Ms. Conn's and Mr. Dowdy's Junior English Assignments, Spring 2016

Ms. Conn's and Mr. Dowdy's Junior English Assignments
Spring 2016

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignment
Monday, June 13th, 2016: 1. Do Now: WRITE DOWN YOUR ANSWERS (Keep them for you! These answers will help guide you to success in the future!).
  • What steps are you taking this summer to help you prepare for your future career?
  • How did this English class help you in preparing for your future career?
  • What did you find most useful and/or intriguing about this class? You may refer to books we read (The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Hamlet, or Fences), the papers we wrote (the central idea essay, the argumentative essay on whether Hamlet should be taught in high school, Hamlet reflection papers, t-chart notes, or 3-column notes), SAT vocabulary, class activities (fishbowl discussion, acting, speed debating), or anything else.
  • What writing skills do you need/want to work on improving in the future?

    2. Work Period & Discussion: If you were a teacher/educational administrator, how would you design the perfect class for high school students? Consider activities, skills needed to learn, type of teacher, type of classroom, type of students, etc. Write a list of TOP TEN qualities of THE PERFECT CLASS FOR LEARNING AND SUCCESS! TURN IT IN! 3.Reflections:

  • What did you you find most valuable in this class?
  • Are you likely to implement (use) reading and writing strategies on the Regents/SAT? Why or why not?
  • What are your educational activities this summer? What are your leisure activities this summer?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare for the future, using the skills and experiences acquired in this class? ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM STRATEGIES (REMEMBER: THE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM IS TOMORROW, TUESDAY, JUNE 14th at 12:15pm. IF YOU EARNED A 74 OR LOWER ON THE REGENTS EXAM, THEN YOU SHOULD RETAKE IT!!!):
    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay. Recommendation: create an outline before writing (look at your packet of outlines!). Write the essay that includes 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) and always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea.
    2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, do career research HERE and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

    Friday, June 10th, 2016: 1. Do Now:
  • What steps are you taking this summer to help you prepare for your future career?
  • How did this English class help you in preparing for your future career?
  • What did you find most useful and/or intriguing about this class? You may refer to books we read (The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Hamlet, or Fences), the papers we wrote (the central idea essay, the argumentative essay on whether Hamlet should be taught in high school, Hamlet reflection papers, t-chart notes, or 3-column notes), SAT vocabulary, class activities (fishbowl discussion, acting, speed debating), or anything else.
  • What writing skills do you need/want to work on improving in the future?

    2. FISHBOWL DISCUSSION: Discuss/Share: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below and offer interpretation and analysis. The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and be ready to switch roles. The inner circle students will respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • What steps are you taking this summer to help you prepare for your future career?
  • How did this English class help you in preparing for your future career?
  • What did you find most useful and/or intriguing about this class? You may refer to books we read (The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Hamlet, or Fences), the papers we wrote (the central idea essay, the argumentative essay on whether Hamlet should be taught in high school, Hamlet reflection papers, t-chart notes, or 3-column notes), SAT vocabulary, class activities (fishbowl discussion, acting, speed debating), or anything else.
  • What writing skills do you need/want to work on improving in the future?

    *Cite textual evidence (refer to the central idea essay returned with Ms. Conn's corrections) to support your answers in discussion Sentence starters include the following:

  • I discovered from_______that...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    3.Reflections:

  • What did you you find most valuable in this class?
  • Are you likely to implement (use) reading and writing strategies on the Regents/SAT? Why or why not?
  • What are your summer plans?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare for the future, using the skills and experiences acquired in this class? ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM STRATEGIES (REMEMBER: THE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM IS TUESDAY, JUNE 14th at 12:15pm. IF YOU EARNED A 74 OR LOWER ON THE REGENTS EXAM, THEN YOU SHOULD RETAKE IT!!!):
    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay. Recommendation: create an outline before writing (look at your packet of outlines!). Write the essay that includes 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) and always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea.
    2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, do career research HERE and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

    Wednesday, June 8th, 2016: 1. Do Now: VOCABULARY CROSSWORD PUZZLE!

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share the answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Research your chosen career at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics website. Search for your chosen career in the right-hand corner search box. Then, click on the "occupational outlook" site. Research the answers to the following questions (be prepared to share):

  • What's your chosen career description?
  • What's the annual wage (salary)?
  • What degree do you need to earn to pursue this career?
  • How can an improved vocabulary help you prepare for this career?
  • Is your chosen career on the "25 Best Jobs of 2016" from U.S. News & World Report? Which career on this list sounds most appealing and why?

    4. Reflections: What are the benefits of improving your vocabulary for college and beyond? Why is it beneficial to do career research now?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare for college and beyond improving our vocabulary and conducting career research? ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM STRATEGIES (REMEMBER: THE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM IS TUESDAY, JUNE 14th at 12:15pm. IF YOU EARNED A 74 OR LOWER ON THE REGENTS EXAM, THEN YOU SHOULD RETAKE IT!!!):
    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay. Recommendation: create an outline before writing (look at your packet of outlines!). Write the essay that includes 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) and always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea.
    2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, do career research HERE and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

    Tuesday, June 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read the exemplary resumes found HERE. What qualities, in terms of categories, formatting, writing style, and word usage, are worth including in your own resume?
  • What impressions do you get from these young people?
  • What judgements have you made about them already?
  • Would you hire them or accept them to your college? Why or why not?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Work on writing your own resume. What will you include in the work experience section? The extracurricular activities section? Honors/Awards? Skills? What do you need to impress the college of your choice? The employer of your choice? Exchange resumes with a classmate and do a peer edit, using the sample resumes as guides.

    4. Reflections: What are the benefits of examining exemplary resumes? What are your next steps in composing your own resume?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare for college and beyond by examining exemplary resumes and creating our own resumes? DUE BY TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th: Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)!! This is the LAST DAY I will collect owed homework!
    Monday, June 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are advantages and disadvantages of composing an outline before writing an essay?

    SHOW EXTRA CREDIT HW: Rewrite of an edited paper. Include the original and highlight the corrections on the rewrite.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period #1: Examine outlines provided. What are advantages and disadvantages for each outline?

  • Owl @ Purdue Outline
  • Argumentative Paper Informal Outline
  • Argumentative Paper Graphic Organizer
  • Central Idea Essay Graphic Organizers

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Share advantages and disadvantages for various outlines examined during the work period.

    5. Work Period: What would you include in your resume (a list of your achievements in education, work and extra-curricular activities)? Compose a draft of your resume.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare for the English Regents and college essay writing by examining outlines? IF YOU HAVE A RESUME, PLEASE BRING IT IN TOMORROW (ELECTRONIC OR WRITTEN)!.

    DUE BY THIS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th: Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)!! This is the LAST DAY I will collect owed homework!

    Friday, June 3rd, 2016: 1. Do Now:
  • Which test-taking strategy for Part 1 (reading passages and multiple-choice questions) is most useful for you and why?
  • Which test-taking strategy for Part 2 (argumentative essay with four texts) is most useful for you and why?
  • Which test-taking strategy for Part 3 (central idea with one text) is most useful for your and why?
  • What are your strengths and areas needing improvement in writing the argumentative essay and central idea essay?

    2. FISHBOWL DISCUSSION: Discuss/Share: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below and offer interpretation and analysis. The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and be ready to switch roles. The inner circle students will respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • Which test-taking strategy for Part 1 (reading passages and multiple-choice questions) is most useful for you and why?
  • Which test-taking strategy for Part 2 (argumentative essay with four texts) is most useful for you and why?
  • Which test-taking strategy for Part 3 (central idea with one text) is most useful for your and why?
  • What are your strengths and areas needing improvement in writing the argumentative essay and central idea essay?

    *Cite textual evidence (refer to the Regents Exam packet) to support your answers in discussion Sentence starters include the following:

  • I discovered from_______that...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • My classmate's claim that________is interesting because...

    3.Reflections:

  • What did you you find most valuable today?
  • Are you likely to implement (use) these strategies on the Regents/SAT? Why or why not?
  • What do you predict we will do on Monday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare to take the English Regents Exam/SAT, using the strategies for success? DUE THIS MONDAY, JUNE 6th:
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: For an extra credit HW, rewrite a paper with Ms. Conn's corrections/edits. In your REWRITE, you will highlight or underline the corrections. You MUST bring in the original (with Ms. Conn's corrections).

    DUE BY NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th: Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)!! This is the LAST DAY I will collect owed homework!

  • Thursday, June 2nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Take out the sample ELA Regents (Common Core) Exam. What are your strengths in Part 1? What areas do you need to work on? Check your answers for Part 1.
    1.) 4     2.) 3     3.) 1     4.) 2    5.) 3     6.) 1    7.) 1     8.) 3
    9.) 4    10.) 4    11.) 1    12.) 2   13.) 3    14.) 1   15.) 1    16.) 4
    17.) 2   18.) 1    19.) 2    20.) 1   21.) 4    22.) 4   23.) 2    24.) 1
    

    SHOW HW: Complete Part 1 of English Regents Booklet. You MUST also CIRCLE key words in each question, UNDERLINE line numbers in the reading passages, WRITE YOUR OWN ANSWER IN THE MARGIN, and ELIMINATE TWO WRONG ANSWERS (cross them out! 50/50 rule!).

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Continue reviewing Regents Exam/SAT strategies. Take notes in class. HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE):

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay (recommendation: create an outline before writing) of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea. 2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    3.Reflections:

  • What did you you find most valuable today?
  • Are you likely to implement (use) these strategies on the Regents/SAT? Why or why not?
  • What do you predict we will do tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare to take the English Regents Exam/SAT, using the strategies for success? DUE THIS MONDAY, JUNE 6th:
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: For an extra credit HW, rewrite a paper with Ms. Conn's corrections/edits. In your REWRITE, you will highlight or underline the corrections. You MUST bring in the original (with Ms. Conn's corrections).

    DUE BY NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th: Make up ALL owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)!! This is the LAST DAY I will collect owed homework!

  • Tuesday, May 31st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Scan the sample ELA Regents (Common Core) Exam. What's a key (important) strategy that would be helpful for you on the English Regents/SAT?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Review Regents Exam/SAT strategies. Take notes in class. HERE ARE THE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN UNDERSTANDING AND EXCELLING ON THE ENGLISH REGENTS (COMMON CORE):

    Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay: 1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay (recommendation: create an outline before writing) of 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) that always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea. 2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    3.Reflections:

  • What did you you find most valuable today?
  • Are you likely to implement (use) these strategies on the Regents/SAT? Why or why not?
  • What do you predict we will do on Thursday?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare to take the English Regents Exam/SAT, using the strategies for success? DUE THIS THURSDAY, JUNE 2nd:
  • Complete Part 1 of English Regents Booklet. You MUST also CIRCLE key words in each question, UNDERLINE line numbers in the reading passages, WRITE YOUR OWN ANSWER IN THE MARGIN, and ELIMINATE TWO WRONG ANSWERS (cross them out! 50/50 rule!).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)

  • Friday, May 27th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's quote interpretation (explain the quote in your own words), analysis (explain how the quote connects to the topics of life choices, achieving dreams/goals, or overcoming the odds).

    2. Discuss/Share: In a fishbowl, students in the inner circle will discuss each of the questions below and offer interpretation and analysis. The outside circle will listen carefully to the ideas presented, and be ready to switch roles. The inner circle students will respect each other, listen when one student is speaking, and not interrupt the speakers. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

  • Which quote was the most inspiring and why?
  • Which text--The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Hamlet, or Fences--was the most intriguing (interesting) and why?
  • Which theme--genetics, environment, a person's life mission, sanity vs. insanity, the power of knowledge, humanization or dehumanization--resonated (provided great meaning) for you and why?

    *Cite textual evidence to support your answers in discussion
    Sentence starters include the following:

  • I discovered from_______that...
  • My idea builds upon__________(person)'s idea that...
  • I concluded that...
  • That's a valid point, but I feel...
  • The author's claim that________is interesting because...
  • 3.Reflections:

  • What did you like/dislike about the fishbowl discussion?
  • How would you evaluate the inner circle and the outer circle?
  • How would you improve the quality of discussion in the future?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we engage in a fishbowl discussion to review major texts and themes studied throughout the semester? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)
    Thursday, May 26th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's follow-up questions (related to the news articles--see handouts):
    1.) How can these news articles relate to Fences? Why?
    2.) What are the differences between the generation that Troy (in Fences) was living in and the generation that Malia Obama is living in? Explain.
    3.) After reading the articles, what opportunities do you believe you should take as a student to better yourself? Why?
    4.) Does environment play a role in achieving your goals or dreams? Why or why not?
    5.) Do you think we should take advantage of all opportunities that are being offered today? Why or why not?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Review the questions and answers (from the Do Now).

    3. Work Period: Choose a quote (hanging on the classroom walls) by a famous person (like Albert Einstein, Aristotle or Gandhi) that resonates with you (has deep meaning for you). Interpret the quote in your own words. Analyze (explain in depth) how your chosen quote connects to the news articles and/or poem on the topics of life choices (positive or negative), achieving dreams/goals, or overcoming the odds.

    4. Work Period: Discuss and share the quotes, interpretations and analysis.

    5. Reflections:

  • What intrigued you about the articles we read today?
  • Why do you believe it's important to read these kinds of news articles?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we compare/contrast Fences, current events, a famous poem, and famous quotes? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)
    Wednesday, May 25th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read Robert Frost's famous poem, "The Road Not Taken." Write down what you think the poem means to you.

    Return your copy of Fences.

    2. Discuss/Share: Find a classmate that you rarely speak to. Share your responses with that classmate. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:
    Read two news articles:

  • "Fox News Readers Bash Obama's Daughter with Racial Slur, 'Ape,' 'Monkey'"
  • "Ex-drug Dealer Graduates at Age 67 from Columbia"

    Answer the follow-up questions (related to the news articles above):
    1.) How can these news articles relate to Fences? Why?
    2.) What are the differences between the generation that Troy (in Fences) was living in and the generation that Malia Obama is living in? Explain.
    3.) After reading the articles, what opportunities do you believe you should take as a student to better yourself? Why?
    4.) Does environment play a role in achieving your goals or dreams? Why or why not?
    5.) Do you think we should take advantage of all opportunities that are being offered today? Why or why not?

    4. Discuss/Share:

  • Review the work period questions and answers.

    5. Reflections:

  • What intrigued you about the articles we read today?
  • Why do you believe it's important to read these kinds of news articles?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we compare/contrast Fences to current events? Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)
    Tuesday, May 24th, 2016: 1. Do Now: ESSAY EXAM INSTRUCTION REMINDERS

    2. Work Period: FINISH THE ESSAY EXAM.

    SHOW OWED HW: Literary Element Sentences (2-3 sentences per quote) AND 10 UNDERLINED vocabulary words in your pre-writing steps (that includes literary element sentences, introductory sentences and analytical sentences).

    3. Reflections:

  • How are the pre-writing steps and central idea essay beneficial for the English Regents and college?
  • What do you predict we will do next?
  • What are three activities that you'd like to do in English class for the rest of the school year?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we effectively write a central idea essay? RETURN YOUR COPIES OF FENCES TOMORROW!

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)

    Monday, May 23rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: ESSAY EXAM INSTRUCTIONS

    2. Work Period: ESSAY EXAM

    SHOW HW: Literary Element Sentences (2-3 sentences per quote) AND 10 UNDERLINED vocabulary words in your pre-writing steps (that includes literary element sentences, introductory sentences and analytical sentences).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we effectively write a central idea essay? BE READY FOR TOMORROW, TUESDAY (MAY 24th): FINISH IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON CENTRAL IDEA in FENCES (25% of the 3rd marking period). You will use your notes and book to guide you.

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments!)

    Friday, May 20th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read "How to Have Fun While Writing an Essay".

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:
    1.) Choose ONE literary element/technique that BEST works for your understanding of Fences and for your understanding of your FIVE citations. For that ONE literary element/technique, you MUST write 2-3 sentences for each citation (quote). YOU SHOULD HAVE A TOTAL OF 10-15 SENTENCES FOR THE LITERARY ELEMENT/TECHNIQUE BELOW (SUPPORTING YOUR CITATIONS). SENTENCE STARTER SUGGESTIONS:

  • Troy is characterized as...
  • Troy and Cory are in conflict because...
  • Troy's point of view can be described as...
  • Since the setting takes place in the 1950's, the reader is able to...
  • Symbolism helps the reader understand...

    Here are the literary element/technique suggestions:
    1.) Characterization
    2.) Conflict
    3.) Point of View
    4.) Setting
    5.) Symbolism

    2.) In your writing on the central idea, substitute TEN words with vocabulary words (you can change the tense of the word, if you choose; for example: benevolent can be benevolence) from the SAT VOCABULARY LISTS #1-4.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are the benefits of these pre-writing steps?
  • What were you successful in completing today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we effectively prepare to write a central idea essay? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY (May 23rd):
  • FINISH THE CLASSWORK:
    1.) Choose ONE literary element/technique that BEST works for your understanding of Fences and for your understanding of your FIVE citations. Then, for that ONE literary element/technique, you MUST write 2-3 sentences for each citation (quote). YOU SHOULD HAVE A TOTAL OF 10-15 SENTENCES FOR THE LITERARY ELEMENT/TECHNIQUE BELOW (SUPPORTING YOUR CITATIONS). SENTENCE STARTER SUGGESTIONS:
  • Troy is characterized as...
  • Troy and Cory are in conflict because...
  • Troy's point of view can be described as...
  • Since the setting takes place in the 1950's, the reader is able to...
  • Symbolism helps the reader understand...

    Here are the literary element/technique suggestions:
    1.) Characterization
    2.) Conflict
    3.) Point of View
    4.) Setting
    5.) Symbolism

    2.) In all of your writing on the central idea (introductory, analytical and literary element sentences), substitute TEN words with vocabulary words (you can change the tense of the word, if you choose; for example: benevolent can be benevolence) from the SAT VOCABULARY LISTS #1-4.

    BE READY FOR THIS COMING MONDAY (MAY 23rd) and TUESDAY (MAY 24th): IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON CENTRAL IDEA in FENCES (25% of the 3rd marking period). You will use your notes and book to guide you.

  • Thursday, May 19th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What do you believe are the FOUR categories by which teachers grade essays?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:
    1.) Choose ONE literary element/technique that BEST works for your understanding of Fences and for your understanding of your FIVE citations. For that ONE literary element/technique, you MUST write 2-3 sentences for each citation (quote). YOU SHOULD HAVE A TOTAL OF 10-15 SENTENCES FOR THE LITERARY ELEMENT/TECHNIQUE BELOW (SUPPORTING YOUR CITATIONS). SENTENCE STARTER SUGGESTIONS:

  • Troy is characterized as...
  • Troy and Cory are in conflict because...
  • Troy's point of view can be described as...
  • Since the setting takes place in the 1950's, the reader is able to...
  • Symbolism helps the reader understand...

    Here are the literary element/technique suggestions:
    1.) Characterization
    2.) Conflict
    3.) Point of View
    4.) Setting
    5.) Symbolism

    2.) In your writing on the central idea, substitute TEN words with vocabulary words from the SAT VOCABULARY LISTS #1-4.

    4. Reflections:

  • Did you finish the literary element sentences? If not, what were your challenges?
  • What were you successful in completing today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we effectively prepare to write a central idea essay? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY (MAY 23rd) and TUESDAY (MAY 24th): IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON CENTRAL IDEA in FENCES (25% of the 3rd marking period). You will use your notes and book to guide you.
    Wednesday, May 18th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Compose 1-2 detailed sentences that summarize Fences, by August Wilson. Sentence starters include the following:
  • Fences, by August Wilson, focuses on...
  • August Wilson's Fences is a play about...
  • The Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, August Wilson, wrote Fences, which chronicles...

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Choose ONE literary element/technique that BEST works for your understanding of Fences and for your understanding of your FIVE citations. For that ONE literary element/technique, you MUST write 2-3 sentences for each citation (quote). YOU SHOULD HAVE A TOTAL OF 10-15 SENTENCES FOR THE LITERARY ELEMENT/TECHNIQUE BELOW (SUPPORTING YOUR CITATIONS). Here are the literary element/technique suggestions:
    1.) Characterization
    2.) Conflict
    3.) Point of View
    4.) Setting
    5.) Symbolism

    SHOW HW: FIVE CITATIONS (from Fences) WITH INTRODUCTORY AND ANALYTICAL SENTENCES.

    4. Reflections:

  • Were you able to finish finding the five citations and composing the introductory and analytical sentences?
  • What was challenging in completing the homework? What are you proud of in completing the homework?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we improve our literary skills in identifying central ideas and citing textual evidence in Fences ? THIS COMING MONDAY (MAY 23rd) and TUESDAY (MAY 24th): IN-CLASS ESSAY EXAM ON CENTRAL IDEA in FENCES (25% of the 3rd marking period). You will use your notes and book to guide you.
    Tuesday, May 17th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why is it beneficial (helpful) to identify citations (direct quotes) and compose introductory and analytical sentences BEFORE writing an essay?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • After having chosen your central ideas in Fences (from the Do Now), find FIVE CITATIONS (direct quotes) in the play to support ONE central idea. Here's an example: For the central idea that fences can't offer protection, Troy finds out "Alberta died having the baby" (p. 76).
  • After you found five citations, you should write an introductory sentence for each quote and then an analysis sentence after each quote, and both sentences MUST connect to the central idea. Here's an example: For the central idea that fences can't offer protection, Troy finds out from Rose that his mistress died. Rose told Troy, "Alberta died having the baby" (p. 76). Troy has always thought he could use a fence to protect himself from more pain and suffering, but he realized that he has to deal with these hardships.

    4. Reflections:

  • Were you able to finish finding the five citations and composing the introductory and analytical sentences?
  • Review the Fences Exam.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we improve our literary skills in identifying central ideas and citing textual evidence in Fences ? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 18th:
    FINISH TODAY'S CLASSWORK:
  • Find FIVE CITATIONS (direct quotes) in the play to support ONE central idea. Follow the format of this example: For the central idea that fences can't offer protection, Troy finds out "Alberta died having the baby" (p. 76).
  • After you found five citations, you should write an introductory sentence for each quote and then an analysis sentence after each quote, and both sentences MUST connect to the central idea. Here's an example (DO THIS FOR EACH QUOTE; THAT MEANS YOU'RE FOLLOWING THIS FORMAT FIVE TIMES!): For the central idea that fences can't offer protection, Troy finds out from Rose that his mistress died. Rose told Troy, "Alberta died having the baby" (p. 76). Troy has always thought he could use a fence to protect himself from more pain and suffering, but he realized that he has to deal with these hardships.
  • Monday, May 16th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Make a list of SIX central ideas in Fences. You may want to scan the STUDY GUIDE for FENCES and find repeated words/phrases that could be the CENTRAL (MAIN) IDEAS in the play.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Class will compile the list of six central ideas in Fences.

    3. Work Period:

  • Choose one of the central ideas in Fences (from the Do Now) and find FIVE CITATIONS (direct quotes) in the play to support that central idea. Here's an example: For the central idea that fences can't offer protection, Troy finds out "Alberta died having the baby" (p. 76).
  • After you found five citations, you should write an introductory sentence for each quote and then an analysis sentence after each quote, and both sentences MUST connect to the central idea. Here's an example: For the central idea that fences can't offer protection, Troy finds out from Rose that his mistress died. Rose told Troy, "Alberta died having the baby" (p. 76). Troy has always thought he could use a fence to protect himself from more pain and suffering, but he realized that he has to deal with these hardships.

    4. Reflections:

  • Why was today's work period activity useful in writing a paper on a central idea in Fences?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we improve our literary skills in identifying central ideas and citing textual evidence in Fences ? Make up owed HW!
    Friday, May 13th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's alternative ending. Imagine an alternative ending of Fences. Write a brief paragraph (4-6 sentences) describing this alternative ending.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • For your assigned question (given out in class), find a citation (direct quote). Introduce the quote (WRITE ONE SENTENCE) by answering the question in the STUDY GUIDE IS HERE (focus on Act 2 questions). Then, write ONE ANALYSIS SENTENCE.
  • Scan the STUDY GUIDE for FENCES and find at least THREE repeated words/phrases that could be the CENTRAL (MAIN) IDEAS in the play.

    4. Work Period Sharing:

  • Students will share their work period answers with the class.
  • 5. Reflections:

  • What are August Wilson's life lessons in Fences?
  • What are your final impressions of this play? Would you recommend it to your friends?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we improve our literary skills in identifying and analyzing evidence in Fences ? Make up owed HW!
    Thursday, May 12th, 2016: 1. Do Now: EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice questions; use your own #2 pencil) on ALL OF FENCES!!!

    2. Work Period: Imagine an alternative ending of Fences. Write a brief paragraph (4-6 sentences) describing this alternative ending.

    Show HW: Act II Notes on Troy's Genetics, Environment and Mission.

    3. Discuss/Share: Review the answers to STUDY GUIDE IS HERE (focus on Act 2).

    4. Reflections:

  • What are August Wilson's life lessons in Fences?
  • What are your final impressions of this play? Would you recommend it to your friends?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of Fences on an assessment? Make up owed HW!
    Wednesday, May 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: How does someone's childhood affect their parenting? You can use Troy as an example.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Discuss the Do Now answer.
  • Discuss and take notes on Act I, Scenes 2-4 Questions for Fences:
    1.) What is Rose's view of a fence (p. 21)? What does her view reveal about her?
    2.) What is Troy's view about lottery (p. 22)? What does his view reveal about Troy and his view about money?
    3.) Describe Gabriel (pp. 24-25). How does he act and why? What are his character traits?
    4.) How does Troy feel about what happened to Gabriel (pp. 25-28)?
    5.) What is Troy's reason for not buying a TV (pp. 32-33)?
    6.) What are Troy's and Cory's arguments regarding football and chores (pp. 35-37)?
    7.) What are Troy's views about responsibility (p. 38)?
    8.) How do Troy and Rose differ in their parenting style toward Cory (pp. 39-40)?
    9.) How does Troy talk to Rose and how does she respond (p. 43)? Is there any evidence that neither takes their role completely seriously?
    10.) On p. 44, what has changed at Troy's work? How is he responsible for the change?
    11.) Why does Lyons come to Troy's house and how does Troy respond (p. 46)?
    12.) What kind of language does Gabriel use? In what ways does Gabriel actually make sense (p. 47)?
    13.) Describe Troy's father and the relationship he had with his family (pp. 51-53). What effect did this have on Troy?
    14.) What kind of past does Troy have (pp. 54-55)? In what ways can you justify his previous behavior with Rose and his sons, Cory and Lyons?
    15.) How does the conflict between Troy and Cory intensify at the end of the scene (pp. 57-58)? Who do you agree with and why?

    3. Work Period: Finish reading Fences and work on the HW due tomorrow.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are August Wilson's life lessons in Fences?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we understand Troy's genetics and environmental influences in Act 1, Scenes 2-4 of Fences, by August Wilson? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 12th:
  • Read the rest of Fences: pp. 59-101. Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include page numbers. You can include quotes (no more than 1-2 sentences long). Students should fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES IN THE CHART.
  • EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil) on ALL OF FENCES!!! STUDY GUIDE IS HERE (Act 2 will be posted by 8pm this evening)!!! Review your class notes and questions/answers reviewed in class (and on the website).
  • Tuesday, May 10th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are your opinions about Troy as a parent in Fences? Explain your answer. (Write 2-3 sentences)

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share your Do Now answer with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Act I, Scenes 2-4 Questions for Fences:
    1.) What is Rose's view of a fence (p. 21)? What does her view reveal about her?
    2.) What is Troy's view about lottery (p. 22)? What does his view reveal about Troy and his view about money?
    3.) Describe Gabriel (pp. 24-25). How does he act and why? What are his character traits?
    4.) How does Troy feel about what happened to Gabriel (pp. 25-28)?
    5.) What is Troy's reason for not buying a TV (pp. 32-33)?
    6.) What are Troy's and Cory's arguments regarding football and chores (pp. 35-37)?
    7.) What are Troy's views about responsibility (p. 38)?
    8.) How do Troy and Rose differ in their parenting style toward Cory (pp. 39-40)?
    9.) How does Troy talk to Rose and how does she respond (p. 43)? Is there any evidence that neither takes their role completely seriously?
    10.) On p. 44, what has changed at Troy's work? How is he responsible for the change?
    11.) Why does Lyons come to Troy's house and how does Troy respond (p. 46)?
    12.) What kind of language does Gabriel use? In what ways does Gabriel actually make sense (p. 47)?
    13.) Describe Troy's father and the relationship he had with his family (pp. 51-53). What effect did this have on Troy?
    14.) What kind of past does Troy have (pp. 54-55)? In what ways can you justify his previous behavior with Rose and his sons, Cory and Lyons?
    15.) How does the conflict between Troy and Cory intensify at the end of the scene (pp. 57-58)? Who do you agree with and why?

    SHOW HW: ACT I NOTES (TWO FULL PAGES) on TROY'S ENVIRONMENT, GENETICS AND MISSION.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are August Wilson's life lessons in Fences (based on the first scene of the play)?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we understand Troy's genetics and environmental influences in Act 1, Scenes 2-4 of Fences, by August Wilson? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MAY 12th:
  • Read the rest of Fences: pp. 59-101. Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include page numbers. You can include quotes (no more than 1-2 sentences long). Students should fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES IN THE CHART.
  • EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil) on ALL OF FENCES!!! STUDY GUIDE IS HERE (Act 2 will be posted on Wednesday)!!! Review your class notes and questions/answers reviewed in class (and on the website).
  • Monday, May 9th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe the playwright, August Wilson, titled this play Fences?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share your Do Now answer with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Discuss and Take Notes on Act I, Scene 1 Questions for Fences:
    1.) August Wilson writes that Troy �is fifty-three years old, a large man with thick, heavy hands; it is this largeness that he strives to fill out and make an accommodation with� (p. 1). What do you think that Wilson means by this? Specifically, what does he mean by �accommodation?�
    2. Rose is described as ignoring or forgiving Troy�s faults, though she is only aware of some of them (p. 5). Based on what you�ve read so far, what do you believe some of his faults may be, and why would she ignore them?
    3. Rose and Troy disagree fairly strongly on the subject of where to purchase bread and vegetables (p. 7). What does their disagreement tell you about each of these characters?
    4. Troy�s son, Cory, has been recruited by a college football team, but Troy doesn�t seem particularly excited about it (p. 8). Why do you think that Troy might be hesitant to support Cory�s achievement?
    5. Troy�s oldest son, Lyons, shows up and crashes Bono and Troy�s Friday night ritual (p. 13). Why does Lyons arrive, and what can you infer about his relationship with his father from this exchange?
    6. Bonnie, Lyons� wife, is largely supporting him in his attempts to make a living as a musician, and his father thinks he is lazy (p. 17). Why doesn�t Lyons take a job at the garbage company with his father?
    7. Rose ultimately concedes to Lyons� request for money, lending him ten dollars (p. 19). What does this tell you about her relationship with both Lyons and Troy?
    8. As the play opens we find Bono and Troy discussing Troy�s recent complaint with the garbage collection company. Troy has accused the company of only allowing white men to drive the trucks, while only allowing black men to pick up garbage (pp. 2-3). What do you think this job might be symbolic of? Do you predict that he will be successful in challenging company policy? Why or why not?
    9. Troy says that �Death ain�t nothing. I done seen him. Done wrassled with him. You can�t tell me nothing about death. Death ain�t nothing but a fastball on the outside corner� (p. 10). Based on what you know about Troy (and the rest of this passage), how do you interpret Troy�s view of death (a motif-repeating idea)? Hint: You might have to ask a baseball player... 4. Reflections:

  • What are August Wilson's life lessons in Fences (based on the first scene of the play)?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we understand the significance of figurative language (characterization, symbolism, and motif) in Act 1, Scene 1 of Fences, by August Wilson? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MAY 10th:
  • Read pp. 21-58 (rest of Act 1) in Fences. Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include page numbers. You can include quotes (no more than 1-2 sentences long). Students should fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES IN THE CHART.

    DUE THURSDAY, MAY 12th:

  • Read the rest of Fences: pp. 59-101. Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include page numbers. You can include quotes (no more than 1-2 sentences long). Students should fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES IN THE CHART.
  • EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil) on ALL OF FENCES!!! STUDY GUIDE IS COMING SOON!!! Review your class notes and questions/answers reviewed in class (and on the website).
  • Friday, May 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are your impressions of Fences so far (after having read Act 1, Scene 1)? Why do you believe this is an award-winning play?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share your Do Now answer with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period on Act I, Scene 1 Questions for Fences:
    1.) August Wilson writes that Troy �is fifty-three years old, a large man with thick, heavy hands; it is this largeness that he strives to fill out and make an accommodation with� (p. 1). What do you think that Wilson means by this? Specifically, what does he mean by �accommodation?�
    2. Rose is described as ignoring or forgiving Troy�s faults, though she is only aware of some of them (p. 5). Based on what you�ve read so far, what do you believe some of his faults may be, and why would she ignore them?
    3. Rose and Troy disagree fairly strongly on the subject of where to purchase bread and vegetables (p. 7). What does their disagreement tell you about each of these characters?
    4. Troy�s son, Cory, has been recruited by a college football team, but Troy doesn�t seem particularly excited about it (p. 8). Why do you think that Troy might be hesitant to support Cory�s achievement?
    5. Troy�s oldest son, Lyons, shows up and crashes Bono and Troy�s Friday night ritual (p. 13). Why does Lyons arrive, and what can you infer about his relationship with his father from this exchange?
    6. Bonnie, Lyons� wife, is largely supporting him in his attempts to make a living as a musician, and his father thinks he is lazy (p. 17). Why doesn�t Lyons take a job at the garbage company with his father?
    7. Rose ultimately concedes to Lyons� request for money, lending him ten dollars (p. 19). What does this tell you about her relationship with both Lyons and Troy?
    8. As the play opens we find Bono and Troy discussing Troy�s recent complaint with the garbage collection company. Troy has accused the company of only allowing white men to drive the trucks, while only allowing black men pick up garbage (pp. 2-3). What do you think this job might be symbolic of? Do you predict that he will be successful in challenging company policy? Why or why not?
    9. Troy says that �Death ain�t nothing. I done seen him. Done wrassled with him. You can�t tell me nothing about death. Death ain�t nothing but a fastball on the outside corner� (p. 10). Based on what you know about Troy (and the rest of this passage), how do you interpret Troy�s view of death (a motif-repeating idea)? Hint: You might have to ask a baseball player...

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Share answers and take notes on the Work Period questions.

    5. Reflections:

  • What predictions can you make about the rest of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we understand the significance of figurative language (characterization, symbolism, and motif) in Act 1, Scene 1 of Fences, by August Wilson? DUE THIS COMING TUESDAY, MAY 10th:
  • Read pp. 21-58 (rest of Act 1) in Fences. Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include page numbers. You can include quotes (no more than 1-2 sentences long). Students should fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES IN THE CHART.

    DUE THURSDAY, MAY 12th:

  • Read the rest of Fences: pp. 59-101. Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include page numbers. You can include quotes (no more than 1-2 sentences long). Students should fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES IN THE CHART.
  • EXAM (25% of the 3rd marking period; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil) on ALL OF FENCES!!! STUDY GUIDE IS COMING SOON!!! Review your class notes and questions/answers reviewed in class (and on the website).
  • Thursday, May 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Compare and contrast your genetics and environment to Troy's genetics and environment in Fences. Identify at least TWO similarities and TWO differences.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share your Do Now answer with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud of Fences:

  • Finish reading pp. 6-20 aloud (Act 1, Scene 1). Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. Students should fill in NOTES IN THE CHART.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your first impressions of Act 1, Scene 1 in Fences?
  • What predictions can you make about the rest of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RL.11-12.5: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • How can we identify evidence of Troy's genetics, environment and life's mission in Act 1, Scene 1 of Fences, by August Wilson? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Wednesday, May 4th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read the Biography of August Wilson (the author of Fences). What intrigues (interests) you, stands out, or impresses you about his life?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share your Do Now answer with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud of Fences:

  • Read pp. 6-20 aloud (Act 1, Scene 1). Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. Students should fill TWO FULL PAGES OF NOTES IN THE CHART.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your first impressions of Act 1, Scene 1 in Fences?
  • What predictions can you make about the rest of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • How can we identify evidence of Troy's genetics, environment and life's mission in Act 1, Scene 1 of Fences, by August Wilson? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: What is one important, historical, American event in 1957? You may use an electronic device to research your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Share your Do Now answer with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read stage directions in Act 1, Scene 1 of Fences. Focus Question: How do genetics and environment influence the protagonist's mission?
  • Make a 3-column chart with TROY'S GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT, and MISSION. Include direct quotes for genetics and environment. Make inferences (educated assumptions or predictions) about Troy's mission.

    4. Discuss/Share #2:

  • Share Work Period answers. Take additional notes.
  • Read pp. 1-10 aloud (Bono, Troy, and Rose). Take notes on GENETICS, ENVIRONMENT and MISSION in a 3-column chart in the LA section of your notebook. Students should fill ONE FULL PAGE OF NOTES IN THE CHART.

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your first impressions of Fences?
  • What predictions can you make about the rest of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • How can we identify evidence of Troy's genetics, environment and life's mission in the first ten pages of Fences, by August Wilson? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Monday, May 2nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: In our new play, Fences, the protagonist Tory is considered Shakespearean. What do you think is a Shakespearean character? Use your knowledge of Hamlet.

    Turn in HW: ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY (4-5 paragraphs; introduction and conclusion paragraphs are 4-6 sentences each, body paragraphs are 10-12 sentences): Write a source-based argument on the following topic question: SHOULD HAMLET BE REQUIRED READING IN HIGH SCHOOL? Using evidence from both HAMLET AND the article, "9 Things You Can Learn from Hamlet", write a well-developed argumentative essay. Clearly establish your claim, distinguish your claim from alternate or opposing claims, and use specific, relevant, and sufficient evidence from both of the texts to develop your argument. Do NOT summarize the texts.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, write FENCES PREDICTIONS at the top of a Cornell Notes page. What can you predict about this play's plot? Refer to the title, the newspapers' reviews and the synopsis on the back of the book. What can you predict about the protagonist Troy's genetics and environment? What can you predict about Troy's mission in life?

    4. Discuss/Share #2 and Note-Taking:

  • Students share their FENCES PREDICTIONS in the Work Period. Note-taking additions can be made.
  • Read stage directions in Act 1, Scene 1 of Fences. Focus Question: How do genetics and environment influence the protagonist's mission? Begin to answer the question, using evidence from the stage directions.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • How can we effectively prepare to focus on genetics and environment influencing a character's mission in Fences, by August Wilson? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK:
  • See previous days' assignments.
  • Friday, April 22nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: SCENE PERFORMANCES: The remaining groups will present their scenes from Hamlet, and they will be individually graded by the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    2. Shakespeare Trivia Game: Student groups will use the whiteboard and hold up their answers to earn snacks in HONOR OF SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHDAY (4/23)!!!

    3. Introduce HW.

    4. Reflections: What were successful elements of the scene performances? If each group had more time to work on their scenes, what could they improve?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we effectively present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE MONDAY, MAY 2nd:
    READ "9 Things You Can Learn from Hamlet", an article from Huffington Post.
  • ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY (4-5 paragraphs; introduction and conclusion paragraphs are 4-6 sentences each, body paragraphs are 10-12 sentences): Write a source-based argument on the following topic question: SHOULD HAMLET BE REQUIRED READING IN HIGH SCHOOL? Using evidence from both HAMLET AND the article, "9 Things You Can Learn from Hamlet", write a well-developed argumentative essay. Clearly establish your claim, distinguish your claim from alternate or opposing claims, and use specific, relevant, and sufficient evidence from both of the texts to develop your argument. Do NOT summarize the texts.

    ESSAY GUIDELINES:

  • Establish your claim regarding: "should Hamlet be required reading in high school?"
  • Distinguish your claim from alternate or opposing claims.
  • Use specific, relevant, and sufficient evidence from BOTH texts to develop your argument.
  • Identify each source that you reference by text name (play or article).
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words, such as: for example, in addition, next, consequently, to conclude, however, therefore, furthermore, etc.).
  • Maintain a formal style of writing (use sophisticated language: SAT VOCABULARY).
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English (check for errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization and sentence structure).
  • Thursday, April 21st, 2016: 1. Do Now:
  • PREPARE YOUR SCENE: Arrange with your partner/group and listen to teacher's instructions for performance day.

    2. SCENE PERFORMANCES: Each group will prepare their scenes from Hamlet, and all students will be individually graded by the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    Here are the scenes:

    HAMLET SCENES:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    3. Introduce HW.

    4. Reflections: What were successful elements of the scene performances? If each group had more time to work on their scenes, what could they improve?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we effectively present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE MONDAY, MAY 2nd:
    READ "9 Things You Can Learn from Hamlet", an article from Huffington Post.
  • ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY (4-5 paragraphs; introduction and conclusion paragraphs are 4-6 sentences each, body paragraphs are 10-12 sentences): Write a source-based argument on the following topic question: SHOULD HAMLET BE REQUIRED READING IN HIGH SCHOOL? Using evidence from both HAMLET AND the article, "9 Things You Can Learn from Hamlet", write a well-developed argumentative essay. Clearly establish your claim, distinguish your claim from alternate or opposing claims, and use specific, relevant, and sufficient evidence from both of the texts to develop your argument. Do NOT summarize the texts.

    ESSAY GUIDELINES:

  • Establish your claim regarding: "should Hamlet be required reading in high school?"
  • Distinguish your claim from alternate or opposing claims.
  • Use specific, relevant, and sufficient evidence from BOTH texts to develop your argument.
  • Identify each source that you reference by text name (play or article).
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner (use transition words, such as: for example, in addition, next, consequently, to conclude, however, therefore, furthermore, etc.).
  • Maintain a formal style of writing (use sophisticated language: SAT VOCABULARY).
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English (check for errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization and sentence structure).
  • Wednesday, April 20th, 2016: 1. Do Now:
  • PRACTICE YOUR SCENE: Read aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene with your partner/group. Apply elements of the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    SHOW HOMEWORK (analysis paragraph for midterm exam) and TURN IN EXTRA CREDIT HW..

    Here are the scenes:

    HAMLET SCENES:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    2. Scene Excerpt Presentations: Groups will present one-minute excerpts of their scenes. Students in the audience will offer warm and cool feedback, which include answers to the following questions:

  • Did the performance reveal actors' understanding of their scene? Refer to actors' emotions, body language, and physical interactions.
  • Did the performance reveal actors' practice of their scene? Refer to learned lines, pronunciation, and volume.

    3. Scene Practice: Arrange in your groups to practice and improve scene performances for tomorrow: grading day!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we prepare to present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, APRIL 21st:
    HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCES: Students will present one of the following scenes:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.
    Tuesday, April 19th, 2016: WORK PERIOD:
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (up to 10 extra credit points on your lowest test grade): Write a DIARY ENTRY for YOUR CHARACTER (the character you're portraying in your scene from Hamlet. Be specific (focus on your scene only!) about your character's thoughts, feelings, actions, speech, opinions about other characters, past experiences and plans for the future. Write two, handwritten pages (one page that's front and back, single-spaced) OR one, typed page (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman). You can include TWO quotes (only two sentences) from your scene.


  • PRACTICE YOUR SCENE: Read aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene with your partner/group. (TAKE A PICTURE OF YOUR SCENE SO THAT YOU CAN PRACTICE AT HOME!) Apply elements of the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Here are the scenes:

    HAMLET SCENES:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we prepare to present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20th:
  • WRITE AN ANALYSIS PARAGRAPH (8-10 sentences) OF YOUR MIDTERM EXAM. Explain WHY you earned the grade you did, based on the rubric. Provide evidence WHY you lost and earned points in each category. You are doing a SELF-ASSESSMENT. Answer the following questions in your analysis paragraph, using evidence and elaboration:
  • Content and Analysis: Did you explain why you included specific evidence from the texts to support your claim? Did you include a counterclaim and explain how it's different from your claim?
  • Command of Evidence: Did you include abundant evidence from both texts? Did you cite your evidence clearly? Did your evidence support your claim?
  • Coherence, Organization and Style: Did every paragraph connect and did you include transition words/phrases to connect the paragraphs? Did every sentence within paragraphs connect and support your claim? Did you use sophisticated language?
  • Control of Conventions: Did you include proper grammar (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage)?


  • BE READY TO PRESENT ONE MINUTE OF YOUR HAMLET SCENE TO THE CLASS (Know your lines! Show emotion! Show body language, physical interactions, and facial expressions!). We will be helping you improve your scene, giving you warm and cool feedback.
  • TURN IN YOUR EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: (up to 10 extra credit points on your lowest test grade): Write a DIARY ENTRY for YOUR CHARACTER (the character you're portraying in your scene from Hamlet. Be specific (focus on your scene only!) about your character's thoughts, feelings, actions, speech, opinions about other characters, past experiences and plans for the future. Write two, handwritten pages (one page that's front and back, single-spaced) OR one, typed page (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman). You can include TWO quotes (only two sentences) from your scene.

    DUE THIS COMING THURSDAY, APRIL 21st:
    HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCES: Students will present one of the following scenes:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

  • Monday, April 18th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Review your Midterm Exam Rubric Categories:
  • Content and Analysis: Did you explain why you included specific evidence from the texts to support your claim? Did you include a counterclaim and explain how it's different from your claim?
  • Command of Evidence: Did you include abundant evidence from both texts? Did you cite your evidence clearly? Did your evidence support your claim?
  • Coherence, Organization and Style: Did every paragraph connect and did you include transition words/phrases to connect the paragraphs? Did every sentence within paragraphs connect and support your claim? Did you use sophisticated language?
  • Control of Conventions: Did you include proper grammar (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share with the class.

    3. WORK PERIOD: Read aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene with your partner/group. (TAKE A PICTURE OF YOUR SCENE SO THAT YOU CAN PRACTICE AT HOME!) Apply elements of the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Here are the scenes:

    HAMLET SCENES:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of your chosen scene from the play, Hamlet?
  • How can you improve your scene performance?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we prepare to present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE THIS COMING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20th:
  • WRITE AN ANALYSIS PARAGRAPH (8-10 sentences) OF YOUR MIDTERM EXAM. Explain WHY you earned the grade you did, based on the rubric. Provide evidence WHY you lost and earned points in each category. You are doing a SELF-ASSESSMENT. Answer the following questions in your analysis paragraph, using evidence and elaboration:
  • Content and Analysis: Did you explain why you included specific evidence from the texts to support your claim? Did you include a counterclaim and explain how it's different from your claim?
  • Command of Evidence: Did you include abundant evidence from both texts? Did you cite your evidence clearly? Did your evidence support your claim?
  • Coherence, Organization and Style: Did every paragraph connect and did you include transition words/phrases to connect the paragraphs? Did every sentence within paragraphs connect and support your claim? Did you use sophisticated language?
  • Control of Conventions: Did you include proper grammar (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage)?

    DUE THIS COMING THURSDAY, APRIL 21st:
    HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCES: Students will present one of the following scenes:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

  • Friday, April 15th, 2016: 1. Do Now: View the actors' performances of scenes from Hamlet. What are the actor's strengths? What can you learn and apply to your own performance?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your group/partner. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. WORK PERIOD: Read aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene with your partner/group. (TAKE A PICTURE OF YOUR SCENE SO THAT YOU CAN PRACTICE AT HOME!) Apply elements of the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Here are the scenes:

    HAMLET SCENES:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of your chosen scene from the play, Hamlet?
  • How can you improve your scene performance?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we prepare to present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, APRIL 21st:
    HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCES: Students will present one of the following scenes:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.
    Thursday, April 14th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Arrange in your scene groups/partners.
  • What's your chosen, modern-day interpretation of your scene from Hamlet? Suggestions include the following: mafia, businessmen/women, gangsters, hipsters, nerds, little kids, older people, athletes, beach bums, etc.
  • Why is this modern-day interpretation relevant to your scene (consider the following: the characters' interactions and development throughout your scene; insights into your understanding of human behavior, as revealed in your scene)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your group/partner. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Reminders for Application of the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    4. WORK PERIOD: Read aloud (on your feet!) your chosen scene with your partner/group. Apply elements of the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Here are the scenes:

    HAMLET SCENES:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of your chosen scene from the play, Hamlet?
  • How can you improve your scene performance?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we prepare to present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, APRIL 21st:
    HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCES: Students will present one of the following scenes:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.
    Wednesday, April 13th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Write a brief synopsis (summary of 3-4 sentences) of your chosen scene from Hamlet. Include main ideas, characters, major events and conflicts. (Show for classwork credit)

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Introduce the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    4. WORK PERIOD: Read aloud your chosen scene with your partner/group. Determine your director's vision (modern-day interpretation) and apply elements of the Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes. Here are the scenes:

    HAMLET SCENES:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of your chosen scene from the play, Hamlet?
  • How can you modernize your scene performance?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
  • SL.11-12.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • How can we prepare to present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, APRIL 21st:
    HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCES: Students will present one of the following scenes:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.
    Tuesday, April 12th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Which character would you prefer to perform and why? Choose from the following: Hamlet, King Hamlet's Ghost, Polonius, Ophelia, King Claudius, Gertrude, and Laertes.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Acting Exercise presentations of Tableaus (with a partner; use different levels; present to class)

    4. WORK PERIOD: Read aloud your chosen scene with your partner/group. Write a brief synopsis (summary of 3-4 sentences) of your chosen scene from Hamlet. Include main ideas, characters, major events and conflicts. Here are the scene choices:

    HAMLET SCENES:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of your chosen scene from the play, Hamlet?
  • How can you modernize your scene performance?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we prepare to present scenes from the play, Hamlet? DUE NEXT THURSDAY, APRIL 21st:
    HAMLET SCENE PERFORMANCES: Students will present one of the following scenes:
    1.) Act I, Scene V (2 characters: Hamlet and the Ghost--stop when Horatio and Marcellus enter)
    2.) Act II, Scene II (2 characters: Hamlet and Polonius--stop when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern enter)
    3.) Act III, Scene I (2 characters: Hamlet and Ophelia--begin with Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy" and end when Claudius enters)
    4.) Act V, Scene II (4 characters: Claudius, Hamlet, Gertrude and Laertes; begin when Claudius enters and says "come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me" and end when Hamlet says "Heaven make thee free of it. I follow thee--I am dead, Horatio.")
    ***Student performers should stage the scenes, using props, stage directions, physical and emotional choices to enhance the performances, clear spatial relationships (actors close together or far apart), different levels (ground, middle, air), a director's theme/vision (Examples: Angels and Devils, Superheroes and Villains, Vampires, Jersey Shore, etc.), a clear scene location, lighting and/or sound. YOU WILL BE GRADED WITH YOUR PARTNER/GROUP (QUIZ GRADE: about 10% of the 3rd marking period) ON THE FOLLOWING: Grading Sheet for Hamlet Scenes.
    Monday, April 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: The resolution of the play, Hamlet, involves multiple deaths, which include the following characters: Gertrude, Laertes, Claudius, and Hamlet. Why does Shakespeare kill off all of these characters? Explain the significance of each person's death.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Act V Discussion and Note-Taking: Take notes on the quote interpretations from Act V (below):

    Act V:

    1.) Laertes says to Hamlet: �The devil take thy soul!� (V, I, 239).
    2.) Claudius says: (To Laertes) "Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech. We'll put the matter to the present push. Good Gertrude, set some watch over your son. This grave shall have a living monument" (V, I, 277-279).
    3.) Hamlet tells Laertes: "What I have done, that might your nature, honor, and exception roughly awake, I here proclaim was madness. Was it Hamlet wronged Laertes? Never Hamlet...his madness is poor Hamlet's enemy" (V, II, 200-209).
    4.) Gertrude says: "No, no, the drink, the drink! O my dear Hamlet! The drink, the drink! I am poisoned" (V, II, 286-287).
    5.) Hamlet (to Claudius) says: "Here, thou incestuous, damned Dane. Drink of this potion. Is the union here? Follow my mother" (V, II, 301-303).
    6.) Hamlet tells Horatio: "Horatio, I am dead. Thou livest. Report me and my cause aright to the unsatisfied" (V, II, 314-316).
    7.) Fortinbras says: "Bear Hamlet like a soldier to the stage, for he was likely, had he been put on, to have proved most royal..." (V, II, 373-375).

    4. Acting Exercises: Choose a partner. Begin tableaus--Statues (acting exercise to show relationships: Hamlet and Gertrude and Hamlet and Laertes). Statues will include archetypes in literature (pretty princess, greedy elf, opera diva, valiant knight) and characters as animals in Hamlet. Tableaus (statues) for some of the following emotions and situations--anger, lonely, brave, jealous, loyal, two-faced, crazy, in love, drunk, revenge, forgiveness, king/queen, ghost, monster, you forgot your homework, and you just won the lottery. Tableaus will include one person, two persons, and three persons. Use all muscles of your body and different levels (low, center, and high). Take up as much or as little space as possible.

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the resolution of the play, Hamlet?
  • What would be an alternative ending of the play?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we analyze essential quotes from Act V and understand the significance of the resolution of the play, Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK! ALL HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY TOMORROW, TUESDAY, APRIL 12th (the 2nd marking period grade book will be closed at the end of the school day TOMORROW!): See previous days' assignments!
    Friday, April 8th, 2016: 1. Do Now: The climax of the play, Hamlet, is when Hamlet accidentally kills Polonius. Why doesn't Hamlet feel remorse (regret) for this murder?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Acts IV and V Discussion and Note-Taking: Take notes on the quote interpretations from Act IV or Act V (below):
    Act IV:
    1.) Gertrude says: �Mad as the sea and wind when both contend which is the mightier. In his lawless fit, behind the arras hearing something stir, whips out his rapier, cries, "A rat, a rat!" And in this brainish apprehension kills the unseen man� (IV, I, 7-12).
    2.) Claudius says: "But we will ship him hence...Hamlet in madness hath Polonius slain, and from his mother's closet hath he dragged him" (IV, I, 30-35).
    3.) Hamlet says: "The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body. The King is a thing--" (IV, II, 23-24).
    4.) Hamlet says: �Not where he eats, but where �a is eaten. A certain convocation of politic worms are e�en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet� (IV, III, 19-22).
    5.) Claudius says (in a soliloquy): "By letters conjuring to that effect, the present death of Hamlet. Do it, England, for like the hectic in my blood he rages, and thou must cure me" (IV, III, 60-64).
    6.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): "How all occasions do inform against me and spur my dull revenge. What is a man if his chief good and market of his time be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more" (IV, IV, 29-32).
    7.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): "Oh, from this time forth, my thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth" (IV, IV, 62-63).
    8.) Gentleman says: "She speaks much of her father, says she hears there's tricks in the world, and hems, and beats her heart, spurns enviously at straws, speaks things in doubt that carry but half sense" (IV, V, 3-7).
    9.) Claudius says: "Poor Ophelia divided from herself and fair judgment, without the which we are pictures, or mere beasts..."(IV, V, 83-85).
    10.) Claudius tells Laertes: "Requite him for your father" (IV, VII, 137).

    Act V:

    1.) Laertes says to Hamlet: �The devil take thy soul!� (V, I, 239).
    2.) Claudius says: (To Laertes) "Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech. We'll put the matter to the present push. Good Gertrude, set some watch over your son. This grave shall have a living monument" (V, I, 277-279).
    3.) Hamlet tells Laertes: "What I have done, that might your nature, honor, and exception roughly awake, I here proclaim was madness. Was it Hamlet wronged Laertes? Never Hamlet...his madness is poor Hamlet's enemy" (V, II, 200-209).
    4.) Gertrude says: "No, no, the drink, the drink! O my dear Hamlet! The drink, the drink! I am poisoned" (V, II, 286-287).
    5.) Hamlet (to Claudius) says: "Here, thou incestuous, damned Dane. Drink of this potion. Is the union here? Follow my mother" (V, II, 301-303).
    6.) Hamlet tells Horatio: "Horatio, I am dead. Thou livest. Report me and my cause aright to the unsatisfied" (V, II, 314-316).
    7.) Fortinbras says: "Bear Hamlet like a soldier to the stage, for he was likely, had he been put on, to have proved most royal..." (V, II, 373-375).

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the climax, falling action and resolution of the play, Hamlet?
  • Why do you think Shakespeare ended his play killing off so many characters?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we analyze significant quotes from Acts IV and V and understand the popularity of the play, Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK! ALL HOMEWORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY TUESDAY, APRIL 12th (the 2nd marking period grade book will be closed on Tuesday!): See previous days' assignments!
    Thursday, April 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Interpret your assigned quote from Act IV or Act V (below):
    Act IV:
    1.) Gertrude says: �Mad as the sea and wind when both contend which is the mightier. In his lawless fit, behind the arras hearing something stir, whips out his rapier, cries, "A rat, a rat!" And in this brainish apprehension kills the unseen man� (IV, I, 7-12).
    2.) Claudius says: "But we will ship him hence...Hamlet in madness hath Polonius slain, and from his mother's closet hath he dragged him" (IV, I, 30-35).
    3.) Hamlet says: "The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body. The King is a thing--" (IV, II, 23-24).
    4.) Hamlet says: �Not where he eats, but where �a is eaten. A certain convocation of politic worms are e�en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet� (IV, III, 19-22).
    5.) Claudius says (in a soliloquy): "By letters conjuring to that effect, the present death of Hamlet. Do it, England, for like the hectic in my blood he rages, and thou must cure me" (IV, III, 60-64).
    6.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): "How all occasions do inform against me and spur my dull revenge. What is a man if his chief good and market of his time be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more" (IV, IV, 29-32).
    7.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): "Oh, from this time forth, my thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth" (IV, IV, 62-63).
    8.) Gentleman says: "She speaks much of her father, says she hears there's tricks in the world, and hems, and beats her heart, spurns enviously at straws, speaks things in doubt that carry but half sense" (IV, V, 3-7).
    9.) Claudius says: "Poor Ophelia divided from herself and fair judgment, without the which we are pictures, or mere beasts..."(IV, V, 83-85).
    10.) Claudius tells Laertes: "Requite him for your father" (IV, VII, 137).

    Act V:

    1.) Laertes says to Hamlet: �The devil take thy soul!� (V, I, 239).
    2.) Claudius says: (To Laertes) "Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech. We'll put the matter to the present push. Good Gertrude, set some watch over your son. This grave shall have a living monument" (V, I, 277-279).
    3.) Hamlet tells Laertes: "What I have done, that might your nature, honor, and exception roughly awake, I here proclaim was madness. Was it Hamlet wronged Laertes? Never Hamlet...his madness is poor Hamlet's enemy" (V, II, 200-209).
    4.) Gertrude says: "No, no, the drink, the drink! O my dear Hamlet! The drink, the drink! I am poisoned" (V, II, 286-287).
    5.) Hamlet (to Claudius) says: "Here, thou incestuous, damned Dane. Drink of this potion. Is the union here? Follow my mother" (V, II, 301-303).
    6.) Hamlet tells Horatio: "Horatio, I am dead. Thou livest. Report me and my cause aright to the unsatisfied" (V, II, 314-316).
    7.) Fortinbras says: "Bear Hamlet like a soldier to the stage, for he was likely, had he been put on, to have proved most royal..." (V, II, 373-375).

    2. Presentations and Note-Taking of Hamlet Quotes: Students will share and take notes on their interpretations of quotes in Acts III.

    Act III:
    1.) Gertrude says, "And for your part, Ophelia, I do wish that your good beauties be the happy cause of Hamlet's wildness" (III, I, 38-40).
    2.)Claudius says, "How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience! The harlot's cheek, beauties with plastering art, is not more ugly to the thing that helps it than is my deed..." (III, I, 48-53).
    3.) Hamlet's "To be or not to be" soliloquy (III, I, 55-87)
    4.) Hamlet tells Ophelia: �Get thee to a nunnery� (III, I, 120), �Go thy ways to a nunnery� (III, I, 128-129), �Get thee to a nunnery� (III, I, 136), �To a nunnery go, and quickly too� (III, I, 139), and �To a nunnery, go� (III, I, 148).
    5.) Ophelia speaks about Hamlet in her soliloquy: �Oh, what a noble mind is here o�erthrown!� (III, I, 148).
    6.) Polonius says about Hamlet: "The origin and commencement of his grief sprung from neglected love" (III, I, 176-177).
    7.) Claudius says about Hamlet: "It shall be so. Madness in great ones must not unwatched go" (III, I, 187-188).
    8.) Hamlet says to Horatio: "There is a play tonight before the king; one scene of it comes near the circumstance which I have told thee of my father's death...observe my uncle" (III, II, 71-76).
    9.) Claudius, after having watched Hamlet's play, says: "Give me some light, away" (III, II, 253).
    10.) Hamlet speaks about his mother (in a soliloquy): �I will speak daggers to her but use none� (III, II, 374).
    11.) Claudius says (in a soliloquy): �Oh my offence is rank�a brother�s murder�my stronger guilt�what if this cursed hand were thicker than itself with brother�s blood�O wretched state! O bosom black as death�� (III, III, 36-72).
    12.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): �Now might I do it, but now he is a-praying. And now I�ll do �t, and so �a goes to Heaven, and so am I revenged�� (III, III, 73-96).
    13.) Hamlet says to his mother: "A bloody deed? Almost as bad, good mother, as kill a king and marry with his brother� (III, IV, 24-28).
    14.) Hamlet tells his mother: �Nay, but to live in the rank sweat of an enseamed bed, stewed in corruption, honeying and making love over the nasty sty�� (III, IV, 92-95).
    15.) Gertrude tells Hamlet: "Alas, how is it with you that you do bend your eye on vacancy and with the incorporal air do hold discourse?" (III, IV, 117-119).
    16.) Hamlet tells his mother: �My pulse as yours doth temperately keep time and makes as healthful music. It is not madness that I have uttered�madness�madness�(III, IV, 140-146).
    17.) Hamlet tells his mother: �Good night�but go not to my uncle�s bed, assume a virtue if you have it not�refrain tonight, and that shall lend a kind of easiness to the next abstinence, the next more easy� (III, IV, 159-167).

    3. Discuss/Share: Share your interpretations (and take notes) of your assigned quotes from Act IV and Act V (see the Do Now).

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the climax, falling action and resolution of the play, Hamlet?
  • Why do you think Shakespeare ended his play killing off so many characters?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we analyze significant quotes from Acts III, IV and V and understand the popularity of the play, Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!: See previous days' assignments!
    Wednesday, April 6th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe the "To Be or Not To Be" Soliloquy from Hamlet is SO POPULAR?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Presentations and Note-Taking of Hamlet Quotes: Students will share and take notes on their interpretations of quotes in Act III.

    Act III:
    1.) Gertrude says, "And for your part, Ophelia, I do wish that your good beauties be the happy cause of Hamlet's wildness" (III, I, 38-40).
    2.)Claudius says, "How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience! The harlot's cheek, beauties with plastering art, is not more ugly to the thing that helps it than is my deed..." (III, I, 48-53).
    3.) Hamlet's "To be or not to be" soliloquy (III, I, 55-87)
    4.) Hamlet tells Ophelia: �Get thee to a nunnery� (III, I, 120), �Go thy ways to a nunnery� (III, I, 128-129), �Get thee to a nunnery� (III, I, 136), �To a nunnery go, and quickly too� (III, I, 139), and �To a nunnery, go� (III, I, 148).
    5.) Ophelia speaks about Hamlet in her soliloquy: �Oh, what a noble mind is here o�erthrown!� (III, I, 148).
    6.) Polonius says about Hamlet: "The origin and commencement of his grief sprung from neglected love" (III, I, 176-177).
    7.) Claudius says about Hamlet: "It shall be so. Madness in great ones must not unwatched go" (III, I, 187-188).
    8.) Hamlet says to Horatio: "There is a play tonight before the king; one scene of it comes near the circumstance which I have told thee of my father's death...observe my uncle" (III, II, 71-76).
    9.) Claudius, after having watched Hamlet's play, says: "Give me some light, away" (III, II, 253).
    10.) Hamlet speaks about his mother (in a soliloquy): �I will speak daggers to her but use none� (III, II, 374).
    11.) Claudius says (in a soliloquy): �Oh my offence is rank�a brother�s murder�my stronger guilt�what if this cursed hand were thicker than itself with brother�s blood�O wretched state! O bosom black as death�� (III, III, 36-72).
    12.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): �Now might I do it, but now he is a-praying. And now I�ll do �t, and so �a goes to Heaven, and so am I revenged�� (III, III, 73-96).
    13.) Hamlet says to his mother: "A bloody deed? Almost as bad, good mother, as kill a king and marry with his brother� (III, IV, 24-28).
    14.) Hamlet tells his mother: �Nay, but to live in the rank sweat of an enseamed bed, stewed in corruption, honeying and making love over the nasty sty�� (III, IV, 92-95).
    15.) Gertrude tells Hamlet: "Alas, how is it with you that you do bend your eye on vacancy and with the incorporal air do hold discourse?" (III, IV, 117-119).
    16.) Hamlet tells his mother: �My pulse as yours doth temperately keep time and makes as healthful music. It is not madness that I have uttered�madness�madness�(III, IV, 140-146).
    17.) Hamlet tells his mother: �Good night�but go not to my uncle�s bed, assume a virtue if you have it not�refrain tonight, and that shall lend a kind of easiness to the next abstinence, the next more easy� (III, IV, 159-167).

    4. Work Period: Interpret your assigned quote from Act IV or Act V (see below).

    Act IV:
    1.) Gertrude says: �Mad as the sea and wind when both contend which is the mightier. In his lawless fit, behind the arras hearing something stir, whips out his rapier, cries, "A rat, a rat!" And in this brainish apprehension kills the unseen man� (IV, I, 7-12).
    2.) Claudius says: "But we will ship him hence...Hamlet in madness hath Polonius slain, and from his mother's closet hath he dragged him" (IV, I, 30-35).
    3.) Hamlet says: "The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body. The King is a thing--" (IV, II, 23-24).
    4.) Hamlet says: �Not where he eats, but where �a is eaten. A certain convocation of politic worms are e�en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet� (IV, III, 19-22).
    5.) Claudius says (in a soliloquy): "By letters conjuring to that effect, the present death of Hamlet. Do it, England, for like the hectic in my blood he rages, and thou must cure me" (IV, III, 60-64).
    6.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): "How all occasions do inform against me and spur my dull revenge. What is a man if his chief good and market of his time be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more" (IV, IV, 29-32).
    7.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): "Oh, from this time forth, my thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth" (IV, IV, 62-63).
    8.) Gentleman says: "She speaks much of her father, says she hears there's tricks in the world, and hems, and beats her heart, spurns enviously at straws, speaks things in doubt that carry but half sense" (IV, V, 3-7).
    9.) Claudius says: "Poor Ophelia divided from herself and fair judgment, without the which we are pictures, or mere beasts..."(IV, V, 83-85).
    10.) Claudius tells Laertes: "Requite him for your father" (IV, VII, 137).

    Act V:

    1.) Laertes says to Hamlet: �The devil take thy soul!� (V, I, 239).
    2.) Claudius says: (To Laertes) "Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech. We'll put the matter to the present push. Good Gertrude, set some watch over your son. This grave shall have a living monument" (V, I, 277-279).
    3.) Hamlet tells Laertes: "What I have done, that might your nature, honor, and exception roughly awake, I here proclaim was madness. Was it Hamlet wronged Laertes? Never Hamlet...his madness is poor Hamlet's enemy" (V, II, 200-209).
    4.) Gertrude says: "No, no, the drink, the drink! O my dear Hamlet! The drink, the drink! I am poisoned" (V, II, 286-287).
    5.) Hamlet (to Claudius) says: "Here, thou incestuous, damned Dane. Drink of this potion. Is the union here? Follow my mother" (V, II, 301-303).
    6.) Hamlet tells Horatio: "Horatio, I am dead. Thou livest. Report me and my cause aright to the unsatisfied" (V, II, 314-316).
    7.) Fortinbras says: "Bear Hamlet like a soldier to the stage, for he was likely, had he been put on, to have proved most royal..." (V, II, 373-375).

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the play, Hamlet?
  • Why do you believe Hamlet is Shakespeare's most popular play?
  • Why do you think Prince Hamlet is used as a case study in many college psychology classes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we analyze significant quotes from Acts III, IV and V and understand the popularity of the play, Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!: See previous days' assignments!
    Tuesday, April 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Why do you believe Hamlet is Shakespeare's MOST popular play?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Answer your assigned Hamlet Question (from the list of questions below).

    4. Presentations of Hamlet Questions: Students will present their questions and answers for Acts II, III, IV and V.

    Act II, Scene 2:
    9.) When Polonius asks Hamlet what he�s reading, Hamlet says, �Words, words, words� (II, II, 188). Interpret in your own words.
    10.) Polonius says, �Though this be madness, yet there is method in�t� (II, II, 201-202). Interpret in your own words.
    11.) Hamlet says, �The play�s the thing wherein I�ll catch the conscience of the King� (II, II, 530-531). Interpret in your own words.

    Act III:
    1.) Gertrude says, "And for your part, Ophelia, I do wish that your good beauties be the happy cause of Hamlet's wildness" (III, I, 38-40).
    2.)Claudius says, "How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience! The harlot's cheek, beauties with plastering art, is not more ugly to the thing that helps it than is my deed..." (III, I, 48-53).
    3.) Hamlet's "To be or not to be" soliloquy (III, I, 55-87)
    4.) Hamlet tells Ophelia: �Get thee to a nunnery� (III, I, 120), �Go thy ways to a nunnery� (III, I, 128-129), �Get thee to a nunnery� (III, I, 136), �To a nunnery go, and quickly too� (III, I, 139), and �To a nunnery, go� (III, I, 148).
    5.) Ophelia speaks about Hamlet in her soliloquy: �Oh, what a noble mind is here o�erthrown!� (III, I, 148).
    6.) Polonius says about Hamlet: "The origin and commencement of his grief sprung from neglected love" (III, I, 176-177).
    7.) Claudius says about Hamlet: "It shall be so. Madness in great ones must not unwatched go" (III, I, 187-188).
    8.) Hamlet says to Horatio: "There is a play tonight before the king; one scene of it comes near the circumstance which I have told thee of my father's death...observe my uncle" (III, II, 71-76).
    9.) Claudius, after having watched Hamlet's play, says: "Give me some light, away" (III, II, 253).
    10.) Hamlet speaks about his mother (in a soliloquy): �I will speak daggers to her but use none� (III, II, 374).
    11.) Claudius says (in a soliloquy): �Oh my offence is rank�a brother�s murder�my stronger guilt�what if this cursed hand were thicker than itself with brother�s blood�O wretched state! O bosom black as death�� (III, III, 36-72).
    12.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): �Now might I do it, but now he is a-praying. And now I�ll do �t, and so �a goes to Heaven, and so am I revenged�� (III, III, 73-96).
    13.) Hamlet says to his mother: "A bloody deed? Almost as bad, good mother, as kill a king and marry with his brother� (III, IV, 24-28).
    14.) Hamlet tells his mother: �Nay, but to live in the rank sweat of an enseamed bed, stewed in corruption, honeying and making love over the nasty sty�� (III, IV, 92-95).
    15.) Gertrude tells Hamlet: "Alas, how is it with you that you do bend your eye on vacancy and with the incorporal air do hold discourse?" (III, IV, 117-119).
    16.) Hamlet tells his mother: �My pulse as yours doth temperately keep time and makes as healthful music. It is not madness that I have uttered�madness�madness�(III, IV, 140-146).
    17.) Hamlet tells his mother: �Good night�but go not to my uncle�s bed, assume a virtue if you have it not�refrain tonight, and that shall lend a kind of easiness to the next abstinence, the next more easy� (III, IV, 159-167).

    Act IV:
    1.) Gertrude says: �Mad as the sea and wind when both contend which is the mightier. In his lawless fit, behind the arras hearing something stir, whips out his rapier, cries, "A rat, a rat!" And in this brainish apprehension kills the unseen man� (IV, I, 7-12).
    2.) Claudius says: "But we will ship him hence...Hamlet in madness hath Polonius slain, and from his mother's closet hath he dragged him" (IV, I, 30-35).
    3.) Hamlet says: "The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body. The King is a thing--" (IV, II, 23-24).
    4.) Hamlet says: �Not where he eats, but where �a is eaten. A certain convocation of politic worms are e�en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet� (IV, III, 19-22).
    5.) Claudius says (in a soliloquy): "By letters conjuring to that effect, the present death of Hamlet. Do it, England, for like the hectic in my blood he rages, and thou must cure me" (IV, III, 60-64).
    6.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): "How all occasions do inform against me and spur my dull revenge. What is a man if his chief good and market of his time be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more" (IV, IV, 29-32).
    7.) Hamlet says (in a soliloquy): "Oh, from this time forth, my thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth" (IV, IV, 62-63).
    8.) Gentleman says: "She speaks much of her father, says she hears there's tricks in the world, and hems, and beats her heart, spurns enviously at straws, speaks things in doubt that carry but half sense" (IV, V, 3-7).
    9.) Claudius says: "Poor Ophelia divided from herself and fair judgment, without the which we are pictures, or mere beasts..."(IV, V, 83-85).
    10.) Claudius tells Laertes: "Requite him for your father" (IV, VII, 137).

    Act V:

    1.) Laertes says to Hamlet: �The devil take thy soul!� (V, I, 239).
    2.) Claudius says: (To Laertes) "Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech. We'll put the matter to the present push. Good Gertrude, set some watch over your son. This grave shall have a living monument" (V, I, 277-279).
    3.) Hamlet tells Laertes: "What I have done, that might your nature, honor, and exception roughly awake, I here proclaim was madness. Was it Hamlet wronged Laertes? Never Hamlet...his madness is poor Hamlet's enemy" (V, II, 200-209).
    4.) Gertrude says: "No, no, the drink, the drink! O my dear Hamlet! The drink, the drink! I am poisoned" (V, II, 286-287).
    5.) Hamlet (to Claudius) says: "Here, thou incestuous, damned Dane. Drink of this potion. Is the union here? Follow my mother" (V, II, 301-303).
    6.) Hamlet tells Horatio: "Horatio, I am dead. Thou livest. Report me and my cause aright to the unsatisfied" (V, II, 314-316).
    7.) Fortinbras says: "Bear Hamlet like a soldier to the stage, for he was likely, had he been put on, to have proved most royal..." (V, II, 373-375).

    5. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the play, Hamlet?
  • Why do you believe Hamlet is Shakespeare's most popular play?
  • Why do you think Prince Hamlet is used as a case study in many college psychology classes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we analyze Acts II and III, and focus on the popularity of the play, Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!: See previous days' assignments!
    Monday, April 4th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Do you believe that Hamlet is insane or sane? Explain, using textual evidence.

    2. Presentations of Act II Questions: Students will present their questions and answers for Act II.
    Act II, Scene 1:
    1.) How does Polonius characterize his son, Laertes?
    2.) How does this characterization of Laertes impact the story's mood?
    3.) What does Polonius want from Reynaldo and why?
    4.) How does Ophelia characterize Hamlet and why?
    5.) How does Ophelia's characterization of Hamlet impact the story's mood?
    6.) What does Polonius think is the reason for Hamlet's characterization?
    7.) How does Polonius characterize all teenagers? How does this characterization of all teenagers impact the story's mood?
    8.) Ophelia says, �Lord Hamlet�as if he had been loosed out of Hell�� (II, I, 74-80). Interpret in your own words.

    Act II, Scene 2:
    9.) When Polonius asks Hamlet what he�s reading, Hamlet says, �Words, words, words� (II, II, 188). Interpret in your own words.
    10.) Polonius says, �Though this be madness, yet there is method in�t� (II, II, 201-202). Interpret in your own words.
    11.) Hamlet says, �The play�s the thing wherein I�ll catch the conscience of the King� (II, II, 530-531). Interpret in your own words.

    3. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of the play, Hamlet?
  • Why do you believe Hamlet is Shakespeare's most popular play?
  • Why do you think Prince Hamlet is used as a case study in many college psychology classes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we analyze Act II and focus on Hamlet's sanity in Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!: See previous days' assignments!
    Friday, April 1st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Quiz on List #4

    2. Work Period: WHO'S A FOOL IN HAMLET?!: Choose a foolish character from Hamlet and fill the index card, writing everything you know about that character (personality traits, actions, thoughts, feelings, other people's points of view, physical appearance, speech, etc.) that explains WHY THIS CHARACTER IS A FOOL. Here are some choices: Hamlet, King Claudius, King Hamlet, Queen Gertrude, Ophelia, Horatio, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Laertes, and Polonius.

    3. Presentations of Act II Questions: Students will present their questions and answers for Act II.
    Act II, Scene 1:
    1.) How does Polonius characterize his son, Laertes?
    2.) How does this characterization of Laertes impact the story's mood?
    3.) What does Polonius want from Reynaldo and why?
    4.) How does Ophelia characterize Hamlet and why?
    5.) How does Ophelia's characterization of Hamlet impact the story's mood?
    6.) What does Polonius think is the reason for Hamlet's characterization?
    7.) How does Polonius characterize all teenagers? How does this characterization of all teenagers impact the story's mood?
    8.) Ophelia says, �Lord Hamlet�as if he had been loosed out of Hell�� (II, I, 74-80). Interpret in your own words.

    Act II, Scene 2:
    9.) When Polonius asks Hamlet what he�s reading, Hamlet says, �Words, words, words� (II, II, 188). Interpret in your own words.
    10.) Polonius says, �Though this be madness, yet there is method in�t� (II, II, 201-202). Interpret in your own words.
    11.) Hamlet says, �The play�s the thing wherein I�ll catch the conscience of the King� (II, II, 530-531). Interpret in your own words.

    4. Reflections:

  • What are your impressions of Hamlet?
  • Why do you believe Hamlet is Shakespeare's most popular play?
  • Why do you think Prince Hamlet is used as a case study in many college psychology classes?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades, reading, and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we prove our vocabulary knowledge on the vocabulary quiz and analyze Act II in Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK!: See previous days' assignments!
    Thursday, March 31st, 2016: 1. Do Now: How did you do on the Hamlet QUIZ on Acts III, IV and V? Explain why your strengths and weaknesses.

    2. Discuss/Share: Volunteers will share their Do Now answers with the class. Review quiz answers.

    3. Vocabulary Pictionary Game

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades, reading, and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How can we effectively review the final acts of Hamlet and prepare for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, APRIL 1st:
  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ: Study SAT VOCABULARY LIST 4. Know the part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), the definition and how to write each vocabulary word in a sentence.
  • Wednesday, March 30th, 2016: 1. Do Now: MIDTERM EXAM: Answer the TOPIC QUESTION as YOUR THESIS STATEMENT (at the end of the introductory paragraph). FOCUS on the THESIS throughout your paper. Your paper MUST be 4-5 paragraphs (each body paragraph should be 10-12 sentences long). You MUSt use evidence from both texts. You MUST include a counterclaim and attack the counterclaim.

    2. Work Period: Prepare for Friday's quiz on Vocabulary List #4 and make up any owed homework.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we successfully compose an argumentative essay on the Midterm Exam? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 1st:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ: Study SAT VOCABULARY LIST 4. Know the part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), the definition and how to write each vocabulary word in a sentence.
  • Tuesday, March 29th, 2016: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on Acts III, IV and V in Hamlet

    Turn in your HW Reflection Paper on Acts III, IV and V.

    2. Work Period: MIDTERM EXAM: Answer the TOPIC QUESTION as YOUR THESIS STATEMENT (at the end of the introductory paragraph). FOCUS on the THESIS throughout your paper. Your paper MUST be 4-5 paragraphs (each body paragraph should be 10-12 sentences long). You MUSt use evidence from both texts. You MUST include a counterclaim and attack the counterclaim.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • What are the major events and famous quotes in Act II in the play, Hamlet? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 1st:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ: Study SAT VOCABULARY LIST 4. Know the part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), the definition and how to write each vocabulary word in a sentence.
  • Monday, March 28th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Answer your assigned question below:
    Act II, Scene 1:
    1.) How does Polonius characterize his son, Laertes?
    2.) How does this characterization of Laertes impact the story's mood?
    3.) What does Polonius want from Reynaldo and why?
    4.) How does Ophelia characterize Hamlet and why?
    5.) How does Ophelia's characterization of Hamlet impact the story's mood?
    6.) What does Polonius think is the reason for Hamlet's characterization?
    7.) How does Polonius characterize all teenagers? How does this characterization of all teenagers impact the story's mood?
    8.) Ophelia says, �Lord Hamlet�as if he had been loosed out of Hell�� (II, I, 74-80). Interpret in your own words.

    Act II, Scene 2:
    9.) When Polonius asks Hamlet what he�s reading, Hamlet says, �Words, words, words� (II, II, 188). Interpret in your own words.
    10.) Polonius says, �Though this be madness, yet there is method in�t� (II, II, 201-202). Interpret in your own words.
    11.) Hamlet says, �The play�s the thing wherein I�ll catch the conscience of the King� (II, II, 530-531). Interpret in your own words.

    2. ACT II PRESENTATIONS: Students will present their answers from the Do Now.

    3. HW Reminders.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that the listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
  • What are the major events and famous quotes in Act II in the play, Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 29th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period)--Be ready to write a Regents-style essay (this will help those of you who need to earn a 75 or higher on the English Regents).
    HAMLET QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period) ON READING THE FOLLOWING (as you read, you should find answers and take notes on the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices?) :
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS III, IV AND V (NOTE THE VALUE CHANGE: THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139-140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.


    1.) King Claudius' interview of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" speech, and Hamlet and Ophelia's relationship: Act III, Scene 1, Lines 1-18, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 19-43, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 44-70, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 71-101, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 102-124, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 125-152, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 153-180, and Act III, Scene 1, Lines 181-188
    2.) Polonius (King Claudius' advisor) spies on Hamlet, and Hamlet kills him. Hamlet praises his dead father. Act III, Scene 4, Lines 1-16, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 17-31, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 32-62, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 63-95
    3.) Hamlet's Apology to Laertes and their Duel Begins: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 212-226 and Act V, Scene 2, Lines 227-240
    4.) Wounding of Hamlet and Laertes, Gertrude's Death, Hamlet's Murder of Claudius and Hamlet's Final Words to Horatio: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 297-299, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 299-317, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 318-335


    *EXTRA CREDIT (CHANGE: to earn a chance at 30 points extra on the Midterm Exam, which is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade): READ ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For MIDTERM EXAM EXTRA CREDIT, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.

    DATE CHANGE: DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 1st:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ: Study SAT VOCABULARY LIST 4. Know the part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), the definition and how to write each vocabulary word in a sentence.
  • Thursday, March 24th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Students will arrange with their groups and present their chart paper with the questions and answers for their assigned scene (below).
    ACT I QUESTIONS
    Scene 1:
    1.) Describe the mood of the scene. How is that mood created?
    2.) What is the irony of one of the first lines in the play--"Long live the king"?
    3.) What is ironic about the guard who is coming on to duty challenging the one who is already on duty?
    4.) Identify images of sickness or disease. What do these suggest?
    5.) Why does Marcellus bring Horatio to the ramparts of the castle?
    6.) What background information does Horatio give about Denmark and about the reasons for the ghost�s appearance?
    7.) What is the political situation in Denmark? What are the present relations with Norway and how did they come about?
    8.) What reasons does Horatio suggest for the appearance of the ghost?
    9.) What is the importance of the actual appearance of the ghost in this scene? Explain how the contrasts between appearance and reality become evident in this scene.
    Scene 2:
    10.) How does Claudius reveal himself to be a capable monarch (king) in this scene? Consider his handling of the explanation of the situation in Denmark (including his justification of the marriage to Gertrude), the Norway affair, Laertes� request, and his interaction with Hamlet. Consider also Claudius�s advice to Hamlet about grieving for his dead father.
    11.) What qualities of Hamlet�s character are evident
    a) in his first words of the play?
    b) in his soliloquy?
    c) in his comments on his mother�s marriage in his soliloquy and his later comments on that marriage to Horatio
    d) in his general conversation with Horatio and the guardsmen?

    Act I, Scene 3: What advice does Laertes give his sister, Ophelia, about Hamlet? What does this advice reveal about Laertes' character and Hamlet's character? What advice does Polonius give Laertes and Ophelia? What does this advice reveal about Polonius' character?
    12.) "Give every man thy ear but few thy voice." Interpret in your own words.
    13.) "Take each man's censure but reserve thy judgment." Interpret in your own words.
    14.) "Neither a borrower nor a lender be." Interpret in your own words.
    15.) "This above all: to thine own self be true." Interpret in your own words

    F.) Act I, Scene 4:
    16.) "I do not set my life at a pin's fee" (Hamlet). Interpret in your own words.
    17.) "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark" (Marcellus). Interpret in your own words.
    18.) How does Hamlet describe King Claudius? What does this portrayal reveal about Hamlet's character?
    19.) How does Hamlet respond to the Ghost's request to follow him? What does Hamlet's response reveal about Hamlet's character?

    G.) Act I, Scene 5:
    20.) "The serpent that did sting thy father's life now wears his crown" (Ghost). Interpret in your own words.
    21.) "The time is out of joint. O cursed spite that ever I was born to set it right" (Hamlet). Interpret in your own words.
    22.) What does the Ghost tell Hamlet? How does Hamlet respond to the Ghost's significant revelation?

    2. Work Period: In your new assigned groups, answer your assigned questions for Act II:
    Act II, Scene 1:
    1.) How does Polonius characterize his son, Laertes?
    2.) How does this characterization of Laertes impact the story's mood?
    3.) What does Polonius want from Reynaldo and why?
    4.) How does Ophelia characterize Hamlet and why?
    5.) How does Ophelia's characterization of Hamlet impact the story's mood?
    6.) What does Polonius think is the reason for Hamlet's characterization?
    7.) How does Polonius characterize all teenagers? How does this characterization of all teenagers impact the story's mood?
    8.) Ophelia says, �Lord Hamlet�as if he had been loosed out of Hell�� (II, I, 74-80). Interpret in your own words.

    Act II, Scene 2:
    9.) When Polonius asks Hamlet what he�s reading, Hamlet says, �Words, words, words� (II, II, 188). Interpret in your own words.
    10.) Polonius says, �Though this be madness, yet there is method in�t� (II, II, 201-202). Interpret in your own words.
    11.) Hamlet says, �The play�s the thing wherein I�ll catch the conscience of the King� (II, II, 530-531). Interpret in your own words.

    3. SHOW HW: VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS FOR Vocabulary List #4.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that the listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
  • What are the major events and famous quotes in Acts I and II in the play, Hamlet? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MARCH 29th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period)
    HAMLET QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period) ON READING THE FOLLOWING (as you read, you should find answers and take notes on the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices?) :
    1.) King Claudius' interview of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" speech, and Hamlet and Ophelia's relationship: Act III, Scene 1, Lines 1-18, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 19-43, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 44-70, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 71-101, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 102-124, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 125-152, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 153-180, and Act III, Scene 1, Lines 181-188
    2.) Polonius (King Claudius' advisor) spies on Hamlet, and Hamlet kills him. Hamlet praises his dead father. Act III, Scene 4, Lines 1-16, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 17-31, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 32-62, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 63-95
    3.) Hamlet's Apology to Laertes and their Duel Begins: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 212-226 and Act V, Scene 2, Lines 227-240
    4.) Wounding of Hamlet and Laertes, Gertrude's Death, Hamlet's Murder of Claudius and Hamlet's Final Words to Horatio: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 297-299, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 299-317, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 318-335


    *EXTRA CREDIT (CHANGE: to earn a chance at 30 points extra on the Midterm Exam, which is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade): READ ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For MIDTERM EXAM EXTRA CREDIT, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS III, IV AND V (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139-140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.

    DUE NEXT THURSDAY, MARCH 31st:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ: Study SAT VOCABULARY LIST 4. Know the part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb), the definition and how to write each vocabulary word in a sentence.
  • Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Students will arrange with their groups and finish posting (on chart paper) the questions and answers for their assigned scene (below).
    ACT I QUESTIONS
    Scene 1:
    1.) Describe the mood of the scene. How is that mood created?
    2.) What is the irony of one of the first lines in the play--"Long live the king"?
    3.) What is ironic about the guard who is coming on to duty challenging the one who is already on duty?
    4.) Identify images of sickness or disease. What do these suggest?
    5.) Why does Marcellus bring Horatio to the ramparts of the castle?
    6.) What background information does Horatio give about Denmark and about the reasons for the ghost�s appearance?
    7.) What is the political situation in Denmark? What are the present relations with Norway and how did they come about?
    8.) What reasons does Horatio suggest for the appearance of the ghost?
    9.) What is the importance of the actual appearance of the ghost in this scene? Explain how the contrasts between appearance and reality become evident in this scene.
    Scene 2:
    10.) How does Claudius reveal himself to be a capable monarch (king) in this scene? Consider his handling of the explanation of the situation in Denmark (including his justification of the marriage to Gertrude), the Norway affair, Laertes� request, and his interaction with Hamlet. Consider also Claudius�s advice to Hamlet about grieving for his dead father.
    11.) What qualities of Hamlet�s character are evident
    a) in his first words of the play?
    b) in his soliloquy?
    c) in his comments on his mother�s marriage in his soliloquy and his later comments on that marriage to Horatio
    d) in his general conversation with Horatio and the guardsmen?

    Act I, Scene 3: What advice does Laertes give his sister, Ophelia, about Hamlet? What does this advice reveal about Laertes' character and Hamlet's character? What advice does Polonius give Laertes and Ophelia? What does this advice reveal about Polonius' character?
    12.) "Give every man thy ear but few thy voice." Interpret in your own words.
    13.) "Take each man's censure but reserve thy judgment." Interpret in your own words.
    14.) "Neither a borrower nor a lender be." Interpret in your own words.
    15.) "This above all: to thine own self be true." Interpret in your own words

    F.) Act I, Scene 4:
    16.) "I do not set my life at a pin's fee" (Hamlet). Interpret in your own words.
    17.) "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark" (Marcellus). Interpret in your own words.
    18.) How does Hamlet describe King Claudius? What does this portrayal reveal about Hamlet's character?
    19.) How does Hamlet respond to the Ghost's request to follow him? What does Hamlet's response reveal about Hamlet's character?

    G.) Act I, Scene 5:
    20.) "The serpent that did sting thy father's life now wears his crown" (Ghost). Interpret in your own words.
    21.) "The time is out of joint. O cursed spite that ever I was born to set it right" (Hamlet). Interpret in your own words.
    22.) What does the Ghost tell Hamlet? How does Hamlet respond to the Ghost's significant revelation?

    2. Reflections/Sharing: Share Work Period answers. What are your impressions of Act I in Hamlet?

    3. Review answers to the Quiz on Hamlet Acts I and II. HW Reminders.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that the listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
  • What are the major events and famous quotes in Act I in the play, Hamlet? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 24th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST 4. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (NOT the sentences provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MARCH 29th:
    READ THE FOLLOWING (as you read, you should find answers and take notes on the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices?) :
    1.) King Claudius' interview of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" speech, and Hamlet and Ophelia's relationship: Act III, Scene 1, Lines 1-18, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 19-43, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 44-70, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 71-101, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 102-124, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 125-152, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 153-180, and Act III, Scene 1, Lines 181-188
    2.) Polonius (King Claudius' advisor) spies on Hamlet, and Hamlet kills him. Hamlet praises his dead father. Act III, Scene 4, Lines 1-16, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 17-31, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 32-62, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 63-95
    3.) Hamlet's Apology to Laertes and their Duel Begins: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 212-226 and Act V, Scene 2, Lines 227-240
    4.) Wounding of Hamlet and Laertes, Gertrude's Death, Hamlet's Murder of Claudius and Hamlet's Final Words to Horatio: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 297-299, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 299-317, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 318-335


    *EXTRA CREDIT (CHANGE: to earn a chance at 30 points extra on the Midterm Exam, which is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade): READ ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For MIDTERM EXAM EXTRA CREDIT, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS III, IV AND V (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139-140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.
  • Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Choose one vocabulary word from SAT Vocabulary List #4 that BEST describes Prince Hamlet. Be ready to explain your reasoning.

    2. SAT Vocabulary: Finish introducing SAT Vocabulary List #4.

    3. Work Period: Students will arrange in groups of four. They will be assigned scene questions to answer. They will find the line numbers. They will post the questions and answers on chart paper.
    ACT I QUESTIONS
    Scene 1:
    1.) Describe the mood of the scene. How is that mood created?
    2.) What is the irony of one of the first lines in the play--"Long live the king"?
    3.) What is ironic about the guard who is coming on to duty challenging the one who is already on duty?
    4.) Identify images of sickness or disease. What do these suggest?
    5.) Why does Marcellus bring Horatio to the ramparts of the castle?
    6.) What background information does Horatio give about Denmark and about the reasons for the ghost�s appearance?
    7.) What is the political situation in Denmark? What are the present relations with Norway and how did they come about?
    8.) What reasons does Horatio suggest for the appearance of the ghost?
    9.) What is the importance of the actual appearance of the ghost in this scene? Explain how the contrasts between appearance and reality become evident in this scene.
    Scene 2:
    10.) How does Claudius reveal himself to be a capable monarch (king) in this scene? Consider his handling of the explanation of the situation in Denmark (including his justification of the marriage to Gertrude), the Norway affair, Laertes� request, and his interaction with Hamlet. Consider also Claudius�s advice to Hamlet about grieving for his dead father.
    11.) What qualities of Hamlet�s character are evident
    a) in his first words of the play?
    b) in his soliloquy?
    c) in his comments on his mother�s marriage in his soliloquy and his later comments on that marriage to Horatio
    d) in his general conversation with Horatio and the guardsmen?

    Act I, Scene 3: What advice does Laertes give his sister, Ophelia, about Hamlet? What does this advice reveal about Laertes' character and Hamlet's character? What advice does Polonius give Laertes and Ophelia? What does this advice reveal about Polonius' character?
    12.) "Give every man thy ear but few thy voice." Interpret in your own words.
    13.) "Take each man's censure but reserve thy judgment." Interpret in your own words.
    14.) "Neither a borrower nor a lender be." Interpret in your own words.
    15.) "This above all: to thine own self be true." Interpret in your own words

    F.) Act I, Scene 4:
    16.) "I do not set my life at a pin's fee" (Hamlet). Interpret in your own words.
    17.) "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark" (Marcellus). Interpret in your own words.
    18.) How does Hamlet describe King Claudius? What does this portrayal reveal about Hamlet's character?
    19.) How does Hamlet respond to the Ghost's request to follow him? What does Hamlet's response reveal about Hamlet's character?

    G.) Act I, Scene 5:
    20.) "The serpent that did sting thy father's life now wears his crown" (Ghost). Interpret in your own words.
    21.) "The time is out of joint. O cursed spite that ever I was born to set it right" (Hamlet). Interpret in your own words.
    22.) What does the Ghost tell Hamlet? How does Hamlet respond to the Ghost's significant revelation?

    4. Reflections/Sharing: Share Work Period answers and take notes. What are your impressions of Act I in Hamlet?

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that the listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
  • What are the major events and famous quotes in Act I in the play, Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 24th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST 4. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (NOT the sentences provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MARCH 29th:
    READ THE FOLLOWING (as you read, you should find answers and take notes on the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices?) :
    1.) King Claudius' interview of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" speech, and Hamlet and Ophelia's relationship: Act III, Scene 1, Lines 1-18, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 19-43, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 44-70, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 71-101, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 102-124, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 125-152, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 153-180, and Act III, Scene 1, Lines 181-188
    2.) Polonius (King Claudius' advisor) spies on Hamlet, and Hamlet kills him. Hamlet praises his dead father. Act III, Scene 4, Lines 1-16, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 17-31, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 32-62, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 63-95
    3.) Hamlet's Apology to Laertes and their Duel Begins: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 212-226 and Act V, Scene 2, Lines 227-240
    4.) Wounding of Hamlet and Laertes, Gertrude's Death, Hamlet's Murder of Claudius and Hamlet's Final Words to Horatio: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 297-299, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 299-317, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 318-335


    *EXTRA CREDIT (CHANGE: to earn a chance at 30 points extra on the Midterm Exam, which is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade): READ ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For MIDTERM EXAM EXTRA CREDIT, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS III, IV AND V (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139-140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.
  • Monday, March 21st, 2016: 1. Do Now: SUPER QUIZ on Acts I and II in Hamlet

    2. Work Period: Work on HW (vocabulary list #4 flashcards, making up HW, and reading Acts III, IV and V in Hamlet).

    SHOW HW: Show your writing reflection on Acts I and II in Hamlet.

    3. SAT Vocabulary: Finish introducing SAT Vocabulary List #4.

    4. Reflections: What are your impressions of Acts I and II in Hamlet? What can you anticipate that we will study tomorrow?

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that the listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
  • What influences Prince Hamlet in Acts I and II in the play, Hamlet? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MARCH 24th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST 4. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (NOT the sentences provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MARCH 29th:
    READ THE FOLLOWING (as you read, you should find answers and take notes on the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices?) :
    1.) King Claudius' interview of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" speech, and Hamlet and Ophelia's relationship: Act III, Scene 1, Lines 1-18, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 19-43, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 44-70, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 71-101, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 102-124, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 125-152, Act III, Scene 1, Lines 153-180, and Act III, Scene 1, Lines 181-188
    2.) Polonius (King Claudius' advisor) spies on Hamlet, and Hamlet kills him. Hamlet praises his dead father. Act III, Scene 4, Lines 1-16, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 17-31, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 32-62, Act III, Scene 4, Lines 63-95
    3.) Hamlet's Apology to Laertes and their Duel Begins: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 212-226 and Act V, Scene 2, Lines 227-240
    4.) Wounding of Hamlet and Laertes, Gertrude's Death, Hamlet's Murder of Claudius and Hamlet's Final Words to Horatio: Act V, Scene 2, Lines 297-299, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 299-317, Act V, Scene 2, Lines 318-335


    *EXTRA CREDIT (CHANGE: to earn a chance at 30 points extra on the Midterm Exam, which is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade): READ ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For MIDTERM EXAM EXTRA CREDIT, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS III, IV AND V in Hamlet.
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS III, IV AND V (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139-140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.
  • Friday, March 18th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Review your predictive script of Hamlet (with your partner). What can you determine about Hamlet's genetics (personality traits, appearance and other inherited qualities) and environment?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Predictive Script Presentation: With a partner, present your one-page predictive play (in modern day language, not Shakespeare's words) about Hamlet, based on the cast of characters and their descriptions. Audience Questions: What can you determine about the characters' genetics (personality traits, appearance and other qualities)? What can you determine about their environment? (Write on white boards)

    4. SAT Vocabulary: Introduce SAT Vocabulary List #4.

    5. Reflections: What are the benefits of composing a predictive script about Hamlet? What can you anticipate that we will study on Monday?

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that the listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
  • What can we predict will be influencing Prince Hamlet in the play, Hamlet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 21st:
    READ THE FOLLOWING (as you read, you should find answers and take notes on the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices?) :
    1.) Hamlet's Soliloquy about his parents and his mother's choices: Act I, Scene 2 (Hamlet's soliloquy), lines 129-141 and Act I, Scene 2, lines 142-159.
    2.) King Hamlet's Ghost speaking to Hamlet: Act I, Scene 5, Lines 32-41, Act I, Scene 5, Lines 42-76, and Act I, Scene 5, Lines 77-111
    3.) Claudius and Gertrude speaking to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern about Hamlet: Act II, Scene 2, Lines 1-26 and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 27-39
    4.) Polonius questioning Hamlet about his well-being: Act II, Scene 2, Lines 163-165, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 166-185, and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 186-210.
    5.) Hamlet's soliloquy (plotting to reveal Claudius' guilt): Act II, Scene 2, Lines 508-523, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 524-561, and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 562-567.


    *EXTRA CREDIT (CHANGE: to earn a chance at 30 points extra on the Midterm Exam, which is 25% of your 2nd marking period grade): READ ALL OF ACTS I AND II in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For a chance at a 90 or higher, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS I AND II in Hamlet.
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS I AND II (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139-140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.
  • Thursday, March 17th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Look at the cast of characters in the play, Hamlet (get a class copy). Read the characters' brief descriptions. What can you predict about these characters' genetics (personality traits, appearance and other inherited qualities) and environment? Write at least three predictions (at least one prediction must be about Hamlet)

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: With a partner, write a one-page predictive play (in modern day language, not Shakespeare's words) about Hamlet, based on the cast of characters and their descriptions. You must include Hamlet in the script.

    4. Predictive Play Presentations: Volunteers will present their predict play. How did students make those predictions based on the cast of characters? What were the class impressions of the presentations?

    5. Reflections: What are the benefits of making predictions? What can you anticipate that we will study tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • What can we predict will be influencing Prince Hamlet in the play, Hamlet? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 21st:
    READ THE FOLLOWING (as you read, you should find answers and take notes on the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices?) :
    1.) Hamlet's Soliloquy about his parents and his mother's choices: Act I, Scene 2 (Hamlet's soliloquy), lines 129-141 and Act I, Scene 2, lines 142-159.
    2.) King Hamlet's Ghost speaking to Hamlet: Act I, Scene 5, Lines 32-41, Act I, Scene 5, Lines 42-76, and Act I, Scene 5, Lines 77-111
    3.) Claudius and Gertrude speaking to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern about Hamlet: Act II, Scene 2, Lines 1-26 and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 27-39
    4.) Polonius questioning Hamlet about his well-being: Act II, Scene 2, Lines 163-165, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 166-185, and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 186-210.
    5.) Hamlet's soliloquy (plotting to reveal Claudius' guilt): Act II, Scene 2, Lines 508-523, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 524-561, and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 562-567.


    *EXTRA CREDIT (to earn a chance at a 90 or higher in English): READ ALL OF ACTS I AND II in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For a chance at a 90 or higher, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS I AND II in Hamlet.
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS I AND II (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.
  • Wednesday, March 16th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read the opening lines by Barnardo and Francisco (two guardsmen) in Act I, Scene I of Hamlet. What are your first impressions? What can you foreshadow about Hamlet's life experiences and what will come next?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Review Shakespeare Exam answers.

    4. Introduce HW.

    5. Reflections: What did we predict are Hamlet's experiences and how are those experiences influenced by genetics and environment? What can you anticipate that we will study tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • What did we predict are Hamlet's experiences and how are those experiences influenced by genetics and environment?? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK: See previous day's assignments.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MARCH 21st:
    READ THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) Hamlet's Soliloquy about his parents and his mother's choices: Act I, Scene 2 (Hamlet's soliloquy), lines 129-141 and Act I, Scene 2, lines 142-159.
    2.) King Hamlet's Ghost speaking to Hamlet: Act I, Scene 5, Lines 32-41, Act I, Scene 5, Lines 42-76, and Act I, Scene 5, Lines 77-111
    3.) Claudius and Gertrude speaking to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern about Hamlet: Act II, Scene 2, Lines 1-26 and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 27-39
    4.) Polonius questioning Hamlet about his well-being: Act II, Scene 2, Lines 163-165, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 166-185, and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 186-210.
    5.) Hamlet's soliloquy (plotting to reveal Claudius' guilt): Act II, Scene 2, Lines 508-523, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 524-561, and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 562-567.


    *EXTRA CREDIT (to earn a chance at a 90 or higher in English): READ ALL OF ACTS I AND II in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For a chance at a 90 or higher, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS I AND II in Hamlet.
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS I AND II (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.
  • Tuesday, March 15th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What persuades you to see a movie or play? Refer to types of movie trailers, advertisements, word of mouth, etc.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Answer one of your assigned questions below:
    1. What would it feel like to return home after being away for the summer to discover that your father is dead and your mother had already remarried?
    2. What if the man your mother remarried was a lowlife and took over all of your father�s business and successes? How would you feel and what, if anything, would you do about it?
    3. What if someone gave you reason to believe that your new stepfather murdered your father?
    4. How would you go about getting your stepfather to confess to the murder of your father?
    5. If you wanted to make people believe you�re insane, how would you do it?
    6. How would you feel and what would you do if you found out that a close friend has been spying on you?
    7. What makes life challenging? What makes it worth living? Describe a few examples that help to show your thinking about how people should value life.

    SHOW HW questions/answers for "The Death of Hamnet and Making of Hamlet" Article

    4. Discuss/Share #2:

  • Discuss the Work Period answers.
  • Discuss the answers to the questions on 'The Death of Hamnet and the Making of Hamlet," an article taken from New York Review of Books. Write the correct answers in your LA section:
    1.) What year did Shakespeare learn about his son Hamnet's illness?
    2.) Where was Shakespeare and where was Hamnet when Hamnet was ill?
    3.) Did Shakespeare write about Hamnet's death?
    4.) Why wasn't it common for parents during Shakespeare's time to express their emotions after a child's death?
    5.) What genre of plays did Shakespeare write after Hamnet's death?
    6.) What type of evidence exists that Shakespeare did experience grief after his son Hamnet's death?
    7.) How is his son's name and his play Hamlet comparable (similar)?
    8.) Where did Shakespeare get the idea for the play Hamlet?
    9.) Was it common for Shakespeare and his peers to steal literary ideas and works from each other?
    10.) Why is the play Hamlet a tragedy?

    5. Reflections: Why is it important to understand the making of Hamlet and Shakespeare's influences? What can you anticipate that we will study tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we effectively prepare to read Hamlet by analyzing the making of the play and anticipatory questions? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK: See previous day's assignments.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, MARCH 21st:
    READ THE FOLLOWING:
    1.) Hamlet's Soliloquy about his parents and his mother's choices: Act I, Scene 2 (Hamlet's soliloquy), lines 129-141 and Act I, Scene 2, lines 142-159.
    2.) King Hamlet's Ghost speaking to Hamlet: Act I, Scene 5, Lines 32-41, Act I, Scene 5, Lines 42-76, and Act I, Scene 5, Lines 77-111
    3.) Claudius and Gertrude speaking to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern about Hamlet: Act II, Scene 2, Lines 1-26 and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 27-39
    4.) Polonius questioning Hamlet about his well-being: Act II, Scene 2, Lines 163-165, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 166-185, and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 186-210.
    5.) Hamlet's soliloquy (plotting to reveal Claudius' guilt): Act II, Scene 2, Lines 508-523, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 524-561, and Act II, Scene 2, Lines 562-567.


    *EXTRA CREDIT (to earn a chance at a 90 or higher in English): READ ALL OF ACTS I AND II in Hamlet.


  • READING SUPER QUIZ (about 10% of the 2nd marking period): For a chance at a 90 or higher, you will have to read ALL OF ACTS I AND II in Hamlet.
  • WRITING REFLECTION ON ACTS I AND II (TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS): Answer the following question: How do Hamlet's genetics (his family's personality traits/genes) and environment (his surroundings and experiences) influence his choices? Write ONE, full, typed page, 12 point font, Times New Roman (or two, handwritten pages). Include a proper heading, with your name, my name, date, class name, and period. Include textual evidence (use Shakespeare's language, NOT the modern text) and with proper citation. Here's an example: Prince Hamlet's father, King Hamlet, is described by Prince Hamlet as a superior being. Prince Hamlet claims he was "so excellent a King, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr" (Act I, Scene 2, Lines 139140). Since King Hamlet was so impressive, Prince Hamlet feels that he needs to stand up for him against Claudius.
  • Monday, March 14th, 2016: 1. Do Now: EXAM on Shakespeare's life, times, works and language

    2. Work Period: Begin HW.

    3. Reflections: Why was it important to be assessed on Shakespeare? What can you anticipate that we will study tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we be successful on today's EXAM ON SHAKESPEARE? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 15th:
    READ 'The Death of Hamnet and the Making of Hamlet," an article taken from New York Review of Books. Answer the following questions (based on the article above) in your LA section:
    1.) What year did Shakespeare learn about his son Hamnet's illness?
    2.) Where was Shakespeare and where was Hamnet when Hamnet was ill?
    3.) Did Shakespeare write about Hamnet's death?
    4.) Why wasn't it common for parents during Shakespeare's time to express their emotions after a child's death?
    5.) What genre of plays did Shakespeare write after Hamnet's death?
    6.) What type of evidence exists that Shakespeare did experience grief after his son Hamnet's death?
    7.) How is his son's name and his play Hamlet comparable (similar)?
    8.) Where did Shakespeare get the idea for the play Hamlet?
    9.) Was it common for Shakespeare and his peers to steal literary ideas and works from each other?
    10.) Why is the play Hamlet a tragedy?
    Friday, March 11th, 2016: NO CLASS (DUE TO PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES) How can we understand the influences of the life, times and background of William Shakespeare, which will prepare us for our EXAM ON SHAKESPEARE? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 14th:
    EXAM on William Shakespeare's life, times and background. You MUST study the following:
  • You need to know your K/W/L chart notes on William Shakespeare and the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background.
  • You need to know IAMBIC PENTAMETER. It sounds like a heartbeat. It includes 5 pairs of alternating unstressed and stressed beats (da DUM, da DUM). Shakespeare included this rhythmic pattern to help his actors memorize their lines.
  • You need to know the following information about Shakespeare's parents, siblings and childhood experiences: "He was John and Mary Shakespeare's oldest surviving child; their first two children, both girls, did not live beyond infancy. Growing up as the big brother of the family, William had three younger brothers, Gilbert, Richard, and Edmund, and two younger sisters: Anne, who died at seven, and Joan. Their father, John Shakespeare, was a leatherworker who specialized in the soft white leather used for gloves and similar items. A prosperous businessman, he married Mary Arden, of the prominent Arden family. John rose through local offices in Stratford, becoming an alderman and eventually, when William was five, the town bailiff�much like a mayor. Not long after that, however, John Shakespeare stepped back from public life; we don't know why. Shakespeare, as the son of a leading Stratford citizen, almost certainly attended Stratford's grammar school. Like all such schools, its curriculum consisted of an intense emphasis on the Latin classics, including memorization, writing, and acting classic Latin plays. Shakespeare most likely attended until about age 15" (Folger Shakespeare Library).
  • The EXAM WILL BE 25% of the 2nd marking period grade.
  • It will be a multiple-choice question test. Bring in your own #2 pencil.

    FOR CTE EXPO STUDENTS ONLY (if you were absent from this class today, then you can do this EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY):

  • FOR UP TO 10 EXTRA CREDIT POINTS ON YOUR EXAM: Compose test questions (up to three!) for the exam! You must include answer choices, and identify the correct answer. Use the English Regents (Common Core) as a guide to how to compose multiple-choice questions and answers. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) by Sunday, March 13th before 12pm.
  • Thursday, March 10th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Do you know any of Shakespeare's famous lines from his plays/poetry? If so, write what you know. Why do you believe these lines are famous?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. K/W/L Note-Taking and Discussion:

  • Take notes on the K/W/L chart based on the Shakespeare's life, times and background FACT SHEET. Introduce IAMBIC PENTAMETER. It sounds like a heartbeat. It includes 5 pairs of alternating unstressed and stressed beats (da DUM, da DUM). Shakespeare included this rhythmic pattern to help his actors memorize their lines.
  • Shakespeare's parents, siblings and childhood experiences: "He was John and Mary Shakespeare's oldest surviving child; their first two children, both girls, did not live beyond infancy. Growing up as the big brother of the family, William had three younger brothers, Gilbert, Richard, and Edmund, and two younger sisters: Anne, who died at seven, and Joan. Their father, John Shakespeare, was a leatherworker who specialized in the soft white leather used for gloves and similar items. A prosperous businessman, he married Mary Arden, of the prominent Arden family. John rose through local offices in Stratford, becoming an alderman and eventually, when William was five, the town bailiff�much like a mayor. Not long after that, however, John Shakespeare stepped back from public life; we don't know why. Shakespeare, as the son of a leading Stratford citizen, almost certainly attended Stratford's grammar school. Like all such schools, its curriculum consisted of an intense emphasis on the Latin classics, including memorization, writing, and acting classic Latin plays. Shakespeare most likely attended until about age 15" (Folger Shakespeare Library).
  • What do you think influenced Shakespeare's life more--his genes or his environment (nature vs. nurture)?

    4. REVIEW GAME (whiteboard competition for extra credit points on the exam!)!

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we understand the influences of the life, times and background of William Shakespeare, which will prepare us for our EXAM ON SHAKESPEARE? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 14th:
    EXAM on William Shakespeare's life, times and background. You MUST study the following:
  • You need to know your K/W/L chart notes on William Shakespeare and the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background.
  • You need to know IAMBIC PENTAMETER. It sounds like a heartbeat. It includes 5 pairs of alternating unstressed and stressed beats (da DUM, da DUM). Shakespeare included this rhythmic pattern to help his actors memorize their lines.
  • You need to know the following information about Shakespeare's parents, siblings and childhood experiences: "He was John and Mary Shakespeare's oldest surviving child; their first two children, both girls, did not live beyond infancy. Growing up as the big brother of the family, William had three younger brothers, Gilbert, Richard, and Edmund, and two younger sisters: Anne, who died at seven, and Joan. Their father, John Shakespeare, was a leatherworker who specialized in the soft white leather used for gloves and similar items. A prosperous businessman, he married Mary Arden, of the prominent Arden family. John rose through local offices in Stratford, becoming an alderman and eventually, when William was five, the town bailiff�much like a mayor. Not long after that, however, John Shakespeare stepped back from public life; we don't know why. Shakespeare, as the son of a leading Stratford citizen, almost certainly attended Stratford's grammar school. Like all such schools, its curriculum consisted of an intense emphasis on the Latin classics, including memorization, writing, and acting classic Latin plays. Shakespeare most likely attended until about age 15" (Folger Shakespeare Library).
  • The EXAM WILL BE 25% of the 2nd marking period grade.
  • It will be a multiple-choice question test. Bring in your own #2 pencil.

    FOR CTE EXPO STUDENTS ONLY (if you were absent from this class today, then you can do this EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY):

  • FOR UP TO 10 EXTRA CREDIT POINTS ON YOUR EXAM: Compose test questions (up to three!) for the exam! You must include answer choices, and identify the correct answer. Use the English Regents (Common Core) as a guide to how to compose multiple-choice questions and answers. You MUST e-mail Ms. Conn (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) by Sunday, March 13th before 12pm.
  • Wednesday, March 9th, 2016: 1. Do Now: How has your neighborhood affected your behavior and choices?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read "Nature vs. Nurture: Outcome Depends on Where You Live" taken from Telegraph. What is the central idea (message) that the author is communicating? What evidence does the author use to support that central idea?

    4. K/W/L Note-Taking:

  • Take notes on the K/W/L chart based on the Shakespeare's life, times and background FACT SHEET.
  • Shakespeare's parents, siblings and childhood experiences: "He was John and Mary Shakespeare's oldest surviving child; their first two children, both girls, did not live beyond infancy. Growing up as the big brother of the family, William had three younger brothers, Gilbert, Richard, and Edmund, and two younger sisters: Anne, who died at seven, and Joan. Their father, John Shakespeare, was a leatherworker who specialized in the soft white leather used for gloves and similar items. A prosperous businessman, he married Mary Arden, of the prominent Arden family. John rose through local offices in Stratford, becoming an alderman and eventually, when William was five, the town bailiff�much like a mayor. Not long after that, however, John Shakespeare stepped back from public life; we don't know why. Shakespeare, as the son of a leading Stratford citizen, almost certainly attended Stratford's grammar school. Like all such schools, its curriculum consisted of an intense emphasis on the Latin classics, including memorization, writing, and acting classic Latin plays. Shakespeare most likely attended until about age 15" (Folger Shakespeare Library).
  • What do you think influenced Shakespeare's life more--his genes or his environment (nature vs. nurture)?

    5. K/W/L Discussion: Discuss the K/W/L notes on Shakespeare's life, times and background. Discuss Shakespeare's genes and environment.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different medias or formats as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we understand the influences of the life, times and background of William Shakespeare, which will prepare us for our Hamlet unit? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 14th:
  • EXAM on William Shakespeare's life, times and background. You need to study your K/W/L chart notes on William Shakespeare and the Fact Sheet on Shakespeare's Life, Times and Background. The EXAM WILL BE 25% of the 2nd marking period grade. It will be a multiple-choice question test. Bring in your own #2 pencil.
  • Tuesday, March 8th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What do you think influences a person more in their life--genes or environment (nature vs. nurture)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. K/W/L Note-Taking:

  • Take notes on the K/W/L chart based on the Shakespeare's life, times and background FACT SHEET.
  • Shakespeare's parents, siblings and childhood experiences: "He was John and Mary Shakespeare's oldest surviving child; their first two children, both girls, did not live beyond infancy. Growing up as the big brother of the family, William had three younger brothers, Gilbert, Richard, and Edmund, and two younger sisters: Anne, who died at seven, and Joan. Their father, John Shakespeare, was a leatherworker who specialized in the soft white leather used for gloves and similar items. A prosperous businessman, he married Mary Arden, of the prominent Arden family. John rose through local offices in Stratford, becoming an alderman and eventually, when William was five, the town bailiff�much like a mayor. Not long after that, however, John Shakespeare stepped back from public life; we don't know why. Shakespeare, as the son of a leading Stratford citizen, almost certainly attended Stratford's grammar school. Like all such schools, its curriculum consisted of an intense emphasis on the Latin classics, including memorization, writing, and acting classic Latin plays. Shakespeare most likely attended until about age 15" (Folger Shakespeare Library).
  • What do you think influenced Shakespeare's life more--his genes or his environment (nature vs. nurture)?

    4. K/W/L Discussion: Discuss the K/W/L notes on Shakespeare's life, times and background. Discuss Shakespeare's genes and environment.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different medias or formats as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • How can we understand the influences of the life, times and background of William Shakespeare, which will prepare us for our Hamlet unit? N/A
    Monday, March 7th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are three facts that you know about William Shakespeare (consider his works of literature, his life, time period, other people's perspectives about him, etc.)?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    Turn in your Creative Vocabulary Story for Lists #2 and #3 (HOMEWORK VALUE=TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS--20 points).

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, create a K/W/L chart on William Shakespeare. Write what you know about Shakespeare in the "K" column (consider what makes Shakespeare a literary genius), what you want to know about him (write in question form) in the "W" column, and leave the "L" section blank for what you're going to learn about him.

    4. Work Period Discussion and Note-Taking: Take notes on the K/W/L chart findings and compose additional notes on Shakespeare's life, times and background FACT SHEET.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we understand the life, times and background of William Shakespeare, which will prepare us for our Hamlet unit? N/A
    Friday, March 4th, 2016: Work Period:
  • Work on composing the Creative Vocabulary Story for Lists #2 and #3 (which is due Monday). Here are the requirements: CREATIVE/ARGUMENTATIVE VOCABULARY STORY: Using AT LEAST 10 of the words from SAT Vocabulary Lists #2 and #3, you will write a story on one (CHOOSE ONE) of the following topics: Education, Success, Slavery, or Freedom (topics taken from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass). You MUST use AT LEAST 10 of the words and underline the vocabulary words! You MUST use your chosen words (from the list) correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten OR one typed, double-spaced page (with 12 point font). Your heading MUST include the following: your name, teacher's name, date, class name, period, and title (Vocabulary Story Topic). HOMEWORK VALUE=TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points).

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
  • How can we effectively prove our knowledge of vocabulary and improve our writing skills? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK IS DUE BY E-MAIL (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY TODAY, BEFORE 3pm (see previous days' assignments)!

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 7th:

  • CREATIVE/ARGUMENTATIVE VOCABULARY STORY: Using AT LEAST 10 of the words from SAT Vocabulary Lists #2 and #3, you will write a story on one (CHOOSE ONE) of the following topics: Education, Success, Slavery, or Freedom (topics taken from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass). You MUST use AT LEAST 10 of the words and underline the vocabulary words! You MUST use your chosen words (from the list) correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten OR one typed, double-spaced page (with 12 point font). Your heading MUST include the following: your name, teacher's name, date, class name, period, and title (Vocabulary Story Topic). HOMEWORK VALUE=TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points).
  • Thursday, March 3rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Vocabulary Exam on Lists #2 and #3.

    2. Work Period:

  • Work on owed homework (see previous days' assignments).
  • Begin the Creative Vocabulary Story for Lists #2 and #3 (which is due Monday).
  • Grade classmates' definition section of the Vocabulary Exam.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we effectively prove our knowledge of vocabulary and improve our writing skills? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK IS DUE BY TODAY BY 3pm OR E-MAIL (hconn@schools.nyc.gov) BY TOMORROW BEFORE 3pm (see previous days' assignments)!

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MARCH 7th:

  • CREATIVE/ARGUMENTATIVE VOCABULARY STORY: Using AT LEAST 10 of the words from SAT Vocabulary Lists #2 and #3, you will write a story on one (CHOOSE ONE) of the following topics: Education, Success, Slavery, or Freedom (topics taken from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass). You MUST use AT LEAST 10 of the words and underline the vocabulary words! You MUST use your chosen words (from the list) correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten OR one typed, double-spaced page (with 12 point font). Your heading MUST include the following: your name, teacher's name, date, class name, period, and title (Vocabulary Story Topic). HOMEWORK VALUE=TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (20 points).
  • Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are your educational aspirations (goals)? Explain your reasons for these educational aspirations.

    SHOW YESTERDAY'S CLASSWORK: Show your full, handwritten page on the pro (in favor) and con (against) on the debate topic: Education is the key to future success. You should reference (cite page numbers and direct quotes; refer to your t-charts for evidence) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

    2. Whole Class Debating: Students will divide up into two sides: pro (in favor) of the debate topic AND con (against) the debate topic. Students will articulate their own unique arguments that support or argue against the debate topic (and include references to the novel, using t-charts):

  • Education is the key to future success.

    3. Whole Class Reflections:

  • What did you learn from debating?
  • What was an interesting comment/idea that sparked during debating?
  • Why is it valuable to discuss the debate topic on education?
  • If you had more time, what else would you like to discuss on this debate topic?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we effectively debate the topic of education as the key to future success? DUE TOMORROW: VOCABULARY EXAM ON LISTS #2 AND #3 , which is TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd: Study Lists #2 and #3 and know each vocabulary word's part of speech and definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. EXAM VALUE=25% of the 1st marking period grade.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK IS DUE BY TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd BY 3pm (see previous days' assignments)!

    Tuesday, March 1st, 2016: 1. Do Now: Finish yesterday's College Writing (CW). Write a minimum of a full, handwritten page on the pro (in favor) and con (against) on the debate topic: Education is the key to future success. You should reference (cite page numbers and direct quotes; refer to your t-charts for evidence) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

    Return copies of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

    2. Speed Debating: Students will divide up into half the class, sitting across from a partner. One side of the room will be pro (in favor) of the debate topic. The other side of the room will be con (against) the debate topic. Students will respond to the following statements that connect to the debate topic (and include references to the novel, using t-charts):

  • Education is the key to future success.

    3. Whole Class Reflections:

  • What did you learn from speed debating?
  • What was an interesting comment/idea that sparked during speed debating?
  • Why is it valuable to discuss the debate topic on education?
  • If you had more time, what else would you like to discuss on this debate topic?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we effectively debate the topic of education as the key to future success? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2nd:
  • FINISH today's classwork: Write a full, handwritten page on the pro (in favor) and con (against) on the debate topic: Education is the key to future success. You should reference (cite page numbers and direct quotes; refer to your t-charts for evidence) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. You should include your classmates' opinions/arguments (from today's speed debating).

    VOCABULARY EXAM ON LISTS #2 AND #3 on THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd: Study Lists #2 and #3 and know each vocabulary word's part of speech and definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. EXAM VALUE=25% of the 1st marking period grade.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK IS DUE BY THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd (see previous days' assignments; last day of the 1st marking period is Friday, March 4th)!

  • Monday, February 29th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What source(s) do you trust to educate yourself? Explain your reasons. (think about newspapers, people, news stations, people, etc.)

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your Do Now with a neighbor. Share with the class.

    SHOW HW: Show 50 vocabulary flashcards for SAT VOCABULARY LISTS #2 and 3. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (NOT the sentences provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app. HOMEWORK VALUE=TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    2. Work Period: Write a minimum of a full, handwritten page on the pro (in favor) and con (against) on the debate topic: Education is the key to future success. You should reference (cite page numbers and direct quotes) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

    3. Reflections: Why is it valuable to discuss the debate topic on education? What can you predict will happen tomorrow?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we expand our vocabulary knowledge and reflect on the power of education? VOCABULARY EXAM ON LISTS #2 AND #3 on THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd: Study Lists #2 and #3 and know each vocabulary word's part of speech and definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. EXAM VALUE=25% of the 1st marking period grade.

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK IS DUE BY THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd (see previous days' assignments; last day of the 1st marking period is Friday, March 4th)!

    Friday, February 26th, 2016: 1. Do Now: Education is the key to future success. Debate the pro (in favor) and the con (against) this statement. You should reference Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

    2. Discuss: Discuss and share the Do Now answers.

    3. Review Vocabulary Lists 2 and 3.

    4. Review the Narrative of Frederick Douglass EXAM answers.

    5. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we examine the lessons from Frederick Douglass' memoir and expand our vocabulary knowledge? DUE THIS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 29th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 50 words in SAT VOCABULARY LISTS #2 and 3. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (NOT the sentences provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app. HOMEWORK VALUE=TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    VOCABULARY EXAM ON THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd: Know each vocabulary word's part of speech and definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. EXAM VALUE=25% of the 1st marking period grade

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments; last day of the 1st marking period is Friday, March 4th)!

  • Thursday, February 25th, 2016: 1. Do Now:
    In your LA section, finish answering the following questions (Write 2-3 sentences for each question):
  • What are Frederick Douglass' lessons to us?
  • What did he envision for future generations of young people of all races?
  • Do you believe that he'd be satisfied with today's youth? Explain your answer.
  • Do you believe that he'd be satisfied with American society today? Explain your answer.
  • What progress would bring Frederick Douglass satisfaction (in today's society)?

    2. Discuss: Discuss and share the Do Now answers.

    3. Introduce Vocabulary Lists 2 and 3.

    4. Introduce HW

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How can we examine the lessons from Frederick Douglass' memoir and expand our vocabulary knowledge? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 29th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 50 words in SAT VOCABULARY LISTS #2 and 3. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (NOT the sentences provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app. HOMEWORK VALUE=TWO HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS.

    VOCABULARY EXAM ON THURSDAY, MARCH 3rd: Know each vocabulary word's part of speech and definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. EXAM VALUE=25% of the 1st marking period grade

    MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments; last day of the 1st marking period is Friday, March 4th)!

  • Wednesday, February 24th, 2016: 1. Do Now: EXAM on NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE

    SHOW HW: Show Chapters 4-11 T-Charts and any owed HW.

    2. Work Period:
    In your LA section, answer the following questions (Write 2-3 sentences for each question):

  • What are Frederick Douglass' lessons to us?
  • What did he envision for future generations of young people of all races?
  • Do you believe that he'd be satisfied with today's youth? Explain your answer.
  • Do you believe that he'd be satisfied with American society today? Explain your answer.
  • What progress would bring Frederick Douglass satisfaction (in today's society)?

    3. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we prove our knowledge of Frederick Douglass' memoir? MAKE UP OWED HOMEWORK (see previous days' assignments)!
    Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Read the Questions and Answers for Frederick Douglass' Memoir.

    TURN IN COMMUNITY SERVICE HOMEWORK.

    2. Discuss/Share: Read-aloud the Do Now questions and answers.

    3. Work Period:

  • READ THE REST OF NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (up to chapter XI--p. 99).
  • Compose CHAPTER IV-XI T-CHARTS (each t-chart need to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. VALUE=8 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (80 points)

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we analyze humanization and dehumanization throughout Frederick Douglass' memoir? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24th:
  • READ THE REST OF NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (up to chapter XI--p. 99).
  • Know the Douglass' Autobiography's Questions and Answers for TOMORROW'S EXAM!
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period grade; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil) on NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (p. 17: chapter I-chapter XI--p. 99). You will be tested on the answers to the questions above and evidence of humanization and dehumanization.
  • Compose CHAPTER IV-XI T-CHARTS (each t-chart need to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. VALUE=8 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (80 points)
  • Monday, February 22nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Answer your assigned question from Questions on Frederick Douglass' Memoir.

    Show HW: CHAPTER III T-CHART (each t-chart needs to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. SHOW OWED HOMEWORK AS WELL.

    2. Discuss/Share: Share your Do Now answer with a neighbor.

    3. Work Period:

  • READ THE REST OF NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (up to chapter XI--p. 99).
  • Compose CHAPTER IV-XI T-CHARTS (each t-chart need to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. VALUE=8 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (80 points)

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we analyze humanization and dehumanization throughout Frederick Douglass' memoir? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23rd:
  • Community Service Activity: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24th:

  • READ THE REST OF NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (up to chapter XI--p. 99).
  • Know the Douglass' Autobiography's Questions and Answers for EXAM!
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period grade; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil) on NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (p. 17: chapter I-chapter XI--p. 99). You will be tested on the answers to the questions above and evidence of humanization and dehumanization.
  • Compose CHAPTER IV-XI T-CHARTS (each t-chart need to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. VALUE=8 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (80 points)
  • Friday, February 12th, 2016: 1. Do Now: QUIZ on SAT Vocabulary Quiz #1

    2. Work Period:

  • Read chapter III (pp. 28-31) in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Compose CHAPTER III T-CHART (each t-chart needs to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization.

    **It will be checked at the end of class TODAY.

    SHOW HW: Your notebook/binder with the following labeled sections: Do Now's and Aim's (DNA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), College Writing (CW), and Homework (HW)

    3. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we improve our vocabulary skills and analyze humanization and dehumanization in chapter III in Frederick Douglass' memoir? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22nd:

  • FINISH THE CLASSWORK: Read chapter III (pp. 28-31) in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • FINISH THE CLASSWORK: Compose CHAPTER III T-CHART (each t-chart needs to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization.

    DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23rd:

  • Community Service Activity: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT

    DUE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24th:

  • READ THE REST OF NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (up to chapter XI--p. 99).
  • Answer the Douglass' Autobiography's Questions in your LA section. VALUE=THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points)
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period grade; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil) on NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (p. 17: chapter I-chapter XI--p. 99). You will be tested on the answers to the questions above and evidence of humanization and dehumanization.
  • Compose CHAPTER IV-XI T-CHARTS (each t-chart need to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. VALUE=8 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (80 points)
  • Thursday, February 11th, 2016: 1. Do Now: How did you feel about chapters I and II? Were these opening chapters engaging? Explain.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1:

  • Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.
  • Volunteers will share evidence and analysis from their T-Charts for Chapters I and II in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read chapter III (pp. 28-31) in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Compose CHAPTER III T-CHART (each t-chart need to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization.

    *YOU WILL HAVE TIME TO WORK ON CHAPTER III T-CHART TOMORROW (it will be checked at the end of class tomorrow).

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we understand and apply the themes of dehumanization and humanization in chapters I, II and III in Frederick Douglass' memoir? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12th:
  • Vocabulary QUIZ #1: QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1. Know each vocabulary word's part of speech and definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=5-10% of the 1st marking period grade

  • SUPPLIES: notebook/section in a notebook with labeled dividers and a folder specifically for this class (see the JUNIOR ENGLISH SYLLABUS for details. Your notebook/binder MUST have the following labeled sections: Do Now's and Aim's (DNA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), College Writing (CW), and Homework (HW). Also, don't forget to bring in a folder for English class.

    DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23rd:

  • Community Service Activity: In honor of the beauty of volunteerism and good citizenship, you are assigned to do the following: Volunteer a minimum of two hours of your time in which you help make the world a better place! This community service assignment is worth THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS. You will be required to do the following: Volunteer two hours of your time (where you are not getting paid). How about volunteering at your local library (story time in the children's section!), homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter/pet store, church/temple/mosque, senior citizen/nursing home, hospital, one of the great NYC parks or museums? Here are some recommended websites to find volunteer opportunities: Volunteer in NYC, Volunteer Match and a food pantry in Rego Park, Queens. COMMUNITY SERVICE HANDOUT

    DUE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24th:

  • READ THE REST OF NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (up to chapter XI--p. 99).
  • Answer the Douglass' Autobiography's Questions in your LA section. VALUE=THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (30 points)
  • EXAM (25% of the 1st marking period grade; multiple-choice questions; bring a #2 pencil) on NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (p. 17: chapter I-chapter XI--p. 99). You will be tested on the answers to the questions above and evidence of humanization and dehumanization.
  • Compose CHAPTER IV-XI T-CHARTS (each t-chart need to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization. VALUE=8 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS (80 points)
  • Wednesday, February 10th, 2016: 1. Do Now: How do chapters I and II (pp. 17-27) connect to Frederick's later accomplishments (such as being a spokesperson for civil rights of African Americans)? Find specific evidence to support your answer.

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read chapters I and II (pp. 17-27) in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Compose TWO T-CHARTS (each t-chart needs to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization.

    *FINISH THESE TWO T-CHARTS TODAY (they will be checked at the end of class today).

    4. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we understand and apply the themes of dehumanization and humanization in chapters I and II in Frederick Douglass' memoir? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12th:
  • Vocabulary QUIZ #1: QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1. Know each vocabulary word's part of speech and definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=5-10% of the 1st marking period grade

  • SUPPLIES: notebook/section in a notebook with labeled dividers and a folder specifically for this class (see the JUNIOR ENGLISH SYLLABUS for details. Your notebook/binder MUST have the following labeled sections: Do Now's and Aim's (DNA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), College Writing (CW), and Homework (HW). Also, don't forget to bring in a folder for English class.
  • Tuesday, February 9th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are Frederick Douglass' accomplishments throughout his life (see the synopsis on the back of the memoir)?

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read chapters I and II (pp. 17-27) in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
  • Compose TWO T-CHARTS (each t-chart needs to have two quotes for dehumanization and two quotes for humanization; analysis for each quote; one t-chart per chapter) on the dehumanization (taking away the human qualities) and the humanization (giving human qualities, like compassion, improvement, and advancement) of the slaves. Identify the page # for each quote. EXAMPLE QUOTE: "I have no accurate knowledge of my age" (p. 17). EXAMPLE ANALYSIS: Frederick is dehumanized by taking away his basic knowledge. You MUST analyze (interpret in your own words) the quote's connection to dehumanization or humanization.

    *YOU WILL HAVE TIME TOMORROW TO FINISH THESE TWO T-CHARTS (they will be checked at the end of class tomorrow).

    SHOW HOMEWORK: VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS AND TURN IN LAST PAGE OF JUNIOR ENGLISH SYLLABUS.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Read and review the JUNIOR ENGLISH SYLLABUS.

    5. HW Reminder.

    6. Reflections: What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today? What do you predict we will learn the rest of the week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we understand and apply the themes of dehumanization and humanization in Frederick Douglass' memoir? DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12th:
  • Vocabulary QUIZ #1: QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1. Know each vocabulary word's part of speech and definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=5-10% of the 1st marking period grade

  • SUPPLIES: notebook/section in a notebook with labeled dividers and a folder specifically for this class (see the JUNIOR ENGLISH SYLLABUS for details. Your notebook/binder MUST have the following labeled sections: Do Now's and Aim's (DNA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), College Writing (CW), and Homework (HW). Also, don't forget to bring in a folder for English class.
  • Friday, February 5th, 2016: 1. Do Now: What are benefits to reading a novel about a slave's experience as opposed to reading historical accounts in a textbook?

    2. Discuss/Share-Part 1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read the synopsis (summary) on the back cover of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. What are your first impressions of this novel? How can you compare and contrast your life to Frederick Douglass' life?
  • Read the first page (p. 17). Frederick has been dehumanized (treated as if he was not a human) as a slave. Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) on p. 17 that support his dehumanization.

    TURN IN HOMEWORK: VOCABULARY STORY.

    4. Discuss/Share-Part 2: Turn and talk over the Work Period questions with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class. Choose from one of the following sentence starters:

  • On page 17, paragraph ____(number), it said that...
  • According to the text, in paragraph _____(number)...
  • From the reading, in paragraph_____...

    5. HW introduced.

    6. Reflections: What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today? What do you predict we will learn next week?

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • How do we begin our study of the theme of dehumanization in Frederick Douglass' memoir? DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9th:
  • Vocabulary Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 30 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1. Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

  • SIGNED CONTRACT: Read the JUNIOR ENGLISH SYLLABUS and turn in the LAST PAGE (provided in class today), which should be SIGNED BY A PARENT/GUARDIAN.
  • Thursday, February 4th, 2016: 1. Do Now:
  • Is struggle required for progress? Explain your answer. (Write 1-2 sentences)
  • In the past 24 hours, you've encountered strangers (on the subway/bus, at the corner store, walking down the street). Choose one stranger and imagine his/her struggles. (Write 1-2 sentences)

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2:
    Finish reading aloud the SAT Vocabulary List #1

    4. Work Period: Begin HW (see details in the homework section).

    SHOW HW: ESSAY REWRITE (include the original essay with the teacher's edits).

    5. Reflections: What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How do we improve our vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5th:
    CREATIVE/ARGUMENTATIVE VOCABULARY STORY: Using AT LEAST 10 of the words in SAT Vocabulary List #1, you will write a story on one (CHOOSE ONE) of the following: Argumentative Question: Is struggle required for progress? Creative Story Topic Ideas (you may write about a stranger's struggle, a role model's progress, a teacher's troubles, hardships around the world, etc.): Struggle, Difficulty, Trouble, Hardship, Progress, Advancement, or Growth. You MUST use AT LEAST 10 of the words and underline them! You MUST use your chosen words (from the list) correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten OR one typed, double-spaced page (with 12 point font). Your heading MUST include the following: your name, teacher's name, date, class name, period, and title (Creative Story Topic or Argumentative Question).
    Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Reflecting on yesterday's quote, "If there is no struggle, there is no progress" (Frederick Douglass), answer the following questions: What progress do you hope to personally achieve throughout the rest of high school and beyond? What progress do you hope your family members achieve? What progress do you hope our country/society will achieve?

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2:
    Read aloud the SAT Vocabulary List #1

    4. Work Period: Begin HW (see details in the homework section).

    5. Reflections: What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    6. HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • How do we prepare to study our unit on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and improve our vocabulary skills? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4th: ESSAY REWRITE: Rewrite an essay from last semester. Bring in the original essay (with the teacher's edits/comments) and your rewritten essay. Highlight your corrections. Your rewrite can be electronic, but you MUST bring it to class with the original essay.

    *IMPORTANT: If you don't have an essay with teacher's corrections from last semester, you can write an essay and turn it in to obtain corrections. Here's an essay assignment: Write five paragraphs on the following argumentative essay question: Should people overcome adversity? Use at least one novel/play to provide evidence to support your answer (which should be the thesis statement at the end of the introductory paragraph). Here's the Argumentative Essay Outline on Adversity.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5th:
    CREATIVE/ARGUMENTATIVE VOCABULARY STORY: Using AT LEAST 10 of the words in SAT Vocabulary List #1, you will write a story on one of the following: Argumentative Question: Is struggle required for progress? Creative Story Topic Ideas (you may write about a stranger's struggle, a role model's progress, a teacher's troubles, hardships around the world, etc.): Struggle, Difficulty, Trouble, Hardship, Progress, Advancement, or Growth. You MUST use AT LEAST 10 of the words and underline them! You MUST use your chosen words (from the list) correctly in a story that makes sense. Write two pages handwritten OR one typed, double-spaced page (with 12 point font). Your heading MUST include the following: your name, teacher's name, date, class name, period, and title (Creative Story Topic or Argumentative Question).

    Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016: 1. Do Now: Interpret the following quote in your own words: "If there is no struggle, there is no progress." --Frederick Douglass

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk over the Do Now with a neighbor. Volunteers share with the class.

    3. Work Period #1:
    Read the SAT Vocabulary List and use at least three SAT words in your answers below.

    1.) What are the key words in the quote from the Do Now?
    2.) What are synonyms (similar meanings) for the key words?
    3.) Explain how this quote connects to your own life, today's society, and works of literature (novels, short stories, movies, plays, etc.).
    4.) What's your prior knowledge of Frederick Douglass, the author of this quote? If you have no prior knowledge, what can you infer about his life from this quote?

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Students share the Work Period questions/answers. Take notes.

    5. Work Period #2:
    Read the SAT Vocabulary List and use at least three more SAT words in your answers below.

    1.) What progress do you hope to personally achieve throughout the rest of high school and beyond?
    2.) What progress do you hope your family members achieve?
    3.) What progress do you hope our country/society will achieve?

    6. Reflections: Share answers to work period #2. What was the most interesting question or discussion point shared today? What do you predict we will learn tomorrow?

    7. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade-appropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How do we prepare to study our unit on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass? DUE THIS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4th: ESSAY REWRITE: Rewrite an essay from last semester. Bring in the original essay (with the teacher's edits/comments) and your rewritten essay. Highlight your corrections. Your rewrite can be electronic, but you MUST bring it to class with the original essay.

    *IMPORTANT: If you don't have an essay with teacher's corrections from last semester, you can write an essay and turn it in to obtain corrections. Here's an essay assignment: Write five paragraphs on the following argumentative essay question: Should people overcome adversity? Use at least one novel/play to provide evidence to support your answer (which should be the thesis statement at the end of the introductory paragraph). Here's the Argumentative Essay Outline on Adversity.