Ms. Conn's Sophomore English Assignments, Fall 2012/Winter 2013

Ms. Conn's Sophomore English Assignments
Fall 2012/Winter 2013

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Friday, January 18th, 2013: Work Period: Write a letter to Ms. Conn, using at least 10 vocabulary words correctly, in which you prove that you are worthy of a good grade. Use evidence to prove yourself. Identify the grade that you think you deserve. How will students effectively culminate the semester? N/A
Thursday, January 17th, 2013: Work Period: To earn the FULL 15% of your classwork grade for this 3rd marking period, answer (or show the answers) the following questions:
1.) From September 12th, 2012, in the LA section of your notebook, identify one new fact learned about the Holocaust (from your K/W/L chart)?
2.) From October 1st and October 2nd, 2012, in the LA section of your notebook: In Chapter 3 of Night, what is the Kaddish and why doesn't Elie and his father say it?
3.) From October 9th, 2012, in the LA section of your notebook: Interpret the following quote in your own words: "All conflict in literature is, in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil." Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why. Explain how Night by Elie Wiesel supports the quote.
4.) From October 15th, 2012, in the Gratitude section of your notebook: In your Gratitude section, write 10 things you are grateful for as a person living in New York City in 2012 (write 5 grateful things for living in NYC and 5 grateful things for living in 2012).
5.) From October 19th, 2012, in the LA section of your notebook: Do Now: Even though it was 1944, and the Nazi extermination of Jews had begun years earlier, the Sighet (of Transylvania) Jews had very few facts about it. Do you think it is possible in today’s world for a community to know so little, to be so unprepared? Explain.
6.) From November 5th, 2012, in the Gratitude section of your notebook: Do Now: In your Gratitude section, write 10 blessings that you are grateful for after Hurricane Sandy.
7.) From November 13th, 2012, identify one strategy for success on the midterm exam.
8.) From November 29th, 2012: Do Now: Identify three qualities of a utopian (perfect) farm, from the animals' perspective.
9.) From December 11th, 2012, you created a Venn Diagram in the LA section of your notebook. Identify one similarity and one difference between Night and Animal Farm.
10.) From January 2nd, 2013, in the LA section of your notebook: Choose one character from your independent novel and imagine that he/she would make a new year's resolution to fix something in his/her life (perhaps a character trait or an action/choice). What would be your chosen character's new year's resolution?
11.) From January 7th, 2013, in the LA section of your notebook: What is Maya Angelou trying to say in her poem, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings"?
12.) From January 8th, 2013, in the LA section of your notebook: Do Now: Finish brainstorming an animal that best fits you (think of an animal that matches your personality, actions, thoughts/feelings, and experiences). Next, brainstorm an animal that you desire to be (think of an animal that has traits that you wish you possessed, actions, experiences, etc.).
13.) From January 9th, 2013, in the LA section of your notebook: Do Now: Night by Elie Wiesel, Animal Farm by George Orwell, the poem "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings", by Maya Angelou, and your original poem that models Ms. Angelou's poem are all connected because they address the following question: What is a better, more desirable life and how can anyone achieve it? Compose a thesis statement (an answer to that question) that includes the two novels and two poems (one that Maya Angelou wrote and one that you wrote).
14.) What did we do on January 10th, 2013?
15.) On January 15th, 2013, in the Gratitude section of your notebook: Do Now: In your Gratitude section, write 5 things you are grateful for this semester (since the semester is over in a few days).

Show ALL HW owed--today's the last day!

How will students effectively culminate the semester by proving their class participation throughout the semester? DUE BY THE END OF TODAY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th:
  • Show today's classwork (see the Work Period): To earn the FULL 15% of your classwork grade for this 3rd marking period, answer (or show the answers) the questions listed in today's Work Period.

    Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com) by THE END OF TODAY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th--the last day of the semester!

  • Wednesday, January 16th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish reviewing answers to the vocabulary test and the Animal Farm test.

    2. Work Period: To earn the FULL 15% of your classwork grade for this 3rd marking period, answer (or show the answers) the following questions:
    1.) From September 12th, 2012, in the LA section of your notebook, identify one new fact learned about the Holocaust (from your K/W/L chart)?
    2.) From October 1st and October 2nd, 2012, in the LA section of your notebook: In Chapter 3 of Night, what is the Kaddish and why doesn't Elie and his father say it?
    3.) From October 9th, 2012, in the LA section of your notebook: Interpret the following quote in your own words: "All conflict in literature is, in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil." Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why. Explain how Night by Elie Wiesel supports the quote.
    4.) From October 15th, 2012, in the Gratitude section of your notebook: In your Gratitude section, write 10 things you are grateful for as a person living in New York City in 2012 (write 5 grateful things for living in NYC and 5 grateful things for living in 2012).
    5.) From October 19th, 2012, in the LA section of your notebook: Do Now: Even though it was 1944, and the Nazi extermination of Jews had begun years earlier, the Sighet (of Transylvania) Jews had very few facts about it. Do you think it is possible in today’s world for a community to know so little, to be so unprepared? Explain.
    6.) From November 5th, 2012, in the Gratitude section of your notebook: Do Now: In your Gratitude section, write 10 blessings that you are grateful for after Hurricane Sandy.
    7.) From November 13th, 2012, identify one strategy for success on the midterm exam.
    8.) From November 29th, 2012: Do Now: Identify three qualities of a utopian (perfect) farm, from the animals' perspective.
    9.) From December 11th, 2012, you created a Venn Diagram in the LA section of your notebook. Identify one similarity and one difference between Night and Animal Farm.
    10.) From January 2nd, 2013, in the LA section of your notebook: Choose one character from your independent novel and imagine that he/she would make a new year's resolution to fix something in his/her life (perhaps a character trait or an action/choice). What would be your chosen character's new year's resolution?
    11.) From January 7th, 2013, in the LA section of your notebook: What is Maya Angelou trying to say in her poem, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings"?
    12.) From January 8th, 2013, in the LA section of your notebook: Do Now: Finish brainstorming an animal that best fits you (think of an animal that matches your personality, actions, thoughts/feelings, and experiences). Next, brainstorm an animal that you desire to be (think of an animal that has traits that you wish you possessed, actions, experiences, etc.).
    13.) From January 9th, 2013, in the LA section of your notebook: Do Now: Night by Elie Wiesel, Animal Farm by George Orwell, the poem "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings", by Maya Angelou, and your original poem that models Ms. Angelou's poem are all connected because they address the following question: What is a better, more desirable life and how can anyone achieve it? Compose a thesis statement (an answer to that question) that includes the two novels and two poems (one that Maya Angelou wrote and one that you wrote).
    14.) What did we do on January 10th, 2013?
    15.) On January 15th, 2013, in the Gratitude section of your notebook: Do Now: In your Gratitude section, write 5 things you are grateful for this semester (since the semester is over in a few days).

    How will students effectively culminate the semester by proving their class participation throughout the semester? DUE TOMRROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th:
  • Show today's classwork (see the Work Period): To earn the FULL 15% of your classwork grade for this 3rd marking period, answer (or show the answers) the questions listed in today's Work Period.

    Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com) by TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th--the last day of the semester!

  • Tuesday, January 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now: In your Gratitude section, write 5 things you are grateful for this semester (since the semester is over in a few days).

    2. Do Now sharing.

    3. Review answers to the vocabulary test and the Animal Farm test.

    4. Show any HW owed.

    How will students effectively culminate the semester? Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com) by THIS THURSDAY, JANUARY 17th--the last day of the semester!
    Monday, January 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now: School's Final Exam

    2. Show any owed HW.

    How will students effectively be assessed on the school's final exam? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Friday, January 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Test

    2. Make up any owed HW.

    How will students effectively be assessed on the vocabulary test and recall the main ideas, characterization and themes in Animal Farm and Night? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Thursday, January 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Baseball--divide into two teams. Divide students into two teams and draw a baseball diamond on the blackboard. Each team has three outs per inning (like regular baseball) and one player from each team goes at a time. You say a word, and the student has 30 seconds to define it. If he defines it in five seconds, the team gets a home run; within 10 seconds, it's a triple; within 15 seconds, it's a double; and just before the time limit, it's a single. If the student does not get the definition right, he's out. Draw an icon for a base runner when a student gets a hit. When a player gets to home plate the team scores a run. The team with the most runs at the end of nine innings (or whenever time runs out) wins the game.

    2. Study for Friday's vocabulary test.

    How will students effectively prepare for the vocabulary test and recall the main ideas, characterization and themes in Animal Farm and Night? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • Lists #1-6
  • Lists #7-10
  • Wednesday, January 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Night by Elie Wiesel, Animal Farm by George Orwell, the poem "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings", by Maya Angelou, and your original poem that models Ms. Angelou's poem are all connected because they address the following question: What is a better, more desirable life and how can anyone achieve it? Compose a thesis statement (an answer to that question) that includes the two novels and two poems (one that Maya Angelou wrote and one that you wrote). When finished, study for Friday's vocabulary test and any owed HW. Show HW: your original poem.

    2. Share your thesis statement and original poems.

    3. Study for Friday's vocabulary test.

    How will students understand how to compose a thesis statement and create an original poem? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • Lists #1-6
  • Lists #7-10
  • Tuesday, January 8th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish brainstorming an animal that best fits you (think of an animal that matches your personality, actions, thoughts/feelings, and experiences). Next, brainstorm an animal that you desire to be (think of an animal that has traits that you wish you possessed, actions, experiences, etc.). This is preparation for poetry writing you will do today.

    2. Work Period: You will compose a similar poem (with the same number of lines and stanzas) to "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." Your poem must follow the following requirements:

  • Your poem must be 6 stanzas (the 3rd and the 6th stanzas are repeated).
  • Your poem must contain evidence of the following poetry terms: animal imagery, repetition, and rhyme scheme.
  • Your 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th stanzas are about the animal that you most represent today. Use PASSIVE VERBS (examples: clipped and tied)
  • Your 1st and 4th stanzas are about the animal that you desire to be. Use ACTIVE VERBS (examples: leaps, floats, dips, dares, sings and names)

    3. If time allows, share your poems aloud!

  • How will students understand/analyze poetic terms and compose their own poems that imitate Maya Angelou's poetic style? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9th:
    FINISH TODAY'S POEM! Here are the instructions: You will compose a similar poem (with the same number of lines and stanzas) to "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." Your poem must follow the following requirements:
  • Your poem must be 6 stanzas (the 3rd and the 6th stanzas are repeated).
  • Your poem must contain evidence of the following poetry terms: animal imagery, repetition, and rhyme scheme.
  • Your 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th stanzas are about the animal that you most represent today. Use PASSIVE VERBS (examples: clipped and tied)
  • Your 1st and 4th stanzas are about the animal that you desire to be. Use ACTIVE VERBS (examples: leaps, floats, dips, dares, sings and names)

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • Lists #1-6
  • Lists #7-10
  • Monday, January 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now: George Orwell, the author of Animal Farm, stated the following: “A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 1. What am I trying to say? 2. What words will express it? 3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect?” Answer the following questions:
  • What is Maya Angelou trying to say in her poem, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings"?
  • What words best express her message?
  • What image or words make her message clearer?
  • Is the image or words fresh enough to have an effect?

    2. Finish reading/discussing/taking notes on "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" poem. Summarize each stanza, discuss the structure of the poem, and identify examples of poetry terms used (such as repetition, personification, rhyme scheme, alliteration, hyperbole, imagery).

    3. How does Maya Angelou's poem connect to our works of literature studied this semester, Animal Farm and Night?

    4. If time allows, discuss Maya Angelou's bio.

    5. If time allows, brainstorm an animal that best fits you (think of an animal that matches your personality, actions, thoughts/feelings, and experiences). Next, brainstorm an animal that you desire to be (think of an animal that has traits that you wish you possessed, actions, experiences, etc.). This is preparation for poetry writing.

  • How will students understand/analyze poetic terms and make connections between a poem and the novels studied this semester? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • Lists #1-6
  • Lists #7-10
  • Friday, January 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Compose two multiple-choice questions (recommendation: write these questions on the novels we studied this semester) for the upcoming vocabulary test (review old lists to refresh your memory).

    2. Read "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" poem.

    3. Answer the following questions for the poem:
    A.) What's the structure of the poem?
    B.) Summarize each stanza in your own words.
    C.) Identify examples of poetry terms used (such as repetition, personification, rhyme scheme, alliteration, hyperbole, imagery).

    4. Read the poem aloud. Discuss the answers for A, B, and C.

    How will students understand/analyze poetic terms and make connections between a poem and the novels studied this semester? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th:
    VOCABULARY TEST (25% of 3rd marking period grade) on ALL OF THE VOCABULARY WORDS STUDIED THIS SEMESTER. HERE ARE THE LISTS:

  • Lists #1-6
  • Lists #7-10
  • Thursday, January 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on your independent reading novel (prove that you read!). Show HW: 15 post-its (value: three HW assignments!)

    2. Read "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" poem.

    3. If time allows, answer the following questions for the poem:
    A.) What's the structure of the poem?
    B.) Summarize each stanza in your own words.
    C.) Identify examples of poetry terms used (such as repetition, personification, rhyme scheme, alliteration, hyperbole, imagery).

    4. Read the poem aloud. Discuss the answers for A, B, and C.

    How will students understand/analyze literary terms, especially characterization, in their independent novels and begin to study poetic terms? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments and jupitergrades.com).
    Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: What are your personal new year's resolutions? Choose one character from your independent novel and imagine that he/she would make a new year's resolution to fix something in his/her life (perhaps a character trait or an action/choice). What would be your chosen character's new year's resolution?

    2. Share Do Now.

    3. Literary Terms matching!

    4. Review the correct answers/definitions for the literary terms above.

    5. If time allows, work on tomorrow's HW.

    How will students understand/analyze literary terms, especially characterization, in their independent novels? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Of Mice and Men, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel on the correct page #s (spread throughout the novel) and, for a challenge, describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!
    Friday, December 21st, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish viewing of V for Vendetta (vendetta is a grudge, hostile feelings or hostile actions). Identify connections to Animal Farm. Answer at least 10 of the following questions for classwork, and earn one extra credit point (on your Animal Farm exam) for each correct question afterward!:
    1.) Identify the setting of the film: In what country does the film take place? In what time period?
    2.) What message is being broadcasted over the television?
    3.) What maxim (well-known saying) do you see on the wall in the alley?
    4.) Who is V?
    5.) Who is Evie?
    6.) Who are the finger men?
    7.) Why do they "remember, remember the 5th of November"?
    8.) How is the Chancellor presented to the panel of men?
    9.) What is "The Bailey"?
    10.) Who is Creedy?
    11.) Where does Evie work?
    12.) What happened to The Bailey?
    13.) Who is Guy Forks?
    14.) What's in the packages that Evie delivers backstage?
    15.) Why does V take over the news station?
    16.) What does V have to say to the people?
    17.) Why does V say that the citizens are the guilty ones?
    18.) What does it mean that "Silent obedience=consent"?
    19.) What does Guy Forks stand for?
    20.) Who do you think V represents?
    21.) Explain "Strength through unity, unity through faith".
    22.) How does the news distort what really happened with "the terrorist", V?
    23.) What objects occupy the majority of space in the room Evie wakes up in?
    24.) What does the fact that Evie hadn't had butter since she was 9 imply about the society in which she lives?
    25.) "People should not be afraid of their governments, governments should be afraid of their people"--Who says this?
    26.) What explanation does V give for blowing up a building?
    27.) What can you piece together about V's past?
    28.) What does V leave behind after killing one of his victims?
    29.) Describe Lewis Prothero.
    30.) How does V use lies to show Evie the truth?
    31.) What happened to Evie's family?
    32.) What does Evie say she wishes she was?
    33.) What does Gordon (the man Evie stays with) admit to Evie?
    34.) What does he say about wearing a mask?
    35.) What are the Scarlet Carsons, and how are they symbolic?
    36.) What is the pattern of people V is killing? What do they all have in common?
    37.) What happens to Gordon? Why?
    38.) Who do they blame for the St. Mary's attack one night on the news? (Think scapegoat!)
    39.) Identify one way in which both Animal Farm and V for Vendetta are similar.
    40.) How does the quote "absolute power corrupts absolutely" apply to both Animal Farm and V for Vendetta?

    2. Turn in classwork questions on the film. Turn in letter revisions. HW Reminders.

    How will students identify connections between the film, V for Vendetta, and the novel, Animal Farm? HAPPY HOLIDAYS AND HAVE A WONDERFUL VACATION!

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details).

    DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Of Mice and Men, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel on the correct page #s (spread throughout the novel) and, for a challenge, describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

    Thursday, December 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Continue viewing of V for Vendetta (vendetta is a grudge, hostile feelings or hostile actions). Identify connections to Animal Farm. Answer at least 10 of the following questions for classwork, and earn one extra credit point (on your Animal Farm exam) for each correct question afterward!:
    1.) Identify the setting of the film: In what country does the film take place? In what time period?
    2.) What message is being broadcasted over the television?
    3.) What maxim (well-known saying) do you see on the wall in the alley?
    4.) Who is V?
    5.) Who is Evie?
    6.) Who are the finger men?
    7.) Why do they "remember, remember the 5th of November"?
    8.) How is the Chancellor presented to the panel of men?
    9.) What is "The Bailey"?
    10.) Who is Creedy?
    11.) Where does Evie work?
    12.) What happened to The Bailey?
    13.) Who is Guy Forks?
    14.) What's in the packages that Evie delivers backstage?
    15.) Why does V take over the news station?
    16.) What does V have to say to the people?
    17.) Why does V say that the citizens are the guilty ones?
    18.) What does it mean that "Silent obedience=consent"?
    19.) What does Guy Forks stand for?
    20.) Who do you think V represents?
    21.) Explain "Strength through unity, unity through faith".
    22.) How does the news distort what really happened with "the terrorist", V?
    23.) What objects occupy the majority of space in the room Evie wakes up in?
    24.) What does the fact that Evie hadn't had butter since she was 9 imply about the society in which she lives?
    25.) "People should not be afraid of their governments, governments should be afraid of their people"--Who says this?
    26.) What explanation does V give for blowing up a building?
    27.) What can you piece together about V's past?
    28.) What does V leave behind after killing one of his victims?
    29.) Describe Lewis Prothero.
    30.) How does V use lies to show Evie the truth?
    31.) What happened to Evie's family?
    32.) What does Evie say she wishes she was?
    33.) What does Gordon (the man Evie stays with) admit to Evie?
    34.) What does he say about wearing a mask?
    35.) What are the Scarlet Carsons, and how are they symbolic?
    36.) What is the pattern of people V is killing? What do they all have in common?
    37.) What happens to Gordon? Why?
    38.) Who do they blame for the St. Mary's attack one night on the news? (Think scapegoat!)
    39.) Identify one way in which both Animal Farm and V for Vendetta are similar.
    40.) How does the quote "absolute power corrupts absolutely" apply to both Animal Farm and V for Vendetta?

    2. HW Reminders

    How will students identify connections between the film, V for Vendetta, and the novel, Animal Farm? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st--REVISE YOUR LETTER (see teacher corrections), which was one of the following (use the modified block letter format):
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    SEE CLASSWORK ON THE FILM, V FOR VENDETTA, AND OPPORTUNITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT (all due tomorrow, Friday, December 21st)!

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details).

    DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Of Mice and Men, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel on the correct page #s (spread throughout the novel) and, for a challenge, describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

  • Wednesday, December 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Exchange your letters with a neighbor and peer review/edit. When finished, turn in all letters to receive credit (you will receive your letters at the end of the period so you can revise them).

    2. Introduce vacation HW and choose a book.

    3. Continue viewing of V for Vendetta (vendetta is a grudge, hostile feelings or hostile actions). Identify connections to Animal Farm. Answer at least 10 of the following questions for classwork, and earn one extra credit point (on your Animal Farm exam) for each correct question afterward!:
    1.) Identify the setting of the film: In what country does the film take place? In what time period?
    2.) What message is being broadcasted over the television?
    3.) What maxim (well-known saying) do you see on the wall in the alley?
    4.) Who is V?
    5.) Who is Evie?
    6.) Who are the finger men?
    7.) Why do they "remember, remember the 5th of November"?
    8.) How is the Chancellor presented to the panel of men?
    9.) What is "The Bailey"?
    10.) Who is Creedy?
    11.) Where does Evie work?
    12.) What happened to The Bailey?
    13.) Who is Guy Forks?
    14.) What's in the packages that Evie delivers backstage?
    15.) Why does V take over the news station?
    16.) What does V have to say to the people?
    17.) Why does V say that the citizens are the guilty ones?
    18.) What does it mean that "Silent obedience=consent"?
    19.) What does Guy Forks stand for?
    20.) Who do you think V represents?
    21.) Explain "Strength through unity, unity through faith".
    22.) How does the news distort what really happened with "the terrorist", V?
    23.) What objects occupy the majority of space in the room Evie wakes up in?
    24.) What does the fact that Evie hadn't had butter since she was 9 imply about the society in which she lives?
    25.) "People should not be afraid of their governments, governments should be afraid of their people"--Who says this?
    26.) What explanation does V give for blowing up a building?
    27.) What can you piece together about V's past?
    28.) What does V leave behind after killing one of his victims?
    29.) Describe Lewis Prothero.
    30.) How does V use lies to show Evie the truth?
    31.) What happened to Evie's family?
    32.) What does Evie say she wishes she was?
    33.) What does Gordon (the man Evie stays with) admit to Evie?
    34.) What does he say about wearing a mask?
    35.) What are the Scarlet Carsons, and how are they symbolic?
    36.) What is the pattern of people V is killing? What do they all have in common?
    37.) What happens to Gordon? Why?
    38.) Who do they blame for the St. Mary's attack one night on the news? (Think scapegoat!)
    39.) Identify one way in which both Animal Farm and V for Vendetta are similar.
    40.) How does the quote "absolute power corrupts absolutely" apply to both Animal Farm and V for Vendetta?

    How will students identify connections between the film, V for Vendetta, and the novel, Animal Farm? DUE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21st--REVISE YOUR LETTER (see teacher corrections), which was one of the following (use the modified block letter format):
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    SEE CLASSWORK ON THE FILM, V FOR VENDETTA, AND OPPORTUNITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT!

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details).

    DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS: Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Of Mice and Men, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel on the correct page #s (spread throughout the novel) and, for a challenge, describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

  • Tuesday, December 18th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce HW. Discuss what we need in today's society: a good flood—a flood of kindness, of caring, of compassion, of goodness, of warmth, of benevolence, of support, of reaching out. There are enough of us on this planet to make sure that not one human being ever feels lost. We need a flood of connections.

    2. Viewing of V for Vendetta (vendetta is a grudge, hostile feelings or hostile actions). Identify connections to Animal Farm. Answer at least 10 of the following questions for classwork, and earn one extra credit point (on your Animal Farm exam) for each correct question afterward!:
    1.) Identify the setting of the film: In what country does the film take place? In what time period?
    2.) What message is being broadcasted over the television?
    3.) What maxim (well-known saying) do you see on the wall in the alley?
    4.) Who is V?
    5.) Who is Evie?
    6.) Who are the finger men?
    7.) Why do they "remember, remember the 5th of November"?
    8.) How is the Chancellor presented to the panel of men?
    9.) What is "The Bailey"?
    10.) Who is Creedy?
    11.) Where does Evie work?
    12.) What happened to The Bailey?
    13.) Who is Guy Forks?
    14.) What's in the packages that Evie delivers backstage?
    15.) Why does V take over the news station?
    16.) What does V have to say to the people?
    17.) Why does V say that the citizens are the guilty ones?
    18.) What does it mean that "Silent obedience=consent"?
    19.) What does Guy Forks stand for?
    20.) Who do you think V represents?
    21.) Explain "Strength through unity, unity through faith".
    22.) How does the news distort what really happened with "the terrorist", V?
    23.) What objects occupy the majority of space in the room Evie wakes up in?
    24.) What does the fact that Evie hadn't had butter since she was 9 imply about the society in which she lives?
    25.) "People should not be afraid of their governments, governments should be afraid of their people"--Who says this?
    26.) What explanation does V give for blowing up a building?
    27.) What can you piece together about V's past?
    28.) What does V leave behind after killing one of his victims?
    29.) Describe Lewis Prothero.
    30.) How does V use lies to show Evie the truth?
    31.) What happened to Evie's family?
    32.) What does Evie say she wishes she was?
    33.) What does Gordon (the man Evie stays with) admit to Evie?
    34.) What does he say about wearing a mask?
    35.) What are the Scarlet Carsons, and how are they symbolic?
    36.) What is the pattern of people V is killing? What do they all have in common?
    37.) What happens to Gordon? Why?
    38.) Who do they blame for the St. Mary's attack one night on the news? (Think scapegoat!)
    39.) Identify one way in which both Animal Farm and V for Vendetta are similar.
    40.) How does the quote "absolute power corrupts absolutely" apply to both Animal Farm and V for Vendetta?

    3. HW Reminders/Book Returns

    How will students identify connections between the film, V for Vendetta, and the novel, Animal Farm? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19th--Choose one (or more) of the following (use the modified block letter format):
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the victim's families (address the letter to: Message of Condolence, PO Box 3700, Newtown, CT 06470), sharing your comfort, sympathy and kind words. You may also want to read and reference bios of the victims or see a list of the victims' names.
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to one of the New York Senators where you express your reaction and hope for the New York Senators to call for action.

    SEE CLASSWORK ON THE FILM, V FOR VENDETTA, AND OPPORTUNITY FOR EXTRA CREDIT!

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details).

    DUE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd, 2013:
    Read your independent novel (Chosen in class! Here are the choices: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Of Mice and Men, Catcher in the Rye, or Romeo and Juliet). YOU MUST FINISH READING YOUR NOVEL BY THURSDAY, JANUARY 3rd AND COMPOSE 15 POST-ITS, which address the Literary Terms Handout. You must identify literary terms found in your novel on the correct page #s (spread throughout the novel) and, for a challenge, describe WHY the author used those literary terms in the novel, which is the author's purpose. Be ready for a quiz on your novel!

  • Monday, December 17th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Animal Farm EXAM

    2. HW Reminders

    How will students apply their study of utopia, dystopia and Communism in Animal Farm to a critical lens essay? Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details).
    Friday, December 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #10 (Show HW: flashcards for List #10).

    2. What is Orwell, the author, protesting against in Animal Farm? Give at least THREE examples of the author's protest.

    3. Discuss the T-CHARTS (examples of utopia and dystopia) for Chapters 9 and 10 in Animal Farm. Page numbers are preferred. Add more notes to your T-Charts.

    4. Go over Essay Exam details.

    4. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the author's purpose in Animal Farm, and also identify evidence of utopia and dystopia in Chapters 9 and 10 in Animal Farm? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:
  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Animal Farm Review Worksheet will be provided.
  • Thursday, December 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Compose two multiple-choice questions (with FIVE answer choices--A, B, C, D, and E) that address the utopia and dystopia in Animal Farm. Identify the correct answer. Turn it in!

    2. Identify at least ONE example from Animal Farm that George Orwell, the author, does NOT like Communism, which is portrayed in the novel. Discuss!

    3. Discuss the T-CHART for Chapters 8 and 9 in Animal Farm. Page numbers are preferred.

    4. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the author's purpose in Animal Farm, and also identify evidence of utopia and dystopia in Chapters 8 and 9 in Animal Farm? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • QUIZ on List #10
  • Flashcards for List #10

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Review worksheet will be provided.
  • Wednesday, December 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Explain how a leader is created, in your own opinion. You may use prior knowledge, historical examples, and evidence from Animal Farm.

    2. Class Interview: Interview 4 people in class, asking them the following questions:
    A.) Identify a successful leader.
    B.) Identify two character traits that make this leader successful.
    C.) How did this leader gain power?

    3. Share your findings. Connect to Animal Farm. How are these successful leaders similar to and different from Napoleon in Animal Farm?

    Show HW: T-Charts for Chapters 8, 9 and 10 (3 HW assignments).

    4. Discuss the T-CHART (three examples of utopia and three examples of dystopia for each T-Chart) for CHAPTER 7 of ANIMAL FARM. Page numbers are preferred.

    5. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the significance of a successful leader in the world today and in Animal Farm, and also identify evidence of utopia and dystopia in Chapter 7 in Animal Farm? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14th:
  • QUIZ on List #10
  • Flashcards for List #10

    DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Review worksheet will be provided.
  • Tuesday, December 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Recall that Communism and Nazism were on opposite ends of the continuum shared in class yesterday (remember, Communism is on the far left and Nazism is on the far right, while Democrats and Republicans are in the middle, but Democrats lean toward the left and Republicans lean toward the right). Though these extreme political ideologies share many qualities, as can be seen in Animal Farm and Night, respectively. Make a Venn Diagram (turn it in!) to identify what these two ideologies have in common and what's different, as seen in these two novels.

    2. Share your Venn Diagram.

    3. Discuss the T-CHARTS (three examples of utopia and three examples of dystopia for each T-Chart) for CHAPTER 6 of ANIMAL FARM and CHAPTER 7 of ANIMAL FARM. Page numbers are preferred.

    4. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the history behind Orwell's Animal Farm and identify evidence of utopia and dystopia in Chapters 6 and 7 in Animal Farm? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
  • Read CHAPTER 8 of ANIMAL FARM, CHAPTER 9 of ANIMAL FARM, and CHAPTER 10 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Review worksheet will be provided.
  • Monday, December 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now:
    A.) In Animal Farm, the "animals worked like slaves, but they were happy in their work...for the benefit of themselves" (Chapter 6, p. 59). What would make you work like a slave, if it was for your own benefit?
    B.) In Animal Farm, the pigs are the most intelligent animals. In your opinion, which animals are intelligent? What makes an animal intelligent?

    *Show HW: Two Homework assignments: T-CHART (three examples of utopia and three examples of dystopia) for CHAPTER 6 of ANIMAL FARM and CHAPTER 7 of ANIMAL FARM. Page numbers are preferred.

    2. Discuss the Do Now answers.

    3. Review the characters from Animal Farm with the real-life historical figures from the Russian Revolution seen here: Animal Farm Comparison of Characters to the Russian Revolution

    4. Discuss the T-CHART for CHAPTER 6 of ANIMAL FARM.

    5. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the history behind Orwell's Animal Farm and identify evidence of utopia and dystopia in Chapters 6 and 7 in Animal Farm? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:
  • Read CHAPTER 8 of ANIMAL FARM, CHAPTER 9 of ANIMAL FARM, and CHAPTER 10 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Review worksheet will be provided.
  • Friday, December 7th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Vocabulary List #9.

    *Show HW: flashcards for List #9

    2. Introduce List #10.

    3. Review the characters from Animal Farm with the real-life historical figures from the Russian Revolution seen here: Animal Farm Comparison of Characters to the Russian Revolution

    4. HW Reminders/Begin HW.

    How will students understand the history behind Orwell's Animal Farm and vocabulary in context? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:
  • Read CHAPTER 6 of ANIMAL FARM and CHAPTER 7 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

  • Read CHAPTER 8 of ANIMAL FARM, CHAPTER 9 of ANIMAL FARM, and CHAPTER 10 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Review worksheet will be provided.
  • Thursday, December 6th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Read the following and be prepared to discuss--
    What is Communism?
  • A movement to create a classless and stateless society
  • Significantly influenced the history of the 20th century
  • A one-party state/country claiming it represents the working class and serves the best interests of the whole of society
  • Claims to rid society of class divisions, economic inequalities, and unequal life-chances

    What is the Russian Revolution?

  • The collective term for a series of revolutions in Russia in 1917 in response to Russia's Czar Nicholas II's oppressive government
  • During the final phase of World War I
  • It removed Russia from the war and brought about the transformation of the Russian Empire into the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), replacing Russia’s traditional monarchy with the world’s first Communist state.
  • The revolution happened in stages through two separate coups, one in February and one in October.
  • The new government, led by Vladimir Lenin, would solidify its power only after three years of civil war, which ended in 1920.
  • When Lenin died in 1924, Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin struggled for power. Stalin won the battle, and he deported Trotsky into permanent exile.
  • Stalin (1878-1953) modernized Soviet industry and used vicious military tactics, including millions of executions. Stalin's government controlled the flow and content of information to the people.

    Why is Communism (a classless society where everyone is treated equally and everyone has equal rights) a good idea in theory but never works in reality?

    2. After reading the Do Now information on the Russian Revolution, in a group of 3-4 students, match up the characters from Animal Farm with the real-life historical figures from the Russian Revolution seen here: Animal Farm Comparison of Characters to the Russian Revolution

    3. Review the answers in #2.

    4. HW Reminders & Vocabulary Review.

  • How will students understand the history behind Orwell's Animal Farm? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #9
  • Compose flashcards (on the front=the word and part of speech and on the back=the definition and YOUR OWN, ORIGINAL sentence--not the sentence provided) for Vocabulary List #9

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:

  • Read CHAPTER 6 of ANIMAL FARM and CHAPTER 7 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

  • Read CHAPTER 8 of ANIMAL FARM, CHAPTER 9 of ANIMAL FARM, and CHAPTER 10 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Review worksheet will be provided.
  • Wednesday, December 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now:
    A.) How would you feel if the school's rules for correct behavior kept changing?
    B.) What are some methods people have for persuading others to follow particular rules of behavior?
    C.) Do you think it’s fair that those who are more educated or more skilled—like the pigs in Animal Farm—have more influence in decision making? Consider how decisions are made in your community, state, or in the nation. Show HW: Chapter 5 T-Chart, which includes three examples of utopia and three examples of dystopia in Animal Farm.

    2. Discuss answers to the Do Now. Review the rest of Chapter 5 and the examples of utopia and dystopia in Animal Farm.

    How will students understand the qualities of a utopia and a dystopia revealed in Orwell's Animal Farm, specifically focusing on Chapter 5? DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #9
  • Compose flashcards (on the front=the word and part of speech and on the back=the definition and YOUR OWN, ORIGINAL sentence--not the sentence provided) for Vocabulary List #9

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:

  • Read CHAPTER 6 of ANIMAL FARM and CHAPTER 7 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

  • Read CHAPTER 8 of ANIMAL FARM, CHAPTER 9 of ANIMAL FARM, and CHAPTER 10 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Review worksheet will be provided.
  • Tuesday, December 4th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing and taking notes on examples of utopia and dystopia in the T-Chart for Chapter 4 of Animal Farm.

    2. Begin reading aloud Chapter 5, identifying examples of utopia and dystopia. Enter these examples in a new T-Chart for Chapter 5 (this is the beginning of HW).

    How will students understand the qualities of a utopia and a dystopia revealed in Orwell's Animal Farm, specifically focusing on Chapters 4 and 5? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5th:
  • Read CHAPTER 5 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • Identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #9
  • Compose flashcards (on the front=the word and part of speech and on the back=the definition and YOUR OWN, ORIGINAL sentence--not the sentence provided) for Vocabulary List #9

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th:

  • Read CHAPTER 6 of ANIMAL FARM and CHAPTER 7 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

  • Read CHAPTER 8 of ANIMAL FARM, CHAPTER 9 of ANIMAL FARM, and CHAPTER 10 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • For each chapter (THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!), identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).

    DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th:

  • ESSAY EXAM (taken in class) ON ANIMAL FARM (you will apply the notes on utopia and dystopia that you've found at home, while reading, and when reviewed in class). Review worksheet will be provided.
  • Monday, December 3rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Compose word wall flashcards for Vocabulary List #9.

    Show HW: T-Chart for Chapter 4 of Animal Farm, with three examples of utopia and three examples of dystopia.

    2. Discuss Chapter 4 and share HW findings. Take additional notes to add to the Chapter 4 T-Chart for examples of utopia and dystopia.

    How will students understand the qualities of a utopia and a dystopia revealed in Orwell's Animal Farm, specifically focusing on Chapter 4? Make up owed HW, if necessary.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5th:

  • Read CHAPTER 5 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • Identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).
  • Friday, November 30th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #8.

    Show HW: flashcards for List #8 and any owed HW and extra credit (today's the last day of the 2nd marking period!

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #9.

    3. Read and discuss the rest of Chapter 3 of Animal Farm. Take notes on the utopian qualities and the dystopian qualities of the animal farm in a T-CHART.

    4. Introduce the HW.

    How will students understand the qualities of a utopia and a dystopia revealed in Orwell's Animal Farm, specifically focusing on Chapter 3?

    DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 3rd:

  • Read CHAPTER 4 of ANIMAL FARM.
  • Identify three examples of utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and three examples of the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm (add this to your T-CHART). If you have the book, include page #s for each example.
  • For an extra credit opportunity--up to 10 extra HW points (and a great challenge!): explain the significance (importance) of each of these examples to the plot (you can look back at the previous chapters to see how these examples of utopia and dystopia affect the story so far or you can make a prediction as to how these examples will affect the plot in the future).
  • Thursday, November 29th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Identify three qualities of a utopian (perfect) farm, from the animals' perspective. Identify three qualities of a dystopian (not perfect) farm, from the animals' perspective. Be ready to share.

    2. Read and discuss Chapter 3 of Animal Farm. Take notes on the utopian qualities and the dystopian qualities of the animal farm.

    How will students understand the qualities of a utopia and a dystopia revealed in Orwell's Animal Farm, specifically focusing on Chapter 3? Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details), especially the reading of Chapter 1 of Animal Farm and Chapter 2 of Animal Farm.
  • Answer the following questions that are relevant to chapters 1 and 2 on pages 6 and 7 (listed as 13 and 14 on the bottom of the pages)--handouts are given in class.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th (EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS WHO WENT ON THE FIELD TRIP)--write 2-4 sentences per question below (earn up to 10 extra HW credit points!):

  • Describe two facts that your tour guide taught you. Explain how those facts connect to your study of Night by Elie Wiesel.
  • Describe two artifacts that you saw at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Explain its personal impact on you and its relevance to the Holocaust.
  • FOR STUDENTS WHO DID NOT GO ON THE FIELD TRIP, YOU CAN DO THIS EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: write 2-4 sentences per question below (earn up to 10 extra HW credit points!)--
    Answer the following questions based on Chapter 1 of Animal Farm.
    A.) Is this story non-fiction or fiction? How do you know?
    B.) Why is this story an allegory?
    C.) What is the danger of one person or a small group of people having too much power?
    D.) Give three examples of leaders in history manipulating people?
    E.) Identify at least 3 human characteristics that the animals in Animal Farm possess.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Flashcards for Vocabulary List #8.
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #8.
  • ALL OWED HW (it's the LAST day of the 2nd marking period!).

    DUE THIS MONDAY, DECEMBER 3rd:

  • Finish reading Chapter 3 of Animal Farm.
  • Compose 6 post-its: 3 post-its on the utopian (perfect, positive, uplifting) qualities and 3 on the dystopian (dehumanizing, belittling, or negative) qualities of the animal farm.
  • Wednesday, November 28th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Read the "Beasts of England" song. What is the message of "Beasts of England" and what is its purpose?

    2. Read and listen to Ms. Conn's alma mater's Michigan fight song. What is this fight song's purpose? To unite the Michigan supporters, give pride in their school and rile up the team to bring down the enemy.

    3. Read and listen to Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall". What are the messages of this song? (Possible answers: express emotion, like anger and frustration; inspire others)

    4. Discuss/share answers to the HW worksheets. Take notes as we discuss.

    How will students personally connect to the utopia that the animals in Orwell's Animal Farm are searching for? Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details), especially the reading of Chapter 1 of Animal Farm and Chapter 2 of Animal Farm.
  • Answer the following questions that are relevant to chapters 1 and 2 on pages 6 and 7 (listed as 13 and 14 on the bottom of the pages)--handouts are given in class.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th (EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS WHO WENT ON THE FIELD TRIP)--write 2-4 sentences per question below (earn up to 10 extra HW credit points!):

  • Describe two facts that your tour guide taught you. Explain how those facts connect to your study of Night by Elie Wiesel.
  • Describe two artifacts that you saw at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Explain its personal impact on you and its relevance to the Holocaust.
  • FOR STUDENTS WHO DID NOT GO ON THE FIELD TRIP, YOU CAN DO THIS EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: write 2-4 sentences per question below (earn up to 10 extra HW credit points!)--
    Answer the following questions based on Chapter 1 of Animal Farm.
    A.) Is this story non-fiction or fiction? How do you know?
    B.) Why is this story an allegory?
    C.) What is the danger of one person or a small group of people having too much power?
    D.) Give three examples of leaders in history manipulating people?
    E.) Identify at least 3 human characteristics that the animals in Animal Farm possess.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Flashcards for Vocabulary List #8.
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #8.
  • ALL OWED HW (it's the LAST day of the 2nd marking period!).
  • Tuesday, November 27th, 2012: 1. Do Now:
    CREATE YOUR UTOPIAN SCHOOL’S MISSION. CREATE 7 COMMANDMENTS FOR YOUR UTOPIAN SCHOOL. MAKE SURE THAT YOUR COMMANDMENTS SUPPORT YOUR MISSION.

    HERE ARE THE COMMANDMENTS FROM ANIMAL FARM TO USE AS A MODEL:


    1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.
    2. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.
    3. No animal shall wear clothes.
    4. No animal shall sleep in a bed.
    5. No animal shall drink alcohol.
    6. No animal shall kill any other animal.
    7. All animals are equal.

    The Animals’ Mission: All animals are against the enemy, humans, and no animals shall act like a human.

    2. Discuss/Share your utopian school's mission and commandments. Then, discuss/share answers to the HW worksheets. Take notes as we discuss.

    How will students personally connect to the utopia that the animals in Orwell's Animal Farm are searching for? Make up any owed HW (see previous days for details)!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th (EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS WHO WENT ON THE FIELD TRIP)--write 2-4 sentences per question below (earn up to 10 extra HW credit points!):

  • Describe two facts that your tour guide taught you. Explain how those facts connect to your study of Night by Elie Wiesel.
  • Describe two artifacts that you saw at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Explain its personal impact on you and its relevance to the Holocaust.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Flashcards for Vocabulary List #8.
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #8.
  • ALL OWED HW (it's the LAST day of the 2nd marking period!).
  • Monday, November 26th, 2012: 1. Do Now:
    A.) In your Gratitude section, write three things/people/experiences you are grateful for from your Thanksgiving weekend. Then, write three of your character traits (qualities that you personally possess) that you are grateful for.
    B.) Choose one of the characters from Animal Farm and write the first paragraph in his personal diary (write in first person).

    Show HW: two worksheets for the first two chapters of Animal Farm and extra credit HW, if completed.

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #8.

    3. Discuss/Share the HW.

    How will students prepare to study Orwell's Animal Farm through personal and historical connections? Make up any owed HW!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th (EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS WHO WENT ON THE FIELD TRIP)--write 2-4 sentences per question below (earn up to 10 extra HW credit points!):

  • Describe two facts that your tour guide taught you. Explain how those facts connect to your study of Night by Elie Wiesel.
  • Describe two artifacts that you saw at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Explain its personal impact on you and its relevance to the Holocaust.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th:

  • Flashcards for Vocabulary List #8.
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #8.
  • Wednesday, November 21st, 2012: 1. Do Now: EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES--write 2-4 sentences per question below (earn up to 10 extra HW credit points!)--
    Answer the following questions based on Chapter 1 of Animal Farm.
    A.) Is this story non-fiction or fiction? How do you know?
    B.) Why is this story an allegory?
    C.) What is the danger of one person or a small group of people having too much power?
    D.) Give three examples of leaders in history manipulating people?
    E.) Identify at least 3 human characteristics that the animals in Animal Farm possess.

    2. Work on the HW.

    How will students prepare to study Orwell's Animal Farm through personal and historical connections? HAVE A WONDERFUL THANKSGIVING!

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26th (after Thanksgiving):

  • Read Chapter 1 of Animal Farm and Chapter 2 of Animal Farm.
  • Answer the following questions that are relevant to chapters 1 and 2 on pages 6 and 7 (listed as 13 and 14 on the bottom of the pages)--handouts are given in class.
  • Tuesday, November 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish discussing the HW (see handouts on the author and Animal Farm): Answers to the following questions:
    1.) What are two reasons that George Orwell became an author? Refer to his life experiences.
    2.) Why is the novel Animal Farm so popular?
    3.) How did George Orwell feel about government? Give at least one example from the reading.
    BONUS (up to 5 points!) 4.) Describe George Orwell's utopia.
    BONUS (up to 5 points!) 5.) Identify similarities between George Orwell and Elie Wiesel. Identify similarities between Animal Farm and Night.

    2. Begin reading Chapter 1 of Animal Farm. Is this story non-fiction or fiction? How do you know? Why is this story an allegory?

    3. Introduce the HW.

    How will students prepare to study Orwell's Animal Farm by evaluating the author's life and times and making personal connections to the novel's themes of the value of rules and the desire for rebellion? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26th (after Thanksgiving):
  • Read Chapter 1 of Animal Farm and Chapter 2 of Animal Farm.
  • Answer the following questions that are relevant to chapters 1 and 2 on pages 6 and 7 (listed as 13 and 14 on the bottom of the pages)--handouts are given in class.
  • Monday, November 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Review last Friday's discussion: your group wants to rise up and revolt against the school to create a utopian school. For the group leader: Identify three school rules that you want to change, and create three new school rules. Is everyone in the group satisfied with the leader's changes and new rules? Explain. Did any disagreements/conflicts arise? Explain.

    2. Distribute copies of Animal Farm. Fill out book receipts. What can you predict about the novel based on the title and the back cover's summary?

    *Show HW: Answers to the following questions:
    1.) What are two reasons that George Orwell became an author? Refer to his life experiences.
    2.) Why is the novel Animal Farm so popular?
    3.) How did George Orwell feel about government? Give at least one example from the reading.
    BONUS (up to 5 points!) 4.) Describe George Orwell's utopia.
    BONUS (up to 5 points!) 5.) Identify similarities between George Orwell and Elie Wiesel. Identify similarities between Animal Farm and Night.

    3. Discuss HW questions. Make predictions about the novel based on the title and the back cover's summary.

    4. Begin reading Chapter 1 of Animal Farm. Is this story non-fiction or fiction? How do you know? Why is this story an allegory?

    How will students prepare to study Orwell's Animal Farm by evaluating the author's life and times and making personal connections to the novel's themes of the value of rules and the desire for rebellion? DUE NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26th:
  • Read Chapter 1 of Animal Farm and Chapter 2 of Animal Farm.
  • Answer the following questions:
  • Friday, November 16th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Vocabulary List #7.

    2. Independent Work Period: Why do you think revolutions occur? What circumstances would lead people to overthrow the government?

    3. Group Work: Imagine this: your group wants to rise up and revolt against the school to create a utopian school. For the group leader: Identify three school rules that you want to change, and create three new school rules. Is everyone in the group satisfied with the leader's changes and new rules? Explain. Did any disagreements/conflicts arise? Explain.

    4. Share answers from the independent work period and group work.

    How will students prepare to study Orwell's Animal Farm? DUE THIS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19th:
    Read the introduction of the author and Animal Farm--pp. 2-4, and then answer the following:
    1.) What are two reasons that George Orwell became an author? Refer to his life experiences.
    2.) Why is Animal Farm so popular?
    3.) How did George Orwell feel about government? Give at least one example from the reading.
    BONUS (up to 5 points!) 4.) Describe George Orwell's utopia.
    BONUS (up to 5 points!) 5.) Identify similarities between George Orwell and Elie Wiesel. Identify similarities between Animal Farm and Night.
    Thursday, November 15th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm your "Utopian (Perfect) Society." Describe your vision of a utopian society. What would a perfect society look like? Describe the type of government in power. Describe the laws/rules of this society. How would the general public act, think, and feel? Identify the positives (pros) and negatives (cons) that may exist in your utopian society. Fill at least one full page answering these questions.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now.

    3. Work Period: Choose your own group of 4 (you and three classmates). Choose a leader.
    A.) Explain why you chose your group leader.
    B.) Identify the person who will most likely argue and challenge the leader.
    C.) Explain what type of challenge, argument, or conflict may exist and why.
    D.) How does an individual in your group acquire power?
    E.) How is a power struggle initiated?
    F.) How does an individual in your group lose power?
    * Be read to discuss as a class.

    4. Discuss/Share the Work Period questions.

    How will students prepare to study Orwell's Animal Farm? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #7
  • Wednesday, November 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: MIDTERM EXAM

    2. If time allows, brainstorm your "Utopian (Perfect) Society." Describe your vision of a utopian society. What would a perfect society look like? Describe the type of government in power. Describe the laws/rules of this society. How would the general public act, think, and feel? Identify the positives (pros) and negatives (cons) that may exist in your utopian society. Fill at least one full page answering these questions.

    Turn in any owed HW and turn in permission slips and $2 for the field trip!.

    3. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share their depictions of a utopian society.

    How will students improve their SAT-style reading skills and prepare to study Orwell's Animal Farm? DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #7
  • Tuesday, November 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss and take notes on strategies for success on tomorrow's midterm. Remember to cover up the answer choices and write your answer in the margin, underline line #s in the reading passages, and recall vocabulary learned so far this year as well as Spanish/French connections to English (through Latin).

    2. Work Period: Define vocabulary words taken from strategies for success on tomorrow's midterm.

    3. Brainstorm your "Utopian (Perfect) Society." Describe your vision of a utopian society. What would a perfect society look like? Describe the type of government in power. Describe the laws/rules of this society. How would the general public act, think, and feel? Identify the positives (pros) and negatives (cons) that may exist in your utopian society. Fill at least one full page answering these questions.

    Show HW: Flashcards for List #7 and Vocabulary Story/Response Paper.

    4. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share their depictions of a utopian society.

    How will students improve their SAT-style reading skills and prepare to study Orwell's Animal Farm? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (PSAT-style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period. Review in-class strategies. Study strategies and vocabulary for success on tomorrow's midterm.

    Field Trip Permission Slips=DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th:

  • ALL permission slips and museum payment ($2) must be submitted in order to go on the field trip!
  • Friday, November 9th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on List #6 (scroll to the bottom) from chapters 7-9

    Turn in owed HW and field trip permission slips.

    2. Introduce Vocabulary List #7.

    3. Discuss strategies for success on the upcoming midterm: cover up the answer choices and write your answer in the margin, underline line #s in the reading passages, and recall vocabulary learned so far this year as well as Spanish/French connections to English (through Latin).

    How will students improve their vocabulary skills? DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th:
  • Flashcards for List #7.
  • Vocabulary Story/Response Paper using List #7: Animal Farm Vocabulary. Write a vocabulary story or response paper using all of the ten words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You MUST write about one of these topics/titles: The Election, Government or Hurricane Relief. You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write one page, handwritten or typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (PSAT-style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period.

    Field Trip Permission Slips=DUE DATE IS NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th:

  • ALL permission slips and museum payment ($2) must be submitted in order to go on the field trip!
  • Thursday, November 8th, 2012: 1. Do Now: FINISH ACUITY TEST (this will assess how we're doing in terms of English Regents preparation). If done early, study for tomorrow's quiz.

    *Turn in any owed HW.

    2. Discuss strategies for success on the upcoming midterm: cover up the answer choices and write your answer in the margin, underline line #s in the reading passages, and recall vocabulary learned so far this year as well as Spanish/French connections to English (through Latin).

    3. Sharing of Elie Wiesel's letter to us. Field trip information.

    How will students prepare for the English Regents in the Acuity Assessment? Make up owed HW (see previous days!).

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:

  • QUIZ on List #6 (scroll to the bottom) from chapters 7-9

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (PSAT-style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period.

    Field Trip Permission Slips=DUE DATE IS NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th:

  • ALL permission slips and museum payment ($2) must be submitted in order to go on the field trip!
  • Wednesday, November 7th, 2012: 1. Do Now: ACUITY TEST (this will assess how we're doing in terms of English Regents preparation).

    *Turn in your personal response HW for Night and the three political questions (HW).

    2. Go over HW.

    How will students prepare for the English Regents in the Acuity Assessment? Make up owed HW (see previous days!).

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:

  • QUIZ on List #6 (scroll to the bottom) from chapters 7-9

    NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th=MIDTERM (PSAT-style) which will test you on reading comprehension skills, vocabulary skills, and ability to eliminate wrong answers. This will be worth 25% of the 2nd marking period.

    Field Trip Permission Slips=DUE DATE TBA (To Be Announced):

  • ALL permission slips and museum payment ($2) must be submitted in order to go on the field trip!
  • Monday, November 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now: In your Gratitude section, write 10 blessings that you are grateful for after Hurricane Sandy.

    *Turn in your personal response HW for Night.

    2. Brainstorm how we at ITHS can help the victims of Hurricane Sandy (provide at least one suggestion).

    3. Reintroduce List #6 (scroll to the bottom) from chapters 7-9 for quiz on Friday.

    4. Compare/Contrast Hurricane Sandy and the Holocaust. Be ready to share.

    5. If time allows, brainstorm at least one question you'd like to ask a Holocaust survivor.

    6. Introduce HW.

    How will students culminate their study of Night? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th:
  • FINISH TODAY'S CLASSWORK.
    HOMEWORK: You may use one (or more) of these news websites to help answer the three questions that are below:
  • The New York Times
  • CNN
  • ABC News

    1.) How did one presidential candidate (President Obama or Governor Romney) react to Hurricane Sandy? Provide one action or verbal response.
    2.) Identify one example of humanity (compassion and concern) shown during/after Hurricane Sandy.
    3.) Imagine this: In 10 years, a small group of people believe that Hurricane Sandy never happened and was merely a hoax made up by New Yorkers. Share your reactions and arguments that counterattack this hoax claim.

    DUE DATE TBA:

  • ALL permission slips and museum payment ($2) must be submitted in order to go on the field trip!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th:

  • QUIZ on List #6 (scroll to the bottom) from chapters 7-9
  • Monday, October 29th-Friday, November 2nd (Hurricane Sandy Days), 2012: N/A due to Hurricane Sandy Clean-Up How will students culminate their study of Night? DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5th, THE DAY WE RETURN FROM HURRICANE SANDY:
    PERSONAL RESPONSE TO NIGHT: Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages on one of the following topics/questions (you may look up real facts/current events online that support your answers):
  • Select one portion of the narrator's words in Night and comment on how it “paints a dark and angry picture of human nature.” What circumstances (or reasons) in the memoir allow for this darker side of human beings?
  • Try to explain the indifference (lack of caring or concern) of the rest of the world to the concentration camps of the Holocaust. Are there any similarities in the world today?
  • A small group of people believe that the Holocaust never happened and was merely a long-running Jewish “hoax.” Share your reactions. What do you think of this controversy?
  • What positive qualities do you think might develop in people who live through experiences as prisoners of war (like Elie Wiesel and other Holocaust victims/survivors)? How might these qualities be used to help others?

    Make up any owed HW.

    DUE DATE TBA:

  • ALL permission slips and museum payment ($2) must be submitted in order to go on the field trip!

    QUIZ on List #6 (scroll to the bottom) from chapters 7-9=TBA

  • Friday, October 26th, 2012: No class due to parent-teacher conferences. How will students culminate their study of Night? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
    PERSONAL RESPONSE TO NIGHT: Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages on one of the following topics/questions (you may look up real facts/current events online that support your answers):
  • Select one portion of the narrator's words in Night and comment on how it “paints a dark and angry picture of human nature.” What circumstances (or reasons) in the memoir allow for this darker side of human beings?
  • Try to explain the indifference (lack of caring or concern) of the rest of the world to the concentration camps of the Holocaust. Are there any similarities in the world today?
  • A small group of people believe that the Holocaust never happened and was merely a long-running Jewish “hoax.” Share your reactions. What do you think of this controversy?
  • What positive qualities do you think might develop in people who live through experiences as prisoners of war (like Elie Wiesel and other Holocaust victims/survivors)? How might these qualities be used to help others?

    Make up any owed HW.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31st:

  • ALL permission slips and museum payment ($2) must be submitted in order to go on the field trip!
  • Thursday, October 25th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Finish reading and discussing the Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech by Elie Wiesel on pp. 117-120 of Night. Share the 2-3 messages that Elie Wiesel is giving to all people.

    2. Read and discuss Elie Wiesel since Night.

    3. Revise your letters to Elie Wiesel (see teacher's corrections).

    4. Introduce the HW.

    How will students culminate their study of Night? DUE THIS MONDAY, OCTOBER 29th:
    PERSONAL RESPONSE TO NIGHT: Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages on one of the following topics:
  • Select one portion of the narrator's words in Night and comment on how it “paints a dark and angry picture of human nature.” What circumstances in the memoir allow for this darker side of human beings?
  • Try to explain the indifference (lack of caring or concern) of the rest of the world to the concentration camps of the Holocaust. Are there any similarities in the world today?
  • A small group of people believe that the Holocaust never happened and was merely a long-running Jewish “hoax.” Share your reactions. What do you think of this controversy?
  • What positive qualities do you think might develop in people who live through experiences as prisoners of war? How might these qualities be used to help others?

    Make up any owed HW.

  • Wednesday, October 24th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss and take notes on the rest of Night--chapters 7-9 (pp. 98-115).

    2. Read the Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech by Elie Wiesel on pp. 117-120 of Night. Share the found, unknown words and define them. Share the 2-3 messages that Elie Wiesel is giving to all people.

    *Turn in HW: The rewrite (which includes teacher's changes) of the Night Essay Exam

    How will students prove their knowledge of the three themes of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d in Night in Chapters 7-9? Make up any owed HW.
    Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Read the Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech by Elie Wiesel on pp. 117-120 of Night. Identify at least 10 unknown words and define them. For a challenge, identify 2-3 messages that Elie Wiesel is giving to all people.

    *Show the HW: 10 post-its for Chapters 7-9 (pp. 98-115) in Night and Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #6 from Chapter 7-9.

    2. Discuss and take notes on the rest of Night--chapters 7-9 (pp. 98-115).

    How will students prove their knowledge of the three themes of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d in Night in Chapters 7-9? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24th:
  • Rewrite (make teacher's changes) the Night Essay Exam
  • Monday, October 22nd, 2012: 1. Do Now: HW Returns/Review and Night Exam Review

    2. Discuss and take notes on the rest of Chapter 6 (pp. 85-97).

    3. Work Period: Work on tomorrow's HW.

    How will students analyze their critical lens essay exam on Night and prove their knowledge of the three themes of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d in Night in Chapter 6? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Read Chapters 7-9 (pp. 98-115) in Night and compose 10 post-its on the three themes (dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity).
  • Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #6 from Chapter 7-9.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24th:

  • Rewrite (make teacher's changes) the Night Essay Exam
  • Friday, October 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6 of Night.

    2. Introduce Night Vocabulary List #6 from Chapters 7-9 of Night.

    3. Discuss and take notes on Chapter 6 (pp. 85-97) and compose 5 post-its on the three themes (dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity).

    4. Distribute/Review field trip permission slip info.

    How will students prove their knowledge of the three themes of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d in Night in Chapter 6? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23rd:
  • Read Chapters 7-9 (pp. 98-115) in Night and compose 10 post-its on the three themes (dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity).
  • Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #6 from Chapter 7-9.
  • Thursday, October 18th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Even though it was 1944, and the Nazi extermination of Jews had begun years earlier, the Sighet (of Transylvania) Jews had very few facts about it. Do you think it is possible in today’s world for a community to know so little, to be so unprepared? Explain. Be ready to share.

    *Show HW: 5 post-its for Chapter 6 of Night and Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6.

    2. Discuss and take notes on Chapter 6 (pp. 85-97) and compose 5 post-its on the three themes (dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity).

    3. Review for tomorrow's quiz.

    How will students prove their knowledge of the three themes of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d in Night in Chapter 6? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:
  • QUIZ on Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6 of Night.
  • Tuesday, October 16th, 2012: Critical Lens Essay Exam (50% of 1st marking period) on Night. You may use your book and notes. Remember, write FIVE paragraphs! You will be graded on: meaning (did you understand the quote and connect it to Night?), development (did you include A LOT of details/examples from the themes of Night that support the quote?), organization (did you organize your ideas and use transitions?), language (did you use sophisticated vocabulary?) and grammar (did you correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization and word usage errors?). How will students prove their knowledge of the three themes of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d in Night in writing a critical lens essay exam? GOOD LUCK ON TOMORROW'S PSAT!

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Read Chapter 6 (pp. 85-97) and compose 5 post-its on the three themes (dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity).
  • Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • QUIZ on Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6 of Night.
  • Monday, October 15th, 2012: 1. Do Now: In your Gratitude section, write 10 things you are grateful for as a person living in New York City in 2012 (write 5 grateful things for living in NYC and 5 grateful things for living in 2012).

    2. Share Do Now.

    3. Review requirements for the Essay Exam (50% of 1st marking period) instructions on Night for TOMORROW, Tuesday, October 16th. See a critical essay on p. 14, which will be the format of the exam. Take notes on the 5 categories that you will be graded on: meaning (did you understand the quote and connect it to Night?), development (did you include A LOT of details/examples from the themes of Night that support the quote?), organization (did you organize your ideas and use transitions?), language (did you use sophisticated vocabulary?) and grammar (did you correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization and word usage errors?).

    4. Introduce a sample grading rubric for tomorrow's essay exam (and for the critical lens essay on the English Regents exam).

    5. Work Period: Work on adding more details to your post-its (this will help on tomorrow's exam) on the themes of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d in Night.

    How will students understand the format of the critical lens essay, using Night, by Elie Wiesel, and be prepared for an essay exam? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • Essay Exam (50% of 1st marking period) on Night. See a critical essay on p. 14, which will be the format of the exam. Review the last few days of classwork and your post-it notes to guide you in study preparation. Make sure to bring your book and use your notes (the more detailed notes you have, the better!) for the exam.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Read Chapter 6 (pp. 85-97) and compose 5 post-its on the three themes (dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity).
  • Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th:

  • QUIZ on Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6 of Night.
  • Friday, October 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5.

    2. Introduce Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6.

    3. Review requirements for the Essay Exam (50% of 1st marking period) instructions on Night for this coming Tuesday, October 16th. See a critical essay on p. 14, which will be the format of the exam. Take notes on the 5 categories that you will be graded on: meaning (did you understand the quote and connect it to Night?), development (did you include A LOT of details/examples from the themes of Night that support the quote?), organization (did you organize your ideas and use transitions?), language (did you use sophisticated vocabulary?) and grammar (did you correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization and word usage errors?).

    4. Work on making up HW owed (post-its/reading of Night)

    5. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the format of the critical lens essay, using Night, by Elie Wiesel, and improve their vocabulary skills in a vocabulary assessment? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • Essay Exam (50% of 1st marking period) on Night. See a critical essay on p. 14, which will be the format of the exam. Review the last few days of classwork and your post-it notes to guide you in study preparation. Make sure to bring your book and use your notes (the more detailed notes you have, the better!) for the exam.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Read Chapter 6 (pp. 85-97) and compose 5 post-its on the three themes (dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity).
  • Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6.
  • Thursday, October 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now:
    Discuss/Share yesterday's interpretation of the following quote in your own words: "Men are at the mercy of events and cannot control them." Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why. Explain how Night, by Elie Wiesel, supports the quote (this should add up to 4-6 sentences).

    2. Introduce Essay Exam (50% of 1st marking period) instructions on Night for next Tuesday, October 16th. See a critical essay on p. 14, which will be the format of the exam.

    3. Review themes of humanity, dehumanization, and faith in G-d in Chapter 5 (pp. 66-84). Take notes.

    How will students understand the format of the critical lens essay, using Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16th:
  • Essay Exam (50% of 1st marking period) on Night. See a critical essay on p. 14, which will be the format of the exam. Review the last few days of classwork and your post-it notes to guide you in study preparation. Make sure to bring your book and use your notes (the more detailed notes you have, the better!) for the exam.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18th:

  • Read Chapter 6 (pp. 85-97) and compose 5 post-its on the three themes (dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity).
  • Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #5 from Chapter 6.
  • Wednesday, October 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now:
    Discuss/Share yesterday's interpretation of the quote in your own words: "All conflict in literature is, in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil." Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why. Explain how Night, by Elie Wiesel, supports the quote.

    2. Interpret the following quote in your own words: "Men are at the mercy of events and cannot control them." Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why. Explain how Night, by Elie Wiesel, supports the quote (this should add up to 4-6 sentences).

    *Show HW: Chapter 5 post-its (pp. 66-84) and Flashcards for Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5.

    How will students understand the format of the critical lens essay, using Night, by Elie Wiesel, and build vocabulary skills? DUE THIS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:
  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments).

  • Tuesday, October 9th, 2012: Work Period:
    1. Interpret the following quote in your own words: "All conflict in literature is, in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil." Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why. Explain how Night by Elie Wiesel supports the quote. (All of the answers above should add up to a full paragraph of 4-6 sentences) Turn it in!
    2. Make a crossword puzzle for our new vocabulary list: Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5. Turn it in!
    How will students understand the format of the first paragraph of the critical lens essay, using Night, by Elie Wiesel, and build vocabulary skills? DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:
  • Read Chapter 5 of Night--pp. 66-84. Compose 5 post-its with evidence of the following themes: humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization (label each post-it with the theme you chose). Each post-it should include evidence (either a direct quote or a summary of evidence on the page) that supports one of the themes above. For more sophisticated post-its, explain why the evidence you chose is important to the story as a whole. Include the page # on the post-it as well. If you don't have post-its, then use regular, notebook paper.
  • Flashcards (vocabulary word and part of speech on the front; definition and your own, original sentence on the back) for Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5.

    DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments).

  • Friday, October 5th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Night Vocabulary List #3 from Chapter 4

    2. Finish discussing and taking notes on Chapter 4, focusing on our three themes--evidence of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d.

    3. Introduce Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5

    4. Introduce HW.

    How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 4 of Night, by Elie Wiesel, and build vocabulary skills? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10th:
  • Read Chapter 5 of Night--pp. 66-84. Compose 5 post-its with evidence of the following themes: humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization (label each post-it with the theme you chose). Each post-it should include evidence (either a direct quote or a summary of evidence on the page) that supports one of the themes above. For more sophisticated post-its, explain why the evidence you chose is important to the story as a whole. Include the page # on the post-it as well. If you don't have post-its, then use regular, notebook paper.
  • Flashcards (vocabulary word and part of speech on the front; definition and your own, original sentence on the back) for Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List #4 from Chapter 5.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments).

  • Thursday, October 4th, 2012: 1. Do Now:
    Finish discussing and taking notes on the answers to these questions (in your Literary Analysis section of your notebook):
    1. In Chapter 3, what is the Kaddish and why doesn't Elie and his father say it?
    2. In Chapter 3, how does Elie change by the end of the first night (physically, spiritually and emotionally)?
    3. In Chapter 4, why does Elie give his father "marching lessons"?
    4. In Chapter 4, whose death affects Elie the most and why?
    5. In Chapter 4, why does Elie find the soup "tasted better than ever" (p. 63) after one execution, but tasting like "corpses" after another (p. 65)?

    2. Discuss and take notes on Chapter 4, focusing on our three themes--evidence of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d.

    3. Work Period: Make up any owed HW--reading/post-its for Night. Prepare for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz.

    Turn in HW: The letter (1st draft) to Elie Wiesel (Ms. Conn will send and/or hand final drafts to Elie Wiesel). Your letter should be a minimum of a 1/2 page. Include at least two references to Night and at least two questions on our themes: dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d.

    How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 4 of Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4.

    Make up any owed HW (see previous days' assignments).

  • Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012: 1. Do Now: Write a letter (1st draft) to Elie Wiesel (Ms. Conn will send and/or hand final drafts to Elie Wiesel). Your letter should be a minimum of a 1/2 page. Include at least two references to Night and at least two questions on our themes: dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Discuss answers to these questions answered individually yesterday (in your Literary Analysis section of your notebook):
    1. In Chapter 3, what is the Kaddish and why doesn't Elie and his father say it?
    2. In Chapter 3, how does Elie change by the end of the first night (physically, spiritually and emotionally)?
    3. In Chapter 4, why does Elie give his father "marching lessons"?
    4. In Chapter 4, whose death affects Elie the most and why?
    5. In Chapter 4, why does Elie find the soup "tasted better than ever" (p. 63) after one execution, but tasting like "corpses" after another (p. 65)?

    3. Discuss and take notes on the end of Chapter 3 and Chapter 4, focusing on our three themes--evidence of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d.

    4. Work Period: Make up any owed HW--reading/post-its for Night. Prepare for Friday's vocabulary quiz.

  • How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 4 of Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4th:
  • Write a letter (1st draft) to Elie Wiesel (Ms. Conn will send and/or hand final drafts to Elie Wiesel). Your letter should be a minimum of a FULL page, handwritten or typed. Include at least two references to Night and at least two questions on our themes: dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d.

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4.

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012: Happy 84th Birthday to Elie Wiesel, our author of Night! 1. Do Now:
  • Answer these questions (in your Literary Analysis section of your notebook):
    1. In Chapter 3, what is the Kaddish and why doesn't Elie and his father say it?
    2. In Chapter 3, how does Elie change by the end of the first night (physically, spiritually and emotionally)?
    3. In Chapter 4, why does Elie give his father "marching lessons"?
    4. In Chapter 4, whose death affects Elie the most and why?
    5. In Chapter 4, why does Elie find the soup "tasted better than ever" (p. 63) after one execution, but tasting like "corpses" after another (p. 65)?

  • Show HW: flashcards for Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4 and 5 post-its for Chapter 4 (up to p. 65) in Night. Make sure you have 5 post-its for each chapter. The more detail on each post-it, the better. For a challenge, work on understanding and explaining why the author thinks it's important for each example of the themes (humanity, faith in G-d and dehumanization).
  • Study for Friday's vocabulary quiz.
  • Make up any owed HW.

    2. Discuss and take notes on the Do Now questions, the end of Chapter 3 and Chapter 4, focusing on our three themes--evidence of dehumanization, humanity and faith in G-d.

  • How will students understand the significance of vocabulary in context and the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 4 of Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:
  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4.

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Monday, October 1st, 2012: Happy 84th Birthday to Elie Wiesel, our author of Night! Work Period:
  • Answer these questions (and be ready to share tomorrow!):
    1. In Chapter 3, what is the Kaddish and why doesn't Elie and his father say it?
    2. In Chapter 3, how does Elie change by the end of the first night (physically, spiritually and emotionally)?
    3. In Chapter 4, why does Elie give his father "marching lessons"?
    4. In Chapter 4, whose death affects Elie the most and why?
    5. In Chapter 4, why does Elie find the soup "tasted better than ever" (p. 63) after one execution, but tasting like "corpses" after another (p. 65)?

  • Work on tomorrow's vocabulary HW: flashcards for Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4 (see details in the HW section)
  • Work on tomorrow's reading HW: Read up to chapter 4 (up to p. 65) in Night. Make sure you have 5 post-its for each chapter. The more detail on each post-it, the better. For a challenge, work on understanding and explaining why the author thinks it's important for each example of the themes (humanity, faith in G-d and dehumanization).
  • Study for Friday's vocabulary quiz.
  • Make up any owed HW.
  • How will students understand the significance of vocabulary in context and the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 4 of Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2nd:
  • Flashcards (vocabulary word and part of speech on the front; definition and your own, original sentence on the back) for Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4.
  • Read Chapter 4 of Night--pages 47-65. Compose 5 post-its with evidence of the following themes: humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization (label each post-it with the theme you chose). Each post-it should include evidence (either a direct quote or a summary of evidence on the page) that supports one of the themes above. Include the page # on the post-it as well. If you don't have post-its, then use regular, notebook paper.

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4.
  • Friday, September 28th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapters 2 and 3

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Introduce Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4

    3. Discuss, share, and take notes on evidence of the three themes in Chapter 3: dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity.

    How will students understand the significance of vocabulary in context and the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 3 of Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2nd:
  • Flashcards (vocabulary word and part of speech on the front; definition and your own, original sentence on the back) for Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4.
  • Read Chapter 4 of Night--pages 47-65. Compose 5 post-its with evidence of the following themes: humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization (label each post-it with the theme you chose). Each post-it should include evidence (either a direct quote or a summary of evidence on the page) that supports one of the themes above. Include the page # on the post-it as well. If you don't have post-its, then use regular, notebook paper.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 4.
  • Thursday, September 27th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Read aloud samples of children's poetry from Terezin Concentration Camp. Here's more information on Terezin Concentration Camp.

    2. Discuss/Share readings and impressions of children's poetry from the Holocaust.

    3. Share Monday's classwork (when you verbalize your gratitude, it makes it more real): Write 10 things and people you are grateful for (think about what you have in contrast to what the Jews did not have during the Holocaust).

    4. Work Period: Prepare for tomorrow's quiz: Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapters 2 and 3 and make up owed HW.

    Show HW due today: 5 post-its for Chapter 3 of Night--pp. 29-46.

    5. If time allows, share (and taken notes) evidence of the three themes in Chapter 3: dehumanization, faith in G-d, and humanity.

    How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 3 of Night, by Elie Wiesel, and analyze Holocaust poetry in connection to Wiesel's memoir? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:
  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapters 2 and 3.
  • Tuesday, September 25th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Read children's poetry from Terezin Concentration Camp. Here's more information on Terezin Concentration Camp. Show HW: 5 post-its for Chapter 2 of Night.

    2. Discuss/Share HW themes from Chapter 2.

    3. Discuss/Share readings and impressions of children's poetry from the Holocaust.

    4. Share yesterday's classwork (when you verbalize your gratitude, it makes it more real): Write 10 things and people you are grateful for (think about what you have in contrast to what the Jews did not have during the Holocaust).

    5. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 2 of Night, by Elie Wiesel, and analyze Holocaust poetry in connection to Wiesel's memoir? DUE THIS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:
  • Read Chapter 3 of Night--pages 29-46. Compose 5 post-its with evidence of the following themes: humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization (label each post-it with the theme you chose). Each post-it should include evidence (either a direct quote or a summary of evidence on the page) that supports one of the themes above. Include the page # on the post-it as well. If you don't have post-its, then use regular, notebook paper.

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 2.
  • Monday, September 24th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss and take notes on Chapter 1 of Night, and identify evidence of humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization. Share (and take notes) the following:
  • Humanity: the Jewish people's disregard of Moishe the Beadle and characterization of Moishe as insane (it's too difficult to believe his claims; for example "infants being used as targets" on p. 6)
  • Dehumanization of the Jews: "Attacking Jewish stores and synagogues"--p. 9, Jews forbidden to own gold, jewelry or any valuables on p. 10, "every Jew had to wear the yellow star" on p. 11, "no longer had the right to frequent restaurants or cafes, to travel by rail, to attend synagogue, to be on the streets after 6 o'clock in the evening...and then came the ghettos...the barbed wire" (p. 11).
  • Humanization of the Jews (seeing the ghetto as a good thing on p. 12).
  • More Dehumanization of the Jews: Being taken to the Concentration Camps with only personal belongings: "a backpack, some food, a few items of clothing. Nothing else" (p. 14). "Hungarian police used their rifle butts, their clubs to indiscriminately strike old men and women, children and cripples" (p. 16) and "the Hungarian police were screaming...they were our first oppressors" (p. 19). "Forbidden to go outside, people relieved themselves in a corner" (p. 22). "The next morning, we walked toward the station, where a convoy of cattle cars was waiting" (p. 22).
  • Faith in G-d: Elie "wanted to have time to pray before leaving" (p. 18) and "have mercy on us" (p. 20). "We had sat down to the traditional Friday night meal...said the customary blessings over the bread..." (p. 21). Also, explanation of Jewish traditions and terminology will be offered.

    2. Work Period: Compose five post-its for Chapter 2, identifying evidence of humanity, faith in G-d and dehumanization. Write down an example in your own words with a page #. Examples: Not being able to lie down, they had to take turns sitting (p. 23; dehumanization). Threatened to be "shot like dogs" (p. 24; dehumanization). When arriving at the labor camp, the Jewish people have hope that they'll work and have good conditions (p. 27; humanity). They gave thanks to G-d (p. 27; faith). The Jews were being beaten (p. 28; dehumanization).

    HW collection: Discipline Code Booklet Handouts and flashcards for List #2. 3. Gratitude Section: Write 10 things and people you are grateful for (think about what you have in contrast to what the Jews did not have during the Holocaust).

  • How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization and vocabulary skill building in chapters 1 and 2 of Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th:
  • Finish today's classwork: Compose five post-its for Chapter 2 (pages 23-28 in Night), identifying evidence of humanity, faith in G-d and dehumanization. Write down an example in your own words with a page # for each post-it.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th:

  • Read Chapter 3 of Night--pages 29-46. Compose 5 post-its with evidence of the following themes: humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization (label each post-it with the theme you chose). Each post-it should include evidence (either a direct quote or a summary of evidence on the page) that supports one of the themes above. Include the page # on the post-it as well. If you don't have post-its, then use regular, notebook paper.

    DUE THIS COMING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 2.
  • Friday, September 21st, 2012: 1. Do Now: Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 1.

    2. Introduce Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 2.

    3. Discuss and take notes on chapter 1 of Night, and identify evidence of humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization. Also, explanation of Jewish traditions and terminology will be offered.

    4. HW Reminders/Discipline Code Booklet Handouts

    How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization and vocabulary skill building in chapter 1 of Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th:
  • Discipline Code Booklet/Handouts
  • Flashcards (vocabulary word and part of speech on the front; definition and your own, original sentence on the back) for Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 2

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 2.
  • Thursday, September 20th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Determine your own title for chapter 1 of Night.

    2. In table groups (assigned a specific theme--humanity, faith in G-d or dehumanization), identify simplified evidence (4 words or less) from chapter 1 of Night that support your assigned theme. Use your post-its (HW) to guide you.

    3. Discuss and take notes on chapter 1 of Night, and identify evidence of humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization. Also, explanation of Jewish traditions and terminology will be offered.

    4. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in chapter 1 of Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 1.
  • Wednesday, September 19th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Prepare for today's ACUITY EXAM--a Regents Exam predictive.

    Show HW: 5 post-its for chapter 1 on evidence of humanity, faith in G-d, and/or dehumanization. Also, show flashcards for chapter 1 vocabulary.

    2. HW Reminders

    How will students understand the importance of English Regents preparation? DUE THIS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:
  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 1.
  • Friday, September 14th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Begin reading the first two pages of Night, and identify evidence of humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization. Also, explanation of Jewish traditions and terminology will be offered.

    2. Discuss previous HW's questions answered and five new facts about the Holocaust. What do you know about the Holocaust? Where did you learn it? What literature of the Holocaust have you already read? What people have you met, movies have you seen, stories have you heard? Do you have a personal connection with someone who experienced the Holocaust? Do you want to know more about this subject? Why or why not?

  • Find FIVE new facts that you did not know about the Holocaust in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum website's links: Intro. to the Holocaust or United States and the Holocaust.

    3. Introduce Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 1.

  • How will students understand the significance of the themes of humanity, faith and dehumanization in Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th:
  • Read Chapter 1 of Night. Compose 5 post-its with evidence of the following themes: humanity, faith in G-d, and dehumanization (label each post-it with the theme you chose). Each post-it should include evidence (either a direct quote or a summary of evidence on the page) that supports one of the themes above. Include the page # on the post-it as well. If you don't have post-its, then use regular, notebook paper.
  • Flashcards (vocabulary word and part of speech on the front; definition and your own, original sentence on the back) for Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 1

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st:

  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 1.
  • Thursday, September 13th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Discuss yesterday's questions: What are the causes and effects of 9/11? What are the causes and effects of the Holocaust? Consider what events led to 9/11 and what events led to the Holocaust. Consider the physical, psychological, and religious effects on people (up-close and distant witnesses) and society.

    2. Brainstorm/Discuss the following main themes explored in Night: humanity (kindness and compassion) and faith in G-d vs. dehumanization (depriving of human qualities).

    3. Book Receipts of Night. Show HW (questions answered and five new facts about the Holocaust).

    How will students see similarities between 9/11 and the Holocaust, and prepare to read Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th:
  • Read Chapter 1 of Night. Compose 5 post-its with evidence of humanity, faith in G-d, or dehumanization.
  • Flashcards (vocabulary word and part of speech on the front; definition and your own, original sentence on the back) for Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 1
  • Quiz on Night Vocabulary List for Chapter 1.

    MAKE UP OWED HW (due today):

  • Answer the following questions: What do you know about the Holocaust? Where did you learn it? What literature of the Holocaust have you already read? What people have you met, movies have you seen, stories have you heard? Do you have a personal connection with someone who experienced the Holocaust? Do you want to know more about this subject? Why or why not?
  • Find FIVE new facts that you did not know about the Holocaust in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum website's links: Intro. to the Holocaust or United States and the Holocaust.
  • Wednesday, September 12th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Compose a Compare/Contrast Venn Diagram of 9/11 and the Holocaust. Be ready to share.

    2. Discuss/Share the Do Now.

    3. K/W/L of the Holocaust. Fill in at least three facts in the "K" (what you know) and at least three questions in the "W" (what you want to know).

    4. Share your facts/questions.

    5. What are the causes and effects of 9/11? What are the causes and effects of the Holocaust? Consider what events led to 9/11 and what events led to the Holocaust. Consider the physical, psychological, and religious effects on people (up-close and distant witnesses) and society.

    6. HW introduced

    How will students see similarities between 9/11 and the Holocaust, and prepare to read Night, by Elie Wiesel? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13th:
  • Answer the following questions: What do you know about the Holocaust? Where did you learn it? What literature of the Holocaust have you already read? What people have you met, movies have you seen, stories have you heard? Do you have a personal connection with someone who experienced the Holocaust? Do you want to know more about this subject? Why or why not?
  • Find FIVE new facts that you did not know about the Holocaust in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum website's links: Intro. to the Holocaust or United States and the Holocaust.

    Make up HW, if necessary (see previous day for details).

  • Tuesday, September 11th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm/Write your answers on the following:
    A.) What unexpectedly changed a 9/11 survivor's life? A victim's child's life? Identify at least two for each question. What are possible reactions or effects of 9/11?
    B.) Do you remember your reaction to 9/11/01? If so, explain. What's your reaction today? Has it changed? Explain.
    C.) Why do people feel hopeless as a reaction to 9/11? How do you think this hopelessness affects people's lives?
    D.) Do you think that it's important to learn about the historical event of 9/11? Can learning about 9/11 guide people to live differently? Explain.
    E.) Do you think that 9/11 changed people's beliefs in G-d? Explain.

    *Show HW: signed portion of your syllabus and the labeled sections of your notebook/binder.

    2. Discuss answers to the Do Now.

    3. Compare/Contrast 9/11 and the Holocaust in a Venn Diagram. Be ready to share.

    4. Gratitude Writing: In your Gratitude section of your notebook/binder, write the following: List 10 body parts that you are grateful for. By showing this gratitude, you are honoring the memories of the victims who lost their lives on 9/11/01.

    5. Discuss/Share the body parts that you're grateful for and why. Why is this gratitude assignment valuable in general, and especially today?

    6. HW Reminders

    How will students commemorate 9/11, see similarities to the Holocaust, and prepare to read Night, by Elie Wiesel? Make up HW, if necessary (see previous day for details).
    Monday, September 10th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm/Write your answers on the following:
  • What events can unexpectedly change a person's life? Identify at least two. What are possible reactions or effects of these events?
  • How have you reacted when faced with danger, either to you or to someone else?
  • What does it mean to feel hopeless? How do you think hopelessness affects people's lives?
  • Do you think that learning about historical events can guide people to live differently? Explain.

    2. Discuss answers to the Do Now.

    3. Share suggestions to help improve high school graduation rate, student motivation, higher grades and higher SAT scores. What can teachers do? How can teachers help motivate their students?

    4. Summer Reading Packet Collection

    5. HW Reminders

  • How will students effectively prepare to read Night by Elie Wiesel? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • Signed portion of the Sophomore English Syllabus
  • 5-subject/binder with labeled sections for this English class. See details in the Sophomore English Syllabus
  • Friday, September 7th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Introduce Sophomore English Syllabus.

    2. Read "High School Graduation Rate Rises in U.S." from The Washington Post. On post-its, post suggestions to help improve high school graduation rate, student motivation, higher grades and higher SAT scores. What can teachers do? How can teachers help motivate their students?

    3. Summer Reading Packet Collection

    How will students introduce understand course expectations and requirements? DUE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th:
  • Signed portion of the Sophomore English Syllabus
  • 5-subject/binder with labeled sections for this English class. See details in the Sophomore English Syllabus
  • Thursday, September 6th, 2012: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and fill out index card #1, answering the following:
    A.) Your full name (in parentheses, write any nickname that you want to be called in class)
    B.) Home phone #
    C.) Emergency phone # and contact person (who will answer this # and how he/she is related to you)
    D.) Three of your good character traits
    E.) One of your passions
    F.) Your career goal
    G.) One thing/person that you're grateful for

    2. Now take index card #2, and do the following:

  • Choose a quote from one of the quotes around the classroom, and write it down.
  • Interpret the quote in your own words.
  • Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why.
  • Choose two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Introduce these two works of literature with their authors, if you can.

    3. Find a neighbor, and interview that person. Find out his/her name and answers to letters D, E, F and G. Be ready to introduce that neighbor to the class.

    4. Class introductions of #3.

    5. Class Expectations and Reflections on today's index cards (positives, negatives, and areas needing improvement)

    6. Summer reading/writing HW collected.

  • How will students introduce themselves in written and oral expression? Not Applicable at this time.