical lens essay of the English Regents!
  • Wednesday, June 1st, 2011: Work Period:
  • Work on HW: FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school!
  • Work on the extra credit: the new controlling idea packet (taken from January 2009 exam)--the annotations (in the margins), the underlining of line numbers (from the multiple-choice questions) and the answers to the multiple-choice questions.
  • Work on any other owed HW assignments.
  • How will students effectively prepare for all of the components of the English Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 3rd:
  • FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school! Time will be given in class to complete these four sheets. These review sheets will be helpful tools for success on the critical lens essay of the English Regents!
  • Tuesday, May 31st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Show the extra credit (it was due today!): the new controlling idea packet (taken from January 2009 exam)--the annotations (in the margins), the underlining of line numbers (from the multiple-choice questions) and the answers to the multiple-choice questions.

    2. Review the annotations and the answers to the Do Now.

    3. Introduce the HW.

    How will students effectively prepare for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph and multiple-choice questions on the English Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 3rd:
  • FOUR Literature Review Sheets for FOUR books read throughout high school! Time will be given in class to complete these four sheets. These review sheets will be helpful tools for success on the critical lens essay of the English Regents!
  • Friday, May 27th, 2011: 1. Do Now: FINALLY finish writing the controlling idea paragraph for the two passages and turn it in! Remember, it must be 8-10 sentences.

    2. Begin a new controlling idea packet (taken from January 2009 exam)--work on annotations and multiple-choice questions.

    How will students effectively prepare for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph and multiple-choice questions on the English Regents? EXTRA CREDIT HW (Due on Tuesday, May 31st!):
  • Read the two passages that were given in class today. Write summary notes in the margin (next to each paragraph). Answer the multiple-choice questions. Identify the line #s in the passages (underline the lines) before reading the passages. Look for the answers above and below the line #s.

    Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).

    DUE IN THE NEAR FUTURE:

  • Literature Review Sheet for FOUR books read throughout high school!
  • Thursday, May 26th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish writing the controlling idea paragraph for the two passages.

    2. If you're finished with the do now, begin a new controlling idea packet (taken from January 2009 exam)--work on annotations and multiple-choice questions.

    How will students effectively prepare for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph and multiple-choice questions on the English Regents? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
    Wednesday, May 25th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish writing the controlling idea paragraph for the two passages.

    2. Take notes on multiple-choice question strategies.

    How will students effectively prepare for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph and multiple-choice questions on the English Regents? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
    Tuesday, May 24th, 2011: 1. Do Now: FInish working on the August 2010 reading and annotating of the two passages for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph. Answer the multiple-choice questions.

    2. Work Period: Work on writing the controlling idea paragraph for the two passages.

    How will students effectively prepare for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph on the English Regents? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
    Monday, May 23rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue working on the August 2010 reading and annotating of the two passages for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph. Answer the multiple-choice questions.

    2. Work Period: Work on writing the controlling idea paragraph for the two passages.

    3. Go over the grammar worksheet HW.

    How will students effectively prepare for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph on the English Regents? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
    Friday, May 20th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue working on the August 2010 reading and annotating of the two passages for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph. Answer the multiple-choice questions.

    2. Work Period: Work on writing the controlling idea paragraph for the two passages.

    How will students effectively prepare for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph on the English Regents? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 23rd:
  • Grammar worksheet (both sides); this worksheet was received in class
  • Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
  • Thursday, May 19th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish evaluating a high-scoring sample critical lens essay. What are the strengths? Take notes.

    2. Controlling Idea Short-Answer Paragraph Reminders

    3. Work Period: Begin working on reading and annotating of the two passages for the controlling idea short-answer paragraph.

    How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay and the controlling idea short-answer paragraph on the English Regents?
  • Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
  • Wednesday, May 18th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Take notes on strategies for success on the entire Regents.

    2. Discuss Do Now.

    3. See a high-scoring sample critical lens essay. What are the strengths? Take notes.

    How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents?
  • Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
  • Tuesday, May 17th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish your 3-paragraph critical lens essay on your independent novel only. Use the August 2010 Regents with this quote: "Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds." Your intro. paragraph should be 4-6 sentences, your body paragraph should be 8-10 sentences with plenty of evidence from your novel to support the quote, and your conclusion should be 4-6 sentences.
    *Turn in the essay for a grade! Return your independent novel.

    2. Take notes on strategies for success on the entire Regents.

    How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents?
  • Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
  • Monday, May 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Critical Lens Instructions and Reminders

    2. Work Period: Write a 3-paragraph critical lens essay on your independent novel only. Use the August 2010 Regents with this quote: "Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds." Your intro. paragraph should be 4-6 sentences, your body paragraph should be 8-10 sentences with plenty of evidence from your novel to support the quote, and your conclusion should be 4-6 sentences.
    *Turn in the essay for a grade!

    How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents?
  • Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades.com!).
  • Friday, May 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: What does it mean to be in prison? What does it mean to be a prisoner of fate? What does it mean to be a prisoner of your mind? Brainstorm and discuss.

    2. Work Period: Read your novel! Take notes on the characterization of the protagonist (characterization includes personality traits, actions, speech, thoughts/feelings, other characters' points of view) and his/her internal conflicts (What's he/she struggling with?). Focus more on the protagonist's thoughts and feelings.

    3. Reflections: Share your findings.

    4. Review the critical lens essay outline. Students should learn this format to help them write the essay.

    How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 16th:
    Read your independent novel! You will need to be finished by THIS Monday, May 16th!! THERE WILL BE A CRITICAL LENS ESSAY (quiz grade-20% of the 3rd marking period) on your novel, so you need to know it and know it well! Here's the critical lens essay outline--you should know it so you can better write your essay!
    Thursday, May 12th, 2011: 1. Work Period: Read your novel! Take notes on the characterization of the protagonist (characterization includes personality traits, actions, speech, thoughts/feelings, other characters' points of view) and his/her internal conflicts (What's he/she struggling with?). Focus more on the protagonist's thoughts and feelings.

    2. Reflections: Share your findings.

    3. Introduce the critical lens essay outline. Students should learn this format to help them write the essay.

    How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? DUE MONDAY, MAY 16th:
    Read your independent novel! You will need to be finished by Monday, May 16th!! THERE WILL BE A CRITICAL LENS ESSAY (quiz grade-20% of the 3rd marking period) on your novel, so you need to know it and know it well!
    Wednesday, May 11th, 2011: 1. Work Period: Read your novel! Take notes on the characterization of the protagonist (characterization includes personality traits, actions, speech, thoughts/feelings, other characters' points of view). Focus more on the protagonist's thoughts and feelings. Include his/her internal conflicts.

    2. Reflections: Share your findings.

    How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? Read your independent novel! You will need to be finished by May 15th!! THERE WILL BE A CRITICAL LENS ESSAY (quiz grade-20% of the 3rd marking period) on your novel, so you need to know it and know it well!
    Tuesday, May 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now: In discussion groups (based on students' book selections: The Namesake, The Color of Water, Night, or Lovely Bones), students will share answers to the following questions (taken from Book Club Discussion Questions):
  • What is unique about the setting of the book? How does the setting enhance or take away from the story?
  • Do the characters seem real and believable? Explain your reasons.
  • What specific themes does the author emphasize throughout the novel? (Examples: sin, guilt, redemption, prejudice)

    2. Work Period: Read your novel!

  • How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? Read your independent novel! You will need to be finished by May 15th!!
    Monday, May 9th, 2011: 1. Do Now: In discussion groups (based on students' book selections: The Namesake, The Color of Water, Night, or Lovely Bones), students will determine and discuss the following questions (taken from Book Club Discussion Questions) and put the answers on chart paper:
  • What is unique about the setting of the book? How does the setting enhance or take away from the story?
  • Do the characters seem real and believable? Explain your reasons.
  • What specific themes does the author emphasize throughout the novel? (Examples: sin, guilt, redemption, prejudice)

    2. Discuss/Share: Share Do Now.

  • How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? Read your independent novel! You will need to be finished by May 15th!!
    Friday, May 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read your independent novel (choose ONLY from one of our class selections: The Namesake, The Color of Water, Night, or Lovely Bones). Work on any owed HW (including the 1/2 page summary and 1/2 page characterization of a main character).

    2. Discuss/Share: In discussion groups (based on students' book selections), students will discuss the following questions (taken from Book Club Discussion Questions) and put the answers on chart paper:

  • What is unique about the setting of the book? How does the setting enhance or take away from the story?
  • Do the characters seem real and believable? Explain your reasons.
  • What specific themes does the author emphasize throughout the novel? (Examples: sin, guilt, redemption, prejudice)
  • How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? Read your independent novel! You will need to be finished by May 15th!!
    Thursday, May 5th, 2011: Work Period: Read your independent novel (choose ONLY from one of our class selections: The Namesake, The Color of Water, Night, or Lovely Bones). Work on the HW that's due today, if not finished (the 1/2 page on the introduction of the plot and a 1/2 page on one main character). How will students effectively prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? Read your independent novel! You will need to be finished by May 15th!!
    Wednesday, May 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish writing the literary term paragraph and the rewrite. Here's the assignment:
    In a full-page paragraph, answer the following questions about ONE literary term (suggestions: characterization, imagery, repetition, symbolism) using the 5 W's and 1 H. Remember, start with an introductory sentence and end with a concluding sentence to summarize your writing. Who are the characters that support this literary term (ONLY for the characterization literary term, if you choose it)? What are examples of this literary term in ONE poem? Where can examples of the literary term be found in ONE poem? When can the literary term be found in ONE poem? Why does the author use this literary term in the poem? How can this literary term help the poem? Use ONE of the poems, "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov, and write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from ONLY ONE poem to identify the literary term and explain why it's important. Develop your paragraph using specific examples (direct quotes are recommended) and details from ONE poem.

    2. Work Period: Choose an independent novel (choose ONLY from one of our class selections: The Namesake, The Color of Water, Night, or Lovely Bones). Begin reading. Start HW (if time allows).

    How will students effectively write the literary term paragraph and prepare for the critical lens essay on the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 5th:
  • Write a 1/2 page (handwritten or typed) on the introduction (events, characters, etc.) of your new, independent novel. Write a 1/2 page (handwritten or typed) on one main character (include personality traits, actions, thoughts and feelings).
  • Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish writing the literary term paragraph. Here's the assignment:
    In a full-page paragraph, answer the following questions about ONE literary term (suggestions: characterization, imagery, repetition, symbolism) using the 5 W's and 1 H. Remember, start with an introductory sentence and end with a concluding sentence to summarize your writing. Who are the characters that support this literary term (ONLY for the characterization literary term, if you choose it)? What are examples of this literary term in ONE poem? Where can examples of the literary term be found in ONE poem? When can the literary term be found in ONE poem? Why does the author use this literary term in the poem? How can this literary term help the poem? Use ONE of the poems, "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov, and write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from ONLY ONE poem to identify the literary term and explain why it's important. Develop your paragraph using specific examples (direct quotes are recommended) and details from ONE poem.

    2. Work Period: Work on writing the SUPER-LONG paragraph (at least ONE full page!). See Ms. Conn for her corrections. Rewrite the paragraph, applying her corrections.

    How will students effectively write the literary term paragraph for the English Regents? Find a good, challenging book to read! Challenge your mind!
    Monday, May 2nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Begin to write the literary term paragraph. Here's the assignment:
    In a full-page paragraph, answer the following questions about ONE literary term (suggestions: characterization, imagery, repetition, symbolism) using the 5 W's and 1 H. Remember, start with an introductory sentence and end with a concluding sentence to summarize your writing. Who are the characters that support this literary term? What are examples of this literary term in ONE poem? Where can examples of the literary term be found in ONE poem? When can the literary term be found in ONE poem? Why does the author use this literary term in the poem? How can this literary term help the poem? Use the poems, "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov, and write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from ONLY ONE poem to identify the literary term and explain why it's important. Develop your paragraph using specific examples (direct quotes are recommended) and details from ONE poem.

    2. Work Period: Work on writing the SUPER-LONG paragraph (at least ONE full page!).

    How will students effectively write the literary term paragraph for the English Regents? Find a good, challenging book to read! Challenge your mind!
    Friday, April 29th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish and make up ALL owed HW!! Many of you need to finish the controlling idea paragraph! Here's the assignment:
    In a full-page paragraph, answer the following questions about the controlling idea on education using the 5 W's and 1 H. Remember, start with an introductory sentence and end with a concluding sentence to summarize your writing. Who are the characters being educated? What is the education in each poem? Where can the education be found in both poems? When can the education be found? Why can the education be found in each of these poems' settings? How can the education be acquired in each of these poems? Use the poems, "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov, and write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from both poems to establish a controlling idea about education. Develop controlling idea using specific examples (direct quotes are recommended) and details from both poems.

    2. Work Period: Make up any and ALL owed HW! Meet with Ms. Conn to discuss/review owed HW.

    How will students effectively write the controlling idea paragraph for the English Regents? N/A
    Thursday, April 28th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish and make up owed HW!! Many of you need to finish the controlling idea paragraph! Here's the assignment:
    In a full-page paragraph, answer the following questions about the controlling idea on education using the 5 W's and 1 H. Remember, start with an introductory sentence and end with a concluding sentence to summarize your writing. Who are the characters being educated? What is the education in each poem? Where can the education be found in both poems? When can the education be found? Why can the education be found in each of these poems' settings? How can the education be acquired in each of these poems? Use the poems, "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov, and write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from both poems to establish a controlling idea about education. Develop controlling idea using specific examples (direct quotes are recommended) and details from both poems.

    2. Work Period: Make up any and ALL owed HW! Meet with Ms. Conn to discuss/review owed HW.

    How will students effectively write the controlling idea paragraph for the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, APRIL 29th (the last day of the 2nd marking period!): Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments, especially the critical lens essays!!).
    Wednesday, April 27th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Extra Credit Quiz on The Namesake. For those who did not read the extra credit book, you may work on the controlling idea assignment below:
    In a full-page paragraph, answer the following questions about the controlling idea on education using the 5 W's and 1 H. Remember, start with an introductory sentence and end with a concluding sentence to summarize your writing. Who are the characters being educated? What is the education in each poem? Where can the education be found in both poems? When can the education be found? Why can the education be found in each of these poems' settings? How can the education be acquired in each of these poems? Use the poems, "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov, and write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from both poems to establish a controlling idea about education. Develop controlling idea using specific examples (direct quotes are recommended) and details from both poems.

    2. Work Period: Make up any owed HW! Meet with Ms. Conn to discuss/review owed HW.

    How will students effectively write the controlling idea paragraph for the English Regents? DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 29th (the last day of the 2nd marking period!): Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments, especially the critical lens essays!!).
    Friday, April 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Instructions provided on the "controlling idea" question on the English Regents. A suggestion for understanding the use of the controlling idea in both passages: compose questions about the controlling idea using the 5 W's and 1 H. For example, for the controlling idea on education below: Who are the characters being educated? What is the education in each poem? Where can the education be found in both poems? When can the education be found? Why can the education be found in each of these poems' settings? How can the education be acquired in each of these poems?

    2. Work Period: Using the poems, "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov, write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from both poems to establish a controlling idea about education. Develop controlling idea using specific examples and details from both poems.

    How will students effectively prepare to write the controlling idea paragraph for the English Regents? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments, especially the critical lens essays!!).

    EXTRA CREDIT:

  • DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th (the day we return from vacation!): Read The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri (this book was provided in class). Take a reading quiz (this will prove that you read the book) and earn points toward your average! It's a great book about a boy and his family becoming American while dealing with loyalties to their native country, India.
  • Thursday, April 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Read "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov.

    2. Discuss and take notes on the poems in the Do Now.

    How will students effectively prepare to write the controlling idea paragraph for the English Regents? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments, especially the critical lens essays!!).

    EXTRA CREDIT:

  • DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th (the day we return from vacation!): Read The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri (this book was provided in class). Take a reading quiz (this will prove that you read the book) and earn points toward your average! It's a great book about a boy and his family becoming American while dealing with loyalties to their native country, India.
  • Wednesday, April 13th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish the Acuity Exam.

    2. Instructions provided on the "controlling idea" question on the English Regents. A suggestion for understanding the use of the controlling idea in both passages: compose questions about the controlling idea using the 5 W's and 1 H. For example, for the controlling idea on education below: Who are the characters being educated? What is the education in each poem? Where can the education be found in both poems? When can the education be found? Why can the education be found in each of these poems' settings? How can the education be acquired in each of these poems?

    3. Work Period: Read "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth and "To David, About His Education" by Howard Nemerov. Write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from both poems to establish a controlling idea about education. Develop controlling idea using specific examples and details from both poems.

    How will students effectively prepare to write the controlling idea paragraph for the English Regents? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments, especially the critical lens essays!!).

    EXTRA CREDIT:

  • DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27th (the day we return from vacation!): Read The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri (this book was provided in class). Take a reading quiz (this will prove that you read the book) and earn points toward your average! It's a great book about a boy and his family becoming American while dealing with loyalties to their native country, India.
  • Tuesday, April 12th, 2011: Work Period: Acuity Exam #2 How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents through an Acuity Exam assessment? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments, especially the critical lens essays!!).
    Monday, April 11th, 2011: Work Period: FINISH your two critical lens essays--BOTH WILL BE GRADED AFTER THE FIRST DRAFTS AND TEACHER CORRECTIONS HAVE BEEN MADE. The essays must be on the TWO critical lens quotes (below), making connections to the themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice in both The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis.
  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."

    *See previous days' classwork to identify the details of each paragraph.

  • How will students effectively write two critical lens essays using The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).
    Friday, April 8th, 2011: 1. Do Now: FINISH your two critical lens essays (due at the end of class today)--BOTH WILL BE GRADED AFTER THE FIRST DRAFTS AND TEACHER CORRECTIONS HAVE BEEN MADE. The essays must be on the TWO critical lens quotes (below), making connections to the themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice in both The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis.
  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."

    Use the B-REAL formula. B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. Write 2-3 body paragraphs in which you include A LOT of evidence from both novels supporting the quote. Use the words from the quote throughout your writing. Finally, include a strong conclusion in which you summarize all ideas written in your essays and connect back to the quote.

    2. Share excerpts of successful writing from the critical lens essay.

    3. When finished with the essay drafts, work on rewrites (after Ms. Conn made the necessary corrections).

  • How will students effectively write two critical lens essays using The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).
    Thursday, April 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Instructions on classwork assignments (due for Friday, at the end of class)--Write TWO critical lens essays (BOTH WILL BE GRADED AFTER THE FIRST DRAFTS AND TEACHER CORRECTIONS HAVE BEEN MADE) on the TWO critical lens quotes (below), making connections to the themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice in both The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis.
  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."

    Use the B-REAL formula. B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. Write 2-3 body paragraphs in which you include A LOT of evidence from both novels supporting the quote. Use the words from the quote throughout your writing. Finally, include a strong conclusion in which you summarize all ideas written in your essays and connect back to the quote.

    2. Share excerpts of successful writing from the critical lens essay.

    3. If finished with one essay, work on rewrites (after Ms. Conn made the necessary corrections).

  • How will students effectively write two critical lens essays using The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis? DUE TOMORROW (at the end of class time), FRIDAY, APRIL 8th:
  • Compose TWO critical lens essays (see classwork for all details).

    Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).

  • Wednesday, April 6th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Instructions on classwork assignments (due for Friday, at the end of class)--Write TWO critical lens essays (BOTH WILL BE GRADED AFTER THE FIRST DRAFTS AND TEACHER CORRECTIONS HAVE BEEN MADE) on the TWO critical lens quotes (below), making connections to the themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice in both The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis.
  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."

    Use the B-REAL formula. B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. Write 2-3 body paragraphs in which you include A LOT of evidence from both novels supporting the quote. Use the words from the quote throughout your writing. Finally, include a strong conclusion in which you summarize all ideas written in your essays and connect back to the quote.

    2. Share excerpts of successful writing from the critical lens essay.

    3. If finished with one essay, work on rewrites (after Ms. Conn made the necessary corrections).

  • How will students effectively write two critical lens essays using The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).
    Tuesday, April 5th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Rewrite (for a GRADE!!) the critical lens essay on one of the critical lens quotes (below) and connections to the themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice in both The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis.
  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."

    Use the B-REAL formula. B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.

    2. Share excerpts of successful writing from the critical lens essay.

    3. If finished with the rewrite, work on your 2nd critical lens essay (on the other critical lens quote--see above).

  • How will students effectively write a critical lens essay using The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).
    Monday, April 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish (or rewrite) the critical lens essay on one of the critical lens quotes (below) and connections to the themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice in both The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis.
  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."

    Use the B-REAL formula. B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.

    2. Share excerpts of successful writing from the critical lens essay.

  • How will students effectively write a critical lens essay using The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).
    Friday, April 1st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing the interpretation of the critical lens quotes (below) and connections to the themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice in both The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis.
  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."

    2. Introduce the B-REAL formula. B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.

    3. Work Period: Have students write the B-REAL intro. for each of the quotes.

    4. If time allows, introduce the body paragraphs and conclusion formats for the rest of the Critical Lens paper. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (6-8 sentences each) with specific examples/details that support literary elements chosen (characterization of characters and themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice) from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.

  • How will students effectively begin to write a critical lens essay using The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 4th Write ONE critical lens essay on one of these quotes:
  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."

    For the critical lens essay, write in the following format:

  • Write the introduction paragraph following this formula: B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.
  • For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (6-8 sentences each) with specific examples/details that support literary elements chosen (characterization of characters and themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice) from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote.
  • Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.

    Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).

  • Thursday, March 31st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Film Analysis of The Kite Runner. Finish looking for evidence of the following themes: sin, guilt, redemption (forgiveness for one's sins), and prejudice/discrimination.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and take notes on the evidence of the themes (sin, guilt, redemption, and prejudice/discrimination) found in the film version of The Kite Runner.

    3. Discuss the interpretation of the critical lens quotes (below) and connections to the themes of sin, guilt, redemption and/or prejudice in both The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis.

  • "In a dark time, the eye begins to see..."
  • "In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers."
  • How will students examine evidence of themes in the film version of The Kite Runner? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).
    Wednesday, March 30th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Film Analysis of The Kite Runner. Look for evidence of the following themes: sin, guilt, redemption (forgiveness for one's sins), and prejudice/discrimination. Show HW: TWO pages (handwritten) or ONE page (typed) on the PLOT (major events) of The Kite Runner, based on our film viewing up to this point. You should write as many details as possible in your own words (no internet resources should be used).

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and take notes on the evidence of the themes (sin, guilt, redemption, and prejudice/discrimination) found in the film version of The Kite Runner.

    How will students examine evidence of themes in the film version of The Kite Runner? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades and previous days' HW assignments!!).
    Tuesday, March 29th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Film Analysis of The Kite Runner. Look for evidence of the following themes: sin, guilt, redemption (forgiveness for one's sins), and prejudice/discrimination.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and take notes on the evidence of the themes (sin, guilt, redemption, and prejudice/discrimination) found in the film version of The Kite Runner.

    3. Introduce HW.

    How will students examine evidence of themes in the film version of The Kite Runner? Due TOMORROW, Wednesday, March 30th:
  • Write TWO pages (handwritten) or ONE page (typed) on the PLOT (major events) of The Kite Runner, based on our film viewing up to this point. You should write as many details as possible in your own words (no internet resources should be used).

    Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades!!).

  • Monday, March 28th, 2011: Work Period: Write a list of 10 things that are similar between The Kite Runner and The Metamorphosis. Write one paragraph of your impressions of the film version of The Kite Runner so far. Be ready to share tomorrow! How will students examine text-text in The Kite Runner? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades!!).
    Friday, March 25th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue viewing the film version of The Kite Runner. Take notes on the themes (sin, guilt, redemption and prejudice/discrimination). Look for evidence to support each theme and any connections to the novella, The Metamorphosis.

    2. Discuss and take additional notes on the evidence from the film that support the themes and text-text connections.

    How will students examine themes and text-text in The Kite Runner? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades!!).
    Thursday, March 24th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Review the answers to the Extra Credit Quiz on The Kite Runner

    2. Work Period: Begin viewing the film version of The Kite Runner. Take notes on the themes (sin, guilt, redemption and prejudice/discrimination). Look for evidence to support each theme and any connections to the novella, The Metamorphosis.

    How will students examine themes and text-text in The Kite Runner? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades!!).
    Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Extra Credit Quiz on The Kite Runner

    2. Work Period: When finished with the extra credit quiz, you should make up any HW owed.

    3. Discuss/Share: Student volunteers will share their flash-forward and flashback creative writing assignment (from yesterday).

    How will students examine themes, flashback and author's purpose in The Kite Runner? Make up any owed HW (see snapgrades!!).
    Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss the role of flashback in the novel. What is flashback? What is its purpose in a story? Why does an author use flashback? What does flashback reveal about the character who's reflecting on his past? Discuss the author's purpose in writing a novel (WHY he writes). Why do you think Hosseini wrote his novel?

    2. Work Period: Creative Writing on Flashback/Flash-Forward=Write one paragraph about yourself in 10 years (the year is 2021), which should include the following: Your age, your career, your status (single or married?), kids (do you have any?), house you live in, car you drive, and anything else about yourself. Explain what happens on your job to make you think of the past. Your last sentence in your paragraph should read, “I remember when…” Tell me about a TRUE flashback incident that happened to you that you will never forget. If you are able to keep going, you can include body paragraphs in which you describe the incident in detail. The more details, the better the story. You should explain and describe everything. In the conclusion, you will come back to reality and end your paper in the present.

    3. When finished with the work period, you can read The Kite Runner.

    4. Discuss/Share: Student volunteers will share their flash-forward and flashback.

    How will students examine themes, flashback and author's purpose in The Kite Runner? DUE TOMORROW,, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23rd:
  • EXTRA CREDIT: Read The Kite Runner. Take notes on the following themes (sins, guilt, redemption and discrimination/prejudice). Take note on the following questions that reflect the themes: What are Amir's burdens? How does he take steps to cleanse himself of these burdens? What obstacles prevent him from redemption? How has this late 20th century, Afghani-American novel broken down barriers and cultural stereotypes? Take a test (for every question you answer correctly, you will earn 10 extra credit points; you can earn up to 100 points; you can increase your grade up to 10% higher!).
  • Monday, March 21st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Volunteer students will share their ideas, prior knowledge and any words/phrases that come to mind for each of these themes: sins, guilt, redemption and discrimination/prejudice. How can these themes relate to our lives today? To other times in history? To works of literature, like The Metamorphosis?

    2. Discuss the role of flashback in the novel. What is flashback? What is its purpose in a story? Why does an author use flashback? What does flashback reveal about the character who's reflecting on his past? Discuss the author's purpose in writing a novel (WHY he writes). Why do you think Hosseini wrote his novel?

    How will students examine themes, flashback and author's purpose in The Kite Runner? DUE THIS, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23rd:
  • EXTRA CREDIT: Read The Kite Runner. Take notes on the following themes (sins, guilt, redemption and discrimination/prejudice). Take note on the following questions that reflect the themes: What are Amir's burdens? How does he take steps to cleanse himself of these burdens? What obstacles prevent him from redemption? How has this late 20th century, Afghani-American novel broken down barriers and cultural stereotypes? Take a test (for every question you answer correctly, you will earn 10 extra credit points; you can earn up to 100 points; you can increase your grade up to 10% higher!).
  • Friday, March 18th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish free-writing one paragraph per theme: sins, guilt, redemption and discrimination/prejudice. What ideas, prior knowledge (personal experiences and knowledge of other works of literature) and any words/phrases come to mind for each of these themes? Earn credit for classwork!

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteer students will share their ideas, prior knowledge and any words/phrases that come to mind for each of these themes.

    How will students examine themes that will be present in The Kite Runner? DUE NEXT, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23rd:
  • EXTRA CREDIT: Read The Kite Runner. Take notes on the following themes (sins, guilt, redemption and discrimination/prejudice). Take note on the following questions that reflect the themes: What are Amir's burdens? How does he take steps to cleanse himself of these burdens? What obstacles prevent him from redemption? How has this late 20th century, Afghani-American novel broken down barriers and cultural stereotypes? Take a test (for every question you answer correctly, you will earn 10 extra credit points; you can earn up to 100 points; you can increase your grade up to 10% higher!).
  • Thursday, March 17th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue to discuss the practices needed to earn the extra credit: composing post-it notes on the following--Amir's and his father's burdens/sins, guilt, redemption, and discrimination/prejudice.

    2. Work Period: Finish free-writing one paragraph per theme: burdens/sins, guilt, redemption, and discrimination/prejudice. What ideas, prior knowledge (personal experiences and knowledge of other works of literature) and any words/phrases come to mind for each of these themes?

    3. Discuss/Share: Volunteer students will share their ideas, prior knowledge and any words/phrases that come to mind for each of these themes.

    How will students examine themes that will be present in The Kite Runner? DUE NEXT, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23rd:
  • EXTRA CREDIT: Read The Kite Runner. Take notes on the following questions: What are Amir's burdens? How does he take steps to cleanse himself of these burdens? What obstacles prevent him from redemption? How has this late 20th century, Afghani-American novel broken down barriers and cultural stereotypes? Take a test (for every question you answer correctly, you will earn 10 extra credit points; you can earn up to 100 points; you can increase your grade up to 10% higher!).
  • Wednesday, March 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Grade/Review the multiple-choice questions on The Metamorphosis

    2. Introduce the author of The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini.

    3. Introduce the practices needed to earn the extra credit: composing post-it notes on the following--Amir's and his father's burdens/sins, guilt, redemption, and discrimination/prejudice. If time allows, students will free-write one paragraph per theme: burdens/sins, guilt, redemption, and discrimination/prejudice. What ideas, prior knowledge (personal experiences and knowledge of other works of literature) and any words/phrases come to mind for each of these themes?

    How will students prepare for the Regents Exam through an assessment of our study of The Metamorphosis? DUE NEXT, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23rd:
  • EXTRA CREDIT: Read The Kite Runner. Take notes on the following questions: What are Amir's burdens? How does he take steps to cleanse himself of these burdens? What obstacles prevent him from redemption? How has this late 20th century, Afghani-American novel broken down barriers and cultural stereotypes? Take a test (for every question you answer correctly, you will earn 10 extra credit points; you can earn up to 100 points; you can increase your grade up to 10% higher!).
  • Tuesday, March 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: EXAM on The Metamorphosis

    2. Honor "Beware the Ides of March" with the following links:

  • History of Julius Caesar
  • Famous Quotes from the play, Julius Caesar

    3. If time allows, introduce the extra credit.

  • How will students prepare for the Regents Exam through an assessment of our study of The Metamorphosis? DUE NEXT, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23rd:
  • EXTRA CREDIT: Read The Kite Runner. Take notes on the following questions: What are Amir's burdens? How does he take steps to cleanse himself of these burdens? What obstacles prevent him from redemption? How has this late 20th century, Afghani-American novel broken down barriers and cultural stereotypes? Take a test (for every question you answer correctly, you will earn 10 extra credit points; you can earn up to 100 points; you can increase your grade up to 10% higher!).
  • Monday, March 14th, 2011: 1, Do Now: Review the Handout on The Metamorphosis Questions to prepare for the exam TOMORROW. Determine literary terms that apply to each of the questions.

    2. Take notes.

    3. Students will share their answers to each of the review questions.

    How will students prepare for the Regents Exam by evaluating the plot's major events and characterization in the novella, The Metamorphosis? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 15th:
  • EXAM (25% of your 1st marking period grade) on The Metamorphosis. Review all questions provided and discussed in our study of the novella. Review the author's biography as well. Review all of your class notes. Use the Handout on The Metamorphosis Questions to prepare for the exam.
  • Friday, March 11th, 2011: 1, Do Now: Finish reading (modeling good reading) The Metamorphosis, pp. 35-42. Answer the following questions:
  • How do the boarders respond to Gregor? How do you feel their response might affect their choice to stay in the Samsas' home?
  • Who decides that it's time to get rid of Gregor? Why is this person's declaration heart-breaking?
  • One of the Samsa Family members says that Gregor is "persecuting" them. Is this Gregor's intention? Explain your reasoning.
  • Why does Gregor die?
  • How does the Samsa Family react to Gregor's death?
  • What was Kafka's (the author's) message in writing this novella?

    2. Discuss the questions and answers in the Do Now. Share your responses to the HW handout (due yesterday).

    3. Distribute Handout on The Metamorphosis Questions to prepare for the exam on Tuesday. Determine literary terms that apply to each of the questions.

  • How will students prepare for the Regents Exam by evaluating the novella, The Metamorphosis? DUE TUESDAY, MARCH 15th:
  • EXAM (25% of your 1st marking period grade) on The Metamorphosis. Review all questions provided and discussed in our study of the novella. Review the author's biography as well. Review all of your class notes. Use the Handout on The Metamorphosis Questions to prepare for the exam.
  • Thursday, March 10th, 2011: 1, Do Now: Continue teacher reading (modeling good reading) The Metamorphosis, pp. 35-42. Answer the following questions:
  • How do the boarders respond to Gregor? How do you feel their response might affect their choice to stay in the Samsas' home?
  • Who decides that it's time to get rid of Gregor? Why is this person's declaration heart-breaking?
  • One of the Samsa Family members says that Gregor is "persecuting" them. Is this Gregor's intention? Explain your reasoning.
  • Why does Gregor die?
  • How does the Samsa Family react to Gregor's death?
  • What was Kafka's (the author's) message in writing this novella?

    2. Discuss the questions and answers in the Do Now.

    3. Turn in the HW.

  • How will students prepare for the Regents Exam by evaluating the novella, The Metamorphosis? DUE TUESDAY, MARCH 15th:
  • EXAM (25% of your 1st marking period grade) on The Metamorphosis. Review all questions provided and discussed in our study of the novella. Review the author's biography as well. Review all of your class notes.
  • Wednesday, March 9th, 2011: 1, Do Now: Continue reading The Metamorphosis, pp. 29-35. Answer the following questions:
  • Identify evidence that Grete (Gregor's sister) is growing up.
  • Why is Gregor becoming more and more neglected?
  • How has Grete's interactions with Gregor changed?
  • How has Gregor's room changed?
  • Who has moved into the Samsas' home? How does Gregor react to these people? How do his parents and sister react to these people?

    2. Discuss the questions and answers in the Do Now.

  • How will students prepare for the Regents Exam? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 10th:
  • Fill out the Responding handout.
  • Tuesday, March 8th, 2011: 1, Do Now: Acuity Exam

    2. If time allows, discuss The Metamorphosis critical lens essays and distribute grades. Take notes on strengths in writing and areas needing improvement.

    How will students prepare for the Regents Exam? N/A
    Monday, March 7th, 2011: 1, Do Now: Read pp. 20-30 in The Metamorphosis. Finish answering the following questions:
  • What was the Samsas' financial situation now that Gregor has become an insect?
  • Why can't Gregor's parents work?
  • How does Gregor show his appreciation and gratitude to his sister?
  • How is Gregor gaining insect-like characteristics?
  • How is Gregor still in possession of his human characteristics?

    2. Discuss The Metamorphosis critical lens essays and distribute grades. Take notes on strengths in writing and areas needing improvement.

  • How will students effectively analyze the development of Gregor, the protagonist, and his family as they deal with new challenges in The Metamorphosis? N/A
    Friday, March 4th, 2011: Work Period: Write a journal entry (diary entry) as if you are Gregor, his sister, his mother or his father in The Metamorphosis. Include the character's inner thoughts, feelings, actions, interactions with other characters, and speech. This journal entry should be two full pages (handwritten). Turn in at the end of class. How will students effectively analyze the characters' points of view in The Metamorphosis? Make up any owed HW.
    Thursday, March 3rd, 2011: 1, Do Now: Read pp. 20-30 in The Metamorphosis. Answer the following questions:
  • What was the Samsas' financial situation now that Gregor has become an insect?
  • Why can't Gregor's parents work?
  • How does Gregor show his appreciation and gratitude to his sister?
  • How is Gregor gaining insect-like characteristics?
  • How is Gregor still in possession of his human characteristics?

    2. HW collection

  • How will students effectively analyze the development of Gregor, the protagonist, and his family as they deal with new challenges in The Metamorphosis? OWED HW (due by the end of TODAY!):
  • If you did not take or finish the Critical Lens Essay Exam, you must do this TODAY.
  • YOU MUST DO THESE ASSIGNMENTs--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.


    Community Service Assignment: In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (20% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:

  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.
  • Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011: Work Period: CRITICAL LENS ESSAY EXAM (you may use your book and notes) How will students effectively write a critical lens essay on The Metamorphosis? OWED HW (due by TOMORROW, THURSDAY!):
  • YOU MUST DO THESE ASSIGNMENTs--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.


    Community Service Assignment: In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (20% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:

  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.
  • Tuesday, March 1st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reading pp. 15-20 in The Metamorphosis. Answer the following questions:
  • What is an example of Gregor's newly acquired preference as an insect?
  • Which Samsa family member has taken charge now that Gregor can no longer do so?
  • How would Gregor's new role be described at this point in the story?

    2. Prepare for tomorrow's Critical Lens Essay Exam (review the introductory paragraph, body paragraphs and conclusion and the grading rurbic).

  • How will students effectively prepare to write a critical lens essay on The Metamorphosis? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2nd:
    CRITICAL LENS ESSAY EXAM on The Metamorphosis (50% of the 1st marking period). Here's the critical lens quote you will write about: “Good literature substitutes for an experience which we have not ourselves lived through.”--Alexander Solzhenitsyn (adapted). Revew in-class notes and the questions answered in class:
    pp. 3-10:
    1.) Why do you believe the author has Gregor Samsa become an insect?
    2.) What kind of job does Gregor have?
    3.) How does he feel about his job?
    4.) Why must Gregor have this job?
    5.) How do Gregor's parents and sister react to his oversleeping?
    6.) What do these different reactions reveal about them?
    7.) How would you characterize Gregor?
    pp. 10-15:
    1.) Why can't the office manager understand Gregor when he speaks?
    2.) What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
    3.) What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
    4.) What are Gregor's concerns now that he has transformed into an insect?
    pp. 15-20:
    1.) What is an example of Gregor's newly acquired preference as an insect?
    2.) Which Samsa family member has taken charge now that Gregor can no longer do so?
    3.) How would Gregor's new role be described at this point in the story?

    How to be Successful on the Critical Lens Essay Exam:

  • For the introductory paragraph of the critical lens essay, use the B-REAL formula. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.
  • Write at least 4-5 paragraphs, with 6-8 sentences for each paragraph!
  • Include a lot of specific examples from the works of literature to support your opinion of the quote.

    OWED HW (due by THIS THURSDAY!):

  • YOU MUST DO THESE ASSIGNMENTs--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.


    In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (20% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:

  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.
  • Monday, February 28th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Recap The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka--pp. 10-15. Review the answers to the following questions:
  • Why can't the office manager understand Gregor when he speaks?
  • What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
  • What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
  • What are Gregor's concerns now that he has transformed into an insect?

    2. Continue to read The Metamorphosis--pp. 15-20. Answer the following questions:

  • What is an example of Gregor's newly acquired preference as an insect?
  • Which Samsa family member has taken charge now that Gregor can no longer do so?
  • How would Gregor's new role be described at this point in the story?

    3. Turn in the HW (community service assignment, which is 20% of your grade for this 1st marking period) and introduce the essay exam on Wed.

  • How will students effectively continue to read and analyze characters' relationships and characterization of the protagonist in The Metamorphosis? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2nd:
    CRITICAL LENS ESSAY EXAM on The Metamorphosis (50% of the 1st marking period). Here's the critical lens quote you will write about: “Good literature substitutes for an experience which we have not ourselves lived through.”--Alexander Solzhenitsyn (adapted). Revew in-class notes and the questions answered in class:
    pp. 3-10:
    1.) Why do you believe the author has Gregor Samsa become an insect?
    2.) What kind of job does Gregor have?
    3.) How does he feel about his job?
    4.) Why must Gregor have this job?
    5.) How do Gregor's parents and sister react to his oversleeping?
    6.) What do these different reactions reveal about them?
    7.) How would you characterize Gregor?
    pp. 10-15:
    1.) Why can't the office manager understand Gregor when he speaks?
    2.) What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
    3.) What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
    4.) What are Gregor's concerns now that he has transformed into an insect?
    pp. 15-20:
    1.) What is an example of Gregor's newly acquired preference as an insect?
    2.) Which Samsa family member has taken charge now that Gregor can no longer do so?
    3.) How would Gregor's new role be described at this point in the story?

    How to be Successful on the Critical Lens Essay Exam:

  • For the introductory paragraph of the critical lens essay, use the B-REAL formula. B: Write a big statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today. R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote.
  • Write at least 4-5 paragraphs, with 6-8 sentences for each paragraph!
  • Include a lot of specific examples from the works of literature to support your opinion of the quote.

    OWED HW (due by THIS THURSDAY!):

  • YOU MUST DO THESE ASSIGNMENTs--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.


    In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (20% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:

  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.
  • Friday, February 18th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue reading The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka--pp. 10-15. Answer the following questions as we read:
  • Why can't the office manager understand Gregor when he speaks?
  • What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
  • What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
  • What are Gregor's concerns now that he has transformed into an insect?

    2. HW reminders (vacation HW and HW owed).

  • How will students effectively continue to read and analyze characters' relationships and characterization of the protagonist in The Metamorphosis? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:
    In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (20% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:
  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.

    OWED HW:

  • YOU MUST DO THIS ASSIGNMENT--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

  • Thursday, February 17th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish the one page (free-write) on everything we've read so far. Summarize the plot, describe the characters and include why the author made his choices.

    2. Work Period: Begin reading The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka--pp. 10-15. Answer the following questions as we read:

  • Why can't the office manager understand Gregor when he speaks?
  • What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
  • What's Gregor's relationship with his parents? Is it positive or negative? How do you know?
  • What are Gregor's concerns now that he has transformed into an insect?

    3. HW introduction (vacation HW) and reminder (HW owed).

  • How will students effectively continue to read and analyze characters' relationships and characterization of the protagonist in The Metamorphosis? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:
    In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (20% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:
  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.

    OWED HW:

  • YOU MUST DO THIS ASSIGNMENT--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

  • Wednesday, February 16th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Continue reading The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka--pp. 3-10. Finish answering the following questions as we read:
  • Why do you believe the author has Gregor Samsa become an insect?
  • What kind of job does Gregor have?
  • How does he feel about his job?
  • Why must Gregor have this job?
  • How do Gregor's parents and sister react to his oversleeping? What do these different reactions reveal about them?
  • How would you characterize Gregor?

    2. Discuss your Do Now answers. Take notes.

    3. Work Period: Write one page (free-write) on everything we've read so far. Summarize the plot and include why the author made his choices.

    4. HW reminders (HW owed).

  • How will students effectively begin to read and analyze characterization and exposition in The Metamorphosis? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:
    In honor of Black History Month, the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is a QUIZ GRADE (20% of your 1st marking period grade). You will lose -10 points for each day late. You will be required to do the following to earn a 100%:
  • Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Community Service Opportunities for Students in NYC, and Volunteer Match
  • Complete the COMMUNITY SERVICE SHEET.

    OWED HW:

  • YOU MUST DO THIS ASSIGNMENT--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

  • Tuesday, February 15th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Begin reading The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka--pp. 3-10. Answer the following questions as we read:
  • Why do you believe the author has Gregor Samsa become an insect?
  • What kind of job does Gregor have?
  • How does he feel about his job?
  • Why must Gregor have this job?
  • How do Gregor's parents and sister react to his oversleeping? What do these different reactions reveal about them?
  • How would you characterize Gregor?

    2. Discuss your Do Now answers. Take notes.

    3. HW reminders (HW owed).

  • How will students effectively begin to read and analyze characterization and exposition in The Metamorphosis? DUE FRIDAY, FEB. 11th:
  • YOU MUST DO THIS ASSIGNMENT--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

  • Monday, February 14th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Answer these pre-reading (pre-The Metamorphosis) questions about love (in the spirit of Valentine's Day!):
  • What job would you love to have and why?
  • What animal would you love to be and why?
  • What do you love about your family and why?
  • What is your most loved characteristic (personality trait) and why?
  • What would you love people to say about you?

    2. Discuss your Do Now answers.

    3. HW reminders (HW owed).

  • How will students effectively prepare to read The Metamorphosis? DUE FRIDAY, FEB. 11th:
  • YOU MUST DO THIS ASSIGNMENT--you will earn late credit (1/2 credit) for completing it: Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

  • Friday, February 11th, 2011: Work Period: Work on HW due today (the Annotated Bibliography Blog MUST be e-mailed to Ms. Conn before midnight!). How will students effectively prepare to read The Metamorphosis? DUE TODAY, BEFORE MIDNIGHT:
  • Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

  • Thursday, February 10th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Preparing to read The Metamorphosis, let's compose the following: A set of 10 rules for creating and maintaining a healthy family life (remember that Kafka and his father did not have a healthy relationship).

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the Do Now.

    3. 2. Work Period: Create word wall flashcards, using the following literary terms: characterization, conflict, tone, imagery, symbolism, metaphor, simile, foreshadowing, flashback, irony, hyperbole, repetition, mood, point of view, theme, diction, oxymoron, personification, allegory, and parable.

    How will students effectively prepare to read The Metamorphosis? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is THIS FRIDAY, February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Wednesday, February 9th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing the background on Franz Kafka, the author of The Metamorphosis. Take notes.

    2. Work Period: Work on the draft of the Annotated Bibliography Blog HW (make sure that you have FIVE books with summaries and assessments).

    How will students analyze the author of The Metamorphosis in order to prepare to read? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is THIS FRIDAY, February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Tuesday, February 8th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Students will share and discussion will ensue for the following themes from The Metamorphosis.
  • Dreams: Think of a situation from a dream you have had that seemed incredibly real at the time but that could not actually happen in real life. What happened in the dream? What details made it seem real? What feelings did you have while dreaming? Afterward?
  • Self-Punishment: Do you think people ever hope to be punished for something they have done, said or even thought? How might this wish lead people into a form of self-punishment?
  • Caregiving: Caring for a sick or elderly relative can be stressful. What stresses might result from being a caregiver? What advice might you give to someone who is a caregiver?

    2. Introduce background on Franz Kafka, the author of The Metamorphosis. Take notes.

  • How will students analyze themes from The Metamorphosis in discussion formats in order to prepare to read? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is THIS FRIDAY, February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Monday, February 7th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Students will choose one of the following themes from The Metamorphosis and write at least one page.
  • Dreams: Think of a situation from a dream you have had that seemed incredibly real at the time but that could not actually happen in real life. What happened in the dream? What details made it seem real? What feelings did you have while dreaming? Afterward?
  • Self-Punishment: Do you think people ever hope to be punished for something they have done, said or even thought? How might this wish lead people into a form of self-punishment?
  • Caregiving: Caring for a sick or elderly relative can be stressful. What stresses might result from being a caregiver? What advice might you give to someone who is a caregiver?

    2. Discuss/Share: Each discussion group will share their thoughts with the class as a whole.

  • How will students analyze themes from The Metamorphosis in written formats in order to prepare to read? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal/requirement: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). The Assessment should address at least one or all of the following questions: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Do not use first person (any form of "I"--this includes my and me). Do not use any form of "you"--this includes your, our, us, and we. You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. In the subject of your e-mail, you MUST write your first and last name. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Friday, February 4th, 2011: 1. Do Now: Discuss and share some answers to the following questions (based on the novels you chose for your Annotated Bibliography)--What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Offer your evaluation of the author's development of the plot, characters and themes. Do not use first person (any form of "I") when doing this assessment. Include at least two sentences for the assessment/reflection of each novel.

    2. Work Period: Finish your summaries and assessments for each of your five novels. Include the authors for the novels chosen. To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    How will students effectively reflect on their high school readings? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). Do not use first person (any form of "I"). You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Thursday, February 3rd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Using the novels you summarized in yesterday's class, add the following:
    Assessment/Reflection: What's your opinion about the novel? How does this novel shape/affect its readers? Do you believe that this novel changes people's thinking? Offer your evaluation of the author's development of the plot, characters and themes. Do not use first person (any form of "I") when doing this assessment. Include at least two sentences for the assessment/reflection of each novel.

    2. Work Period: Examining the poster of novels taught at ITHS, you should identify additional novels that you have read (be prepared to turn in). Write at least two sentences for each novel in which you briefly summarize the novel (for example: Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, revolves around Prince Hamlet who has found his life's mission--to take revenge against his father's murderer. Shakespeare wrote a profound play that many adolescent readers/audience can relate to, which involves a misunderstood young man and his search for meaning in his life.).

    3. Introduce the Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of the books that you've read during your high school career (your goal: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph for each book (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). Do not use first person (any form of "I"). You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    How will students effectively reflect on their high school readings? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • Annotated Bibliography Blog HW. See the Annotated Bibliographies Resource at the Purdue Online Writing Lab. Create a blog (great, free blogging websites are www.blogspot.com and wordpress.com) or original website in which you post your Annotated Bibliography of ALL books that you've read during your high school career (your goal: 5 books or more). You are to write one paragraph (minimum of four sentences) in which you include two sentences of summary and two sentences of assessment/reflection). Do not use first person (any form of "I"). You may, instead, refer to "readers" who have read your chosen novels. You must include the book titles (underlined or italicized) and authors. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) the link to your blog before midnight. You must turn in your draft work completed in class. This HW assignment is worth 15% of your 1st marking period grade! To improve your writing, include sophisticated vocabulary. Here's a useful List of Vocabulary Words.

    Read for enjoyment and for the pure love of reading! Perhaps you would like to read more novels from the "Great Books" list to add to your Annotated Bibliography!

    GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011: 1. Do Now: Fill out the Learning Goals Sheet (which can be found HERE. Find the "Learning Goals" link). Write your previous English teacher's name in the top, right-hand corner. Turn it in! Assigned seats are given.

    2. Work Period: Examining the poster of novels taught at ITHS, you should identify at least three novels that you have read (write this in your notebook). Write at least two sentences for each novel in which you briefly summarize the novel (for example: Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, revolves around Prince Hamlet who has found his life's mission--to take revenge against his father's murderer. Shakespeare wrote a profound play that many adolescent readers/audience can relate to, which involves a misunderstood young man and his search for meaning in his life.).

    How will students effectively set learning goals and reflect on previous readings? GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:
  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships
  • Tuesday, February 1st, 2011: 1. Do Now: Introduce Senior English (Regents Prep) Syllabus.

    2.Discuss/Share: What do you believe should be required in English before you graduate? What is essential for a high school graduate to know as a reader and writer? How would you define an expert reader and expert writer?

    How will students effectively prepare for the spring semester, the final semester of English in their high school career? GREAT SCHOLARSHIPS:
  • Random House Creative Writing Competition for NYC Seniors--deadline is February 11th, 2011.
  • Hispanic College Fund Scholarships