Assignments for Honors Tenth Grade, Spring 06

Assignments for Honors Tenth Grade
Spring 2006

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Tuesday, June 13 1.) Do Now: Review lessons learned from Elie Wiesel and George Orwell.

2.)Viewing of OPRAH episode with Elie Wiesel in Auschwitz and the episode which reveals the winners of Oprah's essay contest!

What can we learn from Elie Wiesel and George Orwell and their lessons to us, the readers? What can we apply from their literature to our lives?
  • Enjoy your summer! Work on building up your resume--get a job, volunteer (keep track of service hours!), take a class, write in a journal about a trip, read some good books (my recommendations: The Poe Shadow by Matthew Pearl, The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, and others--just ask me!
  • Monday, June 12 1.) Do Now: Review final 1984 quiz questions/answers.

    2.)Viewing of OPRAH episode with Elie Wiesel in Auschwitz.

    What can we learn from Elie Wiesel and George Orwell and their lessons to us, the readers? What can we apply from their literature to our lives? FINAL HW ASSIGNMENT FOR SOPHOMORE HONORS ENGLISH:
  • DUE TONIGHT (BY MIDNIGHT): JUNE WEBFOLIO.
  • Friday, June 9 1.) Do Now: Introduction of FINAL ESSAY EXAM: JUNE WEBFOLIO

    2.)Begin working on the Final--due Monday by midnight.

    How can we reflect on the acquisition of knowledge and look toward the future? FINAL HW ASSIGNMENT FOR SOPHOMORE HONORS ENGLISH:
  • DUE MONDAY (BY MIDNIGHT): JUNE WEBFOLIO.
  • Wednesday, June 7 1.) Do Now: Journal Entry #9: Thoughts on My Thesis Statement for 1984

    2.) Review the 1984 Essay Exam instructions: your chosen THESIS STATEMENT to examine 1984, 1984 and Animal Farm, or to examine the author George Orwell. Further explanation of the index card requirement--index cards that identify a quotation from the book, page number (or, if online, the Part # and Chapter #), and your interpretation of the quote--refer to class notes.

    How can we organize and sharpen pre-writing skills for our mini-research essay for 1984? DUE FRIDAY:
  • Create five more quotation index cards that support your thesis statement. You should have a total of 10 quotation index cards (formatted like the in-class sample) with a variety of topics.
  • Be prepared to write your essay in class on Friday, focusing on your thesis statement and using your index cards.
  • Tuesday, June 6 1.) Do Now: Quiz on Part III in 1984

    2.) Introduction of 1984 Essay Exam instructions: determine your chosen THESIS STATEMENT to examine 1984, 1984 and Animal Farm, or to examine the author George Orwell. Explain the index card requirement--minimum of five cards that identify a quotation from the book, page number (or, if online, the Part # and Chapter #), and your interpretation of the quote.

    How can we analyze the essence of 1984 and find relevant information for a research-type writing opportunity? Bring in your Thesis Statement and a minimum of 5 index cards tomorrow.
    Monday, June 5 1.) Do Now: Answer the following questions:
  • Why is 1984 a classic novel, read by countless young people all over the world?
  • Why is it important to read this literary work?
  • Why were the closing chapters of the novel expected?
  • What clues in the novel and background information about the author lead you to expect the outcome?

    2.) Share your answers for the Do Now.

    3.) Discuss Part III Chapter 4,Part III Chapter 5, Part III Chapter 6.

  • Why is 1984 a timely classic, read by high school students since the time it was published? QUIZ TOMORROW ON PART III
  • Study your notes (review notes on the characterization of Winston, O'Brien, and Julia, setting, mood, conflicts, irony, and foreshadowing) and Do Nows for Part III.
  • Friday, June 2 1.) Do Now: How do you feel when you examine the images of enemies? Write a page response.

    2.) Share your impressions about the Do Now.

    2.) Discuss Part III Chapter 3--recounting Winston's prison experience and torture, his interactions and relationship with O'Brien. Discuss student impressions of imprisonment and Winston's responses to the torture. Questions to explore: How does the Party maintain power over the people? How does O'Brien physically and mentally break Winston and enfeeble him? What empowers Winston?

    How do images influence human emotions? How do people have power over others?
  • Read and take notes on Part III Chapter 4,Part III Chapter 5, Part III Chapter 6, --taking notes on the characterization of Winston, O'Brien, and Julia, setting, mood, conflicts, irony, foreshadowing, and 10 unknown words (define them).
  • Thursday, June 1 1.) Do Now: Read "Two 'singing nuns' arrive in exile after escape from Tibet". Identify similarities and differences to the storyline in 1984 and your impressions of the article.

    2.) Discuss the article above and make connections to 1984.

    2.) Discuss Part III Chapter 2--recounting Winston's prison experience and torture, his interactions and relationship with O'Brien. Discuss student impressions of imprisonment and Winston's responses to the torture.

    To analyze political protests and resulting consequences in 1984 and around the world today.
  • Read and take notes on Part III Chapter 3--taking notes on the characterization of Winston, O'Brien, setting, mood, conflicts, irony, foreshadowing, and 10 unknown words (define them).
  • Wednesday May 31 1.) Do Now: Identify the 5 levels of needs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    2.) Discuss Maslow's hierarchy of needs. What happens if these needs are not met? How do the prisoners in 1984 reveal their human needs?

    2.) Discuss Part III Chapter 1--recounting Winston's initial prison experience, his fellow prisoners, their treatment by the Party members/guards, Parsons, and O'Brien. Discuss student impressions of imprisonment and O'Brien's revelation.

    To analyze human needs in 1984.
  • Read and take notes on Part III Chapter 2--taking notes on the characterization of Winston, O'Brien, Julia, setting, mood, conflicts, irony, foreshadowing, and 10 unknown words (define them).
  • Tuesday May 30 1.) Do Now: Quiz on Part II Chapters 4-10

    2.) Begin reading the HW: Part III Chapter 1

    To analyze the signficant events and characters in the latter half of Part II of 1984.
  • Read and take notes on Part III Chapter 1--taking notes on the characterization of Winston, prisoners/criminals, Parsons, and O'Brien, setting, mood, conflicts, irony, foreshadowing, and 10 unknown words (define them).
  • Friday May 26 1.) Do Now: Respond to the following statements and make connections to 1984, especially Part II Chapter 9/10:
  • Keep hope alive!
  • We are the living!
  • What you see is NOT always what you get.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above with neighbors and whole class.

    3.) Discuss Part II Chapter 9/10 of 1984 where it begins "When he woke it was with the sensation..."--focusing on the characterization of the prole woman, Winston, Julia, the thought police, and Mr. Charrington.

  • To analyze the methods in which hope, beauty, life and truth can be maintained in our society today and in 1984. QUIZ ON PART II CHAPTERS 4-10 ON TUESDAY:
  • Review your notes for Part II Chapters 4-10, paying close attention to chapter notes and in-class Do Nows.
  • Thursday May 25 1.) Do Now: Why is the Goldstein book valuable to Winston and to you, the reader?
    2.) Discuss Part II Chapter 9 of 1984--focusing on the depiction of the setting, mood, and conflicts in Oceania, as described by Goldstein's teachings.

    To examine the qualities of a trustworthy person in our personal lives and in 1984. IF YOU HAVE NOT FINISHED LAST NIGHT'S HW, DO THE FOLLOWING:
  • Read Part II Chapter 9/10 of 1984. Take notes on the Goldstein theories (in summary), the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia, the proles, and Mr. Charrington, settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Also, define 10 unknown words.
  • Wednesday May 24 1.) Do Now: Journal Entry #8: Someone I Can Trust
    2.) Discuss Part II Chapter 8 of 1984--focusing on the characterization of trustworthy people and untrustworthy people.
    3.) If time permits, the telephone game (to examine trust!)

    To examine the qualities of a trustworthy person in our personal lives and in 1984. Due Tomorrow:
  • Read Part II Chapter 9 of 1984. Take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston (what are Winston's perceptions/opinions of Goldstein's words?), Julia, O'Brien and Goldstein (include a summary of his theories/teachings), settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Also, define 10 unknown words.
  • Tuesday May 23 WORK PERIOD: Work on reading Part II Chapter 9 of 1984--it's due Thursday (and it's long!). Take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia, O'Brien and Goldstein (include a summary of his theories/teachings), settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Also, define 10 unknown words. Use the books in the middle drawer or read online!

    To analyze anti-government philosophies 1984. Due Tomorrow:
  • Be prepared to discuss Part II Chapter 8!

    Due Thursday:

  • Read Part II Chapter 9 of 1984. Take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia, O'Brien and Goldstein (include a summary of his theories/teachings), settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Also, define 10 unknown words.
  • Monday May 22 1.) Do Now=Google yourself and your immediate family members! What do you find? Do you find personal contact information and personal history? Keep track of this information. How do you feel about this easy access to personal information? Should it be accessible or banned?

    2.) Discuss Chapter 6 of Part II and Chapter 7 of Part II. Analyze O'Brien. What are your impressions of him? Describe Winston as a child and his mother and sister. Why is this worth analyzing? What does Winston learn about himself and what he values from these childhood memories? Why is it important to have memories and history?

    To analyze people's values and society's values in 1984 and in today's world around us. Due Tomorrow:
  • Read Part II Chapter 8 of 1984. Take notes on characterization of Winston, O'Brien, and Julia, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Also, define 10 unknown words.

    Due Thursday:

  • Read Part II Chapter 9 of 1984. Take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia, O'Brien and Goldstein (include a summary of his theories/teachings), settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Also, define 10 unknown words.
  • Friday May 19 1.) Do Now=Read the "District Takes Aim at Teens' Web Posts"--taken from the Chicago Tribune. Be ready to discuss and share opinions about the article.

    2.) Discuss the article. Connect to 1984.

    3.) Discuss Chapter 5 of Part II, analyzing parallels between the world of 1984 and our world today. Also, examine the characterization and developing relationship of Julia and Winston, description of the proles (especially through the eyes of Winston), irony, conflicts, setting, mood and foreshadowing (predictions for the fate of Julia and Winston).

    4.) If time permits, introduce HW: Part II Chapter 6 of 1984 and Part II Chapter 7 of 1984.

    To analyze restrictions on freedoms and the incitement of war in 1984 and in today's world around us.
  • Read Part II Chapter 6 of 1984 and Part II Chapter 7 of 1984. Take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia, O'Brien and other major characters, settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Also, define 10 unknown words for BOTH chapters.
  • Thursday May 18 1.) Do Now=Describe your safe place. Describe a great fear. Write individually and share with a neighbor.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above. Connect to 1984.

    3.) Discuss Chapter 4 of Part II, analyzing the characterization and developing relationship of Julia and Winston, description of the proles (especially through the eyes of Winston), irony, conflicts, setting, mood and foreshadowing (predictions for the fate of Julia and Winston).

    4.) If time permits, begin reading HW: Part II Chapter 5 of 1984.

    To depict comfort and discomfort for both students and characters in 1984.
  • Read Part II Chapter 5 of 1984. Take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia, Syme and other major characters, settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Also, define 10 unknown words.
  • Wednesday May 17 1.) Do Now=Quiz on Part I Chapters 5-8 and Part II Chapters 1-3.

    2.) Discuss the Quiz above.

    3.) Finish discussing Chapter 3 of Part II, analyzing the characterization of Julia and Winston, irony, conflicts, setting, mood and foreshadowing (predictions for the fate of Julia and Winston).

    4.) Begin reading HW: Part II Chapter 4 of 1984.

    To analyze survival tactics of the characters in 1984.
  • Read Part II Chapter 4 of 1984. Take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia, Mr. Charrington and other major characters, settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts.
  • Tuesday May 16 1.) Do Now=Respond to the following statements and make connections to 1984, especially Part II Chapter 3:
  • Ignorance is bliss.
  • Model citizens are never suspects.
  • "We are the dead!"

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above.

    3.) Discuss Chapter 3 of Part II, analyzing the characterization of Julia and Winston, irony, conflicts, setting, mood and foreshadowing (predictions for the fate of Julia and Winston).

  • To analyze survival tactics of the characters in 1984. QUIZ TOMORROW ON CHAPTERS 5-8 OF PART I AND CHAPTERS 1-3 OF PART II:
  • Review chapters 5-8 of Part I and chapters 1-3 of Part II in 1984. Study your notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia and other major characters, settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts.
  • Review your Do Now notes and all notes taken in class for the chapters mentioned above.
  • Monday May 15 1.) Do Now=Respond to the following statements and make connections to 1984, especially Part II Chapters 1 and 2:
  • Appearances are deceiving.
  • Trust no one.
  • Mission Impossible.
  • Victory!

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above.

    3.) Discuss Chapter 8 of Part I. Discuss trust and deception in terms of Mr. Charrington, Winston's childhood rhymes, the girl with dark hair, and the major events that occurred in this chapter.

    4.) Discuss trust, deception, hindrances to Winston's mission, and victory in Part II Chapter 1 and in Part II Chapter 2.

  • To analyze themes of trust and deception and plot development in 1984.
  • Read Part II Chapter 3. Take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston, Julia and any other new/previously mentioned characters, settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and 10 unknown words defined.
  • Friday May 12 1.) Do Now: Read and discuss well-known nursery rhymes and the U.S. national anthem, including Ring Around the Roses, Humpty Dumpty, and "The Star Spangled Banner". Read and interpret why death and war are depicted in these 'uplifting' songs.

    2.) Discuss Chapter 8 of Part I. Discuss the proles, Winston's visit to the prole community, the old man in the pub, capitalists, relics of the past, Mr. Charrington, Winston's childhood rhymes, the girl with dark hair, and the major events that occurred in this chapter. What lessons are learned about different classes of people in this fictional world of 1984, about the setting and general mood of the chapter, Orwell's political opinions as expressed in his writing, and symbolic significance in Part I, Chapter 8.

    To analyze signficance in underlying meanings (symbolism) in Chapter 8 of 1984.
  • Read Part II Chapter 1 and Part II Chapter 2. For each chapter, take notes on the characterization (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of Winston and other new/previously introduced characters, settings, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and 10 unknown words defined.
  • Thursday May 11 1.) Do Now: Listen to reading of an article on modern-day "Big Brother" intrusions. What are your reactions? How does this connect to 1984?

    2.) Discuss article, student opinions and connections to 1984.

    To apply 1984 to current news and work on note-taking skills.
  • No new HW due tomorrow, though any homework owed should be turned in tomorrow.
  • Wednesday May 10 1.) Do Now: Analyze political cartoons on 1984. Share with neighbor and class.

    2.) Review/Discuss Chapter 7 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters and the protagonist (Winston), setting (the canteen, the society of Oceania), mood (atmosphere created by the settings), foreshadowing (Chestnut Tree Cafe, vaporized characters), irony (situations that are the opposite which you expect--such as prostitution), and conflicts (Winston vs. himself).

    To better understand the characters' experiences in 1984 and the literary elements identified in chapters 6 and 7 in 1984. DUE TOMORROW:
  • Read Chapter 8 of 1984, taking notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new and previously mentioned characters (including Winston, the proles, Mr. Charrington, and any other new/previously mentioned characters), setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony and conflicts. Also, identify 10 unknown words and define them.
  • Tuesday May 9 1.) Do Now: Finish Journal #7 ("Forbidden Fruit") and share with class. Discuss what's forbidden in your own life, in American society today, and/or in 1984.

    2.) Review/Discuss Chapter 6 of 1984 and Chapter 7 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters (Syme, Parsons, Parsons' daughter, Katharine, proles, the girl with dark hair) and the protagonist (Winston), setting (the canteen, the society of Oceania), mood (atmosphere created by the settings), foreshadowing (Chestnut Tree Cafe, vaporized characters), irony (situations that are the opposite which you expect--such as prostitution), and conflicts (Winston vs. the girl with dark hair, Winston vs. Syme, Winston vs. himself, Winston vs. Katharine).

    To better understand the characters' experiences in 1984 and the literary elements identified in chapters 6 and 7 in 1984. DUE THURSDAY:
  • Read Chapter 8 of 1984, taking notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new and previously mentioned characters (including Winston, the proles, Mr. Charrington, and any other new/previously mentioned characters), setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony and conflicts. Also, identify 10 unknown words and define them.
  • Monday May 8 1.) Do Now: Journal #7=The Forbidden Apple. Write 250 words or more about this well-known phrase. You may want to write about what's forbidden in your own life, in American society today, and/or in 1984. Enjoy! While working on the journal entry, grades will be given and 1984 pictures will be displayed.

    2.) Review/Discuss Chapter 5 of 1984 and Chapter 6 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters (Syme, Parsons, Parsons' daughter, Katharine, proles, the girl with dark hair) and the protagonist (Winston), setting (the canteen, the society of Oceania), mood (atmosphere created by the settings), foreshadowing (Chestnut Tree Cafe, vaporized characters), irony (situations that are the opposite which you expect--such as prostitution), and conflicts (Winston vs. the girl with dark hair, Winston vs. Syme, Winston vs. himself, Winston vs. Katharine).

    To better understand the characters' experiences in 1984 and the literary elements identified in chapters 5 and 6 in 1984.
  • Read Chapter 7 of 1984, taking notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new and previously mentioned characters (including Winston, the proles, Jones, Aaronson, Rutherford, and O'Brien), setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony and conflicts. Also, identify 10 unknown words and define them.
  • Friday May 5 1.) Review/Discuss Chapter 4 of 1984 and Chapter 5 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters and the protagonist, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts.

    2.) Discuss final grades.

    To better understand the characters' experiences in 1984 and the literary elements identified in chapters 4 and 5 in 1984.
  • Read Chapter 6 of 1984, taking notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new and previously mentioned characters (including Winston's wife and the women of the Party), setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony and conflicts. Also, identify 10 unknown words and define them.
  • Thursday May 4 1.) Do Now: Quiz on Chapters 1-4 in 1984.

    2.) Review the quiz.

    3.) Review/Discuss Chapter 4 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters and the protagonist, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts.

    To better understand the characters' experiences in 1984 and the literary elements identified in chapter 4 in 1984.
  • Read Chapter 5 of 1984, taking notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new and previously mentioned characters, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony and conflicts. Also, identify 10 unknown words and define them.
  • Wednesday May 3 1.) Do Now: Class will begin physical exercises, as directed by teacher. These will include touching toes, hip exercises, and jumping jacks. All students must smile during the exercises and show enjoyment. Experience the world of 1984.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above. How did you feel from the exercise--both emotionally and physically? Explain your experience with a smile on your face during the exercises. Did you enjoy the exercises? Why/Why not? How did these exercises connect to 1984?

    3.) Review Chapter 2 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters and the protagonist, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts. Review Chapter 3 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters and the protagonist, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts.

    To better understand the characters' experiences in 1984 and the literary elements identified in chapters 2 and 3 in 1984.
  • Be prepared for a Quiz on chapters 1-4 in 1984 TOMORROW--study the literary element notes you have written.
  • Read Chapter 4 of 1984, taking notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new characters, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony and conflicts. Identify 10 unknown words and define them.
  • Tuesday May 2 1.) Do Now: Read a neighbor's HW on the reading of yesterday's immigration protest/boycott and the connections to 1984. Engage in table discussions.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above.

    3.) Student Presentations of picture collages.

    5.) Begin reviewing Chapter 2 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters and the protagonist, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts.

    To better understand unification in 1984 and better understand George Orwell's ideologies.
  • Be prepared to continue discussion on Chapter 2 of 1984 and Chapter 3 of 1984
  • Monday May 1 1.) Do Now: Read the University of Michigan fight song. Read it individually and then as a class. Sing it. How does the song make you feel? What is the song's purpose?

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above.

    3.) Gallery walk of 1984 picture collages. Using post-its, write comments--both positive and critical feedback, write questions asking about relevance and understanding, and any other comments of your choice.

    4.) Student Presentations of picture collages.

    5.) Begin reviewing Chapter 2 of 1984--sharing evidence from the novel that depicts new characters and the protagonist, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts.

    To better understand unification in 1984 and better understand George Orwell's ideologies.
  • Read an article on the immigration protest/boycott today around the U.S. The article should be found in NY Times (login: infotechnyc password: power) OR Newsday OR another approved newspaper. Write at least one paragraph (4-7 sentences) explaining how the protest/boycott compares (similar) 1984 and at least one paragraph (4-7 sentences) on how the protest/boycott contrasts (different) to 1984.
  • Friday April 28 Ms. Baratta's visit--college information session Preparation for college DUE MONDAY:
  • Read Chapter 2 of 1984 and take notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new characters, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and unknown words (at least 10--define them!).
  • Read Chapter 3 of 1984 and take notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new characters, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and unknown words (at least 10--define them!).
  • Visually represent Winston Smith (the protagonist/rebel), the ideal citizen of Oceania, and the setting of this novel. You may draw or find pictures from the internet, magazines, newspapers, etc. You may create a collage. Make sure that all pictures are significant and relevant. Be ready to explain your picture(s) on Monday. You may need to read other chapters in 1984 to be able to create your visual representation.
  • Thursday April 27 1.) Do Now: Brainstorm about the ideal citizen that would reside, as described in Chapter One of 1984. What would he/she look like, act like, sound like? Be ready to share.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above.

    3.) Finish discussing specific examples in chapter 1 of 1984 that reveal Orwell's political opinions. Refer to your political analysis composed over the vacation. Also, discuss and take notes on characterization, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and unknown words (at least 10).

    4.) Introduce HW

    To depict the characters, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, and conflicts in 1984 and better understand George Orwell's ideologies. DUE MONDAY:
  • Read Chapter 2 of 1984 and take notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new characters, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and unknown words (at least 10--define them!).
  • Read Chapter 3 of 1984 and take notes on characterization of the protagonist and any new characters, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and unknown words (at least 10--define them!).
  • Visually represent Winston Smith (the protagonist/rebel), the ideal citizen of Oceania, and the setting of this novel. You may draw or find pictures from the internet, magazines, newspapers, etc. You may create a collage. Make sure that all pictures are significant and relevant. Be ready to explain your picture(s) on Monday. You may need to read other chapters in 1984 to be able to create your visual representation.
  • Wednesday April 26 1.) Do Now: Exchange and read a classmate's literary element analysis of Chapter One of 1984. What new information did you find from your partner's analysis? Is there anything that you were impressed by in their analysis? Be ready to share.

    2.) Discuss the Do Now above.

    3.) Discuss specific examples in chapter 1 of 1984 that reveal Orwell's political opinions. Refer to your political analysis composed over the vacation. Also, discuss and take notes on characterization, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and unknown words (at least 10).

    4.) Period 8--review Animal Farm History Test.

    To make connections between poetry and 1984 and George Orwell's ideologies.
    Tuesday April 25 1.) Do Now: Create a Venn Diagram or chart (by yourself or with partner) between the speaker of Sonnet 130 and George Orwell.

    2.) Discuss the Venn/chart with the class.

    3.) Discuss specific examples in chapter 1 of 1984 that reveal Orwell's political opinions. Refer to your political analysis composed over the vacation. Also, find and taken notes on characterization, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and unknown words (at least 10).

    4.) Review Animal Farm History Test.

    To make connections between poetry and 1984 and George Orwell's ideologies.
  • For CHAPTER 1 of 1984, finish identifying characterization (personality traits, actions, speech/language, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view) of characters, setting, mood, foreshadowing, irony, conflicts, and unknown words (at least 10 words that you don't know--define). Be as detailed as you find necessary.
  • Monday April 24 1.) Do Now: Read Sonnet 130--Shakespeare's poem--to commemorate his birthday, April 23, 1564. Answer the following questions below:
  • Interpret the poem's purpose and meaning.
  • Describe the speaker's feelings.
  • Describe the speaker and explain what makes him unique/different.
  • Identify poetic techniques/terms.
  • How can you compare this speaker to Orwell?

    2.) Discuss answers and thoughts as a class.

    3.) Discuss specific examples in chapter 1 of 1984 that reveal Orwell's political opinions. Refer to your political analysis composed over the vacation.

    4.) Discussion of Orwell's passions and compare/contrast with students' passions.

  • To make connections between poetry and themes in Animal Farm, 1984 and George Orwell's ideologies.
  • If vacation HW was not turned in today, turn in tomorrow (-10 each day late).
  • Wednesday April 12 1.) Do Now: Display your poem around the room and classmates will do gallery walk and view analysis of poems' structure, summaries and poetry terms.

    2.) Exemplary poets will read poems and share analysis.

    3.) Begin vacation HW

    To make connections between poetry and themes in Animal Farm and George Orwell's ideologies. Vacation HW--due Monday, April 24th (the day we return):
  • Read "Why I Write"--essay by George Orwell. Imitate his essay style and structure by writing your own essay on a passion/skill of yours that you had as a child, continue to have, and perhaps might apply to a future career. Your essay must be a minimum of 250 words and stay true to Orwellian essay style and structure.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984 and write an analysis of George Orwell's political opinions, using evidence from this first chapter of 1984. This analysis should be a minimum of 250 words.
    When you turn in the above essays, please type, use 12 point font, double-space, and use the heading below:

    Ms. Conn (space, space, space, space, space, space) Your Name
    Sophomore CyberEnglish Period #____ (space, space) Date

    Title of your Choice
  • Tuesday April 11 1.) Do Now: Check out your class laptop and sign onto the internet--go directly to "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". Finish identifying the structure of the poem, summary for each stanza, and any Poetry Terms used. Be prepared to share with the class.

    2.) Discuss the structure, summaries, and poetry terms appearing in the poem "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" by Maya Angelou.

    3.) On your poem, analyze your own chosen poem's structure, summary for each stanza and any poetry terms used--such as repetition, personification, rhyme scheme, alliteration, hyperbole, imagery, etc. Be prepared to share with the class.

    4.) Display your poem around the room and classmates will do gallery walk and view analysis of poems' structure, summaries and poetry terms.

    5.) Exemplary poets will read poems and share analysis.

    6.) Introduction of vacation HW

    To make connections between poetry and themes in Animal Farm and George Orwell's ideologies.
  • Make up any homework owed--if necessary.

    Vacation HW:

  • Read "Why I Write"--essay by George Orwell. Imitate his essay style and structure by writing your own essay on a passion of yours that you had as a child, continue to have, and perhaps might apply to a future career. Your essay must be a minimum of 250 words and stay true to Orwellian essay style and structure.
  • Read Chapter One of 1984 and write an analysis of George Orwell's political opinions, using evidence from this first chapter of 1984. This analysis should be a minimum of 250 words.
  • Monday April 10 1.) Do Now: Check out your class laptop and sign onto the internet--go directly to "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". Identify the structure of the poem, summary for each stanza, and any Poetry Terms used. Be prepared to share with the class.

    2.) Discuss the structure, summaries, and poetry terms appearing in the poem "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" by Maya Angelou.

    3.) On your poem, analyze your own chosen poem's structure, summary for each stanza and any poetry terms used--such as repetition, personification, rhyme scheme, alliteration, hyperbole, imagery, etc. Be prepared to share with the class.

    4.) Display your poem around the room and classmates will do gallery walk and view analysis of poems' structure, summaries and poetry terms.

    5.) Exemplary poets will read poems and share analysis.

    To make connections between poetry and themes in Animal Farm.
  • Make up any homework owed--if necessary.
  • Friday April 7 1.) Do Now: Check out your class laptop and sign onto the internet--go directly to www.nicenet.org and choose a discussion forum on "Freedom's Plow" that you plan to share a response.

    2.) Discuss www.nicenet.org discussion forums and responses to "Freedom's Plow"--historical context, connections to Animal Farm and poetic devices.

    3.) Identify poetic devices and structure of the poem.

    4.) Introduction of HW.

    To make connections between poetry and history of the slaves to Animal Farm.
  • Find a poem (preferably by a well-known poet like Langston Hughes, Julia Alvarez, Maya Angelou, Emily Dickinson, Shakespeare, etc.) that focuses on a theme in Animal Farm. Be ready to share the poem and answer the following questions: Why did you choose this poem? How does it focus on your theme? How can it connect to Animal Farm--the historical context and/or George Orwell's ideologies? You may want to use these poetry search sites: Poem Hunter, Poets.org, or Poetry Archives.
  • Thursday April 6 1.) Do Now: Check out your class laptop and sign onto the internet.

    2.) Read aloud "Freedom's Plow" by Langston Hughes.

    3.) Read nicenet.org discussion forums on "Freedom's Plow"--its historical context, connections to Animal Farm, and poetic devices. Share your responses to the discussion forum comments.

    To make connections between poetry and history of the slaves to Animal Farm.
  • Read at least 3 comments (not your own) in the discussion forums on "Freedom's Plow" on nicenet.org. Be ready to discuss the forum comments tomorrow.
  • Wednesday April 5 1.) Do Now: Read (in a gallery walk) your classmates' thematic poems.

    2.) Comment/Discuss themes in Animal Farm and reactions to your classmates' poems.

    3.) Volunteers to share Journal #6.

    4.) Introduction of poetry HW and nicenet discussion forums.

    To apply themes in Animal Farm to current real-life situations that we can relate to today.
  • Respond in nicenet.org to one of the "Freedom's Plow" poem discussions. Read the poem and respond to a discussion forum of your choice.
  • Tuesday April 4 1.) Do Now: With your partner, finish rewriting your 3 rules (behaviors and consequences, just as Squealer did) to make exceptions for certain people or groups. There is no minimum word requirement for this assignment, just be ready to share your rewritten rules with the class.

    2.) Share your new, interpretive ITHS rules, based on the Discipline Code. Connect to Animal Farm.

    3.) Share your favorite sentence (with vocabulary word) from Journal #6.

    4.) Eliminate unnecessary words from last night's homework--the themes in Animal Farm. Keep the essential words and turn your prose into poetic form, eliminating unessential words (such as: a, the, in, or, after).

    To apply themes in Animal Farm to current real-life situations that we can relate to today.
  • Finish the poetic transformation of your Animal Farm thematic prose.
  • Monday April 3 1.) Do Now: Read the following-Laws and rules are a part of everyone's life. Some are obeyed, some are not, and some are just outright ignored. Some rules are "bent" to help an individual or a group when they are caught disobeying them. Read the rules and possible consequences on pp. 10-16 in the NYC Education Discipline Code handbook.
  • With a partner, select 3 unacceptable behaviors (from the Discipline Code handbook) that you think are frequently changed to benefit one student or a group of students.
  • Witb your partner, rewrite 3 rules (behaviors and consequences, just as Squealer did) to make exceptions for certain people or groups. There is no minimum word requirement for this assignment, just be ready to share your rewritten rules on Monday.

    2.) Share Journal #6 with class!

  • To apply themes in Animal Farm to current real-life situations that we can relate to today.
  • Determine at least 3 themes-universal message, general idea or insight about life that a writer wishes to express--in Animal Farm. Write at least one paragraph supporting your theme--with real evidence from the story.
  • Friday Mar 31 1.) Do Now: Reaad the following-Laws and rules are a part of everyone's life. Some are obeyed, some are not, and some are just outright ignored. Some rules are "bent" to help an individual or a group when they are caught disobeying them. Read the rules and possible consequences on pp. 10-16 in the NYC Education Discipline Code handbook.
  • With a partner, select 3 unacceptable behaviors (from the Discipline Code handbook) that you think are frequently changed to benefit one student or a group of students.
  • Witb your partner, rewrite 3 rules (behaviors and consequences, just as Squealer did) to make exceptions for certain people or groups. There is no minimum word requirement for this assignment, just be ready to share your rewritten rules on Monday.

    2.) Begin HW--Journal #6: Animal Farm Vocabulary Story

  • Write a creative story (on the topic of your choice!) in which you use 20 of the 28 vocabulary words (from the quiz). You must include your chosen 20 vocabulary words, underlined and correctly used in your original story. Make sure to stay focused on your chosen topic.
  • Write a minimum of 250 words.

  • To apply themes in Animal Farm to current real-life situations that we can relate to today. Journal #6: Animal Farm Vocabulary Story--DUE MONDAY
  • Write a creative story (on the topic of your choice!) in which you use 20 of the 28 vocabulary words (from the quiz). You must include your chosen 20 vocabulary words, underlined and correctly used in your original story. Make sure to stay focused on your chosen topic.
  • Write a minimum of 250 words.


  • Period 8 class only: Finish reading Chapter 10--identifying historical and current event significance.
  • Thursday Mar 30 1.) Do Now: Animal Farm Vocabulary Quiz

    2.) Continue to read aloud Chapter 10--identifying historical and current event significance.

    To examine and apply the historical and current event significance of a literary classic, Animal Farm.
  • No Homework. Enjoy your evening off. Read a good book or check out some newspapers online, such as NEW YORK TIMES (login: infotechnyc
    password: power).
  • Wednesday Mar 29 1.) Do Now: Make a prediction about the future of Animal Farm (10 years after chapter IX).

    2.) Share predictions. Read chapter X aloud and discuss historical and current event relevance.

    To examine and apply the historical and current event significance of a literary classic, Animal Farm.
  • Learn the following Animal Farm Vocabulary--quiz tomorrow. It's a great game and easy to learn the vocabulary! VOCABULARY QUIZ TOMORROW!
  • Tuesday Mar 28 1.) Do Now: Review/Discuss historical and current relevance of chapter IX of Animal Farm.

    2.) Show Animal Farm history flashcards.

    To examine and understand the historical significance of a literary classic, Animal Farm.
  • If you haven't done so, read chapter IX and take notes in the margin on historical and current event relevance, as well as your opinions/reactions (we will read chapter X) tomorrow.
  • Monday Mar 27 1.) Do Now: Introduce instructions for today's test on history behind Animal Farm.

    2.) History Test on Animal Farm

    3.) Begin reading HW--finish reading chapters IX and X, taking notes in the margin on historical and current event relevance, as well as your opinions/reactions.

    To examine and understand the historical significance of a literary classic, Animal Farm.
  • Finish reading the rest of Animal Farm. Underline and take notes in the margin on historical and current event relevance, as well as your opinions/reactions. Be prepared to discuss the end of the novel tomorrow.
  • Friday Mar 24 NO CLASS TODAY DUE TO PARENT/TEACHER CONFERENCES. N/A
  • Finish your 37 flashcards and study the facts for the historical connections to the plot and characters in Animal Farm. You can find these historical connections HERE. You will have a historical connections in Animal Farm TEST on Monday. The more history you learn that connects to Animal Farm, the more successful you will be on Monday's test. Make sure that you can you support your historical claims with real evidence from Animal Farm.
  • Finish chapters IX and X in Animal Farm by Tuesday.
  • Thursday Mar 23 1.) Do Now: Read Chapter VIII in Animal Farm--identifying evidence of how the Animal Farm has become a tyrannical society (and no longer the revolutionary government they had hoped for) and evidence that supports "absolute power corrupts absolutely."

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss/Share signs of tyranny in Chapter VIII.

    3.) Review the HISTORICAL CONNECTIONS IN ANIMAL FARM.

  • To evaluate historical and modern connections in Animal Farm--making older literary texts relevant to today's modern world.
  • To analyze text and identify evidence that supports a specific theme--"absolute power corrupts absolutely."

  • Study your flashcards for the historical connections to the plot and characters in Animal Farm. You can find these historical connections HERE. You will have a historical connections in Animal Farm TEST on Monday. The more history you learn that connects to Animal Farm, the more successful you will be on Monday's test. Make sure that you can you support your historical claims with real evidence from Animal Farm.
  • Wednesday Mar 22 1.) Do Now: Read Chapter VII in Animal Farm--identifying support and hindrances to the revolution.

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss/Share supporting and hindering evidence on the revolution in Chapter VII.

    3.) Review the HISTORICAL CONNECTIONS IN ANIMAL FARM.

    To evaluate historical and modern connections in Animal Farm--making older literary texts relevant to today's modern world.
  • Make flashcards for the historical connections to the plot and characters in Animal Farm. You can find these historical connections HERE. This is due TOMORROW. You will have a historical connections in Animal Farm TEST on Monday.
  • Tuesday Mar 21 1.) Do Now: Read the Nicenet Discussion Responses.

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss/Share thoughts about the Nicenet Discussion Forums.

    3.) Discuss the supporting evidence for the revolution and hindering evidence against the revolution in chapter VI of Animal Farm.

    To analyze literature, using habits of proficient readers--writing notes in the margin, underlining evidence of an assigned topic, and creating expressive writing on a literary theme.
  • In the margins of chapters I-VI, write notes marking historical connections, as identified HERE. Be ready to share tomorrow.
  • Monday Mar 20 1.) Do Now: Read the Nicenet Discussion Responses and read the AM New York article "Three's Not a Charm for Middle East" and identify propaganda efforts in favor of the war. How does this connect to Animal Farm?

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss/Share thoughts about the article and Nicenet Discussion Forums.

    3.) Discuss the supporting evidence for the revolution and hindering evidence against the revolution in chapter V of Animal Farm.

    To analyze literature, using habits of proficient readers--writing notes in the margin, underlining evidence of an assigned topic, and creating expressive writing on a literary theme.
  • Read chapter VI in Animal Farm and find (take notes in the margin and underline key words/phrases) the following in the reading:
  • Evidence that supports and hinders the rebellion/revolution, including characters who are leaders, followers, and strayers. Also, identify events that support the revolution.
  • Friday Mar 17 1.) Do Now: Journal Entry #5: The Making of a Leader. Write a minimum of 250 words. Explain how a leader is created, in your own opinion. You may use prior knowledge, historical examples, and evidence from Animal Farm.

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss/Share Journal Entry #5. Discuss both the supporters and hindrances to the revolution in Chapter IV. Discuss how the Animal Farm's government and newly established rules are changing to benefit the leaders of the revolution.

    3.) Discuss the strengths and weaknesses in the Night essays.

    To analyze literature, using habits of proficient readers--writing notes in the margin, underlining evidence of an assigned topic, and creating expressive writing on a literary theme.
  • Read chapter V in Animal Farm and find (take notes in the margin and underline key words/phrases) the following in the reading:
  • Evidence that supports and hinders the rebellion/revolution, including characters who are leaders, followers, and strayers. Also, identify events that support the revolution.
  • Post a response on one of the discussion forums on Nicenet Discussion. Make sure to login appropriately and follow the directions carefully. The discussion forums will be available Saturday, March 18th.
  • Thursday Mar 16 1.) Do Now: What historical connections can you make to Animal Farm? Identify governments and/or leaders that can relate to events and characters in the novel. Use your historical research from Friday's homework.

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss both the supporters and hindrances to the revolution in Chapter III. Discuss how the Animal Farm's government and newly established rules are changing to benefit the leaders of the revolution.

    3.) Introduce chapter IV for Animal Farm.

    To identify events and characters that support and hinder the path to a revolution, as expressed in the satirical allegory, Animal Farm.
    Read chapter IV in Animal Farm and find (take notes in the margin and underline key words/phrases) the following in the reading:
  • Evidence that supports and hinders the rebellion/revolution, including characters who are leaders, followers, and strayers. Also, identify events that support the revolution.
  • Wednesday Mar 15 1.) Do Now: Who/What are potential obstacles to the revolution? Explain your reasoning for these obstacles.

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss the obstacles to the revolution. Discuss the characters and events that support a revolution in Chapter II--the initial events and the leading characters that direct the revolution on Manor Farm. Discuss the new rules created from the animals' rebellion.

    3.) Introduce chapter III for Animal Farm.

    To introduce events and characters that support and hinder the path to a revolution, as expressed in our new novel Animal Farm.
    Read chapter III in Animal Farm and find (take notes in the margin and underline key words/phrases) the following in the reading:
  • Evidence that supports and hinders the rebellion/revolution, including characters who are leaders, followers, and strayers. Also identify events that lead to the revolution.
  • Tuesday Mar 14 1.) Do Now: Identify the path to a revolution. For each page of Chapter I, identify the events and clues (such as characters with potential for leadership and following of a rebellion) that will lead to a revolution.

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss the path to a revolution in Chapter I--the initial events and the leading characters that direct the revolution on Manor Farm.

    3.) Identify the animals' pain and suffering on Manor Farm. Identify the new rules created from the animals' rebellion.

    4.) Introduce chapter 2 for Animal Farm.

    To introduce events and individuals' character traits that support the path to a revolution, as expressed in our new novel Animal Farm.
    Read chapter 2 in Animal Farm and find the following in the reading:
  • Evidence that lead to the rebellion/revolution, including characters who are leaders, followers, and strayers and events that lead to the revolution.
  • Monday Mar 13 1.) Do Now: Choose your own group of 4. Choose a leader. Explain why you chose your group leader. Identify the person who will most likely argue/challenge the leader. Explain what type of challenge/argument/conflict may exist and why. Answer the following questions and discuss with your group. How does an individual or group acquire power? How is a power struggle initiated? How does an individual or group lose power? Discuss as a class.

    2.) Class Discussion: Discuss what it takes to be a great leader--characterize him/her by discussing personality traits, actions, beliefs/values, people's points of view, and the government he/she established (including when and where it existed). Discuss governments that have been overthrown in history. Discuss the governments, where, when, and how they were overthrown, who overthrew the governments, what was the form of rebellion, and why it happened.

    3.) Introduce chapter 1 for Animal Farm and identify the explorative questions that will be answered during the reading.

    To explore both oral and written expression in order to introduce the theme of "power struggle" in our new novel Animal Farm.
    Read chapter 1 in Animal Farm and answer the following questions:
  • Which character is the natural leader? Describe the character traits and actions of this natural leader. Who is a natural follower? Describe the character traits and actions of this natural follower. What do you predict will happen in chapter 2? Explain your reasoning for these predictions based on what you've read so far and what you know about the author, George Orwell.
  • Friday Mar 10 1.) Do Now: Viewing of "Alfred Nobel--the Man" video/Discuss George Orwell--the man--and explain essential facts that are necessary to know before reading his literary works.
    2.) Using chart paper, identify the pros and corresponding cons of a Utopian Society.
    3.) Discussion/Debate on the pros and cons of a Utopian Society. Questions worth discussing: How could this fictional utopia be created and executed? Why are these utopian qualities considered ideal? Why couldn't they work?
    4.) Describe characteristics (personality traits, actions, thoughts/feelings, values/beliefs, and the people's points of view) of a great leader (imagine a leader who would lead a utopian government).
    5.) Describe the qualities of a dystopian government--one which would be overthrown.
    To explore both oral and written expression in order to identify themes in our new novel Animal Farm.
    Identify one of the following in 250 words or more:
  • A great leader in history--characterize him/her by explaining personality traits, actions, beliefs/values, people's points of view, and the government he/she established (including when and where it existed).
  • A government that has been overthrown in history. Describe what kind of government it was, where, when, how it was overthrown, who overthrew the government, what was the form of rebellion, and why it happened.
  • Thursday Mar 9 1.) Do Now: Finish Speech Presentations
    2.) Reflections & Evaluations--Calculate your Presentation grade, based on the class evaluations.
    3.) Viewing of "Alfred Nobel--the Man" video
    4.) Using chart paper, identify the pros and corresponding cons of a Utopian Society.
    5.) Discussion/Debate on the pros and cons of a Utopian Society
    To explore both oral and written expression in order to identify themes in our new novel Animal Farm.
  • Read as much as you can about GEORGE ORWELL and identify THREE important facts that you feel are essential to know before you read his political satire Animal Farm. Bring these facts in tomorrow and be ready to share.
  • Wednesday Mar 8 1.) Do Now: Speech Presentations
    2.) Reflections & Evaluations--Calculate your Presentation grade, based on the class evaluations.
    3.) If time permits, viewing of "Alfred Nobel--the Man" video
    To assess presentations of Nobel Peace Prize Speeches.
    To explore both oral and written expression.
  • Journal Entry #4: My Utopian Society. Describe your vision of a utopian society. What would a perfect society look like? Describe the type of government in power. Describe the laws/rules of this society. How would the general public act, think, and feel? Identify the positives (pros) and negatives (cons) that may exist in your utopian society. Remember, all journal entries must be a minimum of 250 words.
  • Return Night books to Ms. Conn.
  • Tuesday Mar 7 1.) Do Now: Review Speech Evaluation Criteria
    2.) Speech Presentations
    3.) Reflections and Evaluations
    To assess presentations of Nobel Peace Prize Speeches.
    To explore both oral and written expression.
  • For those who have not yet presented, practice your Nobel Peace Prize speeches.
  • Return Night books to Ms. Conn.
  • Monday Mar 6 1.) Do Now: Introduce new website and its components--www.msconn.net.
    Review Speech Evaluation Criteria
    2.) Speech Presentations
    3.) Reflections and Evaluations
    To assess presentations of Nobel Peace Prize Speeches.
    To explore both oral and written expression.
  • For those who have not yet presented, practice your Nobel Peace Prize speeches.
  • Return Night books to Ms. Conn.