Freshman Assignments, Spring Semester, 2016

Freshman Assignments
Spring Semester, 2016

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 13th, 2016: Work Period: TURN IN THESE ANSWERS ON A LOOSE LEAF AT THE END OF CLASS.
  • From the film Shakespeare in Love, WRITE FIVE historical truths revealed in the film about Shakespeare and his famous play, Romeo and Juliet. From the film Shakespeare, WRITE FIVE fictional details revealed in the film.
  • How did this English class prepare you for 10th grade and the rest of high school?
  • What did you find most useful and/or interesting about this class? You may refer to texts (Romeo and Juliet and stories in the textbook), papers we wrote on universal experiences, class activities (acting, speed debating, white board game, etc.) or anything else.
  • What writing skills do you need/want to work on improving in the future?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we compare and contrast the film Shakespeare in Love to Shakespeare's life and Romeo and Juliet and reflect on this semester in English? SUMMER ACTIVITY RECOMMENDATIONS:
    Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, create a website/blog, and enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more)!

    HAVE A FABULOUS SUMMER!

    Friday, June 10th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What can you predict will be the resolution in the film, Shakespeare in Love?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Film Viewing & Discussion: Watch the academy-award winning film Shakespeare in Love. What are historical truths revealed in the film about Shakespeare and his famous play, Romeo and Juliet? What parts of the film are fiction?

    4. Reflections:

  • Are you satisfied with the film's ending? Why or why not?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we compare and contrast the film Shakespeare in Love to Shakespeare's life and Romeo and Juliet? SUMMER ACTIVITY RECOMMENDATIONS:
    Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, create a website/blog, and enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more)!
    Wednesday, June 8th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What can you predict will happen next in the film, Shakespeare in Love?

    SHOW OWED HW! TODAY IS THE LAST DAY TO TURN IN HW!

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Film Viewing & Discussion: Watch the academy-award winning film Shakespeare in Love. What are historical truths revealed in the film about Shakespeare and his famous play, Romeo and Juliet? What parts of the film are fiction?

    4. Reflections:

  • Are you satisfied with the film thus far? Why or why not?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we compare and contrast the film Shakespeare in Love to Shakespeare's life and Romeo and Juliet? SUMMER ACTIVITY RECOMMENDATIONS:
    Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, create a website/blog, and enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more)!
    Tuesday, June 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What can you predict will be the plot of the film Shakespeare in Love (based on the title)?

    SHOW HW: "The End and the Beginning" questions and original poem

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Film Viewing & Discussion: Watch the academy-award winning film Shakespeare in Love. What are historical truths about Shakespeare and his famous play, Romeo and Juliet? What parts of the film are fiction?

    4. HW Reminders.

    5. Reflections:

  • Were you satisfied with the film thus far? Why or why not?
  • How can you improve your grade this week (the last week of the school year's classes)?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we compare and contrast the film Shakespeare in Love to Shakespeare's life and Romeo and Juliet? DUE BY TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th:
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN!!! THIS IS THE LAST DAY THAT I WILL COLLECT OWED HOMEWORK!!!
  • Monday, June 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Continue to work on Friday's classwork:
  • Read the poem, "The End and the Beginning," on p. 351 of the Collections textbook.
    1.) What repetition does the poet use and why? Cite specific lines.
    2.) What's the poet's tone (feeling, attitude)? Cite specific lines.
    3.) What imagery does the poet use and why? Cite specific lines.
    4.) What's the significance (importance) of the title? How does the title reflect the poet's message?
  • Turn to the poem, "The End and the Beginning," on p. 351 of the Collections textbook. Write your own poem with the title "The End and the Beginning." Your poem should be a minimum of 12 lines and include repetition, imagery, and a clear message that connects to the title (just like the poem, "The End and the Beginning," on p. 351 of the Collections textbook).

    SHOW HW: TWO REWRITES (WITH ORIGINALS) WITH HIGHLIGHTED CORRECTIONS.

    2. Discuss/Share: Review the answers to the SUPER QUIZ on "Duty," "Is Survival Selfish?" and Vocabulary

    3. Work Period: Finish the Do Now, if necessary. Show for classwork credit.

    4. HW Reminders.

    5. Reflections:

  • Were you satisfied with your poem? Why or why not?
  • How can you improve your grade this week (the last week of the school year's classes)?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we compose a poem that models the poem "The End and the Beginning" (p. 351) from Collections? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JUNE 7th: FINISH TODAY'S CLASSWORK:
  • Answer the following questions for the poem, "The End and the Beginning," on p. 351 of the Collections textbook.
    1.) What repetition does the poet use and why? Cite specific lines.
    2.) What's the poet's tone (feeling, attitude)? Cite specific lines.
    3.) What imagery does the poet use and why? Cite specific lines.
    4.) What's the significance (importance) of the title? How does the title reflect the poet's message?
  • Using the poem, "The End and the Beginning," on p. 351 of the Collections textbook. Write your own poem with the title "The End and the Beginning." Your poem should be a minimum of 12 lines and include repetition, imagery, and a clear message that connects to the title (just like the poem, "The End and the Beginning," on p. 351 of the Collections textbook).

    DUE BY THIS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th:

  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN!!! THIS IS THE LAST DAY THAT I WILL COLLECT OWED HOMEWORK!!!
  • Friday, June 3rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: SUPER QUIZ on "Duty," "Is Survival Selfish?" and Vocabulary

    2. Work Period #1: Read the poem, "The End and the Beginning," on p. 351 of the Collections textbook.

  • What repetition does the poet use and why? Cite specific lines.
  • What's the poet's tone (feeling, attitude)? Cite specific lines.
  • What imagery does the poet use and why? Cite specific lines.
  • What's the significance (importance) of the title? How does the title reflect the poet's message?

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your answers to the work period questions.

    4. Work Period #2: Write your own poem with the title "The End and the Beginning." Your poem should be a minimum of 12 lines and include repetition, imagery, and a clear message that connects to the title.

    5. HW Reminders.

    5. Reflections:

  • What were your impressions of the poem? What do you predict we will do on Monday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we be assessed on the Super Quiz on vocabulary and two stories from Collections? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, JUNE 6th: REWRITE TWO PAPERS (they HAD to be corrected by Ms. Conn) written between April 23rd and present day. In your REWRITES, you will highlight or underline the corrections. You MUST bring in the originals (with Ms. Conn's corrections). This is worth TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    DUE BY THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th:

  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN!!! THIS IS THE LAST DAY THAT I WILL COLLECT OWED HOMEWORK!!!
  • Thursday, June 2nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Take out corrected papers that you've received from Ms. Conn. Identify two strengths and two areas needing improvement. You may want to consider the following: following the directions, focusing on the topic, including evidence, organization of ideas, language/vocabulary, and grammar (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and sentence structure).

    SHOW VOCABULARY STORY HOMEWORK.

    2. Discuss/Share: Add one strength and one area needing improvement on the chart paper. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. REVIEW GAME: We will do a Review Game (using white boards) on Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?"

    4. HW Reminders.

    5. Reflections:

  • 3: What are three topics that you should review to prepare for tomorrow's Super Quiz?
  • 2: What are two of your strengths in writing?
  • 1: What is one area needing improvement in your writing?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we prepare for the Super Quiz on vocabulary and two stories from Collections? BE READY FOR TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JUNE 3rd:
    SUPER QUIZ (20% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice test; bring a #2 pencil): You will need to know the following:
  • Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?"
  • "Duty"--a short story by Pamela Rafael Berkman, in the Collections textbook (pp. 289-296): the significance (importance) of the title, the textual connections to Romeo and Juliet, author's purpose in writing from Lady Capulet's perspective, Lady Capulet's regrets, Lady Capulet's opinions about Romeo and Juliet, Lady Capulet's opinions about her husband, Lord Capulet, Lady Capulet's opinions about Lord Montague, characterization of Lady Capulet, and reasons that Lady Capulet's life is tragic.
  • "Is Survival Selfish?"--argumentative text by Lane Wallace, in the Collections textbook (pp. 317-320): answers to the questions on p. 322--which include the influence of human instinct, behaviors, different survival situations, the meaning of "fight or flight" (p. 320, lines 92-94), author's message of the text, two arguments presented in the text, and importance of anecdotes (stories) in the text, and reasons for survivors' guilt.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, JUNE 6th: REWRITE TWO PAPERS (they HAD to be corrected by Ms. Conn) written between April 23rd and present day. In your REWRITES, you will highlight or underline the corrections. You MUST bring in the originals (with Ms. Conn's corrections). This is worth TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    DUE BY THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th:

  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN!!! THIS IS THE LAST DAY THAT I WILL COLLECT OWED HOMEWORK!!!
  • Tuesday, May 31st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Compose a fill in the blank sentence with four answer choices for one vocabulary word from the Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?" Be ready to turn it in.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with the neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Compose an original, creative, fiction/non-fiction story using ALL words from the Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?" Your topic choices include the following: love, survival, adversity (struggle), Romeo and Juliet, "Duty," "Is Survival Selfish?", or "I Have a Dream."

    SHOW HW: VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS

    4. HW Reminders.

    5. Reflections:

  • 3: What are three activities that we did today?
  • 2: What are two of your opinions about the lesson?
  • 1: What is one prediction you can make about Thursday's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we prepare for the Super Quiz on vocabulary and two stories from Collections? DUE THIS COMING THURSDAY, JUNE 2nd:
  • VOCABULARY STORY: Compose an original, creative, fiction/non-fiction story using ALL of the words from the Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?". Your topic choices include the following: love, survival, adversity (struggle), Romeo and Juliet, "Duty," "Is Survival Selfish?", or "I Have a Dream." Your story MUST be two, handwritten pages OR one, typed, double-spaced page (12 point font, Times New Roman). You must underline each vocabulary word and use each word correctly in a story that makes sense. Your heading must include the following: your name, the teacher's name, the date, the class name, class period, and the story's title (centered).

    BE READY FOR THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 3rd:
    SUPER QUIZ (20% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice test; bring a #2 pencil): You will need to know the following:

  • Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?"
  • "Duty"--a short story by Pamela Rafael Berkman, in the Collections textbook (pp. 289-296): the significance (importance) of the title, the textual connections to Romeo and Juliet, author's purpose in writing from Lady Capulet's perspective, Lady Capulet's regrets, Lady Capulet's opinions about Romeo and Juliet, Lady Capulet's opinions about her husband, Lord Capulet, Lady Capulet's opinions about Lord Montague, characterization of Lady Capulet, and reasons that Lady Capulet's life is tragic.
  • "Is Survival Selfish?"--argumentative text by Lane Wallace, in the Collections textbook (pp. 317-320): answers to the questions on p. 322--which include the influence of human instinct, behaviors, different survival situations, the meaning of "fight or flight" (p. 320, lines 92-94), author's message of the text, two arguments presented in the text, and importance of anecdotes (stories) in the text, and reasons for survivors' guilt.
  • Friday, May 27th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Using the DOK QUESTION STEMS, compose a question for one of the topics on the upcoming SUPER QUIZ (next Friday!):
  • "Duty"--a short story by Pamela Rafael Berkman, in the Collections textbook (pp. 289-296): the significance (importance) of the title, the textual connections to Romeo and Juliet, author's purpose in writing from Lady Capulet's perspective, Lady Capulet's regrets, Lady Capulet's opinions about Romeo and Juliet, Lady Capulet's opinions about her husband, Lord Capulet, Lady Capulet's opinions about Lord Montague, characterization of Lady Capulet, and reasons that Lady Capulet's life is tragic.
  • "Is Survival Selfish?"--argumentative text by Lane Wallace, in the Collections textbook (pp. 317-320): answers to the questions on p. 322--which include the influence of human instinct, behaviors, different survival situations, the meaning of "fight or flight" (p. 320, lines 92-94), author's message of the text, two arguments presented in the text, and importance of anecdotes (stories) in the text, and reasons for survivors' guilt.

    2. Discuss/Share: Review the Super Quiz topics (listed in the Do Now).

    3. Vocabulary Read-Aloud: Introduce and read aloud Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?"

    4. Introduce the HW.

    5. Reflections:

  • 3: What are three activities that we did today?
  • 2: What are two of your opinions about the lesson?
  • 1: What is one prediction you can make about Tuesday's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can we prepare for the Super Quiz on vocabulary and two stories from Collections? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, MAY 31st:
  • Create VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS for Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?". You can create flashcards on index cards, loose leaf or an electronic device. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (NOT the sentences provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    LOOKING AHEAD TO NEXT FRIDAY, JUNE 3rd:
    SUPER QUIZ (20% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice test; bring a #2 pencil): You will need to know the following:

  • Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?"
  • "Duty"--a short story by Pamela Rafael Berkman, in the Collections textbook (pp. 289-296): the significance (importance) of the title, the textual connections to Romeo and Juliet, author's purpose in writing from Lady Capulet's perspective, Lady Capulet's regrets, Lady Capulet's opinions about Romeo and Juliet, Lady Capulet's opinions about her husband, Lord Capulet, Lady Capulet's opinions about Lord Montague, characterization of Lady Capulet, and reasons that Lady Capulet's life is tragic.
  • "Is Survival Selfish?"--argumentative text by Lane Wallace, in the Collections textbook (pp. 317-320): answers to the questions on p. 322--which include the influence of human instinct, behaviors, different survival situations, the meaning of "fight or flight" (p. 320, lines 92-94), author's message of the text, two arguments presented in the text, and importance of anecdotes (stories) in the text, and reasons for survivors' guilt.
  • Thursday, May 26th, 2016: 1. Do Now: In the argumentative text, "Is Survival Selfish?" the author presents both sides of the debate on survival. Is it beneficial (good) to present both sides? Is it better to argue for just one side? Explain your answers.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Answer the questions on p. 322 (in your LA section). Be ready to share. Write in complete sentences.

    4. Work Period Discussion/Note-Taking: Review and take notes on the answers on p. 322.

    5. Reflections:

  • 3: What are three activities that we did today?
  • 2: What are two opinions about the text we read?
  • 1: What is one prediction you can make about tomorrow's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • How can you summarize, analyze, critique, evaluate and interpret "Is Survival Selfish?"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!

    LOOKING AHEAD TO NEXT FRIDAY, JUNE 3rd:
    SUPER QUIZ (20% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice test; bring a #2 pencil): You will need to know the following:

  • Vocabulary List (words taken from Romeo and Juliet, "Duty" and "Is Survival Selfish?"
  • "Duty"--a short story by Pamela Rafael Berkman, in the Collections textbook (pp. 289-296): the significance (importance) of the title, the textual connections to Romeo and Juliet, author's purpose in writing from Lady Capulet's perspective, Lady Capulet's regrets, Lady Capulet's opinions about Romeo and Juliet, Lady Capulet's opinions about her husband, Lord Capulet, Lady Capulet's opinions about Lord Montague, characterization of Lady Capulet, and reasons that Lady Capulet's life is tragic.
  • "Is Survival Selfish?"--argumentative text by Lane Wallace, in the Collections textbook (pp. 317-320): answers to the questions on p. 322--which include the influence of human instinct, behaviors, different survival situations, the meaning of "fight or flight" (p. 320, lines 92-94), author's message of the text, two arguments presented in the text, and importance of anecdotes (stories) in the text, and reasons for survivors' guilt.
  • Wednesday, May 25th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What's your opinion--are survivors selfish and uncivilized or smart and civilized? Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Take Notes/Discuss: Read aloud pp. 319-320 of "Is Survival Selfish?"

  • Identify quotes that resonate (have significant meaning) for you, questions that the text inspires within you (you can choose to DOK question stems or not), and/or any personal/textual connections you made.

    4. Reflections:

  • 3: What are three activities that we did today?
  • 2: What are two opinions about the text we read?
  • 1: What is one prediction you can make about tomorrow's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • What are your personal opinions and connections in "Is Survival Selfish?"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!
    Tuesday, May 24th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What can you predict about an argumentative text called "Is Survival Selfish?" Explain your answer in your own words.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period Instructions: Arrange in groups (3-4 students per group). Choose roles:
    1.) Summarizer (summarize each page in 3-4 sentences)
    2.) Question Maker (create two DOK questions per page and cite line numbers where the answers can be found)
    3.) Question Taker (answer the DOK questions provided by Ms. Conn by citing line numbers)
    4.) Vocabulary Guru (identify at least three unknown words and define them)

    4. Work Period: Read pp. 317-318 in "Is Survival Selfish?" Complete role assignments.

    5. Work Period Discussion/Sharing: Student volunteers will share their findings for each role while discussing the first two pages of "Is Survival Selfish?"

    5. Reflections Exit Slip:

  • 3: What are three activities that we did today?
  • 2: What are two opinions about the text we read?
  • 1: What is one prediction you can make about tomorrow's lesson?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
  • RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
  • What is the author's message in "Is Survival Selfish?"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!
    Monday, May 23rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: What does 'survival of the fittest' mean? Explain in your own words.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Answer the following questions in your LA section. You may use the textbook ("Duty" can be found on pp. 289-296). Use textual evidence to support your answer.

  • DOK 1: Can you recall the author's message of "Duty"? Explain.
  • DOK 2: Can you explain how Juliet's death affected Lady Capulet in "Duty"? Explain.
  • DOK 2: How would you contrast the tragedy of Juliet's life story to the tragedy of Lady Capulet's life story?
  • DOK 3: How is 'survival of the fittest' related to "Duty"?

    4. Work Period Discussion: Discuss and share work period questions and answers.

    5. Reflections:

  • How does the short story, "Duty" connect to the idea of 'survival of the fittest'?
  • Were you satisfied with the author's message? Explain.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How do we connect the 'survival of the fittest' idea to the short story, "Duty"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!
    Friday, May 20th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Do you believe Lady Capulet, her husband, and the Montagues feel guilty that they're alive and their children are dead? Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read pp. 293-296 of "Duty." Compose (create) TWO QUESTIONS FOR EACH PAGE, using the DOK QUESTIONS CHART. IDENTIFY ANSWERS FOR EACH QUESTION BY CITING SPECIFIC LINE NUMBERS.

    4. Work Period Discussion: The whole class will share their questions and answers for pp. 293-296.

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the entire short story, "Duty"?
  • Were you satisfied with the ending? Explain.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How do we effectively compose Depth of Knowledge questions and cite textual evidence in the short story, "Duty"? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!
    Thursday, May 19th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are some of your duties at home and at school? What are your feelings about these duties? Do you feel these duties are benevolent (good) for you or deleterious (harmful) to you? Explain.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read p. 292 of "Duty." Compose (create) FOUR QUESTIONS, using the DOK QUESTIONS CHART. IDENTIFY ANSWERS FOR EACH QUESTION BY CITING SPECIFIC LINE NUMBERS.

    4. Work Period Discussion: The whole class will share their questions and answers for p. 292.

    5. Work Period Repeat: Read p. 293 of "Duty." Compose (create) THREE QUESTIONS, using the DOK QUESTIONS CHART. IDENTIFY ANSWERS FOR EACH QUESTION BY CITING SPECIFIC LINE NUMBERS.

    6. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the short story, "Duty"?
  • What do you predict will happen next in this story?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How do we effectively compose Depth of Knowledge questions and cite textual evidence in the short story, "Duty"? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Wednesday, May 18th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Turn to p. 289 in the Collections Textbook. How does the author of "Duty" (Berkman) compare (similar) and contrast (different) from the author of Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare)? FIND TEXTUAL EVIDENCE TO SUPPORT YOUR ANSWER.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read pp. 290-291 of the short story, "Duty." Compose (create) a question for each paragraph (FIVE QUESTIONS IN TOTAL), using the DOK QUESTIONS CHART. Identify answers for each question, citing specific line numbers.

    4. Work Period Discussion: The whole class will share their questions and answers for pp. 290-291.

    5. Work Period Repeat: Read p. 292 of "Duty." Compose (create) FOUR QUESTIONS, using the DOK QUESTIONS CHART. IDENTIFY ANSWERS FOR EACH QUESTION BY CITING SPECIFIC LINE NUMBERS.

    6. Reflections:

  • What are your first impressions of the short story, "Duty"?
  • What do you predict will happen next in this story?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How do we effectively compose Depth of Knowledge questions and cite textual evidence in the short story, "Duty"? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Tuesday, May 17th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Turn to p. 289 in the Collections Textbook. What do you believe is the author's purpose in writing from Lady Capulet's perspective?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Finish reading the first page of the short story, "Duty," on p. 289. Compose (create) a question for each paragraph (THREE QUESTIONS IN TOTAL), using the DOK QUESTIONS CHART. Identify answers for each question, citing specific line numbers.

    4. Work Period Discussion: The whole class will share their questions and answers for p. 289.

    5. Work Period Repeat: Read pp. 290-291 of "Duty." Compose (create) a question for each paragraph (FIVE QUESTIONS IN TOTAL), using the DOK QUESTIONS CHART. Identify answers for each question, citing specific line numbers.

    6. Review answers to the Romeo and Juliet exam.

    7.Reflections:

  • What are your first impressions of the short story, "Duty"?
  • What do you predict will happen next in this story?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How do we effectively compose Depth of Knowledge questions and cite textual evidence in the short story, "Duty"? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Monday, May 16th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Turn to p. 289 in the Collections Textbook. What is the meaning of the title of this short story, "Duty"? What do you notice about this title in connection with the play, Romeo and Juliet?

    Turn in HW: Reflection Paper for Acts IV and V.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the first page of the short story, "Duty," on p. 289. Compose (create) a question for each paragraph, using the DOK QUESTIONS CHART. Identify answers for each question, citing specific line numbers.

    4. Work Period Discussion: At each table, students will decide the most sophisticated DOK question to ask the class. The whole class will then answer that DOK question on the white boards provided, providing line numbers from the text.

    5.Reflections:

  • What are your first impressions of the short story, "Duty"?
  • Why do you believe the author wrote this short story?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How do we effectively compose Depth of Knowledge questions and cite textual evidence in the short story, "Duty"? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Friday, May 13th, 2016: 1. Do Now: ROMEO AND JULIET EXAM on ACTS III-V (3-5). This exam will be 50% of the 3rd marking period grade. The exam will only have multiple-choice questions (use a #2 pencil).

    2. Work Period: Work on HW:

  • ACTS IV AND V REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACTS IV AND V of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act IV and V to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we be assessed on our knowledge of events, characters and figurative language in Acts 3-5 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MAY 16th (before or during class ONLY for full credit):
  • ACTS IV AND V REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACTS IV AND V of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act IV and V to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.
  • Thursday, May 12th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Do you believe fate (forces in which people have no control) or free will (people's choices to act) caused this tragic ending? Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read Act V (5), Scene 3 (Textbook: pp. 275-278). Take Cornell Notes on the resolution of the play.

    4. Exam Review: Review ACT III STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS and ACTS IV AND V STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS.

    5.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the resolution in Act V (5) Scene 3?
  • Why is this play so popular?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • What are the events leading to the resolution in Act V (5), Scene 3 in Romeo and Juliet? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

    EXAM is TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 13th:

  • ROMEO AND JULIET EXAM on ACTS III-V (3-5). This exam will be 50% of the 3rd marking period grade. The exam will only have multiple-choice questions (bring a #2 pencil). You will need to study the Cornell Notes (taken in class). HERE ARE ACT III STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS and ACTS IV AND V STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 16th (before or during class ONLY for full credit):

  • ACTS IV AND V REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACTS IV AND V of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act IV and V to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.
  • Wednesday, May 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Everyone has flaws (weaknesses). What are Romeo's flaws and Juliet's flaws?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read Act V (5), Scene 3 (Textbook: pp. 270-_____). Take Cornell Notes on Romeo's interactions with Paris, Romeo's tragic flaw, Romeo's death, Friar Lawrence's late arrival and Juliet's death.

    4.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act V (5) Scene 3?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the final pages of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • What are the events leading to the resolution in Act V (5), Scene 3 in Romeo and Juliet? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

    EXAM is THIS FRIDAY, MAY 13th:

  • ROMEO AND JULIET EXAM on ACTS III-V (3-5). This exam will be 50% of the 3rd marking period grade. The exam will only have multiple-choice questions (bring a #2 pencil). You will need to study the Cornell Notes (taken in class). HERE ARE ACT III STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS and ACTS IV AND V STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 16th (before or during class ONLY for full credit):

  • ACTS IV AND V REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACTS IV AND V of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act IV and V to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.
  • Tuesday, May 10th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Motif (an example of figurative language) is a repeating idea, subject, or theme. Another motif in Romeo and Juliet is dreaming. Do you believe that dreams have significance? Read "Why Do We Dream?" from Psychology Today.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read Act V (5), Scenes 1, 2 and the beginning of Scene 3 (Textbook: pp. 266-270). Take Cornell Notes on the motif of dreaming, the revelation to Romeo that Juliet is 'dead', dramatic irony, Romeo's plans to join Juliet, the delay in getting letters to Romeo and Friar Lawrence's plan to see 'dead' Juliet.

    4.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act V (5), Scenes 1 and 2?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the final scenes of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • What is the significant plot development in Act V (5), Scenes 1, 2 and the beginning of Scene 3 in Romeo and Juliet? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

    EXAM is THIS FRIDAY, MAY 13th:

  • ROMEO AND JULIET EXAM on ACTS III-V (3-5). This exam will be 50% of the 3rd marking period grade. The exam will only have multiple-choice questions (bring a #2 pencil). You will need to study the Cornell Notes (taken in class). Review is coming this week.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 16th (before or during class ONLY for full credit):

  • ACTS IV AND V REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACTS IV AND V of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act IV and V to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.
  • Monday, May 9th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Motif (an example of figurative language) is a repeating idea, subject, or theme. What is one example of a motif in Romeo and Juliet?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read the rest of Act IV, Scene 5 (Textbook: pp. 261-264). Take Cornell Notes on the reactions of Friar Lawrence, Lord Capulet, Lady Capulet, Nurse and Paris after Juliet's "death." Focus on dramatic irony, motif and personification.

    4.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of scene 5 of Act IV (4)?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the final act of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • What are the characters' reactions to Juliet's "death" in Act IV, Scene 5 in Romeo and Juliet? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

    EXAM ON FRIDAY, MAY 13th:

  • ROMEO AND JULIET EXAM on ACTS III-V (3-5). This exam will be 50% of the 3rd marking period grade. The exam will only have multiple-choice questions (bring a #2 pencil). You will need to study the Cornell Notes (taken in class). Review is coming this week.
  • Friday, May 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe Juliet trusts Friar with this vial of sleeping potion? Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read Act IV, Scenes 2-4 (Textbook: pp. 256-260). Take Cornell Notes on Juliet's interactions with her parents, Juliet's soliloquy in Scene 3 (right before she takes the sleeping potion), and the wedding preparations.

    4.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of scenes 2-4 of Act IV (4)?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of Juliet's role in Act IV, Scenes 2-4 in Romeo and Juliet? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Thursday, May 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: How is 2016 better for romantic love than the past (when your grandparents were your age and during Shakespeare's time period--1500's)?

    Turn in HW: Act III Reflection Paper.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read Act IV, Scene 1. Take notes on Juliet's diction (word choice), Paris' expectations, and Friar Lawrence's advice/solution.

    4.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the first scene of Act IV (4)?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of Paris' role in Act IV, Scene 1 in Romeo and Juliet? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)
    Wednesday, May 4th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What would you change in Act III, Scene 5 that could lead to Romeo and Juliet surviving the play?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • ACT III REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACT III of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act III to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.

    4.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of all of Act III?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the universal experiences of all of Act III in Romeo and Juliet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 5th (during your class period ONLY; NO e-mails after your class period are accepted for on-time credit):
    FINISH TODAY'S CLASSWORK: ACT III REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACT III of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act III to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.
  • Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Would you approve of a mate (spouse, partner) that your parents would choose for you? Explain reasons for your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read aloud Act III, Scene 5 (TEXTBOOK: pp. 246-251) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes.

    4.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act III, Scene 5?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of Juliet's relationship with her parents as developing the plot in Act III, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Monday, May 2nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Do you believe that there is a Romeo and Juliet Effect (the powerful urge to react against restrictions) for teenagers? Explain reasons for your answer.

    Show HW: Advice Response Paper (one, typed, double-spaced paper OR two, single-spaced, handwritten pages) for the "Teen Romance and the Romeo and Juliet Effect". GIVE ADVICE TO THE CONCERNED MOTHER. You MUST include your own or your friends' experiences, your knowledge of Romeo and Juliet (you MUST include at least ONE quote from the play), and at least ONE quote from the the letters (the link above).

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read aloud Act III, Scene 5 (TEXTBOOK: pp.244-246) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes.

    4.Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act III, Scene 5?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of Romeo and Juliet's relationship as developing the plot in Act III, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Friday, April 22nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: What is Friar Laurence's motive in telling Romeo that his "tears are womanish" (Act III, Scene 3, Line 110)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read aloud Act III, Scenes 3-4 (TEXTBOOK: pp. 242-244) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on how Friar and Nurse help Romeo and Juliet, Paris' demand to the Capulets, and the Capulets' decision for Juliet.

    4. Shakespeare Trivia Game in HONOR OF SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHDAY (4/23)!!!!

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act III, Scenes 3 and 4?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of Friar, Nurse and Paris as developing the plot in Act III, Scenes 3 and 4 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE MONDAY, MAY 2nd (after vacation):
  • Read "Teen Romance and the Romeo and Juliet Effect". WRITE A RESPONSE PAPER (one, typed, double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font paper OR two, single-spaced handwritten pages) in which you GIVE ADVICE TO THE CONCERNED MOTHER. You MUST include your own or your friends' experiences, your knowledge of Romeo and Juliet (you MUST include at least ONE quote from the play), and at least ONE quote from the the letters (the link above).
  • Thursday, April 21st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe Juliet says that Romeo's banishment is worse than "slain ten thousand Tybalts" (Act III, Scene 2, Line 125)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read aloud Act III, Scene 3 (TEXTBOOK: pp. 238-242) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on Friar Laurence's revelation to Romeo (his banishment) and Friar Laurence's advice to Romeo.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act III, Scene 3?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of Romeo's banishment and Friar and Romeo's relationship in Act III, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE MONDAY, MAY 2nd (after vacation):
  • Read "Teen Romance and the Romeo and Juliet Effect". WRITE A RESPONSE PAPER (one, typed, double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font paper OR two, single-spaced handwritten pages) in which you GIVE ADVICE TO THE CONCERNED MOTHER. You MUST include your own or your friends' experiences, your knowledge of Romeo and Juliet (you MUST include at least ONE quote from the play), and at least ONE quote from the the letters (the link above).
  • Wednesday, April 20th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What do you believe Shakespeare would say if he was able to time travel to 2016 and see us reading his plays?

    SHOW HOMEWORK (analysis paragraph on midterm exam) and TURN IN EXTRA CREDIT (alternative scene).

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read aloud Act III, Scene 2 (pp. 129-139) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on Juliet's longing for Romeo, the Nurse's revelation of Tybalt's death by Romeo, Romeo's banishment, Nurse's comfort to Juliet and assistance in bringing them together.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act III, Scene 2?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of Tybalt's death, Romeo's banishment and Nurse's relationship with Juliet in Act III, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments).
    Tuesday, April 19th, 2016: Work Period:
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (up to 10 extra points on your lowest test grade): Write an ALTERNATIVE (different; other) SCENE (instead of Act III, Scene 1) of Romeo and Juliet. Instead of Tybalt's and Mercutio's deaths (which are the climax of the play), what can you include so that the play's ending? Perhaps you'd like to change the play into a comedy, a 'happily ever after' romance, or a more gruesome tragedy. You can write this ALTERNATIVE SCENE in play form (like Romeo and Juliet) or in paragraph form (like an essay). It MUST be two pages (front and back, handwritten, single-spaced) or one, typed page (double-spaced).


  • WORK ON HOMEWORK (DUE TOMORROW): WRITE AN ANALYSIS PARAGRAPH (4-6 sentences) OF YOUR MIDTERM EXAM. Explain WHY you earned the grade you did, based on the rubric. Provide evidence WHY you lost and earned points in each category. You are doing a SELF-ASSESSMENT. Answer the following questions in your analysis paragraph, using evidence and elaboration:
  • Content and Analysis: Did you explain why you included specific evidence from the texts to support your claim? Did you include a counterclaim and explain how it's different from your claim?
  • Command of Evidence: Did you include abundant evidence from both texts? Did you cite your evidence clearly? Did your evidence support your claim?
  • Coherence, Organization and Style: Did every paragraph connect and did you include transition words/phrases to connect the paragraphs? Did every sentence within paragraphs connect and support your claim? Did you use sophisticated language?
  • Control of Conventions: Did you include proper grammar (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage)?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we effectively create an alternative scene for Act III, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20th:
  • WRITE AN ANALYSIS PARAGRAPH (4-6 sentences) OF YOUR MIDTERM EXAM. Explain WHY you earned the grade you did, based on the rubric. Provide evidence WHY you lost and earned points in each category. You are doing a SELF-ASSESSMENT. Answer the following questions in your analysis paragraph, using evidence and elaboration:
  • Content and Analysis: Did you explain why you included specific evidence from the texts to support your claim? Did you include a counterclaim and explain how it's different from your claim?
  • Command of Evidence: Did you include abundant evidence from both texts? Did you cite your evidence clearly? Did your evidence support your claim?
  • Coherence, Organization and Style: Did every paragraph connect and did you include transition words/phrases to connect the paragraphs? Did every sentence within paragraphs connect and support your claim? Did you use sophisticated language?
  • Control of Conventions: Did you include proper grammar (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage)?


  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY IS DUE TOMORROW! EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (up to 10 extra points on your lowest test grade): Write an ALTERNATIVE (different; other) SCENE (instead of Act III, Scene 1) of Romeo and Juliet. Instead of Tybalt's and Mercutio's deaths (which are the climax of the play), what can you include so that the play's ending? Perhaps you'd like to change the play into a comedy, a 'happily ever after' romance, or a more gruesome tragedy. You can write this ALTERNATIVE SCENE in play form (like Romeo and Juliet) or in paragraph form (like an essay). It MUST be two pages (front and back, handwritten, single-spaced) or one, typed page (double-spaced).
  • Monday, April 18th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What can you predict will happen in the upcoming scenes now that Mercutio and Tybalt are dead?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read aloud the rest of Act III, Scene 1 (pp. 125-129) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the characters reactions to Tybalt's and Mercutio's deaths, Benvolio's revelation, and the consequences for Romeo.

    4. Review your Midterm Exam Rubric Categories:

  • Content and Analysis: Did you explain why you included specific evidence from the texts to support your claim? Did you include a counterclaim and explain how it's different from your claim?
  • Command of Evidence: Did you include abundant evidence from both texts? Did you cite your evidence clearly? Did your evidence support your claim?
  • Coherence, Organization and Style: Did every paragraph connect and did you include transition words/phrases to connect the paragraphs? Did every sentence within paragraphs connect and support your claim? Did you use sophisticated language?
  • Control of Conventions: Did you include proper grammar (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage)?

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act III, Scene 1?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of the deaths of Mercutio and Tybalt in Act III, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20th:
  • WRITE AN ANALYSIS PARAGRAPH (4-6 sentences) OF YOUR MIDTERM EXAM. Explain WHY you earned the grade you did, based on the rubric. Provide evidence WHY you lost and earned points in each category. You are doing a SELF-ASSESSMENT. Answer the following questions in your analysis paragraph, using evidence and elaboration:
  • Content and Analysis: Did you explain why you included specific evidence from the texts to support your claim? Did you include a counterclaim and explain how it's different from your claim?
  • Command of Evidence: Did you include abundant evidence from both texts? Did you cite your evidence clearly? Did your evidence support your claim?
  • Coherence, Organization and Style: Did every paragraph connect and did you include transition words/phrases to connect the paragraphs? Did every sentence within paragraphs connect and support your claim? Did you use sophisticated language?
  • Control of Conventions: Did you include proper grammar (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage)?
  • Friday, April 15th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What can you predict will be Romeo's reaction to Tybalt's rage toward him? Explain your answer by referring to Romeo's characterization.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Note-Taking: Read aloud Act III, Scene 1 (pp. 115-123) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the significance of this brawl, foreshadowing language, and repetition.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Act III, Scene 1?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the significance of the brawl between Mercutio, Benvolio, Tybalt and Romeo in Act III, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet? N/A
    Thursday, April 14th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Who can you predict will be the first person to die in this play (this person's death will be the climax and it will occur in Act III)? Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Review answers to the Super Quiz on Acts I and II in Romeo and Juliet

    3. Work Period: FINISH ACT II (Scenes 1-6) REFLECTION PAPER: Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACT II of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act II (scenes 1-6) to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date. SHOW FOR CLASSWORK CREDIT!

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the reflection papers?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following acts?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we make effective predictions for the remainder of Romeo and Juliet? N/A
    Wednesday, April 13th, 2016: 1. Do Now: SUPER QUIZ on ACTS I AND II in Romeo and Juliet

    2. Work Period: ACT II (Scenes 1-6) REFLECTION PAPER: Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACT II of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act II (scenes 1-6) to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.

    3. Reflections:

  • What are your overall impressions of all of Act II in Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following acts?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we be assessed on Acts I and II in Romeo and Juliet? N/A
    Tuesday, April 12th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Compare (find similarities) and contrast (find differences) the Nurse and Friar Lawrence.

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act II, Scenes 5 and 6 (pp. 107-111) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the significance of the Nurse and Friar Lawrence in this play.

    4. Review of the following Notes on Acts I and II in Romeo and Juliet: the sonnet format of the prologue, the relationship between the Montagues and the Capulets in the Prologue, the significance of the servants (Sampson and Gregory) in the opening scene of Act I, the prince's role in the first scene, Romeo's unrequited love, the relationship between Mercutio, Benvolio, and Romeo, Lord Capulet's plan for Juliet and Paris, Lady Capulet's plan for Juliet and Paris, Romeo's reason for attending the Capulets' party, Nurse's relationship with Juliet, characterization of Paris, Juliet's opinion of Paris, examples of foreshadowing, Romeo's opinions of Juliet, religious allusions (references), Tybalt's impressions of Romeo, Lord Capulet's impressions of Romeo, the first encounter between Romeo and Juliet (Act I, Scene 5), the balcony scene in Act II, Scene 2, Romeo's metaphors for Juliet, interpretation of "O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" (Act II, Scene 2, line 36), importance of names in Act II, Scene 2, examples of personification, Romeo and Juliet's plans involving Friar Lawrence and the Nurse, relationship between Romeo and Friar Lawrence in Act II, Scene 3, Friar Lawrence's reasons for marrying Romeo and Juliet, Nurse's reasons for connecting Romeo and Juliet

    5. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal importance of minor characters?
  • What are your impressions of Act II, Scenes 5 and 6 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following acts?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of the roles of the Nurse and Friar Lawrence in Act II, Scenes 5 and 6 of Romeo and Juliet? SUPER QUIZ ON ACTS I AND II (20% of the 2nd marking period) TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13th: You will need to study the following (look at your class notes): the sonnet format of the prologue, the relationship between the Montagues and the Capulets in the Prologue, the significance of the servants (Sampson and Gregory) in the opening scene of Act I, the prince's role in the first scene, Romeo's unrequited love, the relationship between Mercutio, Benvolio, and Romeo, Lord Capulet's plan for Juliet and Paris, Lady Capulet's plan for Juliet and Paris, Romeo's reason for attending the Capulets' party, Nurse's relationship with Juliet, characterization of Paris, Juliet's opinion of Paris, examples of foreshadowing, Romeo's opinions of Juliet, religious allusions (references), Tybalt's impressions of Romeo, Lord Capulet's impressions of Romeo, the first encounter between Romeo and Juliet (Act I, Scene 5), the balcony scene in Act II, Scene 2, Romeo's metaphors for Juliet, interpretation of "O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" (Act II, Scene 2, line 36), importance of names in Act II, Scene 2, examples of personification, Romeo and Juliet's plans involving Friar Lawrence and the Nurse, relationship between Romeo and Friar Lawrence in Act II, Scene 3, Friar Lawrence's reasons for marrying Romeo and Juliet, Nurse's reasons for connecting Romeo and Juliet.

    **You will need to study your notes (it will NOT be open-book; it will have multiple-choice questions).

    Monday, April 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe Romeo and Juliet want to get married so quickly? Explain your answer.

    Show HW: Show TWO rewrite assignments (must include originals).

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act II, Scene 5 (pp. 103-109) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on Juliet's impatience, the significance of the Nurse and the Nurse's revelation.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal experiences in love?
  • What are your impressions of Act II, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of the Nurse's role in Act II, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet? ALL OWED HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS ARE DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, APRIL 12th; NO HW WILL BE COLLECTED AFTER TOMORROW!!!

    SUPER QUIZ ON ACTS I AND II (20% of the 2nd marking period) THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13th: Review is coming tomorrow! You will need to study your notes (it will NOT be open-book; it will have multiple-choice questions).

    Friday, April 8th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe Romeo and Juliet is so popular (over 400 years later)? Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act II, Scene 4 (pp. 91-103) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the interactions between Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio (focus on why they're typical boys) and the significance of the Nurse.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal experiences in love?
  • What are your impressions of Act II, Scene 4 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of Romeo's dependence on the Nurse in Act II, Scene 4 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, APRIL 11th:
  • REWRITE TWO PAPERS (they HAD to be corrected by Ms. Conn). In your REWRITES, you will highlight or underline the corrections. You MUST bring in the originals (with Ms. Conn's corrections). This is worth TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    ALL OWED HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS ARE DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, APRIL 12th; NO HW WILL BE COLLECTED AFTER TUESDAY!!!

    SUPER QUIZ ON ACTS I AND II (20% of the 2nd marking period) ON WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13th: Details are coming soon! You will need to study your notes (it will NOT be open-book; it will have multiple-choice questions)

  • Thursday, April 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Who would you consult (seek help from) for romantic advice? Provide at least two reasons why this person is trustworthy and helpful.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act II, Scenes 3 and 4 (pp. 83-93) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the relationship and dialogue between Romeo and Friar Lawrence and the interactions between Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio (focus on why they're typical boys).

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal experiences in love?
  • What are your impressions of Act II, Scenes 3 and 4 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of Romeo's dependence on Friar Lawrence in Act II, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, APRIL 11th:
  • REWRITE TWO PAPERS (they HAD to be corrected by Ms. Conn). In your REWRITES, you will highlight or underline the corrections. You MUST bring in the originals (with Ms. Conn's corrections). This is worth TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.
  • Wednesday, April 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do girls and guys play 'hard to get' in romantic situations? Why do girls and guys rush into relationships?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act II, Scene 2 (pp. 69-83) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on Romeo's strong desire for Juliet and Romeo and Juliet's dialogue in the balcony scene.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal theme of mutual love?
  • What are your impressions of Act II, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand the importance of Romeo and Juliet's dialogue in Act II, Scene 2 (balcony scene) of Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Tuesday, April 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: How would you characterize (describe) two people who are experiencing love at first sight? Consider their actions, speech, appearance and other people's points of view.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act II, Scene 2 (pp. 69-83) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on Romeo's strong desire for Juliet and Romeo and Juliet's interactions at the balcony scene.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal theme of mutual love?
  • What are your impressions of Act II, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand Romeo's intentions in Act II, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Monday, April 4th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Now that Romeo learns that Juliet is from his enemy's family, what is your advice to him? What is a reason that Romeo cannot stay away from Juliet?

    TURN IN HOMEWORK: ACT I, SCENES 4 AND 5

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act II, Scenes 1 and 2 (pp. 65-83) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the third sonnet (1st sonnet: prologue, 2nd sonnet: Romeo meets Juliet for the first time, and 3rd sonnet: opening of Act II), Romeo's strong desire for Juliet, foreshadowing, characterization of Mercutio, Romeo's disappearance, and the balcony scene.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal theme of mutual love?
  • What are your impressions of Act II, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following scenes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we understand Romeo's intentions in Act II, Scenes 1 and 2 of Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Friday, April 1st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do authors, like Shakespeare, include religious allusions (references) in their writing?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Finish reading aloud Act I, Scene 5 (pp. 51-61) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on Romeo's first sight of Juliet, religious allusions (references), sonnet format, foreshadowing, and revelation of Romeo's and Juliet's families.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal theme of love at first sight?
  • What are your impressions of Act I, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen in the following acts?

    5. Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we analyze textual evidence of love at first sight in Act I, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
  • ACT I, SCENES 4 and 5 REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACT I, SCENES 4 AND 5 of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act I, Scenes 4 and 5 to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.
  • Thursday, March 31st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Do you believe in love at first sight? Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud the rest of Act I, Scene 4 (pp. 41-49) and Act I, Scene 5 (pp. 51-61) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the characterization of Tybalt, Romeo's appearance at the Capulets' party, and Romeo's first sight of Juliet.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal theme of love at first sight?
  • What are your impressions of Act I, Scenes 4 and 5 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that will happen tomorrow? Common Core Standards:
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we analyze textual evidence of love at first sight in Act I, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, APRIL 4th:
  • ACT I, SCENES 4 and 5 REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACT I, SCENES 4 AND 5 of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act I, Scenes 4 and 5 to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.
  • Wednesday, March 30th, 2016: 1. MIDTERM EXAM: ANSWER the question in the introduction (the answer is your THESIS STATEMENT, which usually goes at the end of the introduction paragraph). Your ENTIRE paper (3-5 paragraphs; each body paragraph should be 10-12 sentences) should focus on answering the question and providing evidence from the texts to support your answer. MAKE SURE YOU FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES!

    2. Work Period: Make up owed homework.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we effectively address the topic on teenagers experiencing true love? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW!
    Tuesday, March 29th, 2016: MIDTERM EXAM: ANSWER the question in the introduction (the answer is your THESIS STATEMENT, which usually goes at the end of the introduction paragraph). Your ENTIRE paper (3-5 paragraphs; each body paragraph should be 10-12 sentences) should focus on answering the question and providing evidence from the texts to support your answer. MAKE SURE YOU FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we effectively address the topic on teenagers experiencing true love? MAKE UP ANY OWED HW!
    Monday, March 28th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Who would console (comfort) you if you experienced unrequited love? Explain why you chose this person.

    TURN IN HW: Turn in your Act I, Scenes 2 and 3 Reflection Paper.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act I, Scene 4 (pp. 41-49) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the relationship between Romeo, Benvolio and Mercutio. Focus on how Benvolio and Mercutio console (comfort) Romeo during his period of unrequited love. Understand how they encourage him to dance, rise up above his sadness, and defeat the torture of unrequited love.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal theme of unrequited love?
  • What are your impressions of Act I, Scene 4 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that you'll see on tomorrow's midterm exam? Common Core Standards:
  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • How can we effectively understand the universal experience of unrequited love in Act I, Scene 4 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 29th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period): an in-class essay on Romeo and Juliet notes. REVIEW YOUR NOTES ON LOVE AND THE UNIVERSAL EXPERIENCES IN Romeo and Juliet!!
  • Thursday, March 24th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What would your parent(s) describe as your ideal mate? Explain your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act I, Scene 3 (pp. 33-41) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the relationship between the Nurse and Juliet and the portrayal of Paris as an ideal man for Juliet?

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal theme of love and the parent-child relationships?
  • What are your impressions of Act I, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do on Monday? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, finding, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  • How can we effectively understand the universal experiences of romantic love and parent-child love in Act I, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY:
    ACT I, SCENES 2 AND 3 REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACT I, SCENES 2 AND 3 of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two SINGLE-SPACED, handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act I, Scenes 2 and 3 to support your answer. Recommendation: Use direct quotes to support your answer to the question on universal experiences. For example, The Nurse says, "he's a flower" (Act I, Scene 3, Line 84). Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). The Nurse describes Paris as a handsome man, and many parents have ideal mates for their children. DON'T FORGET: Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.

    THIS COMING TUESDAY, MARCH 29th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period): an in-class essay on Romeo and Juliet notes. More info. will be provided.
  • Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Are teenagers ready to get married? Explain your answer.

    Turn in your HW Reflection Paper on Act I, Scene 1.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act I, Scene 2 (pp. 27-33) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on Mr. Capulet, Paris, Benvolio and Romeo. Focus on the theme of love--Romeo's obsession with Rosaline and Paris' obsession with Juliet.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the universal theme of love?
  • What are your impressions of Act I, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do tomorrow? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, finding, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  • How can we effectively understand the universal experiences in Act I, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet? Make up owed HW!
    Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are personal experiences in your life that are UNIVERSAL (applicable to all people all over the world throughout time)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act I, Scene 1 (pp. 19-25) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on Romeo's emotional state and his unrequited love. Consider the themes of love and hate.

    4. Begin HW.

    5. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the themes of love and hate?
  • What are your impressions of the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do tomorrow? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, finding, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  • How can we effectively understand the universal experiences in Act I, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23rd, 2016
    ACT I, SCENE 1 REFLECTION PAPER:
  • Answer the following question: WHAT UNIVERSAL (timeless and applicable to all people) EXPERIENCES OCCUR IN ACT I, SCENE 1 of ROMEO AND JULIET? Write one, full typed, double-spaced page (or two handwritten pages) in which you answer this question. Refer to textual evidence (see your Cornell Notes) from Act I, Scene 1 to support your answer. Do NOT use first person (any form of "I"). Include a proper heading, which includes your name, the teacher's name, class name (Elements of Literacy), period, and date.
  • Monday, March 21st, 2016: 1. Do Now: What do you believe is the best way to deal with feuding (fighting) families?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act I, Scene 1 (pp. 15-21) of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the Prince's manner of dealing with the feud, character development of Benvolio and Tybalt, and Romeo's emotional state. Consider the themes of love and hate.

    4. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the themes of love and hate?
  • What are your impressions of the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do tomorrow? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, finding, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  • How can we effectively understand the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP HOMEWORK
    Friday, March 18th, 2016: 1. Do Now:
  • Why do you believe Shakespeare starts many of his plays with minor characters?
  • Why do you think Shakespeare begins his tragedies (like Romeo and Juliet) with a humorous scene?

    2. Read-Aloud/Cornell Note-Taking: Read aloud Act I, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet. Take Cornell Notes on the purpose of the minor characters and the conflict established between the Montagues and the Capulets. Consider the themes of love and hate.

    3. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the themes of love and hate?
  • What are your impressions of the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do on Monday? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, finding, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  • How can we effectively understand the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP HOMEWORK
    Thursday, March 17th, 2016: 1. Do Now:
  • Arrange into Speed Debating format.
  • Read over your brainstorming on the following question: Can teenagers experience true love? Prepare your position--in favor or against teenagers having the ability to experience true love.

    2. Speed Debating: Students will divide up into half the class, sitting across from a partner. One side of the room will be pro (in favor) of teenagers experiencing true love. The other side of the room will be con (against) teenagers experiencing true love. Students will take notes on new information learned during Speed Debating. THREE MINUTES PER DEBATE.

    3. Whole Class Discussion: Can teenagers experience true love? Students will share any new findings/epiphanies (revelations) from Speed Debating. Refer to yourself, your family, your friends, teenagers in the movies, books, and plays. Connect your answer to the definition of true love.

    4. Introduce Shakespeare's rhythmic pattern: Note-taking (in your LA section) on Iambic Pentameter. It sounds like a heartbeat. It includes 5 pairs of alternating unstressed and stressed beats (da DUM, da DUM). Shakespeare included this rhythmic pattern to help his actors memorize their lines.

    5. Reflections:

  • What did you learn about the theme of teenagers experiencing true love?
  • Did you understand Iambic Pentameter?
  • Are you ready to focus on the concept of love in Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do tomorrow? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.4: Present information, finding, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  • How can we prepare to focus on the theme of true love in Romeo and Juliet? MAKE UP HOMEWORK
    Wednesday, March 16th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What's the definition of true love? Write 1-2 sentences to support your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now. Volunteers share with a neighbor.

    3. Work Period: Can teenagers experience true love? Brainstorm a full, handwritten page on this question. Refer to yourself, your family, your friends, teenagers in the movies, books, and plays. Connect your answer to the definition of true love.

    SHOW HW: Show the Prologue paragraph HW.

    4. Review the Shakespeare Exam.

    5. Introduce Shakespeare's rhythmic pattern: Note-taking (in your LA section) on Iambic Pentameter. It sounds like a heartbeat. It includes 5 pairs of alternating unstressed and stressed beats (da DUM, da DUM). Shakespeare included this rhythmic pattern to help his actors memorize their lines.

    6. Reflections:

  • What are the benefits of studying Shakespeare's life and understanding the prologue in order to prepare to read Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do tomorrow? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we understand the importance of Shakespeare and the prologue in Romeo and Juliet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 17th:
  • Finish today's classwork brainstorming in your LA section: Can teenagers experience true love? Brainstorm a full, handwritten page on this question. Refer to yourself, your family, your friends, teenagers in the movies, books, and plays. Connect your answer to the definition of true love. ALSO, WRITE THE COUNTERCLAIM (the opposing viewpoint) and ATTACK IT (say why it's wrong). This writing assignment will help you prepare for tomorrow's debate activity!

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK

  • Tuesday, March 15th, 2016: 1. Do Now: The prologue serves as a preview to the show. What would be a captivating preview/movie trailer? Explain the qualities of captivating preview/movie trailers.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now. Volunteers share with a neighbor.

    3. Prologue Interpretation & Note-taking: Read and interpret Prologue of Romeo and Juliet. Take notes on the interpretations for each line. What literary techniques/devices does Shakespeare use in the prologue? Why are these techniques/devices important to the prologue's message?

    4. Work Period: Begin HW.

    5. Reflections:

  • What are the benefits of interpreting the prologue of Romeo and Juliet?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do tomorrow? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we effectively interpret the prologue of Romeo and Juliet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16th:
    Does the Prologue of Romeo and Juliet intrigue (interest) audiences to desire to view the play? Write a well-developed paragraph of 10-12 sentences to support your answer.
  • Clearly answer your question in the first sentence (this is your THESIS, which is the focus of your entire paragraph). Sentence Starter examples: The Prologue of Romeo and Juliet does intrigue audiences to desire to view the play because... OR The Prologue of Romeo and Juliet does not intrigue audiences to desire to view the play because...
  • You MUST include quotes AND line numbers from the Prologue to support your answer.
  • You MUST analyze (explain) why those quotes from the Prologue support your answer.
  • You MUST offer a counterclaim (what the other side would say) and you MUST attack that counterclaim.
  • Monday, March 14th, 2016: 1. Do Now: EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period) on William Shakespeare's Life, Times, Background and Works (you need a #2 pencil)

    Turn in Extra Credit HW

    2. Work Period: Read Prologue of Romeo and Juliet. Interpret the lines in your own words. What is the meaning of a prologue? What literary techniques/devices does Shakespeare use in the prologue? Why are these techniques/devices important to the prologue's message?

    3. Discuss the Work Period: Review and take notes on the work period questions and prologue interpretation.

    4. Reflections:

  • How did you do on today's assessment of Shakespeare's life, time period and works?
  • What are the benefits of learning about Shakespeare?
  • What can you anticipate that we'll do tomorrow? Common Core Standards:
  • W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we develop our knowledge base on William Shakespeare and begin to understand the prologue of Romeo and Juliet? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16th:
    Does the Prologue of Romeo and Juliet intrigue (interest) audiences to desire to view the play? Write a well-developed paragraph of 10-12 sentences to support your answer.
  • Clearly answer your question in the first sentence (this is your THESIS, which is the focus of your entire paragraph). Sentence Starter examples: The Prologue of Romeo and Juliet does intrigue audiences to desire to view the play because... OR The Prologue of Romeo and Juliet does not intrigue audiences to desire to view the play because...
  • You MUST include quotes from the Prologue to support your answer.
  • You MUST analyze (explain) why those quotes from the Prologue support your answer.
  • You MUST offer a counterclaim (what the other side would say) and you MUST attack that counterclaim.
  • Friday, March 11th, 2016: Work Period (EXTRA CREDIT: UP TO 15 POINTS ON THE EXAM ON MONDAY!): Romeo and Juliet Pre-Reading Opinionnaire
    Identify whether you agree or disagree with the statements below. Provide an explanation by defending your position with detailed reasons. Write 2-3 sentences for each explanation.

    1.) Teenagers can't understand what true love really is. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    2.) Good friends should stick together at all times no matter how wrong a friend may be. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    3.) At times, young people have more passion than wisdom, while older people forget the power of love. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    4.) Love is more powerful than hate. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    5.) The right age to get married is 18 years old. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Romeo and Juliet by accessing prior knowledge and developing our knowledge base on William Shakespeare and the components of a tragedy? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 14th:
  • EXAM on William Shakespeare's life, times and background. You need to study your K/W/L chart notes on William Shakespeare and the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background. The EXAM WILL BE 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. It will be a multiple-choice question test. Bring in your own #2 pencil.


  • EXTRA CREDIT (up to 15 points on the EXAM!):

    Romeo and Juliet Pre-Reading Opinionnaire
    Identify whether you agree or disagree with the statements below. Provide an explanation by defending your position with detailed reasons. Write 2-3 sentences for each explanation.

    1.) Teenagers can't understand what true love really is. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    2.) Good friends should stick together at all times no matter how wrong a friend may be. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    3.) At times, young people have more passion than wisdom, while older people forget the power of love. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    4.) Love is more powerful than hate. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

    5.) The right age to get married is 18 years old. Agree/Disagree
    Reasoning:

  • Thursday, March 10th, 2016: CTE FRESHMAN EXPO: We will be visiting the Video Production Academy (Room 231), Web Design Academy (Room 237) and Apple Academy (Room 312).

    Common Core Standards:

  • How can we understand the complexities of the academies available at ITHS? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 14th:
  • EXAM on William Shakespeare's life, times and background. You need to study your K/W/L chart notes on William Shakespeare and the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background. The EXAM WILL BE 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. It will be a multiple-choice question test. Bring in your own #2 pencil.
  • Wednesday, March 9th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are the components (qualities or parts) of a tragedy? What can you predict (based on Shakespeare's life and time period) will be included in the tragedies that Shakespeare wrote?

    2.Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period/Read-Aloud: Read p. 177 (textbook) to see the components of a Shakespearean tragedy. Identify tragic heroes, antagonists and foils in tragic stories or movies in which you're familiar.

    4. Note-Taking: Finish note-taking in your K/W/L chart on William Shakespeare, adding to the "L" column. Use the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background as a guide for your note-taking in the "L" column.

    5. Reflections: What was valuable about today's lesson? What do you predict that we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Romeo and Juliet by accessing prior knowledge and developing our knowledge base on William Shakespeare and the components of a tragedy? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 14th:
  • EXAM on William Shakespeare's life, times and background. You need to study your K/W/L chart notes on William Shakespeare and the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background. The EXAM WILL BE 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. It will be a multiple-choice question test. Bring in your own #2 pencil.
  • Tuesday, March 8th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are your first impressions of William Shakespeare?

    2.Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Review the answers to the Unit Exam on the textbook stories.

    3. Note-Taking: Take notes in your K/W/L chart on William Shakespeare, adding to the "L" column. Use the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background as a guide for your note-taking in the "L" column.

    4. Reflections: What was valuable about today's lesson? What do you predict that we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Romeo and Juliet by accessing prior knowledge and developing our knowledge base on William Shakespeare? N/A
    Monday, March 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Create a K/W/L chart in your LA section on "Prior Knowledge on William Shakespeare."

    2. Work Period: Fill in the K/W/L chart in your LA section. In the "K" section, answer the following questions: What do you know about Shakespeare, his works, his background, the time that he lived, and any other information? Write as much as you can to fill the entire column (from top to the bottom of the page). Write at least THREE questions that you'd like to know in the "W" section.

    TURN IN THE EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (for the 2nd marking period!): Rank each of the following offenses in order of seriousness (1 is the most serious, and 14 is the least serious). Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) explaining your reasoning behind your ranking for each offense. You may also explain what factors may contribute to a person participating in the offenses. You may also explain how people's personality traits may contribute to them committing these acts. You can earn UP TO THREE EXTRA CREDIT HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!

  • Planning to trick someone
  • Lying to your parents
  • Killing someone for revenge
  • Advising someone to marry for money
  • Two families having a feud
  • Selling poison
  • Killing someone by mistake while fighting
  • Cursing
  • Killing someone in self-defense
  • Suicide
  • Crashing a party
  • Marrying against parents' wishes
  • Giving an obscene gesture
  • Picking a fight

    3. Discuss/Share/Note-Taking: Share your K/W/L chart--focusing on the "W" and "L" sections. Take notes, adding to the "L" column. Use the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background as a guide for your note-taking in the "L" column.

    4. Reflections: What was valuable about today's lesson? What do you predict that we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Romeo and Juliet by accessing prior knowledge and developing our knowledge base on William Shakespeare? N/A
    Friday, March 4th, 2016: Work Period:
    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (for the 2nd marking period!): Rank each of the following offenses in order of seriousness (1 is the most serious, and 14 is the least serious). Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) explaining your reasoning behind your ranking for each offense. You may also explain what factors may contribute to a person participating in the offenses. You may also explain how people's personality traits may contribute to them committing these acts. You can earn UP TO THREE EXTRA CREDIT HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS!
  • Planning to trick someone
  • Lying to your parents
  • Killing someone for revenge
  • Advising someone to marry for money
  • Two families having a feud
  • Selling poison
  • Killing someone by mistake while fighting
  • Cursing
  • Killing someone in self-defense
  • Suicide
  • Crashing a party
  • Marrying against parents' wishes
  • Giving an obscene gesture
  • Picking a fight

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Romeo and Juliet by analyzing the offenses committed in the play?
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY TODAY, MARCH 4TH, BEFORE 3PM.
  • Thursday, March 3rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: EXAM on textbook works of literature (excerpts from Reading Lolita in Tehran and Persepolis and "I Have a Dream" Speech). Open book and open notes.

    2. Work Period:

  • Work on owed homework.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively prove our knowledge on the exam on excerpts from Persepolis 2 and Reading Lolita in Tehran, as well as "I Have a Dream" speech?
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY 3PM TODAY OR E-MAILED (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 4TH BEFORE 3PM.
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (due by 3pm TODAY): Read "Women's Rights in Iran: Human Rights Watch". Write a well-developed paragraph review of the article (10-12 sentences) in which you explain how Iran creates fear (as described in the article), include direct quotes (with quotation marks) that support how Iran creates fear, and your opinions of this regime in Iran. You can earn up to 10 EXTRA POINTS on the Exam!!!
  • Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: What strategies do you use when answering multiple-choice questions on an exam?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Answer questions (and take notes) on p. 86 for the excerpts from Persepolis 2 and Reading Lolita in Tehran.

    3. Work Period Discussion/Note-Taking: Exam preparation/review.

    4. Reflections: What was valuable about the exam strategies and note-taking skills discussed today? What do you predict we will do tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively prepare for the exam on excerpts from Persepolis 2 and Reading Lolita in Tehran, as well as "I Have a Dream" speech? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd:
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period) on the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran and the excerpt from Persepolis 2 (textbook pages 81-86), vocabulary from Persepolis 2 (discreet, subversion, pretext, regime, confront, and repression), AND "I Have a Dream" speech (pp. 48-51). You should review your class notes. IMPORTANT CHANGE: This will be an open book/notes exam. You MUST still study your notes. You MUST bring a #2 pencil (it's a multiple-choice question exam).
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY 3PM TOMORROW, THURSDAY!
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: Read "Women's Rights in Iran: Human Rights Watch". Write a well-developed paragraph review of the article (10-12 sentences) in which you explain how Iran creates fear (as described in the article), include direct quotes (with quotation marks) that support how Iran creates fear, and your opinions of this regime in Iran. You can earn up to 10 EXTRA POINTS on the Exam!!!
  • Tuesday, March 1st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why does a government create fears within its citizens?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the excerpt from Persepolis 2: THe Story of a Return on p. 84.

  • Briefly summarize the graphic novel excerpt in your own words (2-3 sentences). Also, apply one of the annotations from the annotation bookmark provided.
  • Answer questions on p. 86.

    4. Work Period Discussion/Note-Taking: Share paragraph summaries and annotations from the work period.

    5. Reflections: What was valuable about the analysis of the excerpt from Persepolis 2? What do you predict we will do tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively summarize and annotate an excerpt from a graphic novel, Persepolis 2? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd:
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period) on the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran and the excerpt from Persepolis 2 (textbook pages 81-86), vocabulary from Persepolis 2 (discreet, subversion, pretext, regime, confront, and repression), AND "I Have a Dream" speech (pp. 48-51). You should review your class notes. IMPORTANT CHANGE: This will be an open book/notes exam. You MUST still study your notes. You MUST bring a #2 pencil (it's a multiple-choice question exam).
  • ALL OWED HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY 3PM on THURSDAY!
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: Read "Women's Rights in Iran: Human Rights Watch". Write a well-developed paragraph review of the article (10-12 sentences) in which you explain how Iran creates fear (as described in the article), include direct quotes (with quotation marks) that support how Iran creates fear, and your opinions of this regime in Iran. You can earn up to 10 EXTRA POINTS on the Exam!!!
  • Monday, February 29th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are the benefits and drawbacks to expressing oneself through appearance (clothes, makeup, shoes, jewelry, etc.)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran on pp. 82-83 (paragraphs 1-7).

  • Briefly summarize each paragraph in your own words (2-3 sentences). Focus on the author's purpose of characterization of Sanaz (why does she describe her actions, thoughts, feelings, personality, and appearance in those ways?). Also, for each paragraph, apply one of the annotations from the annotation bookmark provided.
  • Answer questions 1-3 on p. 86 for the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran.

    4. Work Period Discussion/Note-Taking: Share paragraph summaries and annotations from the work period.

    5. Reflections: What was valuable about the analysis of the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran? What do you predict we will do tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • How can we effectively summarize and annotate an excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd:
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period) on the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran and the excerpt from Persepolis 2 (textbook pages 81-86. You should review your class notes. This is NOT an open book/notes exam. You MUST study your notes. You MUST bring a #2 pencil (it's a multiple-choice question exam).
  • Friday, February 26th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What do you believe is a government's purpose for strict rules of dress, interactions between genders, and segregation?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran on pp. 82-83 (paragraphs 1-7). Briefly summarize each paragraph in your own words (2-3 sentences). Focus on the author's purpose of characterization of Sanaz (why does she describe her actions, thoughts, feelings, personality, and appearance in those ways?). Also, for each paragraph, apply one of the annotations from the annotation bookmark provided.

    4. Work Period Discussion/Note-Taking: Share paragraph summaries and annotations from the work period.

    4. Reflections: What was valuable about the analysis of the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran? What do you predict we will do next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • How can we effectively summarize and annotate an excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Thursday, February 25th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Speech Presentation Reminders (listen): (Students with last names beginning with N-Z will present TODAY. Students who didn't present yesterday MUST present today. If you didn't present yesterday or today, you will earn a zero for this assignment):
  • "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period.

    2. SPEECH PRESENTATIONS: "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Students will be graded on the Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period.

    3. Work Period: Read the background of Iran and the authors, Azar Nafisi and Marjane Satrapi, on p. 81 (textbook). Answer the following questions in your LA section: 1.) What purposes might these authors have in writing? 2.) How might the similarities and differences in their personal histories affect their purposes? If we finish early, do the following: Begin reading the excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran on p. 82. Briefly summarize each paragraph in your own words (2-3 sentences). Focus on the author's purpose of characterization of Sanaz (why does she describe her actions, thoughts, feelings, personality, and appearance in those ways?).

    4. Reflections: What was valuable about these speech presentations? What do you predict we will do tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we fulfill the requirements for the "I Have a Dream, Too" speech? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.
    Wednesday, February 24th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Speech Presentation Reminders (listen): (Students with last names beginning with A-M will present TODAY. Students with last names beginning with N-Z will present on TOMORROW):
  • "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period.

    2. SPEECH PRESENTATIONS: "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Students will be graded on the Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period.

    3. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we fulfill the requirements for the "I Have a Dream, Too" speech? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25th (Students with last names beginning with N-Z will present TOMORROW):
  • "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period. (ALL STUDENTS MUST BE DONE PRESENTING TODAY. IF YOU DID NOT PRESENT TODAY, YOU CAN PRESENT TOMORROW FOR -10)
  • Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Rate your community service experience on a 1-10 scale (10=great, 1=poor). Explain your reasoning (1-2 sentences).

    TURN IN COMMUNITY SERVICE HOMEWORK.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Impromptu Presentations: Consider eye contact, volume, voice inflection (variation in voice and tone), enthusiasm, and knowledge of subject. SHARE ONE SENTENCE (stand up in front of the class) from your "I Have a Dream, Too" Speech.

    4. Speech Practice: In small groups of 3-4 students, present your speech. Offer each other feedback on eye contact, volume, voice inflection, enthusiasm, organization, and following all parts of both rubrics.

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we fulfill the requirements for the "I Have a Dream, Too" speech? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24th-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25th (Students with last names beginning with A-M will present on WEDNESDAY. Students with last names beginning with N-Z will present on THURSDAY):
  • "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period.
  • Monday, February 22nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: What was a success and a challenge in accomplishing the community service assignment?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Review speech requirements for "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric.

    3. Impromptu Presentations: Consider eye contact, volume, voice inflection (variation in voice and tone), enthusiasm, and knowledge of subject. SHARE YOUR THESIS STATEMENT for your "I Have a Dream, Too" speech. Answer the following question: What is your dream for yourself/your family/your friends/NYC/USA/world? (Share a detailed, sophisticated answer in one sentence) SAY THE FOLLOWING: "I HAVE A DREAM THAT..."

    SHOW OWED HW.

    5. Reflections:

  • What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today?
  • What do you anticipate working on to prepare for your speech presentation?

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we fulfill the requirements for the "I Have a Dream, Too" speech? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments; each late homework assignment receives half-credit without an acceptable excuse note)

    DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23rd:


  • Community Service Activity: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24th-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25th (Students with last names beginning with A-M will present on WEDNESDAY. Students with last names beginning with N-Z will present on THURSDAY):

  • "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period.
  • Friday, February 12th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What is your answer to the "I Have a Dream, Too" speech's question: What is your dream for yourself/your family/your friends/NYC/USA/world? (Write a detailed, sophisticated answer in one sentence)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Finish discussing speech requirements for "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric.

    3. Impromptu Presentations: Consider eye contact, volume, voice inflection (variation in voice and tone), enthusiasm, and knowledge of subject. "My biggest concern for the future is..." taken from Impromptu Public Speaking Topics.

    4. Work Period: Begin speech composition.

    SHOW HW: Show your supplies: labeled notebook/binder sections (DNA, LA, LS, and HW), a folder, and paper. Refer to the details in the FRESHMAN ENGLISH SYLLABUS.

    5. Reflections:

  • What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today?
  • What do you anticipate working on over the upcoming vacation?

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we fulfill the requirements for the "I Have a Dream, Too" speech? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments; each late homework assignment receives half-credit without an acceptable excuse note)

    DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23rd:


  • Community Service Activity: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, tutoring a neighbor's son/daughter, grocery shopping for an elderly neighbor, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT

    DUE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24th-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25th (Students with last names beginning with A-M will present on WEDNESDAY. Students with last names beginning with N-Z will present on THURSDAY):

  • "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period.
  • Thursday, February 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are your strengths and challenges in presenting a speech? How can you overcome those challenges?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Discuss speech requirements for "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric

    3. Work Period: Begin speech composition.

    4. Reflections:

  • What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today?
  • What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • What are the requirements for the "I Have a Dream, Too" speech? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments; each late homework assignment receives half-credit without an acceptable excuse note)

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12th:

  • Bring in your supplies: labeled notebook/binder sections (DNA, LA, LS, and HW), a folder, and paper. See details in the FRESHMAN ENGLISH SYLLABUS.

    DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23rd:


  • Community Service Activity: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT

    DUE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24th-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25th (Students with last names beginning with A-M will present on WEDNESDAY. Students with last names beginning with N-Z will present on THURSDAY):

  • "I Have a Dream, Too" speech: Speech Composition Rubric and Speech Presentation Rubric. GRADE=25% of the 1st marking period.
  • Wednesday, February 10th, 2016: 1. Do Now: If you were to write a speech on dreams (goals, plans for the future, etc.), what would you prefer--your own dreams, dreams for family, dreams for friends, dreams for NYC, dreams for USA or dreams for the world? Explain reasons for your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Acquire a textbook and turn to p. 53. Finish answering the "Analyzing the Text" questions (1-6 only). You don't need to write the questions as long as YOU WRITE IN COMPLETE SENTENCES.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Review the contents of the answers to the "Analyzing the Text" questions (1-6 only) on p. 53.

    5. Reflections:

  • What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today?
  • What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • Why is Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech important today? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments; each late homework assignment receives half-credit without an acceptable excuse note)

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12th:

  • Bring in your supplies: labeled notebook/binder sections (DNA, LA, LS, and HW), a folder, and paper. See details in the FRESHMAN ENGLISH SYLLABUS.
  • Tuesday, February 9th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What was a challenge in completing the homework (the well-developed paragraph on "I Have a Dream" speech)? What was a success in completing the homework?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Acquire a textbook and turn to p. 53. Begin answering the "Analyzing the Text" questions (1-6 only). You don't need to write the questions as long as YOU WRITE IN COMPLETE SENTENCES.

    TURN IN HOMEWORK: LAST PAGE OF SYLLABUS AND WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Review the contents of the FRESHMAN ENGLISH SYLLABUS. Discuss any questions/concerns.

    5. Reflections:

  • What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today?
  • What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • Why is Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech important today? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments; each late homework assignment receives half-credit without an acceptable excuse note)

    DUE THIS FRIDAY:

  • Bring in your supplies: labeled sections (DNA, LA, LS, and HW), a folder, and paper
  • Friday, February 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe it's important to study "I Have a Dream" speech, which was delivered in 1963 (53 years ago)?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Acquire a textbook and turn to p. 48. Watch the Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" Speech and follow along on pp. 49-51. Answer the following questions:
    1.) What is MLK persuading his audience to do? Find at least three examples in the text (specifically pp. 49-51), using citations (quotes and line numbers).
    2.) What literary techniques does MLK use in his speech? Suggestions: repetition, parallelism, imagery, metaphor, and alliteration. Find at least three examples on pp. 49-51, using citations (quotes and line numbers).
    3.) How is MLK's speech delivery inspirational to his audience? Refer to the video and MLK's tone (feeling), volume, and pauses.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Students share the Work Period questions/answers. Take notes. When sharing, use one of the following sentence starters:

  • On page____, line_____, it said that...
  • The author wrote on page____ and line____...
  • In the speech, MLK said...

    5. Introduce HW.

    6. Reflections:

  • What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today?
  • What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Why is Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech important today? DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9th
  • Read the FRESHMAN ENGLISH SYLLABUS and TURN IN THE LAST PAGE (provided in class today), which should be SIGNED BY A PARENT/GUARDIAN.
  • WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPH ON "I HAVE A DREAM SPEECH": Write a well-developed paragraph (10-12 sentences) on the following: Why is Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream Speech" so popular and relevant (necessary) today? You should do the following in your paragraph:
    1.) Answer the question at the beginning of the paragraph (this answer is your thesis statement, which is the focus of your entire paragraph).
    2.) Include at least three specific examples from the speech, which include citations. A citation looks like this: "I have a dream today" (line 108).
    3.) Explain the three specific examples (from #2 above) in your own words and connect to your thesis statement (the answer to the question).
  • Thursday, February 4th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Based on p. 47 (the background of Martin Luther King, Jr.), what do you believe was MLK's purpose in delivering his "I Have a Dream" speech?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Acquire a textbook and turn to p. 48. Watch the Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" Speech and follow along on pp. 48-49. Answer the following questions:
    1.) What are the reasons that MLK delivered his speech? Find at least three examples on p. 48, using citations (quotes and line numbers).
    2.) What literary techniques does MLK use in his speech? Suggestions: repetition, parallelism, imagery, metaphor, and alliteration. Find at least three examples on pp. 48-49, using citations (quotes and line numbers).
    3.) How is MLK's speech delivery inspirational to his audience? Refer to the video and MLK's tone (feeling), volume, and pauses.

    SHOW HW: Essay Rewrite (show original essay with teacher's edits/comments, too)

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Students share the Work Period questions/answers. Take notes.

    5. Reflections: What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today? What were challenges and successes in composing the essay rewrite HW? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How does the "I Have a Dream" speech fit in our unit on the struggle for freedom? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous day).
    Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: What is one dream (hope or goal) that you have for your future? What is one dream (hope or goal) that you have for the future of America?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Acquire a textbook and turn to p. 47. Read aloud the historical background of the "I Have a Dream" speech. Answer the following questions:
    1.) Why did thousands of Americans march on Washington, D.C.?
    2.) Where did Martin Luther King, Jr. deliver his "I Have a Dream" speech?
    3.) What did Martin Luther King, Jr.'s moral leadership bring about?
    4.) How did Martin Luther King, Jr. die?
    5.) Using context clues, define the following vocabulary words: catalyst, galvanize, boycott, injustice, and conscience.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Students share the Work Period questions/answers. Take notes.

    5. Reflections: What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    6. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How does the "I Have a Dream" speech fit in our unit on the struggle for freedom? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4th: ESSAY REWRITE: Rewrite an essay from last semester. Bring in the original essay (with the teacher's edits/comments) and your rewritten essay. Highlight your corrections. Your rewrite can be electronic, but you MUST bring it to class with the original essay.
    Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Interpret the following quote in your own words: "If there is no struggle, there is no progress." --Frederick Douglass

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period #1:
    1.) What are the key words in the quote from the Do Now?
    2.) What are synonyms (similar meanings) for the key words?
    3.) Explain how this quote connects to your own life, today's society, and works of literature (novels, short stories, movies, plays, etc.).
    4.) How does this quote support the "I Have a Dream" speech by Martin Luther King, Jr.? What prior knowledge do you have about the "I Have a Dream" speech? Why is this speech popular and universal?

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Students share the Work Period questions/answers. Take notes.

    5. Work Period #2:
    1.) What are the qualities of a great speech?
    2.) Who are outstanding speakers and why?

    6. Reflections: Share answers to work period #2. What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    7. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How does the "I Have a Dream" speech fit in our unit on the struggle for freedom? DUE THIS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4th: ESSAY REWRITE: Rewrite an essay from last semester. Bring in the original essay (with the teacher's edits/comments) and your rewritten essay. Highlight your corrections. Your rewrite can be electronic, but you MUST bring it to class with the original essay.