Ms. Conn's Sophomore English Assignments, Spring 2013

Ms. Conn's Sophomore English Assignments
Spring 2013

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Tuesday, June 25th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Share and discuss all that we learned this past semester, including vocabulary, 1984 and Julius Caesar.

2. Q & A Discussion:

  • What skills can you learn in high school that will prepare you for your future career?
  • What skills have you learned so far at ITHS that will prepare you for your future career?

    3. Read aloud the following article: "New Study: 21st Century Skills Learned in School Positively Correlated with Job Success". What was a new, helpful idea that you learned from this article? How can this new, helpful idea from this article improve your success in school and in a future career?

  • How will students effectively prepare for junior year by analyzing skills learned in high school that will help guide them to success in a future career? Have a great summer by doing the following: read books that you didn't have time to read during the school year, read challenging books that teach you new things, volunteer to help people in need (a local hospital, homeless shelter, soup kitchen, daycare center, library, etc.), and learn a new hobby!
    Monday, June 24th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Share and discuss the top 50 jobs of 2013. Is your future career on this list? If not, why do you believe your future career is not on this list? If you don't know your future career, what are your favorite subjects/hobbies?

    2. Q & A Discussion:

  • What skills can you learn in high school that will prepare you for your future career?
  • What skills have you learned so far at ITHS that will prepare you for your future career?

    3. Read aloud the following article: "New Study: 21st Century Skills Learned in School Positively Correlated with Job Success". What was a new, helpful idea that you learned from this article? How can this new, helpful idea from this article improve your success in school and in a future career?

  • How will students effectively prepare for junior year by analyzing skills learned in high school that will help guide them to success in a future career? N/A
    Monday, June 10th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Finish film of 1984.

    2. English Regents Reminders

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents? FOR THOSE OF YOU TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS, HERE ARE IMPORTANT PREPARATION TECHNIQUES (ENGLISH REGENTS=TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JUNE 11th):
    Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TOMORROW, TUES., JUNE 11th at 8:15am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 10-12 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (one on the Controlling Idea on both passages and one on the literary term from one passage) . If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. I will be available daily via e-mail.
  • Use this great resource packet (provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JUNE 11th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Friday, June 7th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Julius Caesar Critical Lens Essay Exam Returns & Review

    2. Continue film of 1984.

    3. Turn in all owed HW (last day is today!).

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents? FOR THOSE OF YOU TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS, HERE ARE IMPORTANT PREPARATION TECHNIQUES (ENGLISH REGENTS=NEXT TUESDAY, JUNE 11th):
    Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TUES., JUNE 11th at 8:15am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 10-12 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (one on the Controlling Idea on both passages and one on the literary term from one passage) . If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. I will be available daily via e-mail.
  • Use this great resource packet (provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JUNE 11th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Wednesday, June 5th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Finish reviewing the components and strategies for success on the English Regents (see the HW section). Extra Credit Presentations (Choose one of the following that you'd like to memorize and present on Wednesday, June 5th (for an extra credit quiz grade). You will need to be fully memorized. One mistake is allowed to earn a 100%. After one mistake, you will have -10 points for each mistake.
    1.) Act III, Scene II: Antony's speech at Caesar's funeral OR 2.) Act I, Scene II: Cassius' persuasive speech convincing Brutus that Caesar is a tyrant

    2. Introduce English Regents Writing Resource Packet.

    3. If time allows, begin film of 1984.

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents? ALL WORK IS DUE BY THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 7th (the last opportunity to turn in work for the 3rd marking period)!

    FOR THOSE OF YOU TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS, HERE ARE IMPORTANT PREPARATION TECHNIQUES (ENGLISH REGENTS=NEXT TUESDAY, JUNE 11th):
    Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TUES., JUNE 11th at 8:15am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 10-12 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (one on the Controlling Idea on both passages and one on the literary term from one passage) . If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. I will be available daily via e-mail.

  • Use this great resource packet (provided in class, too): English Regents Writing Resource Packet.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JUNE 11th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Tuesday, June 4th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Continue reviewing the components and strategies for success on the English Regents (see the HW section).

    2. If time allows and if packets arrive, introduce English Regents Writing Resource Packet.

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5th: Choose one of the following that you'd like to memorize and present on Wednesday, June 5th (for an extra credit quiz grade). You will need to be fully memorized. One mistake is allowed to earn a 100%. After one mistake, you will have -10 points for each mistake.
    1.) Act III, Scene II: Antony's speech at Caesar's funeral:
    Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them;
    The good is oft interred with their bones.
    So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
    Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
    If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
    And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
    Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
    For Brutus is an honorable man;
    So are they all, all honorable men—
    Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
    He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
    But Brutus says he was ambitious,
    And Brutus is an honorable man.

    2.) Act I, Scene II: Cassius' persuasive speech convincing Brutus that Caesar is a tyrant:
    Men at some time are masters of their fates:
    The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
    But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
    Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?
    Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
    Write them together, yours is as fair a name;
    Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;
    Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,
    Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
    Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
    Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,
    That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
    Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
    When went there by an age, since the great flood,
    But it was famed with more than with one man?

    ALL WORK IS DUE BY THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 7th (the last opportunity to turn in work for the 3rd marking period)!

    FOR THOSE OF YOU TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS, HERE ARE IMPORTANT PREPARATION TECHNIQUES (ENGLISH REGENTS=NEXT TUESDAY, JUNE 11th):
    Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TUES., JUNE 11th at 8:15am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 10-12 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (one on the Controlling Idea on both passages and one on the literary term from one passage) . If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. I will be available daily via e-mail.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JUNE 11th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Monday, June 3rd, 2013: 1. DO NOW: K/W/L about the English Regents. What do you KNOW about the English Regents? What do you WANT to know? What do you WANT to learn?

    2.) Review the DO NOW and the components of the English Regents (see the HW section).

    How will students effectively prepare for the English Regents and remember famous lines from Julius Caesar? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5th: Choose one of the following that you'd like to memorize and present on Wednesday, June 5th (for an extra credit quiz grade). You will need to be fully memorized. One mistake is allowed to earn a 100%. After one mistake, you will have -10 points for each mistake.
    1.) Act III, Scene II: Antony's speech at Caesar's funeral:
    Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them;
    The good is oft interred with their bones.
    So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
    Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
    If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
    And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
    Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
    For Brutus is an honorable man;
    So are they all, all honorable men—
    Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
    He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
    But Brutus says he was ambitious,
    And Brutus is an honorable man.

    2.) Act I, Scene II: Cassius' persuasive speech convincing Brutus that Caesar is a tyrant:
    Men at some time are masters of their fates:
    The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
    But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
    Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?
    Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
    Write them together, yours is as fair a name;
    Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;
    Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,
    Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
    Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
    Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,
    That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
    Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
    When went there by an age, since the great flood,
    But it was famed with more than with one man?

    ALL WORK IS DUE BY THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 7th (the last opportunity to turn in work for the 3rd marking period)!

    FOR THOSE OF YOU TAKING THE ENGLISH REGENTS, HERE ARE IMPORTANT PREPARATION TECHNIQUES (ENGLISH REGENTS=NEXT TUESDAY, JUNE 11th):
    Review all notes, exams, practice materials and strategies for success on the English Regents. DON'T FORGET--THE ENGLISH REGENTS IS TUES., JUNE 11th at 8:15am (DON'T BE LATE!!!!! SLEEP WELL, EAT A GOOD BREAKFAST AND BRING MULTIPLE PENS AND PENCILS, ALONG WITH YOUR SCHOOL ID). Review all Regents materials. Best of luck! WRITE A MINIMUM OF TWO FULL PAGES FOR THE CRITICAL LENS (Part 4) ESSAY. IN PART 3, WRITE 10-12 SENTENCES (ONE FULL PAGE) FOR EACH WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH (one on the Controlling Idea on both passages and one on the literary term from one passage) . If you have any questions or concerns, email me at hconn@schools.nyc.gov. I will be available daily via e-mail.

    HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (TUESDAY, JUNE 11th at 8:15am:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Friday, May 31st, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Choose one of the following that you'd like to memorize and present on Wednesday, June 5th (for an extra credit quiz grade):
    1.) Act III, Scene II: Antony's speech at Caesar's funeral:
    Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them;
    The good is oft interred with their bones.
    So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
    Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
    If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
    And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
    Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
    For Brutus is an honorable man;
    So are they all, all honorable men—
    Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
    He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
    But Brutus says he was ambitious,
    And Brutus is an honorable man.

    2.) Act I, Scene II: Cassius' persuasive speech convincing Brutus that Caesar is a tyrant:
    Men at some time are masters of their fates:
    The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
    But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
    Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?
    Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
    Write them together, yours is as fair a name;
    Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;
    Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,
    Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
    Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
    Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,
    That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
    Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
    When went there by an age, since the great flood,
    But it was famed with more than with one man?

    Show HW: Act V questions/answers.

    2. Work Period: Discuss the HW--
    Take notes and make corrections on the following Act V questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?
    2. How do the conspirators die?
    3. Why are the conspirators' deaths significant?
    4. Why does Antony give the final speech of the play?
    5. How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?
    6. Write the 20-word summary of Act V.

    3. Acting Exercises: Introduce levels, physical interactions and tableau. Tableau of Caesar's funeral and tableau of Act I, Scene II (where Cassius is trying to convince Brutus that Caesar is a tyrant). Use different levels and physical interactions for the tableaus.

    How will students effectively culminate the play and prepare to present memorized speeches from Julius Caesar? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5th: Choose one of the following that you'd like to memorize and present on Wednesday, June 5th (for an extra credit quiz grade). You will need to be fully memorized. One mistake is allowed to earn a 100%. After one mistake, you will have -10 points for each mistake.
    1.) Act III, Scene II: Antony's speech at Caesar's funeral:
    Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them;
    The good is oft interred with their bones.
    So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
    Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
    If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
    And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
    Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
    For Brutus is an honorable man;
    So are they all, all honorable men—
    Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
    He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
    But Brutus says he was ambitious,
    And Brutus is an honorable man.

    2.) Act I, Scene II: Cassius' persuasive speech convincing Brutus that Caesar is a tyrant:
    Men at some time are masters of their fates:
    The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
    But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
    Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?
    Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
    Write them together, yours is as fair a name;
    Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;
    Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,
    Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
    Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
    Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,
    That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
    Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
    When went there by an age, since the great flood,
    But it was famed with more than with one man?

    Thursday, May 30th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Finish reading Act V of Julius Caesar. Take notes on the resolution of the play, including how the conspirators meet their deaths, Caesar's recurring presence and the final tribute to Brutus.

    2. Work Period: Work on HW due tomorrow--
    Answer the following Act V questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?
    2. How do the conspirators die?
    3. Why are the conspirators' deaths significant?
    4. Why does Antony give the final speech of the play?
    5. How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?
    6. Write the 20-word summary of Act V.

    How will students effectively analyze the significance of the meeting between the conspirators and the triumvirate in Act V? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 31st:
    Answer the following Act V questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?
    2. How do the conspirators die?
    3. Why are the conspirators' deaths significant?
    4. Why does Antony give the final speech of the play?
    5. How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?
    6. Write the 20-word summary of Act V.
    Wednesday, May 29th, 2013: 1. DO NOW:
  • How did Antony change from Act III (when he spoke at Caesar's funeral) to Act IV (as he leads the triumvirate)?
  • Why does the triumvirate (Antony, Octavius and Lepidus) appear that they will likely be triumphant at the end of the play?
  • How do you feel about the play thus far? Share your favorite moments and your least favorite moments.

    Show HW: Act IV Questions for Julius Caesar.

    2. Begin reading Act V of Julius Caesar. Take notes on what happens when the conspirators meet the triumvirate.

  • How will students effectively analyze the significance of the meeting between the conspirators and the triumvirate in Act V? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 31st:
    Answer the following Act V questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are the opposing forces' (the conspirators vs. the triumvirate) interactions? Why are these interactions important to the story?
    2. How do the conspirators die?
    3. Why are the conspirators' deaths significant?
    4. Why does Antony give the final speech of the play?
    5. How does the resolution of the play tie the whole play together?
    6. Write the 20-word summary of Act V.
    Tuesday, May 28th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: Finish reading Act IV of Julius Caesar. Take notes on what happens between Brutus and Cassius (their strained relationship) and to Portia in Scene III. Pay attention to the significance of the repetition of Caesar's name and presence in the play, even after his death.

    2. Work Period: Work on HW due tomorrow--

    Answer the following Act IV questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning?
    2. How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius?
    3. How are these dialogues between Antony and his men and Brutus, Cassius and their men significant to the plot of the play?
    4. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and how is it significant to the plot?
    5. What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?
    6. What happened to Portia?
    7. How does Brutus react to Portia's disappearance and what does his reaction reveal about his character?
    8. Why is Caesar's ghost's appearance important to the play?
    9. Write a 20-word summary for Act IV.

    How will students effectively analyze the significance of Caesar's name and presence in Act IV? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29th:
    Answer the following Act IV questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning?
    2. How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius?
    3. How are these dialogues between Antony and his men and Brutus, Cassius and their men significant to the plot of the play?
    4. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and how is it significant to the plot?
    5. What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?
    6. What happened to Portia?
    7. How does Brutus react to Portia's disappearance and what does his reaction reveal about his character?
    8. Why is Caesar's ghost's appearance important to the play?
    9. Write a 20-word summary for Act IV.
    Friday, May 24th, 2013: 1. DO NOW: School-wide Sophomore Exam (Regents preparatory material)

    2. Work Period: Work on HW--

    Answer the following Act IV questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning?
    2. How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius?
    3. How are these dialogues between Antony and his men and Brutus, Cassius and their men significant to the plot of the play?
    4. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and how is it significant to the plot?
    5. What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?
    6. What happened to Portia?
    7. How does Brutus react to Portia's disappearance and what does his reaction reveal about his character?
    8. Why is Caesar's ghost's appearance important to the play?
    9. Write a 20-word summary for Act IV.

    3. Continue reading Act IV. Take notes on what happens to Portia in Scene III and the repetition of Caesar's name and presence in the play, even after his death.

    How will students effectively analyze the significance of Caesar's name and presence in Act IV? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 29th:
    Answer the following Act IV questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning?
    2. How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius?
    3. How are these dialogues between Antony and his men and Brutus, Cassius and their men significant to the plot of the play?
    4. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and how is it significant to the plot?
    5. What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?
    6. What happened to Portia?
    7. How does Brutus react to Portia's disappearance and what does his reaction reveal about his character?
    8. Why is Caesar's ghost's appearance important to the play?
    9. Write a 20-word summary for Act IV.

    Thursday, May 23rd, 2013: 1. DO NOW: What do you think will happen to Antony in Acts IV and V? What do you think will happen to the conspirators--like Brutus, Cassius and the others?

    2. Share Do Now predictions.

    3. Begin reading Act IV. Take notes on Antony's plans in Scene I, the relationship between Brutus and Cassius in Scenes II and III, and what happens to Portia in Scene III.

    How will students effectively analyze characterization of Antony and the conflicting relationship between Brutus and Cassius in Act IV? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 29th:
    Answer the following Act IV questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    1. What are Antony, Octavius and Lepidus planning?
    2. How do their plans contrast to the discussions between Brutus and Cassius?
    3. How are these dialogues between Antony and his men and Brutus, Cassius and their men significant to the plot of the play?
    4. What is the strained relationship between Brutus and Cassius and how is it significant to the plot?
    5. What is the importance of Caesar's ghost's appearance?
    6. What happened to Portia?
    7. How does Brutus react to Portia's disappearance and what does his reaction reveal about his character?
    8. Why is Caesar's ghost's appearance important to the play?
    9. Write a 20-word summary for Act IV.

    Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013: CRITICAL LENS ESSAY--FINAL EXAM

    REMINDERS: WRITE 5 PARAGRAPHS ON TWO WORKS OF LITERATURE (ONE WORK MUST BE JULIUS CAESAR, AND THE OTHER ONE MAY BE A BOOK OF YOUR CHOICE) THAT SUPPORT THE QUOTE GIVEN. YOUR BODY PARAGRAPHS SHOULD BE 10-12 SENTENCES EACH. USE PLENTY OF DETAILS FROM THE TWO WORKS OF LITERATURE. USE SOPHISTICATED VOCABULARY. MENTION THE WORDS IN THE QUOTE THROUGHOUT YOUR ESSAY.

    How will students effectively write the critical lens essay? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW.
    Tuesday, May 21st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Here's a critical lens quote: “Circumstances are beyond the control of man; but his conduct is in his own power.”— Benjamin Disraeli

    Do the following (one sentence per bullet point):

  • Interpret the quote in your own words.
  • Agree or disagree with the quote (agreeing is better!), and explain a reason for your opinion.
  • Introduce two works of literature (one MUST be Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, and the other may be a book of your choice. Though, 1984, by George Orwell, is recommended). Mention the titles of the books and the authors, and briefly explain why the books support the quote.

    View the full instructions at the following link: January 2013 English Regents Exam.

    2. Discuss the quote and review the Do Now. Introduce the B-REAL formula. Discuss and take notes on what you could include in body paragraphs (from both Julius Caesar and 1984 to support the quote above.

    3. Examine sample exemplary critical lens essays.

    4. HW Reminders

  • How will students prepare to write the critical lens essay? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 22nd:
  • FINAL EXAM (50% of the 3rd marking period)=CRITICAL LENS ESSAY. Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements (characterization, symbolism, foreshadowing, and themes work best) that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least THREE well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature (ONE WORK OF LITERATURE MUST BE JULIUS CAESAR, by William Shakespeare, and the other work of literature recommended is 1984, by George Orwell) that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • REVIEW YOUR NOTES ON JULIUS CAESAR AND 1984.
  • SEE OUTSTANDING CRITICAL LENS ESSAYS HERE: sample exemplary critical lens essays. Check out Level 6 (90+).
  • Monday, May 20th, 2013: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary.

    2. For each of the quotes below, do the following (one sentence per bullet point):

  • Interpret the quote in your own words.
  • Agree or disagree with the quote (agreeing is better!), and explain a reason for your opinion.
  • Introduce two works of literature (one MUST be Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, and the other may be a book of your choice. Though, 1984, by George Orwell, is recommended). Mention the titles of the books and the authors, and briefly explain why the books support the quote.

    QUOTES:
    1.) "All conflict in literature is, in its simplest form, a struggle between good and evil."
    2.) “You must take life the way it comes at you and make the best of it.”

    3. Discuss the quotes, and introduce the B-REAL formula.

    4. HW introduced.

  • How will students understand the vocabulary in Julius Caesar and prepare to write the critical lens essay? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, MAY 22nd:
  • FINAL EXAM (50% of the 3rd marking period)=CRITICAL LENS ESSAY. Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements (characterization, symbolism, foreshadowing, and themes work best) that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature (ONE WORK OF LITERATURE MUST BE JULIUS CAESAR, by William Shakespeare, and the other work of literature recommended is 1984, by George Orwell) that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • Friday, May 17th, 2013: 1. Do Now: With a neighbor, test each other on the vocabulary words' definitions in List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary (Quiz on Monday!).

    Show HW:

  • Act III Questions
  • Vocabulary Story for List #3
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #3

    2. Review List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary (Quiz on Monday!).

    3. Review answers to the Act III Questions:
    1. How could Caesar's murder have been prevented?
    2. How do the characters react to his death? How do characters' reactions differ?
    3. What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after Caesar's death?
    4. Describe various reactions to Caesar's death.
    5. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?
    6. Compare and contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans.
    7. How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story?
    8. Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet?
    9. What does this attack on Cinna, the poet, reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?
    10. Write the 20-word summary for Act III.

  • How will students understand the content (plot development, characters' characterization, and literary techniques) and vocabulary in Act III of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MAY 20th:
  • QUIZ on List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary
  • Wednesday (May 15th) and Thursday (May 16th), 2013: Work Periods: Work on HW due Friday:
  • Act III Questions
  • Vocabulary Story for List #3
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #3
  • How will students understand the content (plot development, characters' characterization, and literary techniques) and vocabulary in Act III of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 17th:
    Act III Questions:
    1. How could Caesar's murder have been prevented?
    2. How do the characters react to his death? How do characters' reactions differ?
    3. What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after Caesar's death?
    4. Describe various reactions to Caesar's death.
    5. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?
    6. Compare and contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans.
    7. How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story?
    8. Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet?
    9. What does this attack on Cinna, the poet, reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?
    10. Write the 20-word summary for Act III.

    VOCABULARY STORY for List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary on one of the following topics: Freedom, Murder Mystery, My Life or Life at ITHS. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS for List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 20th:

  • QUIZ on List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary.
  • Tuesday, May 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • How do the citizens react to Brutus' speech at Caesar's funeral?
  • Why does Shakespeare include the citizens' reactions? What's their purpose?
  • Why does Shakespeare have both Brutus and Antony speak at Caesar's funeral?

    2. Discuss answers to the Do Now questions.

    3. Finish reading Act III of Julius Caesar. How do different characters seek justice (fairness) after Caesar's death? Which character is more convincing in his oratorial (public speaking) skills in his argument for justice FOR Caesar or AGAINST Caesar--Brutus or Antony?

    4. Introduce HW.

  • How will students analyze the means by which Brutus and Antony seek justice for Rome and Caesar's death, respectively, in Act III of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 17th:
    Act III Questions:
    1. How could Caesar's murder have been prevented?
    2. How do the characters react to his death? How do characters' reactions differ?
    3. What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after Caesar's death?
    4. Describe various reactions to Caesar's death.
    5. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?
    6. Compare and contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans.
    7. How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story?
    8. Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet?
    9. What does this attack on Cinna, the poet, reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?
    10. Write the 20-word summary for Act III.

    VOCABULARY STORY for List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary on one of the following topics: Freedom, Murder Mystery, My Life or Life at ITHS. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS for List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 20th:

  • QUIZ on List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary.
  • Monday, May 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    Why are each of the following quotes important to the play, Julius Caesar, as a whole?
    A.) "Stoop, Romans, stoop, and let us bathe our hands in Caesar's blood..." (Brutus, III, I).
    B.) "Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more" (Brutus, III, II).
    C.) "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him..." (Antony, III, II).
    D.) "For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel...this was the most unkindest cut of all" (Antony, III, II).

    2. Discuss answers to the Do Now questions in small groups. Be ready to introduce one of your classmate's answers and share your response, starting with this statement: "I agree/disagree with ________________ (classmate's name) because___________________________ (evidence provided from Julius Caesar).

    3. Continue reading Act III of Julius Caesar. How do the conspirators react (in word and action) after Caesar's death? How were their words and actions prophetic (ominous or foreshadowing)? Why does Antony shake hands with the conspirators? How do different characters seek justice (fairness)?

    4. EXIT SLIP: On the paper provided, provide your answers to the following:

  • Which character is more convincing in his oratorial (public speaking) skills in his argument for justice FOR Caesar or AGAINST Caesar--Brutus or Antony? Explain your answer, using evidence from the play. Write your answer, filling up the space on the front of the index card.
  • Challenge: Choose a character from Act III who wants justice (e.g. Brutus or Antony). Explain his understanding of justice, an explanation in which you analyze if his search for justice is successful, and the significance (importance) of this search to the play as a whole.

    Standards:

  • 10.RL.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • 10.W.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How will students analyze the means by which Brutus and Antony seek justice for Rome and Caesar's death, respectively, in Act III of Julius Caesar? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 17th:
    Act III Questions:
    1. How could Caesar's murder have been prevented?
    2. How do the characters react to his death? How do characters' reactions differ?
    3. What can you, the reader/viewer, foreshadow will come next, after Caesar's death?
    4. Describe various reactions to Caesar's death.
    5. Why is Antony an expert orator (speaker)?
    6. Compare and contrast Brutus' address and Antony's address to the Romans.
    7. How is Antony's funeral speech significant to the story?
    8. Why do the citizens attack Cinna, the poet?
    9. What does this attack on Cinna, the poet, reveal about the portrayal of the citizens?
    10. Write the 20-word summary for Act III.

    VOCABULARY STORY for List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary on one of the following topics: Freedom, Murder Mystery, My Life or Life at ITHS. Write a vocabulary story using all of the words above. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). You may write fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten or one page typed, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS for List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 20th:

  • QUIZ on List #3 for Julius Caesar Vocabulary.
  • Friday, May 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    Why are each of the following quotes important to the play, Julius Caesar, as a whole?
    A.) "I am constant as the Northern Star" (Caesar, III, I).
    B.) "Et tu, Brute? Then fall Caesar" (Caesar, III, I).

    2. Discuss answers to the Do Now questions in small groups. Be ready to introduce one of your classmate's answers and share your response, starting with this statement: "I agree/disagree with ________________ (classmate's name) because___________________________ (evidence provided from Julius Caesar).

    2. Continue reading Act III of Julius Caesar. What are the events leading up to Caesar's death in Act III, Scene I? What could Caesar have said to prevent his murder? How do the conspirators react and say after Caesar's death? How were their words prophetic (ominous or foreshadowing)? Why does Antony shake hands with the conspirators?

    How will students analyze the characterization of Caesar, the conspirators and Antony prior to Caesar's death and immediately after his death in Act III of Julius Caesar? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW.
    Thursday, May 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
  • Make a prediction about the rest of the play--Acts III, IV and V.
  • What will happen to each of the characters we've met so far? Caesar? Cassius? Brutus? Calpurnia? Portia?
  • What could Caesar have done differently in Acts I or II to prevent his imminent murder?

    Show HW: Two paragraphs on Portia vs. Calpurnia and Brutus vs. Cassius (who's your favorite?).

    2. Finish discussing answers to
    Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).

    3. Begin reading Act III of Julius Caesar. What are the events leading up to Caesar's death in Act III, Scene I? What could Caesar have said to prevent his murder? How do the conspirators react and say after Caesar's death? How were their words prophetic (ominous or foreshadowing)? Why does Antony shake hands with the conspirators?

  • How will students analyze the characterization of Portia, Calpurnia, Cassius and Brutus, the plot's events and the literary techniques developed in Act II of Julius Caesar, which prepares the readers for Act III? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW.
    Wednesday, May 8th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Interpret (in your own words) important quotes from Act II. Identify the speaker and each quote's significance to the story of Julius Caesar as a whole:
  • “And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg, which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous, and kill him in the shell” (Brutus, II, I).
  • “Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers...let’s kill him boldly, but not wrathfully...” (Brutus, II, I).
  • “A lioness hath whelped in the streets, and graves have yawned and yielded up their dead. Fierce fiery warriors fought upon the clouds in ranks and squadrons right form of war, which drizzled blood upon the Capitol” (Calpurnia, II, II).
  • “Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once” (Caesar, II, II).
  • “She dreamt tonight she saw my statue, which, like a fountain with an hundred spouts, did run pure blood, and many lusty Romans came smiling and did bathe their hands in it” (Caesar, II, II).
  • “Ay me, how weak a thing the heart of a woman is” (Portia, II, IV).

    SHOW HW: ACT II QUESTIONS and yesterday's classwork (two well-developed paragraphs on your favorite wife and favorite conspirator.

    2. Discuss the quotes in the Do Now and yesterday's classwork.

    3. Review HW questions for Act II of Julius Caesar

  • How will students analyze the characterization of Portia, Calpurnia, Cassius and Brutus, the plot's events and the literary techniques developed in Act II of Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 9th:
  • Who's your favorite wife: Portia (Brutus' wife) or Calpurnia (Caesar's wife)? Who's your favorite conspirator: Brutus or Cassius? Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) for each question.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW.

  • Tuesday, May 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Who's your favorite wife: Portia (Brutus' wife) or Calpurnia (Caesar's wife)? Who's your favorite conspirator: Brutus or Cassius? Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) for each question. Be ready to turn in to Ms. Conn.

    2. Work on HW due tomorrow.

    How will students analyze the characterization of Portia vs. Calpurnia and Cassius vs. Brutus in Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 8TH:
    Read Act II of Julius Caesar (packet provided and read in class). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).
    Monday, May 6th, 2013: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down)

    2. Finish reading Act II. Take notes that will focus on the HW questions that are due this Wednesday: Brutus' characterization of Caesar, characterization of Brutus, the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar, Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar, the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol), examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration, the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia, the relationship between Brutus and Portia, and examples of omens/foreshadowing.

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students analyze the characterization of Cassius vs. Brutus, characterization of Brutus' wife Portia, plot development (rising action), and omens/foreshadowing in Act II of Julius Caesar)? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 8TH:
    Read Act II of Julius Caesar (packet provided and read in class). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).
    Friday, May 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: Compare and contrast Cassius and Brutus. Create a Venn Diagram or a T-Chart.

    2. Share your answers to the Do Now.

    3. Continue reading Act II. Take notes that will focus on the HW questions that are due next Wednesday: Brutus' characterization of Caesar, characterization of Brutus, the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar, Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar, the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol), examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration, the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia, the relationship between Brutus and Portia, and examples of omens/foreshadowing.

    4. HW Reminders/Vocabulary Review

    How will students analyze the characterization of Cassius vs. Brutus, characterization of Brutus' wife Portia, plot development (rising action), and omens/foreshadowing in Act II of Julius Caesar)? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MAY 6th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down)

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 8TH:
    Read Act II of Julius Caesar (packet provided and read in class). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).

  • Thursday, May 2nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: It has been said that Shakespeare is “not of an age (one time period), but for all time.” What makes Shakespeare's plays universal (timeless)?

    SHOW HW: Journal and any owed HW.

    2. Continue reading Act II. Take notes that will focus on the HW questions that are due next Wednesday: Brutus' characterization of Caesar, characterization of Brutus, the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar, Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar, the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol), examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration, the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia, the relationship between Brutus and Portia, and examples of omens/foreshadowing.

    How will students analyze the theme of betrayal, characterization of a popular and successful leader, and the influence of various events (through the lens of Julius Caesar) by writing in diary form? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MAY 6th:
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down)

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 8TH:
    Read Act II of Julius Caesar (packet provided and read in class). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).

  • Wednesday, May 1st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's classwork: Choose one of the following journal (diary) entry choices. Write a minimum of ONE full page. Be ready to show to Ms. Conn and share with class.
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #1:
    Write about a time that you or someone you know felt betrayed or betrayed someone else. What type of relationship was it that ended in betrayal? How did it get to that point? Do you have to love someone in order to betray him or her?
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #2:
    Julius Caesar was loved by the Roman common people because of his charisma (magnetic personality and leadership). Choose another important leader in history or in your life and describe the personality traits, actions, and decisions that made or make him or her popular and successful.
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #3:
    There is a soothsayer (fortune teller) in Act I of Julius Caesar who gives Caesar a message. Do you or any of your friends or family members believe in psychics or the supernatural? Why or why not? Write about a time when you wished you had known the future so you could have done something differently to change the outcome.

    SHOW HW: Flashcards and Vocabulary Story for Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down).

    2. Begin reading Act II. Take notes.

  • How will students analyze the theme of betrayal, characterization of a popular and successful leader, and the influence of various events (through the lens of Julius Caesar) by writing in diary form? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 2nd:
  • Finish today's Do Now (classwork): Choose one of the following journal (diary) entry choices. Write a minimum of ONE full page. Be ready to show to Ms. Conn TOMORROW.
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #1:
    Write about a time that you or someone you know felt betrayed or betrayed someone else. What type of relationship was it that ended in betrayal? How did it get to that point? Do you have to love someone in order to betray him or her?
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #2:
    Julius Caesar was loved by the Roman common people because of his charisma (magnetic personality and leadership). Choose another important leader in history or in your life and describe the personality traits, actions, and decisions that made or make him or her popular and successful.
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #3:
    There is a soothsayer (fortune teller) in Act I of Julius Caesar who gives Caesar a message. Do you or any of your friends or family members believe in psychics or the supernatural? Why or why not? Write about a time when you wished you had known the future so you could have done something differently to change the outcome.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 6th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down)

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 8TH:
    Read Act II of Julius Caesar (packet provided and read in class). Answer the following questions in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act II Questions:
    1. Describe Brutus' characterization of Caesar.
    2. Describe the characterization of Brutus.
    3. What are the reasons the conspirators want to kill Caesar?
    4. What are Brutus' reasons for killing Caesar?
    5. Describe the conspirators' assassination plan (their method to bring Caesar to the Capitol).
    6. Identify examples for each of the following literary elements: simile, irony and alliteration.
    7. Describe the characterization of Brutus' wife Portia.
    8. Describe the relationship between Brutus and Portia.
    9. Identify examples of omens/foreshadowing.
    10. Describe how Caesar's arrogance is revealed in Act II.
    11. Write the Act II summary (exactly 20 words).

  • Tuesday, April 30th, 2013: 1. Work Period: Choose one of the following journal (diary) entry choices. Write a minimum of ONE full page. Be ready to turn in tomorrow.  
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #1: 
    Write about a time that you or someone you know felt betrayed or betrayed someone else. What   type of relationship was it that ended in betrayal? How did it get to that point? Do you have to love someone  in order to betray him or her?   
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #2: 
    Julius Caesar was loved by the Roman common people because of his charisma (magnetic personality  and leadership). Choose another important leader in history or in your life and describe the personality  traits, actions, and decisions that made or make him or her popular and successful.   
  • Julius Caesar Journal Choice #3: 
    There is a soothsayer (fortune teller) in Act I of Julius Caesar who gives Caesar a message. Do you or any  of your friends or family members believe in psychics or the supernatural? Why or why not? Write about  a time when you wished you had known the future so you could have done something differently to  change the outcome. 

    2. Work on homework due tomorrow.

  • How will students analyze the theme of betrayal, characterization of a popular and successful leader, and the influence of various events (through the lens of Julius Caesar) by writing in diary form? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 1st:
  • Compose flashcards for Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Compose a vocabulary story for all of the words in Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down). You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: Conspiracy, Murder Mystery, In the Future, or a Day in Your Life. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two, handwritten pages or one, typed page, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 6th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down)
  • Monday, April 29th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Choose one of the characters from Act I of Julius Caesar (Caesar, Cassius, Brutus, Soothsayer, or Calpurnia) and write the first paragraph in his personal diary (write in first person).

    2. Share excerpts from your Do Now.

    3. Introduce Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down).

    4. Introduce HW.

    How will students analyze characterization in Julius Caesar by writing in a character's perspective (diary form)? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 1st:
  • Compose flashcards for Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Compose a vocabulary story for all of the words in Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down). You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: Conspiracy, Murder Mystery, In the Future, or a Day in Your Life. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two, handwritten pages or one, typed page, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 6th:

  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List #2 for Julius Caesar (scroll down)
  • Friday, April 26th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read Manga version of Act I of Julius Caesar

    Show any owed HW (last day of 2nd marking period!)

    2. Review answers to vocabulary quiz for Julius Caesar Vocabulary List #1.

    How will students analyze Act I of Julius Caesar by examining characterization, major events of the exposition (introduction), and literary devices (and why they're significant to the story)? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 29th:
  • Finish reading the rest of the Manga packet for Act I of Julius Caesar.
  • Thursday, April 25th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Word Search and Crossword Puzzle for Act I of Julius Caesar

    Show HW: Questions for Act I (THREE HW ASSIGNMENTS).

    2. Review HW answers. Take notes/fix HW. Discuss the following questions (VALUE OF THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!) in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.

    3. HW Reminders--tomorrow is the last day of the 2nd marking period.

    How will students analyze Act I of Julius Caesar by examining characterization, major events of the exposition (introduction), and literary devices (and why they're significant to the story)? Make up any owed HW! TOMORROW (FRIDAY) IS THE LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD!
    Wednesday, April 24th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Caesar has ignored TWO warnings that DANGER is approaching him. What are these warnings? Be ready to share.

    2. Finish reading aloud Act I Scene II and Scene III of the play, Julius Caesar. How would you characterize Cassius? What does Cassius have against Caesar? What does Caesar have against Cassius? What is Caesar's weakness? How does Cassius convince Brutus to join his conspiracy against Caesar? Why is Brutus a "good guy" that Cassius wants as a member of the conspiracy? What are the omens (warnings of danger to come) in Scene III? Take notes.

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students analyze characterization of Caesar, Cassius, and Brutus in Act I, Scenes II and III in Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, APRIL 25th:
  • Read Act I of Julius Caesar (packet provided in class) Answer the following questions (VALUE OF THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!) in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.

    Make up any owed HW! THIS FRIDAY IS THE LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD!

  • Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013 (Shakespeare's 449th birthday!): 1. Do Now: QUIZ on List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary. When finished, have cookies and juice for Shakespeare's birthday!

    2. Continue reading aloud Act I Scene II of the play, Julius Caesar. What does "Beware the Ides of March" mean? How does Caesar react to the Soothsayer's words? What are Brutus' troubles? How would you characterize Cassius? What does Cassius have against Caesar? What does Caesar have against Cassius? What is Caesar's weakness? Take notes.

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students analyze characterization of Caesar, Cassius, and Brutus in Act I, Scene II in Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar? DUE THIS THURSDAY, APRIL 25th:
  • Read Act I of Julius Caesar (packet provided in class) Answer the following questions (VALUE OF THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!) in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.

    Make up any owed HW! THIS FRIDAY IS THE LAST DAY OF THE 2ND MARKING PERIOD!

  • Monday, April 22nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: Since we finished reading Act I, Scene I of Julius Caesar, what do you suppose makes Caesar popular? Can you name other men in history who have been instantly popular? Be ready to discuss.

    2. Begin reading aloud Act I Scene II of the play, Julius Caesar. What does "Beware the Ides of March" mean? How does Caesar react to the Soothsayer's words? What are Brutus' troubles? How would you characterize Cassius? What does Cassius have against Caesar? What does Caesar have against Cassius? What is Caesar's weakness? Take notes.

    How will students analyze characterization of Caesar, Cassius, and Brutus in Act I, Scene II in Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, APRIL 22nd:
  • QUIZ on List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary (about 15% of 2nd marking period's grade).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, APRIL 25th:

  • Read Act I of Julius Caesar (packet provided in class) Answer the following questions (VALUE OF THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!) in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Friday, April 19th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Check out Act I packet for Julius Caesar.

    2. Discuss and take notes on the following:

  • Describe the theater during Shakespeare's lifetime (Elizabethan Era).
  • Describe actors during Shakespeare's lifetime.
  • Describe Shakespeare's wealth and status during his lifetime.
  • Describe the health and disease during Shakespeare's lifetime.

    2. Begin reading aloud Act I Scene I of the play, Julius Caesar. Examine the double entendre/puns, dialect, and plot development. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar? How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (i.e. Flavius)? Take notes.

  • How will students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar by analyzing Shakespeare's language and the theme of friendship? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, APRIL 22nd:
  • QUIZ on List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary (about 15% of 2nd marking period's grade).

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, APRIL 25th:

  • Read Act I of Julius Caesar (packet provided in class) Answer the following questions (VALUE OF THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!) in complete sentences (2-4 sentences per question):
    Act I, Scene I:
    1. Identify at least one example of double entendre (also called a pun).
    2. How do the citizens feel about Julius Caesar?
    3. How do the lawmakers feel about Caesar (e.g. Flavius)?
    Act I, Scene II:
    4. Characterize Julius Caesar.
    5. Characterize Brutus.
    6. Characterize Cassius.
    7. What conflicts are introduced?
    8. Why are these conflicts important to the storyline?
    9. What is the significance of Shakespeare's language choices in the play so far?
    10. What are the differences between prose and poetry?
    11. How does Cassius reveal his jealousy of Caesar?
    12. How can Caesar tell Cassius is dangerous?
    13. What are Caesar's weaknesses?
    Act I, Scene III:
    14. Identify omens (signs of bad things to come).
    15. Describe Cassius' scheming/plotting to convince Casca and Brutus to join his conspiracy to bring down Caesar.
    16. Write a 20-word (EXACTLY 20 words!) summary of Act I.

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Thursday, April 18th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Friendship is a major theme in the play. Explore this theme by answering the following questions:
    1.) How far would you go to stop a friend from harming your country?
    2.) How far would you go to obtain revenge on someone or some group who destroyed your best friend?
    3.) Is there anything for which you would betray a friend?
    4.) Which is more important to you, friendship or personal principles (values/morals)? Why?

    Show HW: Provide answers to the following questions. You should research on the internet and identify the website URL and name of the website. You should provide a minimum of 2-3 sentences per answer.
    1.) What kind of education did William Shakespeare have? Describe his elementary school and high school education.
    2.) Describe theater during Shakespeare's lifetime (Elizabethan Era).
    3.) Describe actors during Shakespeare's lifetime.
    4.) Describe Shakespeare's wealth and status during his lifetime.
    5.) Describe the health and disease during Shakespeare's lifetime.

    2. Discuss Do Now answers, HW and the 10 lines that you interpreted yesterday (in class), taken from Act I of Julius Caesar.

    3. HW Reminders: Quiz on Tuesday. Make up owed HW!

    How will students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar by analyzing Shakespeare's language and the theme of friendship? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, APRIL 22nd:
  • QUIZ on List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary (about 15% of 2nd marking period's grade).

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Wednesday, April 17th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Interpret 10 lines taken from Act I of Julius Caesar. What do they mean in modern-day English?

    2. WORK PERIOD: Friendship is a major theme in the play. Explore this theme by answering the following questions:
    1.) How far would you go to stop a friend from harming your country?
    2.) How far would you go to obtain revenge on someone or some group who destroyed your best friend?
    3.) Is there anything for which you would betray a friend?
    4.) Which is more important to you, friendship or personal principles? Why?

    3. HW Reminder: Turn in the vocabulary story to Ms. Conn today (either stop by her class or e-mail her at hconn@schools.nyc.gov) and turn in the vocabulary flashcards (period 3-tomorrow and period 9-today).

    How will students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar by analyzing Shakespeare's language and the theme of friendship? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, APRIL 18th:
    Provide answers to the following questions. You should research on the internet and identify the website URL and name of the website. You should provide a minimum of 2-3 sentences per answer.
    1.) What kind of education did William Shakespeare have? Describe his elementary school and high school education.
    2.) Describe theater during Shakespeare's lifetime (Elizabethan Era).
    3.) Describe actors during Shakespeare's lifetime.
    4.) Describe Shakespeare's wealth and status during his lifetime.
    5.) Describe the health and disease during Shakespeare's lifetime.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, APRIL 22nd:

  • QUIZ on List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary (about 15% of 2nd marking period's grade).

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Tuesday, April 16th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Compose two fill in the blank sentence questions and one definition question for words from List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary. Turn it in.

    2. WORK PERIOD: Work on the HW due tomorrow (Vocabulary Story and flashcards) and any owed HW.

    How will students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar by enhancing their vocabulary? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Compose a Vocabulary Story (PLEASE show it in class or during the school day OR e-mail it to Ms. Conn at hconn@schools.nyc.gov), using ALL of the words in List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: What Makes a Good Leader, Shakespeare, A Day in Your Life, or A Blast from the Past. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two, handwritten pages or one, typed page, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, APRIL 18th:
    Provide answers to the following questions. You should research on the internet and identify the website URL and name of the website. You should provide a minimum of 2-3 sentences per answer.
    1.) What kind of education did William Shakespeare have? Describe his elementary school and high school education.
    2.) Describe theater during Shakespeare's lifetime (Elizabethan Era).
    3.) Describe actors during Shakespeare's lifetime.
    4.) Describe Shakespeare's wealth and status during his lifetime.
    5.) Describe the health and disease during Shakespeare's lifetime.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, APRIL 22nd:

  • QUIZ on List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary (about 15% of 2nd marking period's grade).

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Monday, April 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Brainstorm the true life of Julius Caesar. What is your prior knowledge of this historic, political figure? Describe the popularity of Julius Caesar, his character traits, his effect on people, and his time period.

    Show HW: questions/answers for famous lines taken from Julius Caesar at Caesar's funeral

    2. Discuss Do Now and the rest of the HW questions/answers.

    3. Introduce List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary and HW.

    How will students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards for List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech on the front of the card, and write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list above) on the back of the card. You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • Vocabulary Story (write your own creative story!), using ALL of the words in List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary. You MUST use all of the words (underline them!). Story topic/title choices (fiction or non-fiction, including poetry, play/movie script, etc.) include: What Makes a Good Leader, Shakespeare, A Day in Your Life, or A Blast from the Past. You do need to use the words correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two, handwritten pages or one, typed page, underlining all of the vocabulary words. You must write your OWN story.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, APRIL 22nd:

  • QUIZ on List #1 of Julius Caesar Vocabulary (about 15% of 2nd marking period's grade).

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Friday, April 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish discussion and note-taking on the K/W/L Chart on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works

    2. Introduce HW. Begin working.

    How will students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 15th:
  • Read famous lines taken from Julius Caesar at Caesar's funeral. Answer the following questions:
    1.) What makes Julius Caesar a popular leader?
    2.) It is well known that authors reference their personal lives in their literature. Identify an example of Shakespeare's life in this excerpt from his play.
    3.) Identify examples of imagery, repetition, and alliteration.
    4.) Identify an example of irony.
    5.) This quote (see the link above) is taken from Act 3. What can you predict will happen in Acts 4 and 5?

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Thursday, April 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Note-taking on the K/W/L Chart on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works (Period 9: review the answers to the 1984 vocabulary quiz). Take additional notes.

    2. Introduce HW. Begin working.

    How will students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 15th:
  • Read famous lines taken from Julius Caesar at Caesar's funeral. Answer the following questions:
    1.) What makes Julius Caesar a popular leader?
    2.) It is well known that authors reference their personal lives in their literature. Identify an example of Shakespeare's life in this excerpt from his play.
    3.) Identify examples of imagery, repetition, and alliteration.
    4.) Identify an example of irony.
    5.) This quote (see the link above) is taken from Act 3. What can you predict will happen in Acts 4 and 5?

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Wednesday, April 10th, 2013: 1. Do Now: In your GENIUS section, answer the following:
    1.) Why is William Shakespeare a genius?
    2.) Why is George Orwell, the author of 1984 and Animal Farm, a genius?
    3.) How is a genius different today than during Shakespeare's time period (late 1500's and early 1600's)? How is a genius different today than during Orwell's time period (early 1900's)?

    Show HW: K/W/L Chart on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works.

    2. Review the Do Now questions/answers.

    3. Review 1984 Vocabulary Quiz.

    4. Conferences with students regarding their Mock Regents scores.

    5. If time allows, begin reviewing the K/W/L Chart on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works

    How will students prepare for the study of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar? Make up any owed HW!
    Tuesday, April 9th, 2013: 1. Do Now: What do you believe are some strategies for success on the English Regents (imagine you are an English teacher)? If you were the English Regents test-maker, how would you change the exam?

    2. Discuss Do Now answers.

    3. Introduce the components and strategies of the English Regents Exam (examine the January 2013 Regents exam when reviewing these components and strategies):

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • How will students improve their English Regents skills? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10th:
  • Compose a K/W/L CHART on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Works. Include at least three facts in the "K" (what you know) column and at least three facts in the "W" column (what you want to know). The "L" column is left blank. What do you know about William Shakespeare--his life, times, and works? What do you want to know? What will be helpful in learning about Shakespeare's life and times in order to study and better understand his plays and poetry?

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Monday, April 8th, 2013 (Holocaust Remembrance Day): 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz on Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984 (10% of 2nd marking period). Show HW: Vocabulary Flashcards and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss the following questions:
    1.) What were some of your strengths on yesterday's practice English Regents Exam?
    2.) What were some of your areas needing improvement on yesterday's practice English Regents Exam?
    3.) Which section do you believe was your most successful?
    4.) What skills do you want to improve in order to be successful on the real English Regents Exam?
    5.) What do you want Ms. Conn to teach so you can improve on the real English Regents Exam?

    3. IF TIME ALLOWS, introduce the components and strategies of the English Regents Exam:

  • Part 1/Listening with Multiple-Choice Questions: Listen to a passage being read to you two times. Take notes both times. Listen and take notes on the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where and why) and 1 H (how). Preview the questions (circle key words in the questions) before, during and between the readings. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we listening to this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?). Answer multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination).
  • Part 2/Fiction Passage & Non-Fiction Passage with Multiple-Choice Questions: For the fiction passage, search for literary terms and their purpose. Preview the multiple-choice questions, circling key words and underlining line #s in the questions and in the passages. Write summary notes in the margin. Answer the multiple-choice questions. Remember two important strategies--cover up the answer choices and determine the answer on your own, without the distraction of the answer choices (write your own answer in the margins) and then look at the answer choices, doing POE (process of elimination). For the non-fiction passage, look for the 5 Ws and 1 H and the purpose for each. Preview the questions (circle key words and underline line #s in the questions and in the passage). Write summary notes in the margins of the passage. Always understand the author's purpose for writing the passage (WHY did he/she write it?!).
  • Part 3/Fiction Passage and Poem: Search for literary terms and author's purpose. Preview multiple-choice questions and two short-response (paragraph/one page) questions. Circle key words and underline line #s. Write summary notes in the margin (for the passage and the poem). Answer the multiple-choice questions. For the paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The first paragraph is focused on the controlling idea (whatever they provide; it's the main idea that connects the fiction passage and the poem). You MUST use plentiful details/specific examples from BOTH the passage and the poem. In the second paragraph (10-12sentences/ONE FULL PAGE), you choose ONE passage (either the fiction passage or the poem) to identify ONE literary element/technique and explain how the author uses that element/technique to develop the passage (refer to the author's purpose in using that element/technique). Use plentiful details/specific examples to support your choice.
  • Part 4/Critical Lens Essay: Use the B-REAL formula for the introductory paragraph. B: Write a big attention-grabber (a statement about the topic revealed in the quote that relates to you or people in society today). R: Restate the quote. E: Explain the quote in your own words. A: Agree or disagree (agreeing is easier!) with the quote and explain why. L: Introduce two works of literature and Literary Elements that support your opinion of the quote. For the rest of THIS LONG ESSAY, you should include at least two well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences each) with specific examples/details from two works of literature that support your opinion of the quote. Finish the essay with an outstanding conclusion that ties together the entire paper.
  • How will students improve their English Regents skills? Make up any owed HW!
    Friday, April 5th, 2013: Work Period: Answer the following questions:
    1.) What were some of your strengths on yesterday's practice English Regents Exam?
    2.) What were some of your areas needing improvement on yesterday's practice English Regents Exam?
    3.) Which section do you believe was your most successful?
    4.) What skills do you want to improve in order to be successful on the real English Regents Exam?
    5.) What do you want Ms. Conn to teach so you can improve on the real English Regents Exam?

    *When finished with the questions above (please turn in), work on the HW due (vocabulary flashcards, studying for Monday's vocabulary quiz, vocabulary story--if not completed, and any other owed HW).

    How will students improve their English Regents skills? DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 8th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS (make your own electronic or paper flashcards) for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). You may choose to use an electronic app to create your flashcards.
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984 (10% of 2nd marking period).

    Make up any owed HW!

  • Thursday, April 4th, 2013: Period 3: MOCK ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM

    Period 9: Answer the following questions:
    1.) What were some of your strengths on today's practice English Regents Exam?
    2.) What were some of your areas needing improvement on today's practice English Regents Exam?
    3.) Which section do you believe was your most successful?
    4.) What skills do you want to improve in order to be successful on the real English Regents Exam?
    5.) What do you want Ms. Conn to teach so you can improve on the real English Regents Exam?

    *When finished with the questions above (please turn in), work on the HW due (vocabulary flashcards, studying for Monday's vocabulary quiz, vocabulary story--if not completed, and any other owed HW).

    How will students improve their English Regents skills? DUE TODAY (by your class period), THURSDAY, APRIL 4th:
  • E-MAIL MS. CONN (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) by class time: CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. You must write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). This story will be checked for completion, not accuracy, though do your best to use the words correctly and avoid grammatical errors. You must use all words from the vocabulary list in this creative story. You must adhere (follow) Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. You must underline all of the vocabulary words in a creative or non-fiction story that you write about one of the following topics: Rebellion, Oppression, The Future, or Invasion of Privacy.

    HW DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 8th:


  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS (make your own electronic or paper flashcards) for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). You may choose to use an electronic app to create your flashcards.
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984 (10% of 2nd marking period).
  • Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013: 1. Do Now: For the Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984, compose one sentence completion multiple-choice question (with four answer choices) and one definition multiple-choice question (with four answer choices). Turn it in.

    2. Vocabulary Baseball for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984----divide into two teams. Divide students into two teams and draw a baseball diamond on the blackboard. Each team has three outs per inning (like regular baseball) and one player from each team goes at a time. You say a word, and the student has 30 seconds to define it. If he defines it in five seconds, the team gets a home run; within 10 seconds, it's a triple; within 15 seconds, it's a double; and just before the time limit, it's a single. If the student does not get the definition right, he's out. Draw an icon for a base runner when a student gets a hit. When a player gets to home plate the team scores a run. The team with the most runs at the end of nine innings (or whenever time runs out) wins the game.

    3. AMAZING EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY DUE TODAY:

  • For those students who have read the rest of 1984, they will take an oral test and earn up to 10 points on their final 2nd marking period grade!

    4. HW Reminders

  • How will students improve their vocabulary skills in question composition and a virtual baseball game activity? ALL SOPHOMORES WILL BE TAKING A PRACTICE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM TOMORROW.

    DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • E-MAIL MS. CONN (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) by class time: CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. You must write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). This story will be checked for completion, not accuracy, though do your best to use the words correctly and avoid grammatical errors. You must use all words from the vocabulary list in this creative story. You must adhere (follow) Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. You must underline all of the vocabulary words in a creative or non-fiction story that you write about one of the following topics: Rebellion, Oppression, The Future, or Invasion of Privacy.

    HW DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS MONDAY, APRIL 8th:


  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS (make your own electronic or paper flashcards) for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). You may choose to use an electronic app to create your flashcards.
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984 (10% of 2nd marking period).
  • Friday, March 22nd, 2013: Work Period: Work on the HW:
  • Vocabulary Story: You must write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). You must use all words from the vocabulary list in this creative story. You must adhere (follow) Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. You must underline all of the vocabulary words in a creative or non-fiction story that you write about one of the following topics: Rebellion, Oppression, The Future, or Invasion of Privacy. Here's the list: Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984.
  • Vocabulary FLASHCARDS (make your own electronic or paper flashcards) for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). You may choose to use an electronic app to create your flashcards.
  • How will students improve their vocabulary skills in context? Have a great vacation!

    DUE THURSDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS (make your own electronic or paper flashcards) for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). You may choose to use an electronic app to create your flashcards.
  • Write a CREATIVE VOCABULARY STORY for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. You must write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). This story will be checked for completion, not accuracy, though do your best to use the words correctly and avoid grammatical errors. You must use all words from the vocabulary list in this creative story. You must adhere (follow) Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. You must underline all of the vocabulary words in a creative or non-fiction story that you write about one of the following topics: Rebellion, Oppression, The Future, or Invasion of Privacy.
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984 (10% of 2nd marking period).

    For up to TWO free extra credit HW assignments, please e-mail me if you could access a copy of the 1984 film.

    AMAZING EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3rd:

  • Read the rest of 1984. You may read it online or check out a copy in Ms. Conn's classroom. Take an oral test and earn up to 10 points on your final 2nd marking period grade!
  • Thursday, March 21st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Introduce Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984 and the HW.

    Show HW: picture, caption and cutline for evidence of 1984 today.

    2. Reality Improv Game based on 1984:

  • Students will write a short story (a minimum of a 1/2 page) on a time when they've rebelled or felt controlled/oppressed (based on the themes in 1984). The short story must have a beginning, middle and an end.
  • Students will put their short stories in a container/box. Then a volunteer actor #1 will pull a short story out of the container. Then the volunteer actor will choose a volunteer actor #2 with whom he will act.
  • Volunteer actor #1 will know the story and volunteer actor #2 will have to follow actor #1's lead. Students in the class will watch, but no one will share whose story was performed. Acting should be no more than 1 minute.
  • We will repeat this a few times.
  • At the end, students who wrote the stories performed will share who they are and if their stories were performed accurately.
  • How will students personally connect to the themes of rebellion and oppression in 1984? DUE THURSDAY, APRIL 4th:
  • Vocabulary FLASHCARDS (make your own electronic or paper flashcards) for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. On the front of the flashcard, write the word and part of speech. On the back of the flashcard, write the definition and an original sentence (your own sentence, not the sentence provided in the list). You may choose to use an electronic app to create your flashcards.
  • Write a Creative Story for Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984. You must write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). This story will be checked for completion, not accuracy, though do your best to use the words correctly and avoid grammatical errors. You must use all words from the vocabulary list in this creative story. You must adhere (follow) Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. You must underline all of the vocabulary words in a creative or non-fiction story that you write about one of the following topics: Rebellion, Oppression, The Future, or Invasion of Privacy.
  • QUIZ on Vocabulary List from Part 1 of 1984 (10% of 2nd marking period).

    For up to TWO free extra credit HW assignments, please e-mail me if you could access a copy of the 1984 film.

    AMAZING EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3rd:

  • Read the rest of 1984. You may read it online or check out a copy in Ms. Conn's classroom. Take an oral test and earn up to 10 points on your final 2nd marking period grade!
  • Wednesday, March 20th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Read and discuss the 1984 Book Review from 1949. Identify the positive reviews and the negative reviews. Identify facts about the novel that you didn't know from Part I. Color code these findings (include a color code box at the top of the handout).

    2. Read George Orwell's Obituary in 1950. Highlight ALL references to 1984.

    3. HW Reminders

    4. Reality Improv Game based on 1984:

  • Students will write a short story (a minimum of a 1/2 page) on a time when they've rebelled or felt controlled/oppressed (based on the themes in 1984). The short story must have a beginning, middle and an end.
  • Students will put their short stories in a container/box. Then a volunteer actor #1 will pull a short story out of the container. Then the volunteer actor will choose a volunteer actor #2 with whom he will act.
  • Volunteer actor #1 will know the story and volunteer actor #2 will have to follow actor #1's lead. Students in the class will watch, but no one will share whose story was performed. Acting should be no more than 1 minute.
  • We will repeat this a few times.
  • At the end, students who wrote the stories performed will share who they are and if their stories were performed accurately.
  • How will students effectively analyze positive reviews, negative reviews and unknown facts about 1984 in a book review of 1984 from 1949 and a focus on 1984 in Orwell's obituary in 1950? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 21st:
    FOR TWO HOMEWORK CREDITS (one HW credit for the picture and one HW credit for the caption and cutline): Take a picture of yourself with evidence of 1984 today. You may include a picture of evidence of spying, invasion of privacy, Big Brother (the government) monitoring your everyday life, etc. Write a caption and cutline for your picture that connects to 1984. Here's a great website on how to write a caption and cutline. Bring in your picture, caption and cutline. A cutline (keep it brief; only 2-3 sentences) includes the 5 W's and the 1 H. Here are the questions you should answer:
  • Who is that? (And, in most cases, identify people from left to right unless the action in the photograph demands otherwise.)
  • What's going on?
  • When is this?
  • Where is this?
  • Why is this picture connected to 1984?
  • How did this picture occur?

    For up to TWO free extra credit HW assignments, please e-mail me if you could access a copy of the 1984 film.

    AMAZING EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3rd:

  • Read the rest of 1984. You may read it online or check out a copy in Ms. Conn's classroom. Take an oral test and earn up to 10 points on your final 2nd marking period grade!
  • Tuesday, March 19th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    A.) What are your hopes for the future? You may include some or all of the following: your personal hopes and your hopes for your family, your community, your friends, your school, New York, U.S. and the world.
    B.) What are your fears for the future? You may include some or all of the following: your personal fears and your fears for your family, your community, your friends, your school, New York, U.S. and the world.

    *Show Extra Credit HW (up to 5 quotes and 2-3 sentences explanation for each quote).

    2. Discuss the Do Now answers and your predictions for the rest of 1984.

    3. Read and discuss the 1984 Book Review from 1949. Identify the positive reviews and the negative reviews. Identify facts about the novel that you didn't know from Part I. Color code these findings (include a color code box at the top of the handout).

    If time allows, read George Orwell's Obituary in 1950.

    How will students effectively assess hopes and fears for themselves and the world around them, as well as examine a book review of 1984 from 1949 and Orwell's obituary in 1950 in which they address hopes and fears of readers of that post-World War II era? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 21st:
    FOR TWO HOMEWORK CREDITS (one HW credit for the picture and one HW credit for the caption and cutline): Take a picture of yourself with evidence of 1984 today. You may include a picture of evidence of spying, invasion of privacy, Big Brother (the government) monitoring your everyday life, etc. Write a caption and cutline for your picture that connects to 1984. Here's a great website on how to write a caption and cutline. Bring in your picture, caption and cutline. A cutline (keep it brief; only 2-3 sentences) includes the 5 W's and the 1 H. Here are the questions you should answer:
  • Who is that? (And, in most cases, identify people from left to right unless the action in the photograph demands otherwise.)
  • What's going on?
  • When is this?
  • Where is this?
  • Why is this picture connected to 1984?
  • How did this picture occur?

    For up to TWO free extra credit HW assignments, please e-mail me if you could access a copy of the 1984 film.

    AMAZING EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3rd:

  • Read the rest of 1984. You may read it online or check out a copy in Ms. Conn's classroom. Take an oral test and earn up to 10 points on your final 2nd marking period grade!
  • Monday, March 18th, 2013: 1. Do Now= Finish composing one well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) prediction about what will happen in the rest of 1984. Include answers to the following:
  • Who will be part of future events?
  • What will happen?
  • Where will the major events occur?
  • When will the major events occur?
  • Why will your predictions come true?
  • How will the rest of the book end?

    2. Show the Do Now (when completed). Share predictions.

    3. Review the answers to the quiz (10% of 2nd marking period) on Chapters VII and VIII in Part I of 1984

    4. Introduce EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY HW.

  • How will students effectively prove their knowledge and analysis of 1984 by making accurate predictions about the rest of the novel? EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 19th (EARN UP TO 20 POINTS ON YOUR 1984 CHAPTERS VII AND VIII QUIZ!):
  • Read 1984 Book Review from 1949. Identify three intriguing (interesting) quotes and explain their significance (importance) to the novel, 1984 (up to 4 extra credit points per quote and a 2-3 sentences explanation per quote).
  • Read George Orwell's Obituary in 1950. Identify two intriguing (interesting) quotes and explain their significance (importance) to the novel, 1984 (up to 4 extra credit points per quote and 2-3 sentences explanation per quote).

    YOU CAN ONLY EARN POINTS TO GET YOU TO 100% ON THE QUIZ.

  • Friday, March 15th, 2013: Parent-Teacher Conferences How will students dramatically interpret and relate to the themes of rebellion and oppression in 1984? Make up any owed HW!
    Thursday, March 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now=QUIZ (10% of 2nd marking period) on Chapters VII and VIII in Part I of 1984

    2. Work Period: Compose one well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) prediction about what will happen in the rest of 1984. Include answers to the following:

  • Who will be part of future events?
  • What will happen?
  • Where will the major events occur?
  • When will the major events occur?
  • Why will your predictions come true?
  • How will the rest of the book end?

    3. Discuss the rest of Chapter VIII in Part I of 1984.

  • How will students effectively prove their knowledge and analysis of Chapters VII and VIII, focusing on setting, mood, major events and the characterization of Winston? Make up any owed HW!
    Wednesday, March 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now=Personal Reactions to Chapter VIII (pp. 81-104) in 1984:
    A.) How would you feel if you were never allowed any solitude (alone time)?
    B.) How do you, your family members and your friends feel about the lottery? Do any of them play the lottery? If so, why? If not, why not?
    C.) How do you feel about learning history? Your family's history?

    Show HW: Chapter VIII T-Chart (3 quotes for each section) and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss the rest of Chapters VII and VIII, including yesterday's personal reaction questions:
    A.) How are the proles similar to the 99% today?
    B.) How do you feel about the arrests of Jones, Aaronson and Rutherford?
    C.) How do you feel about the children's history book? What are the children being taught?

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively understand the significance of children's roles in 1984 and analyze Chapters VII and VIII, identifying evidence of setting, mood and the characterization of Winston? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 14th:
  • QUIZ (10% of 2nd marking period) on Chapter VII (7) in 1984 and Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. The quiz will only contain multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil.
  • Tuesday, March 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now=Finish and display your mini-children's book for 1984 around the classroom in a gallery walk. What illustrations and text did you include? What messages does Big Brother want to send the children? Make sure you have a minimum of four pages with illustrations and text on each page.

    2. Discuss/Reflect on the book-making process. What did you learn from this activity? Why was this activity useful? What did you enjoy about this activity? Why are the children's roles so important in the society of 1984?

    3. Discuss your Personal Reactions to Chapter VII (pp. 69-81) in 1984:
    A.) How are the proles similar to the 99% today?
    B.) How do you feel about the arrests of Jones, Aaronson and Rutherford?
    C.) How do you feel about the children's history book? What are the children being taught?

    4. Discuss and add notes to the T-Chart for Chapter VII (pp. 69-81), with three quotes for each section.

    5. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively understand the significance of children's roles in 1984 and analyze Chapter VII, identifying evidence of setting, mood and the characterization of Winston? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13th:
  • Read Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. Create a T-Chart for Chapter VIII. Include THREE quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VIII on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 14th:

  • QUIZ (10% of 2nd marking period) on Chapter VII (7) in 1984 and Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. It will be multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil.
  • Monday, March 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now=Personal Reactions to Chapter VII (pp. 69-81) in 1984:
    A.) How are the proles similar to the 99% today?
    B.) How do you feel about the arrests of Jones, Aaronson and Rutherford?
    C.) How do you feel about the children's history book? What are the children being taught?

    Show the T-Chart for Chapter VII (pp. 69-81), with three quotes for each section.

    2. Make a mini-children's book for 1984. What illustrations and text should you include? What messages does Big Brother want to send the children? Make sure you have a minimum of four pages with illustrations and text on each page.

    How will students effectively analyze Chapter VII, identifying evidence of setting, mood and the characterization of Winston? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 12th:
  • Finish today's mini-children's book for 1984. What illustrations and text should you include? What messages does Big Brother want to send the children? Make sure you have a minimum of four pages with illustrations and text on each page.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13th:

  • Read Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. Create a T-Chart for Chapter VIII. Include THREE quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VIII on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 14th:

  • QUIZ (10% of 2nd marking period) on Chapter VII (7) in 1984 and Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. It will be multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil.
  • Friday, March 8th, 2013: Work Period=Begin reading Chapter VII (pp. 69-81). See details in the HW section. How will students effectively read Chapter VII, identifying evidence of setting, mood and the characterization of Winston? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 11th:
  • Read Chapter VII (7) in 1984. Create a T-Chart for Chapter VII. Include THREE quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VII on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13th:

  • Read Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. Create a T-Chart for Chapter VIII. Include THREE quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VIII on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, MARCH 14th:

  • QUIZ (10% of 2nd marking period) on Chapter VII (7) in 1984 and Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. It will be multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil.
  • Thursday, March 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now=Review the answers to the EXAM on Chapters I-VI in 1984.

    2. Go over Chapter VI T-Chart, focusing on the Winston's courage to be with a prostitute, the ban on love/sexual desire among the Party members, and Winston's feelings about his wife, Katharine.

    3. Work Period: Work on owed HW and begin reading Chapter VII (pp. 69-81).

    4. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively culminate the unit on Chapters I-VI? DUE MONDAY, MARCH 11th:
  • Read Chapter VII (7) in 1984. Create a T-Chart for Chapter VII. Include THREE quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VII on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).


  • Read Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. Create a T-Chart for Chapter VIII. Include THREE quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VIII on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, MARCH 14th:

  • QUIZ (10% of 2nd marking period) on Chapter VII (7) in 1984 and Chapter VIII (8) in 1984. It will be multiple-choice questions. Please bring a #2 pencil.
  • Wednesday, March 6th, 2013: 1. Do Now=EXAM on Chapters I-VI in 1984. You need a #2 pencil. Show HW: T-CHART for Chapter VI (two quotes for each section of the T-CHART). Show any other owed HW.

    2. Work Period: Make up any owed HW.

    3. Discuss/Review Chapter VI.

    4. HW Reminders--tomorrow I'm closing the gradebook for the 1st marking period.

    How will students effectively culminate the unit on Chapters I-VI? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 7th:
  • MAKE UP ALL OWED HW--IT'S THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD (see previous days for details).
  • Tuesday, March 5th, 2013: 1. Do Now=Discuss/Analyze/Take Notes on T-CHARTS for Chapters IV AND V (three quotes for each section of the T-CHARTS).

    2. Work Period: Make up any owed HW and read Chapter VI (pp. 63-69) in 1984. Include 2 quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VI on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    3. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively find detailed, supportive evidence for their claims regarding the setting, mood and characterization of Winston in the work of literature, 1984 and understand how the novel reveals control of society's citizens in Chapters IV and V? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6TH:
  • TEST (50% of the 1st marking period grade) ON CHAPTERS I-VI (up to page 69). You can read the chapters HERE. You need to review the Do Nows, the notes taken in the T-Charts, and the questions discussed in class. More review details will be provided in class. Bring a #2 pencil. It will be a scantron/multiple-choice question test.
  • Read CHAPTER VI. Create a T-Chart for Chapter VI. Include TWO quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VI on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 7th:

  • MAKE UP ALL OWED HW--IT'S THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD (see previous days for details)
  • Monday, March 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now=Personal Reactions to pages 43-48 (the end of Chapter IV) and Chapter V in 1984:
    A.) Why do you believe Big Brother supports Winston's creation of fictional people like Comrade Ogilvy (Chapter IV, pp. 46-47)?
    B.) What's the purpose for the destruction of words (Chapter V, p. 52)? Are we destroying words today? Explain.
    C.) How do you feel about the the distorted information--"As compared with last year there was more food, more clothes, more houses..." (Chapter V, p. 59)?

    SHOW HW: T-CHARTS for Chapters IV AND V (three quotes for each section of the T-CHARTS).

    2. Work Period: Make up any owed HW and read Chapter VI (pp. 63-69) in 1984. Include 2 quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VI on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    3. Discuss/Share Do Now questions and answers. If time allows, share findings in the T-CHARTS.

    4. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively make personal connections and find detailed, supportive evidence for their claims regarding the work of literature, 1984 and how the novel reveals control of society's citizens in Chapters IV and V? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6TH:
  • TEST (50% of the 1st marking period grade) ON CHAPTERS I-VI (up to page 69). You can read the chapters HERE. You need to review the Do Nows, the notes taken in the T-Charts, and the questions discussed in class. More review details will be provided. Bring a #2 pencil. It will be a scantron/multiple-choice question test. We will review thoroughly in class on Tuesday, March 5th.
  • Read CHAPTER VI. Create a T-Chart for Chapter VI. Include TWO quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter VI on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 7th:

  • MAKE UP ALL OWED HW--IT'S THE LAST DAY OF THE 1ST MARKING PERIOD (see previous days for details)
  • Friday, March 1st, 2013: 1. Do Now=Personal Reactions to pages 37-42 (the beginning of Chapter IV) in 1984:
    A.) Would you be able to do Winston's job (rectifying or correcting facts in the news)? Why or why not?
    B.) Why do you believe Big Brother wants people to be "vaporized" (p. 42)?
    C.) What's the author's purpose for creating these details about rectifying the news and vaporizing people in Chapter IV?

    2. Work Period: Finish reading Chapter IV (pp. 37-48) in 1984. Include 3 quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter IV on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS). Pay close attention to Winston's "rectifying" (correcting) facts in the news. Why does he do this?

    Show HW: revision of the short answer on the Chapter I quiz and any owed HW.

    3. Share/Discuss: Discuss answers to the Do Now questions in small groups. Be ready to introduce one of your classmate's answers and share your response, starting with this statement: "I agree/disagree with ________________ (classmate's name) because___________________________ (evidence provided from 1984).

    4. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively make personal connections and find detailed, supportive evidence for their claims regarding the work of literature, 1984 and how the novel reveals control of society's citizens? DUE THIS MONDAY, MARCH 4th:
  • Finish reading Chapter IV of 1984. Create a T-Chart for Chapter IV. Include THREE quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter IV on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).
  • Read Chapter V of 1984. Create a T-Chart for Chapter V. Include a minimum of THREE quotes and explanations (1-2 sentences for each quote) for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter V on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6TH:

  • TEST (50% of the 1st marking period grade) ON CHAPTERS I-VI (up to page 69). You can read the chapters HERE. You need to review the Do Nows, the notes taken in the T-Charts, and the questions discussed in class. More review details will be provided.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Thursday, February 28th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Begin reading Chapter IV (pp. 37-48) in 1984. Include 3 quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter IV on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS). Pay close attention to Winston's "rectifying" (correcting) facts in the news. Why does he do this?

    2. Share/Discuss: Share your thoughts on Newspeak and your understanding of the memory hole in Chapter IV. Share excerpts from your journal #2 (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, another character (Mrs. Parsons, one of the Parsons' children, O'Brien, etc.) OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.).

    3. Go over the quiz on Chapter I.

    4. Introduce HW.

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, and focus on setting, mood, and the characterization of Winston in Chapter IV in Part I? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 1st:
  • Rewrite the short answer paragraph in the Chapter I quiz.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6TH:

  • TEST (50% of the 1st marking period grade) ON CHAPTERS I-VI (up to page 69). You can read the chapters HERE. You need to review the Do Nows, the notes taken in the T-Charts, and the questions discussed in class. More review details will be provided.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Wednesday, February 27th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to pages 29-37 (Chapter III) in 1984: How would you feel if you were restricted to wear only a few articles of clothing (see p. 31)? Imagine the internet is wiped out and there is no trace of any news events from the past. How does that make you feel? Would you question whether the events actually happened? Have you ever told a lie and started to believe that it was the truth? If so, why? How would you feel if you always had to appear happy, even when you weren't?

    Show HW: Chapter 3 T-Chart (a minimum of three quotes for each section) AND any owed HW.

    2. Share/Discuss:

  • Discuss the Do Now personal reaction questions. Share the "laughing yoga" phenomenon that forces everyone to appear and even feel happy.
  • Share your quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter III on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).
  • JOURNAL #2: Share excerpts from your journal #2 (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, another character (Mrs. Parsons, one of the Parsons' children, O'Brien, etc.) OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.).
  • How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, and focus on setting, mood, and the characterization of Winston in Chapter III in Part I? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)
    Tuesday, February 26th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to pages 25-28 (the end of Chapter II) in 1984: How do you feel about a place "with no darkness"? What images and feelings does this place conjure (create) for you? How would you feel if your food was limited on a daily basis (like the chocolate ration reduced from thirty grams to twenty)? How would you feel if you saw an image of Big Brother on everything (book covers, posters, stamps, food wrappings, etc.) and everywhere? Would you have the courage that Winston has? Explain.

    Show HW: Chapter 2 T-Chart (a minimum of two quotes for each section) AND Journal #2 for 1984.

    2. Share/Discuss:

  • Share your quotes and explanations for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter II on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).
  • JOURNAL #2: Share excerpts from your journal #2 (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, another character (Mrs. Parsons, one of the Parsons' children, O'Brien, etc.) OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.).

    3. If time allows, begin reading Chapter III, pp. 29-37. Create a new T-Chart, with a minimum of three quotes in each section, for Chapter III on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from Chapter III of 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

  • How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, and focus on setting, mood, and the characterization of Winston in Chapter II in Part I? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27th:
  • Read the rest of Chapter III in 1984. You should have a minimum of THREE quotes for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter III on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Monday, February 25th, 2013: Work Period=Work on the Homework due tomorrow:
  • Read the rest of Chapter II (from Part I) in 1984. You should have a minimum of TWO quotes for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter II on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

  • JOURNAL #2: Write a journal (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, another character (Mrs. Parsons, one of the Parsons' children, O'Brien, etc.) OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.).

  • Make up any owed HW!
  • How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, and focus on setting, mood, and the characterization of Winston in Chapter II in Part I? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26th:
  • Read the rest of Chapter II (from Part I) in 1984. You should have a minimum of TWO quotes for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter II on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

  • JOURNAL #2: Write a journal (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, another character (Mrs. Parsons, one of the Parsons' children, O'Brien, etc.) OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.).

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Friday, February 22nd, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to pages 20-24 (the beginning of Chapter II) in 1984: How do you feel about Winston in these pages? How do you feel about Mrs. Parsons and her children?

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now and pages 20-24 in 1984:
    Share a minimum of ONE quote for each section in your T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    3. Introduce HW.

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, and focus on setting, mood, and the characterization of Winston in Chapter II in Part I? DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26th:
  • Read the rest of Chapter II (from Part I) in 1984. You should have a minimum of TWO quotes for each section in your T-Chart for Chapter II on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

  • JOURNAL #2: Write a journal (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, another character (Mrs. Parsons, one of the Parsons' children, O'Brien, etc.) OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.).

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Thursday, February 21st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Quiet Reading of pages 20-24 (the beginning of Chapter II) in 1984: While you read, take notes on evidence (direct quotes) of setting, mood, and Winston Smith as a genius. Find a minimum of ONE quote for each section in your T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Explain, in 1-2 sentences, why each quote from 1984 supports each section (either SETTING & MOOD OR WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS).

    Show HW: yesterday's classwork completed Anticipation Guide and 1-2 sentences supporting your opinion of each statement.

    2. Finish discussing Part I of Anticipation Guide. Provide 1-2 sentences to support your agreement or disagreement with each of the statements. These statements are connected to 1984.

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, and focus on major themes, as can be revealed in an Anticipation Guide and in current news events? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)
    Wednesday, February 20th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Complete Part I of Anticipation Guide. Provide 1-2 sentences to support your agreement or disagreement with each of the statements. These statements are connected to 1984.

    Show HW (Newspaper article and a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) explaining how the news article connects to 1984. Use specific quotes from the news article that support Chapter 1 of 1984 and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss/Review the Anticipation Guide and the HW.

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, and focus on major themes, as can be revealed in an Anticipation Guide and in current news events? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21st:
  • Finish Part I of Anticipation Guide. Provide 1-2 sentences to support your agreement or disagreement with each of the statements. These statements are connected to 1984.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Friday, February 15th, 2013: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Chapter 1 of 1984.

    Show HW: T-Chart (5 quotes and analysis for each section; a total of 10 quotes and analysis)

    2. Work Period: Complete Part I of Anticipation Guide. Provide 1-2 sentences to support your agreement or disagreement with each of the statements.

    3. Discuss Anticipation Guide.

    4. Introduce HW.

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, and focus on Chapter 1 and prepare for the Critical Lens Essay of the English Regents? DUE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20th:
    Find a newspaper article from one of the following respected newspapers (bring in the article) that connects to 1984 in some way (suggestions: an article about a person protesting the government, invasion of privacy, security cameras everywhere, etc.). Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) explaining how the news article connects to 1984. Use specific quotes from the news article that support Chapter 1 of 1984.
  • The New York Times
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • US News and World Report

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Thursday, February 14th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to pages 16-20 in 1984) (LITERARY ANALYSIS (LA) SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK)=Why does everyone love Big Brother (p. 16)? Would you love Big Brother--why/why not? Why does Winston follow the crowd and chant "B-B" with everyone else (p. 17)? Would you be able to avoid doing what everyone else is doing? Why/Why not? Why does Winston love O'Brien? Would you love O'Brien? What's the Brotherhood and why does Winston love the Brotherhood (p. 17)? Would you have the courage to stand with the Brotherhood? Why/Why not? Show HW any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers.

    3. Discuss/Share T-Chart for pp. 16-20 in 1984. Winston is a genius because he follows the crowd to save himself, as "he chanted with the rest: it was impossible to do otherwise" (p. 17). Winston is a genius because he is courageous in writing "DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER" (p. 18) multiple times. Winston has sensitivity genius because he was "slightly ashamed of himself" (p. 19) when he wrote in his diary. The mood of the setting is gloomy and fearful as Winston reveals "they (the thought police) were bound to get you" (p. 19).

    4. Prepare for tomorrow's quiz (review Do Now's).

    5. HW Reminders

    6. "Sonnet 18" gift for Valentine's Day!

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, by focusing on setting, mood and the characterization of the protagonist on pages 16-20? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:
  • Show FIVE QUOTES and analysis/explanation (a sentence or two) in each section--a TOTAL OF TEN QUOTES (setting/mood AND Winston is a genius) of the T-Chart for Chapter I of 1984.

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:

  • QUIZ (about 10% of the 1st marking period grade) on PART I, CHAPTER I OF 1984 (pp. 1-20). Review the in-class Do Now's, your T-Chart, and all class notes. The quiz will include both multiple-choice and short answer questions.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Wednesday, February 13th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to pages 10-16 in 1984) (LITERARY ANALYSIS (LA) SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK)=Why do you believe that Goldstein is the target for the Two Minutes Hate (hint: this book was published in 1949)? How do you feel about the Two Minutes Hate? Why do you believe Winston hates the dark-haired girl so much?

    Show HW due today (rewrite of the "Awakening Genius" assignment) and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers.

    3. Discuss/Share T-Chart for pp. 10-16 in 1984. Winston is a genius because he analyzes the dark-haired girl and sees she "gave him the impression of being more dangerous than most" (p. 10). Winston is also intrigued by O'Brien and his "intelligence" and that he was "a person that you could talk to" (p. 11). The mood of the novel is now rage-filled by the Two Minutes Hate, as seen on pp. 13-14. People are shouting, throwing things, and kicking.

    4. Quiet Reading of pages 16-20 (the end of Chapter I) in 1984: While you read, take notes on evidence (direct quotes) of setting, mood, and Winston Smith as a genius. Find a minimum of ONE quote for each section in your T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS.

    5. HW Reminders

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, by focusing on setting, mood and the characterization of the protagonist on pages 10-16? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:
  • QUIZ (about 10% of the 1st marking period grade) on PART I, CHAPTER I OF 1984 (pp. 1-20). Review the in-class Do Now's, your T-Chart, and all class notes. The quiz will include both multiple-choice and short answer questions.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Tuesday, February 12th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to pages 7-10 in 1984) (LITERARY ANALYSIS (LA) SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK)=How do you feel about Winston's rebellious, life-risking act of writing in a diary? Why do you believe it's so important that Winston write in a diary? Why do you believe there are so many grammatical mistakes (spelling, punctuation, capitalization and run-on errors) in his diary entry?

    Show any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers.

    3. Quiet Reading of pages 10-16 in 1984: While you read, take notes on evidence (direct quotes) of setting, mood, and Winston Smith as a genius. Find a minimum of one quote for each section in your T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS.

    4. Sharing of T-Chart

    5. HW introduced

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, by focusing on setting, mood and the characterization of the protagonist on pages 10-16? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th:
  • Rewrite of the "Awakening Genius" writing assignment, making the teacher's corrections. Bring in the original and rewrite.
  • Show today's classwork: Reading of pages 10-16 in PART I, CHAPTER I OF 1984 and notes on evidence (direct quotes with page #s) of setting, mood, and Winston Smith as a genius. Find a minimum of one quote for each section in your T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS.

    DUE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:

  • QUIZ (about 10% of the 1st marking period grade) on Chapter I of 1984 (pp. 1-20). Review the in-class Do Now's, your T-Chart, and all class notes. The quiz will include both multiple-choice and short answer questions.

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Monday, February 11th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to pages 4-6 in 1984) (LITERARY ANALYSIS (LA) SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK)=What kind of world is created when everyone believes that "war is peace, freedom is slavery and ignorance is strength" (p. 4)? Why is Winston a likable character? Why is Winston an unlikable character? What predictions can you make about what will happen next in 1984? How do you feel about the novel so far? Explain.

    Show HW: JOURNAL #1: Write a journal (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.). Also, show the EXTRA CREDIT from Friday.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers.

    3. Read-Aloud pages 6-10 in 1984: Continue reading aloud the beginning pages of 1984 (pp. 6-10). While you read, take notes on evidence (direct quotes) of setting, mood, and Winston Smith as a genius. Keep the course theme of "identifying and awakening genius" in mind. Take notes in a T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD (comparing/contrasting 1984 to the setting and mood of the 1980's) and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Identify direct quotes from the novel to support the setting, mood, and Winston Smith, the genius protagonist (recall 12 genius qualities from Awakening Genius: curiosity, playfulness, imagination, creativity, wonder, wisdom, inventiveness, vitality, sensitivity, flexibility, humor, and joy). Here are some examples of quotes from pp. 4-8 that should be entered in the T-Chart: "The thing that he was about to do was open a diary...but if detected it was reasonably certain that it would be punished by death..." (p. 6). Winston is courageous and full of wonder in that he takes great risk, no matter the consequences. He also asks a lot of questions, such as: "For whom, it suddenly occurred to him to wonder, was he writing this diary?" (p. 7). Also, he pondered: "How could you communicate with the future?" (p. 7). Winston was not sure of his purpose for writing, but he knew it was something he had to do. Also, the setting creates a patriotic and orderly mood with the "strident military music" (p. 7). The setting also creates a mood of darkness and hate with the "Two Minutes Hate" (p. 9). Winston also reveals his rebellious nature in hating the women because they followed the rules of the Party strictly. "It was always the women, and above all the young ones who were the most bigoted adherents of the Party..." (p. 10).

    4. HW (journal excerpts) sharing.

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, by focusing on setting, mood and the characterization of the protagonist on pages 6-10? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)
    Friday, February 8th, 2013: 1. Work Period: EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (value=1 free HW!)=Define the following vocabulary words. First, define in your own words (based on the context of 1984. Next, look up the dictionary definitions. Finally, look up the part of speech (noun, verb, adjective, or adverb).

    1.) Vile (p. 1)
    2.) Depict (p. 1)
    3.) Hover (p. 2)
    4.) Scrutinize (p. 3)
    5.) Sordid (p. 3)
    6.) Apparatus (p. 4)
    7.) Ramifications (p. 4)
    8.) Archaic (p. 6)
    9.) Procure (p. 6)
    10.) Tremor (p. 7)

    2. Make up any owed HW. Work on HW due Monday.

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, by focusing on setting, mood and the characterization of the protagonist on pages 4-6? DUE THIS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • JOURNAL #1: Write a journal (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.).

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Thursday, February 7th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to pages 2 and 3 in 1984) (LITERARY ANALYSIS (LA) SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK)=What do you believe the "Thought Police" is? Winston works at the "Ministry of Truth." What do you think happens at this place of work? Winston cannot remember his childhood memories. How would that make you feel? Be ready to share your answers.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers.

    3. Read-Aloud pages 4-6 in 1984: Continue reading aloud the beginning pages of 1984 (pp. 4-6). While you read, take notes on evidence (direct quotes) of setting, mood, and Winston Smith as a genius. Keep the course theme of "identifying and awakening genius" in mind. Take notes in a T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD (comparing/contrasting 1984 to the setting and mood of the 1980's) and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Identify direct quotes from the novel to support the setting, mood, and Winston Smith, the genius protagonist (recall 12 genius qualities from Awakening Genius: curiosity, playfulness, imagination, creativity, wonder, wisdom, inventiveness, vitality, sensitivity, flexibility, humor, and joy). Here are some examples of quotes from pp. 4-8 that should be entered in the T-Chart: "The three slogans of the Party: War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, and Ignorance is Strength" (p. 4). This reveals the mood of the society to be grim and supporting war, slavery and ignorance (implying that they're all good by the words "peace", "freedom" and "strength"). It's a world of opposites, just like the Ministry of Love had "no windows in it all" (p. 4). It's a fake world where Winston "had set his features into the expression of quiet optimism which it was advisable to wear when facing the telescreen" (p. 5). With the use of "Victory Gin" and "Victory Cigarettes", Winston and everyone else, it seems, would become happier and the gloomy mood in society would slowly disappear. "Winston was able to remain outside the range of the telescreen, so far as sight went. He could be heard, of course, but so long as he stayed in his present position he could not be seen" (p. 6). "The thing that he was about to do was open a diary...but if detected it was reasonably certain that it would be punished by death..." (p. 6).

    4. Introduce HW.

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, by focusing on setting, mood and the characterization of the protagonist on pages 4-6? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11th:
  • JOURNAL #1: Write a journal (diary entry) as if you are the protagonist, Winston Smith, OR an observer in the world of 1984. Write one typed page OR two handwritten pages (about 250 words). Please follow the proper requirements of writing (including the heading) found in Ms. Conn's Writing Standards. Include your thoughts, feelings, actions, and speech (you should include a minimum of one quote from the novel, 1984). Include a description of the setting and mood. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, my, mine, etc.).

    MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)

  • Wednesday, February 6th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Personal Reactions to page 1 of 1984) (LITERARY ANALYSIS (LA) SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK)=How would you feel if the "clocks were striking thirteen"? What would be your reaction to the smells of "boiled cabbage and old rag mats"? How would you feel if there were large posters of an enormous face staring at you, with a caption of BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU underneath? Be ready to share your answers.

    2. Discuss/Share Do Now answers.

    3. Read-Aloud of the first pages of 1984: Continue reading aloud the beginning pages of 1984 (pp. 2-3). While you read, take notes on evidence (direct quotes) of setting, mood, and Winston Smith as a genius. Keep the course theme of "identifying and awakening genius" in mind. Take notes in a T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD (comparing/contrasting 1984 to the setting and mood of the 1980's) and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. Identify direct quotes from the novel to support the setting, mood, and Winston Smith, the genius protagonist (recall 12 genius qualities from Awakening Genius: curiosity, playfulness, imagination, creativity, wonder, wisdom, inventiveness, vitality, sensitivity, flexibility, humor, and joy).

    How will students effectively read the work of literature, 1984, by focusing on setting, mood and the characterization of the protagonist? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)
    Tuesday, February 5th, 2013: 1. Do Now: TIME TRAVEL #2 (pre-reading for 1984) (LITERARY ANALYSIS (LA) SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK)=Imagine that you are going to travel back in time to when your parents were the age that you are now. Choose one parent whose background fascinates you for the time travel trip. You will live in the family and community your parent lived in. You will not be able to do anything that might affect later events. Otherwise, though, you will participate in the life of the time and place as if you belonged there. Where and when would you go? What would your life be like there?

    Turn in and show HW due and any owed HW. HW due includes the following: 1980's internet research and interview

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and share Do Nows on Time Travel.

    3. 1980's Internet Research and Interview HW/Pre-Reading for 1984 (LA SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK): What were the 1980's like, in terms of the government, economy, fashion, music, technology and people's interests/concerns? What were your findings from the interview? Any new insights or shocking revelations?

    4. Read-Aloud of the first pages of 1984: Begin reading aloud the beginning pages of 1984. Take notes in a T-Chart on the following: SETTING & MOOD (comparing/contrasting 1984 to the setting and mood of the 1980's) and WINSTON SMITH IS A GENIUS. How does the introduction of 1984 compare/contrast to the real-life 1980's (based on your research/interview/brainstorming)?

    How will students effectively prepare to read the work of literature, 1984, and make connections to the 1980's? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW (see previous days for details)
    Monday, February 4th, 2013: 1. Do Now: TIME TRAVEL #1 (pre-reading for 1984) (LITERARY ANALYSIS (LA) SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK)=Imagine you have the opportunity to travel to a time and place in the past. When you get there, you will be the same age and gender you are now. You will not be able to do anything that might affect later events. Otherwise, though, you will participate in the life of the time and place as if you belong there. Where and when would you go? Why? What would your life be like? Turn in and show HW: turn in the syllabus' contract and parent information form AND show your notebook/binder with 5 sections: Literary Analysis (LA), Language and Writing (LW), Regents Strategies (RS), Homework (HW), and Genius (GENIUS).

    2. Discuss/Share: Discuss and share Do Nows on Time Travel.

    3. 1980's Brainstorming/Pre-Reading for 1984 (LA SECTION OF YOUR NOTEBOOK): What were the 1980's like? What did people wear? What kind of music did people listen to? Where did people live? Were people happy? Why/Why not? What was the economy like? The government? What was the technology?

    4. Discuss/Share: Discuss and Share Brainstorming about the 1980's.

    5. Read-Aloud of the first pages of 1984: Begin reading aloud the beginning pages of 1984, and describe the setting, the mood, Winston Smith (the protagonist) and his characterization. Take notes as you read, keeping the course theme in mind.

    6. HW introduced

    How will students effectively make predictions about the work of literature, 1984, we will study? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5th:
  • Find five facts about the 1980's on the internet (include the website URL address and the name of the website). Your five facts should include the government/economy, the music, the fashion, the people (what were their interests/concerns?), and one interesting fact of your choice.
  • Interview a family member (mom, dad, older brother/sister, aunt, uncle, grandparent) OR a teacher/staff member at ITHS and ask about their experience in the 1980's (this person that you choose MUST clearly remember living in the 1980's). Ask the following questions: What do you remember about the 1980's? Were you happy living in the 1980's? Why or why not? How are the 1980's different than today, 2013?
  • Friday, February 1st, 2013: 1. Do Now: Finish introducing the Sophomore English Syllabus.

    2. Introduce Ms. Conn's English Writing Standards.

    3. Pre-Reading/Analysis of the packaging (front and back cover) and first page of 1984:

  • Predict the plot based on the packaging. What does this illustration have to do with the plot?
  • What do you predict about the plot?
  • Identify the setting, mood, and characters.
  • What strategies do good readers use before and during the study of a novel? Which strategies work well for you?
  • How do you think this novel will fit into our course theme of "identifying and awakening genius"? What clues helped you figure out the connection between the course theme and the novel?

    4. HW Reminders

  • How will students effectively understand the course objectives and requirements and make predictions about the work of literature, 1984, we will study? DUE THIS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4th:
  • Fill out (you and your parent/guardian) and turn in the Contract and Information Form (page 5) of the Sophomore English Syllabus.
  • Bring in a binder or 5-subject notebook (with pockets) with dividers that have the following sections: Literary Analysis (LA), Language and Writing (LW), Regents Strategies (RS), Homework (HW), and Genius (GENIUS).
  • Thursday, January 31st, 2013: 1. Do Now: What can you predict about the following works of literature, based on their titles: 1984, Julius Caesar, and The Metamorphosis? Think about setting, characters, and plot events. Now, when you know the authors' names, what are some new predictions?

    Turn in HW: "Awakening Genius".

    2. Discuss/Share thoughts on the HW (Did you learn anything new about yourself by doing this assignment? If so, why? If not, why not?) and the Do Now.

    3. Discuss/Share the quote analysis (from yesterday's Do Now).

    4. Introduce the Sophomore English Syllabus

    How will students effectively understand the course objectives and requirements and make predictions about the works of literature we will study? DUE THIS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4th:
  • Fill out (you and your parent/guardian) and turn in the Contract and Information Form (page 5) of the Sophomore English Syllabus.
  • Bring in a binder or 5-subject notebook (with pockets) with dividers that have the following sections: Literary Analysis (LA), Language and Writing (LW), Regents Strategies (RS), Homework (HW), and Genius (GENIUS).
  • Wednesday, January 30th, 2013: 1. Do Now:
    A.) Choose a quote from one of the quotes around the classroom, and write it down (include the author of the quote).
    B.) Interpret the quote in your own words.
    C.) Agree or disagree with the quote and explain why.
    D.) Identify two works of literature (novels, plays or short stories), with their authors if you can, that support your opinion of the quote.

    2. Finish yesterday's ice-breaker, if necessary.

    3. Read "Awakening Genius". Read the introductory paragraphs aloud. Students will determine which quality of genius applies to them. Then, they will read the genius description page that they have chosen. Brainstorm how that word applies to you. Please provide two examples from your life, one school related and the other non-school related, that shows how that word is one of your qualities of genius. Be ready to write about 150+ words (about one full handwritten page) showing how that word describes your genius.

    How will students introduce themselves in written and oral expression? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, JANUARY 31st:
  • Finish today's classwork: Read "Awakening Genius". Determine which quality of genius applies to you. Write about 150+ (a minimum of one full, handwritten page OR about 3/4 of a typed page), showing how that word describes your genius. Please provide two examples from your life, one school related and the other non-school related, that shows how that word is one of your qualities of genius.
  • Tuesday, January 29th, 2013: 1. Do Now: Take your designated seat and begin the Self Assessment (see handout): Write your answer to each question below in descriptive detail. You may want to include specific examples. This is your opportunity to show off, like using sophisticated vocabulary! Also, star (*) the one that you want me, your teacher, to read closely (perhaps because it's an interesting fact about you, it's well written, or another unique reason).

    1.) Describe your performance in high school thus far. Include any factors that have influenced your school performance, either negatively or positively.
    2.) Describe your academic and personal strengths.
    3.) What three characteristics or traits best define you?
    4.) If you were writing yourself a recommendation for a summer job or introducing yourself to a new teacher, what would you say about yourself?
    5.) What skills do you want to improve or acquire in English and other subjects this semester?
    6.) What are your future goals? What do you want to become? What area of study (for college and beyond) most interests you and why?
    7.) Share three random things about yourself that would be surprising or unique. Of course, this would be appropriate to share with me, your teacher, and your classmates.

    2. Ice-breaker: Students at each table will find three things they have in common and share with the class as an introduction. For example, all students like chocolate ice cream.

    How will students introduce themselves in written and oral expression? Not Applicable at this time.