Ms. Conn's and Ms. Sarlin's Junior English Assignments, Spring 2017

Ms. Conn's and Ms. Sarlin's Junior English Assignments
Spring 2017

DateAgendaAIMHomework Assignments
Tuesday, June 27th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Do the Teacher Evaluation Survey

2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk. Captain sharing.
  • Share wisdom from graduation keynote speaker--Dr. Bonnie Butler:
    1.) Learn as you are to live forever. Strive to continue to learn. It makes life enriching.
    2.) Be passionate about everything you do.
    3.) Persevere. Always move forward and make progress.
    4.) Make a list of things you want to do (like a bucket list).
    5.) Make resolutions that are positive.
    6.) Do service. Give of yourself. Volunteer. Do things like coaching youth sports or feeding the homeless.
    7.) Smile. Be nice. Be kind to everyone from the janitor to the CEO.
    8.) Cherish the important people in your lives.

    *How can people implement her advice? Why do you think her advice is important?

    3. Work Period: Coloring book pages for brain boosters and stress relief

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively end the school year with culminating activities? Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer: check out volunteer match to find a volunteer opportunity near you, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, do career research HERE and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

    Monday, June 12th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Read the comments on your research papers. What are your strengths and what do you need to work on in the future?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk. Captain sharing.
  • Regents and SAT strategies

    3. Work Period: MOVIE OR VOCABULARY BASEBALL: Divide into two teams. Divide students into two teams and draw a baseball diamond on the blackboard. Each team has three outs per inning (like regular baseball) and one player from each team goes at a time. Teacher asks a question about facts learned in this class during the spring semester. The student "at bat" has 30 seconds to answer. If he answers correctly in five seconds, the team gets a home run; within 10 seconds, it's a triple; within 15 seconds, it's a double; and just before the time limit, it's a single. If the student does not get the answer right, he's out. Draw a symbol for a base runner when a student gets a hit. When a player gets to home plate the team scores a run. The team with the most runs at the end of nine innings (or whenever time runs out) wins the game.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively end the school year with culminating activities? ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM STRATEGIES (REMEMBER: THE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM IS THIS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14th at 9:15am. IF YOU EARNED A 74 OR LOWER ON THE REGENTS EXAM, THEN YOU SHOULD RETAKE IT!!!): Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:
    1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay. Recommendation: create an outline before writing (look at your packet of outlines!). Write the essay that includes 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) and always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea.
    2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, do career research HERE and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

    Friday, June 9th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose a career that interests you from Best Jobs of 2017 (they include business, technology, medical and education professionals) or another career that suits you better. Then, go to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics to research that career (type in the name of the career in the top, right-hand search box. Answer the following (and be ready to share):
  • What's your chosen career and why?
  • What's the expected salary?
  • What degree do you need to pursue that career?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk. Captain sharing.
  • HW Reminders

    3. Gift of Sunshine: Write your name on the top of a blank piece of paper. Then, stand up and walk around the room with your fellow classmates. Give each classmate a compliment on their papers. Bring sunshine to their day.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively end the school year with culminating activities? ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM STRATEGIES (REMEMBER: THE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM IS NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14th at 9:15am. IF YOU EARNED A 74 OR LOWER ON THE REGENTS EXAM, THEN YOU SHOULD RETAKE IT!!!): Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:
    1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay. Recommendation: create an outline before writing (look at your packet of outlines!). Write the essay that includes 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) and always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea.
    2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, do career research HERE and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

    Wednesday, June 7th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Find a famous, inspiring quote said by one of the authors we read this year (August Wilson or Frederick Douglass). Write the famous quote in neat, colorful handwriting on paper. Give credit to the author. Write your name on the back.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk. Captain sharing.
  • HW Reminders

    3. Work Period: Write a Letter of Advice to a Freshman. Write at least one, full page in which you include the following:

  • Share tips for success at ITHS
  • Give specific evidence of your experiences at ITHS
  • Include positive insights (understandings/judgments) about ITHS
  • Write in letter form, which includes today's date, Dear________, and a signature (Sincerely, your name/Regards, your name/All the Best, your name).

    4. Turn in owed HW (today's the last day!)

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively end the school year with culminating activities? DUE BY THE END OF THE SCHOOL DAY: WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:
  • ATTENTION TO ALL STUDENTS WHO HAVE ALREADY E-MAILED THE RESEARCH PAPER TO MS. CONN/MS. SARLIN: Please print out your paper (Ms. Conn's printer isn't working!) and turn it in tomorrow, by the end of the day!
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (up to 100 extra credit points): Act out your script on JOURNEY. Present it to the class with a partner or just on your own! Here's how you'll be graded: Grading Sheet for Extra Credit.
  • MAKE UP OWED HW--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THE END OF TODAY, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period; -10 points for each day late; up to -30 points off for 3+ days late): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:
  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Use this MLA Checklist to check off that you've included all components of MLA format.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).

    ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM STRATEGIES (REMEMBER: THE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM IS NEXT TUESDAY, JUNE 14th at 9:15am. IF YOU EARNED A 74 OR LOWER ON THE REGENTS EXAM, THEN YOU SHOULD RETAKE IT!!!): Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:
    1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay. Recommendation: create an outline before writing (look at your packet of outlines!). Write the essay that includes 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) and always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea.
    2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, do career research HERE and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

  • Tuesday, June 6th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are three steps that you're going to take this summer to help you prepare for your future career? Suggestions: get a job, prepare for the SAT, research and visit colleges, e-mail colleges to obtain information, research careers, etc.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk. Captain sharing.
  • HW Reminders

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively improve our language and writing skills to prepare us for college? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:
  • ATTENTION TO ALL STUDENTS WHO HAVE ALREADY E-MAILED THE RESEARCH PAPER TO MS. CONN/MS. SARLIN: Please print out your paper (Ms. Conn's printer isn't working!) and turn it in tomorrow, by the end of the day!
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (up to 100 extra credit points): Act out your script on JOURNEY. Present it to the class with a partner or just on your own! Here's how you'll be graded: Grading Sheet for Extra Credit.
  • MAKE UP OWED HW--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THIS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period; -10 points for each day late; up to -30 points off for 3+ days late): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:
  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Use this MLA Checklist to check off that you've included all components of MLA format.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).

    ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM STRATEGIES (REMEMBER: THE ENGLISH REGENTS EXAM IS NEXT TUESDAY, JUNE 14th at 9:15am. IF YOU EARNED A 74 OR LOWER ON THE REGENTS EXAM, THEN YOU SHOULD RETAKE IT!!!): Part 1/Reading Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions:
    1.) Preview the questions AND circle key words in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will ask about characterization of characters (personality traits, appearance, actions, thoughts/feelings, other people's points of view and dialogue/speech), speaker's point of view, tone (author's attitude toward the subject), and author's purpose (Why are we reading this passage? What's the point? Why is it important to us? What should we learn?).
    2.) Underline the line numbers in the reading passages (see the line numbers in the questions). You do this so when you read the passages, you are prepared to focus on the underlined line numbers.
    3.) When you are done reading the passages, cover up the answer choice and answer the questions without looking at the answer choices. Write your own answers in the margins of each question. You do this so you're not distracted by the answer choices, but instead you focus on figuring out the correct answer quickly.
    4.) Eliminate two wrong answers for each question (50-50 rule). You should easily cross out two wrong answers (usually, they have similar/close meanings).
    5.) If you don't know the meanings of unknown words, determine if the words are positive or negative. This will help you figure out which answers to eliminate. Trust your gut instinct about positive or negative sounding words. Also, use your prior knowledge (roots, other languages like Spanish or French) to make your best guess about the meanings of the words.

    Part 2/Argumentative Essay:
    1. Circle key words in the Topic Question (those key words should be repeated throughout your essay; you may use synonyms of those key words). Establish your Thesis Statement as your answer to the Topic Question.
    2. Read the four passages (be ready to choose three passages), focusing on underlining evidence that supports the key words from the Topic Question and your Thesis Statement.
    3. Compose an essay. Recommendation: create an outline before writing (look at your packet of outlines!). Write the essay that includes 5 paragraphs (2-3 handwritten pages) and always focuses on the Thesis Statement (the answer to the Topic Question). Make sure that you include the counterclaim and your attack on the counterclaim. Include abundant evidence at least 5 direct quotes) from three passages. For the body paragraphs, you MUST write 10-12 sentences (ONE FULL PAGE) for each paragraph. The introductory paragraph introduces the Thesis Statement. Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passages you've referenced). Make sure that every sentence (except the counterclaim) supports your Thesis Statement. Remember, this is an argumentative essay.

    Part 3/Central Idea Essay:
    1.) Read the passage provided, and identify a central (main) idea in the text. Search for one MAIN literary element (such as characterization, conflict, setting, or symbolism) that develops the central idea. Take notes in the margin that support the central idea and literary element that develops the central idea.
    2.) Create an essay of 3 paragraphs (recommendation: create an outline before writing the essay), with one body paragraph of 10-12 sentences. Include 3-5 direct quotes from the passage that support the central idea and the literary element that develops the central idea. Stay focused on the central idea (which you clearly identified in a thesis statement in the introduction paragraph). Include sophisticated vocabulary. Cite the evidence (give credit to the passage with line #s). Make sure that every sentence supports your central idea.

    Summer Recommendations: Get a job, volunteer, read books you've always wanted to read and books to challenge your mind, write poetry/creative writing/a book, etc., create a website/blog, enjoy a new hobby (i.e. karate, boxing, software development, game design, salsa dancing, and more), work on your resume (sample high school resumes), write a draft of your college essay, prepare (check out: Ms. Conn's vocabulary lists) and sign up for the fall SAT, figure out what colleges you will apply to and obtain their applications, do career research HERE and so much more!

    Read for pleasure and challenge!

    It was a great pleasure teaching you!

  • Monday, June 5th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Review for today's quiz on List #5

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Work on owed HW and extra credit opportunity. See HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively prepare for college? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (up to 100 extra credit points): Act out your script on JOURNEY. Present it to the class with a partner or just on your own! Here's how you'll be graded: Grading Sheet for Extra Credit.

    MAKE UP OWED HW--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY THIS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period; -10 points for each day late; up to -30 points off for 3+ days late): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Use this MLA Checklist to check off that you've included all components of MLA format.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Friday, June 2nd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What did you find most useful and/or intriguing about this class? You may refer to books we read (The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass or Fences), the papers we wrote (the thematic essay on Fences, the research paper, pre-writing steps--including index cards, outlining, ICE (introducing, citing and explaining the quotes), essay rewriting, t-chart notes, resume writing), SAT vocabulary, captain role as a leadership opportunity, or anything else.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Review for Monday's quiz on Vocabulary List #5

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively improve our language and writing skills to prepare us for college? DUE THIS MONDAY, JUNE 5th: QUIZ (10% of the 3rd marking period) on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #5 AND the ROOTS: CORP (body) and VERT (turn)

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:

  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (extra credit points TBA): Act out your script on JOURNEY. Present it to the class with a partner or just on your own!

    MAKE UP OWED HW--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period; -10 points for each day late; up to -30 points off for 3+ days late): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Use this MLA Checklist to check off that you've included all components of MLA format.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Wednesday, May 31st-Thursday, June 1st, 2017: Work Period: Work on completing the following HW (see details in the HW section).
  • Flashcards for Vocabulary List #5
  • Rewrite of Fences essay
  • Work on your original script individually or with a partner.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively improve our language and writing skills to prepare us for college? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 2nd:
  • FENCES ESSAY REWRITE (PERIOD 7 CLASS WILL HAVE THIS DUE ON MONDAY, JUNE 5th): Rewrite your essay, making Ms. Conn's corrections. Please highlight/underline the corrections and bring in the original essay with the corrections.
  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #5 AND the ROOTS: CORP (body) and VERT (turn). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • ORIGINAL SCRIPT: Write your own script with a partner or on your own. Your script must be two pages (typed) or three pages (handwritten). You must include the following:
  • Four-five characters, with at least one character from one of the texts we studied this semester (The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass or Fences)
  • The theme is the challenges and highlights of a journey (the journey can be literal or figurative) in which the character(s) have a destination and a reason for getting there
  • A clear setting (time period and location)
  • Progress with a beginning (exposition), climax (turning point of the story), and a resolution
  • Clear relationships between characters and conflicts (internal and/or external)
  • Dialogue in which two or more characters clearly interact with each other, expressing their actions, thoughts, feelings and personality traits
  • Stage Directions in which the playwright (you!) is telling the actors what to do and how to do it

    DUE MONDAY, JUNE 5th: QUIZ (10% of the 3rd marking period) on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #5 AND the ROOTS: CORP (body) and VERT (turn)

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (extra credit points TBA): Act out your script on JOURNEY. Present it to the class with a partner or just on your own!

    MAKE UP OWED HW--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period; -10 points for each day late; up to -30 points off for 3+ days late): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Use this MLA Checklist to check off that you've included all components of MLA format.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Tuesday, May 30th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What would you like to do in the remaining days in English class to prepare you for senior year?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Share your answers with your table mates. Captains will share their warm-up answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Work on the following:

  • Flashcards for Vocabulary List #5
  • Rewrite of Fences essay
  • Work on your original script individually or with a partner.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • What did we find valuable from conducting research and composing the research paper? DUE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 2nd:
  • FENCES ESSAY REWRITE (PERIOD 7 CLASS WILL HAVE THIS DUE ON MONDAY, JUNE 5th): Rewrite your essay, making Ms. Conn's corrections. Please highlight/underline the corrections and bring in the original essay with the corrections.
  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #5 AND the ROOTS: CORP (body) and VERT (turn). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • ORIGINAL SCRIPT: Write your own script with a partner or on your own. Your script must be two pages (typed) or three pages (handwritten). You must include the following:
  • Four-five characters, with at least one character from one of the texts we studied this semester (The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass or Fences)
  • The theme is the challenges and highlights of a journey (the journey can be literal or figurative) in which the character(s) have a destination and a reason for getting there
  • A clear setting (time period and location)
  • Progress with a beginning (exposition), climax (turning point of the story), and a resolution
  • Clear relationships between characters and conflicts (internal and/or external)
  • Dialogue in which two or more characters clearly interact with each other, expressing their actions, thoughts, feelings and personality traits
  • Stage Directions in which the playwright (you!) is telling the actors what to do and how to do it

    DUE MONDAY, JUNE 5th: QUIZ (10% of the 3rd marking period) on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #5 AND the ROOTS: CORP (body) and VERT (turn)

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (extra credit points TBA): Act out your script on JOURNEY. Present it to the class with a partner or just on your own!

    MAKE UP OWED HW--ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN BY NEXT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period; -10 points for each day late; up to -30 points off for 3+ days late): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Use this MLA Checklist to check off that you've included all components of MLA format.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Friday, May 26th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up:
  • What did you learn while doing the research for the research paper? Share an intriguing (interesting) fact, something shocking/unexpected, or a fact that you think everyone should know!

    TURN IN YOUR RESEARCH PAPER with the RUBRIC.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Share your answers with your table mates. Captains will share their warm-up answers with the class.
  • Introduce Vocabulary List #5.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • What did we find valuable from conducting research and composing the research paper? DUE NEXT FRIDAY, JUNE 2nd:
  • VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #5 AND the ROOTS: CORP (body) and VERT (turn). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • ORIGINAL SCRIPT: Write your own script with a partner or on your own. Your script must be two pages (typed) or three pages (handwritten). You must include the following:
  • Four-five characters, with at least one character from one of the texts we studied this semester (The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass or Fences)
  • The theme is the challenges and highlights of a journey (the journey can be literal or figurative) in which the character(s) have a destination and a reason for getting there
  • A clear setting (time period and location)
  • Progress with a beginning (exposition), climax (turning point of the story), and a resolution
  • Clear relationships between characters and conflicts (internal and/or external)
  • Dialogue in which two or more characters clearly interact with each other, expressing their actions, thoughts, feelings and personality traits
  • Stage Directions in which the playwright (you!) is telling the actors what to do and how to do it

    DUE MONDAY, JUNE 5th: QUIZ (10% of the 3rd marking period) on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #5 AND the ROOTS: CORP (body) and VERT (turn)

    EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY (extra credit points TBA): Act out your script on JOURNEY. Present it to the class with a partner or just on your own!

    MAKE UP OWED HW:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period; -10 points for each day late; up to -30 points off for 3+ days late): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Use this MLA Checklist to check off that you've included all components of MLA format.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Thursday, May 25th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up:
  • What questions and/or concerns do you have about the research paper?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Volunteers share their warm-up questions/concerns.
  • Review the contents of the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Analyze the contents of a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.

    3. Work Period:

  • Work on composing your research paper--it's due tomorrow (Friday)!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand the research paper rubric and analyze sample research papers? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period; -10 points for each day late; up to -30 points off for 3+ days late): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:
  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Use this MLA Checklist to check off that you've included all components of MLA format.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Wednesday, May 24th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up:
  • What did you find easy and what did you find difficult in composing your research paper outline?

    Show HW: Show the outline for your research paper.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review the contents of the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Analyze the contents of a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.

    3. Work Period:

  • Work on composing your research paper--it's due this Friday!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand the research paper rubric and analyze sample research papers? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:
  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up:
  • Why does your research topic matter to you?
  • Why does it matter to others?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Introduce Research Paper Rubric.

    3. Work Period:

  • Work on your outline. You MUST follow this OUTLINE FOR YOUR RESEARCH PAPER

    SHOW owed HW: Show your source cards (see samples on the chalkboard) and online: Book Source Card and Website Source Card.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we create an outline and see its value in a research paper? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24th:
  • Outline of your Research Paper (handouts will be provided): You MUST follow OUTLINE FOR YOUR RESEARCH PAPER. Also, see Sample Outline and Outline Format in Research Paper Instructions.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Monday, May 22nd, 2017: Work Period:
  • Why does your research topic matter to you?
  • Why does it matter to others?
  • Work on your outline. You MUST follow this OUTLINE FOR YOUR RESEARCH PAPER

    SHOW HW: Show your source cards (see samples on the chalkboard) and online: Book Source Card and Website Source Card.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we create source cards and an outline and see their value in a research paper? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 24th:
  • Outline of your Research Paper (handouts will be provided): You MUST follow OUTLINE FOR YOUR RESEARCH PAPER. Also, see Sample Outline and Outline Format in Research Paper Instructions.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    UPDATED Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • You will write 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font Times New Roman font in which you answer your Essential Question (the "why" or "how" question on your research topic) throughout your writing.
  • You will be graded on the Research Paper Rubric.
  • Here is a detailed, sample research paper and additional sample research papers in MLA style.
  • You need to include a proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.
  • You need a Works Cited page (this does not count in your page count of 5-7 pages) in which you include all of your information from your source cards in alphabetical order.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Friday, May 19th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What have you completed so far in the research paper process?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Finish your source cards (see samples on the chalkboard) and online: Book Source Card and Website Source Card. When finished with your source and research cards, work on your outline. You MUST follow this OUTLINE FOR YOUR RESEARCH PAPER

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we create source cards and an outline and see their value in a research paper? DUE THIS MONDAY, MAY 22nd:
    FIVE Source Cards (one for each source: four online articles and one book) and TWENTY Research Cards (a minimum of three cards per source). Use these class samples: Book Source Card and Website Source Card. CREATE TWENTY RESEARCH CARDS: TEN CARDS THAT MATCH SAMPLE #1: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper AND TEN CARDS THAT MATCH SAMPLE #2: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper. Use "MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources" and "MLA Works Cited Page: Books" as a guide for your source cards.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Outline of your Research Paper (handouts will be provided): You MUST follow OUTLINE FOR YOUR RESEARCH PAPER. Also, see Sample Outline and Outline Format in Research Paper Instructions.

    DUE FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman font
  • proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Thursday, May 18th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are your challenges in composing the source cards and research cards?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Finish your source cards (see samples on the chalkboard) and online: Book Source Card and Website Source Card.

    Show owed HW.

    4. Mini-Lesson on Research Cards and Outline: See SAMPLE #1: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper SAMPLE #2: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper as guides for your research cards.

  • Introduce OUTLINE.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we create source cards and an outline and see their value in a research paper? DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 22nd:
    FIVE Source Cards (one for each source: four online articles and one book) and TWENTY Research Cards (a minimum of three cards per source). Use these class samples: Book Source Card and Website Source Card. CREATE TWENTY RESEARCH CARDS: TEN CARDS THAT MATCH SAMPLE #1: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper AND TEN CARDS THAT MATCH SAMPLE #2: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper. Use "MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources" and "MLA Works Cited Page: Books" as a guide for your source cards.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Outline of your Research Paper (handouts will be provided): You MUST follow OUTLINE FOR YOUR RESEARCH PAPER. Also, see Sample Outline and Outline Format in Research Paper Instructions.

    DUE FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman font
  • proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Wednesday, May 17th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Finish your source cards (see samples on the chalkboard) and online: Book Source Card and Website Source Card.

    Show owed HW.

    2. Mini-Lesson on Research Cards: See SAMPLE #1: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper SAMPLE #2: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper as guides for your research cards.

    3. Work Period: Work on creating your TWENTY research cards.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we create source cards and see their value in a research paper? DATE CHANGE: DUE NEXT MONDAY, MAY 22nd:
    FIVE Source Cards (one for each source: four online articles and one book) and TWENTY Research Cards (a minimum of three cards per source). Use these class samples: Book Source Card and Website Source Card. CREATE TWENTY RESEARCH CARDS: TEN CARDS THAT MATCH SAMPLE #1: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper AND TEN CARDS THAT MATCH SAMPLE #2: How to Create Research Cards for your Research Paper. Use "MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources" and "MLA Works Cited Page: Books" as a guide for your source cards.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 24th:

  • Outline of your Research Paper (handouts will be provided): see Sample Outline and Outline Format in Research Paper Instructions.

    DUE FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman font
  • proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Tuesday, May 16th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What do you think belongs in a source card and why is it beneficial to create source cards for a research paper?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Work on composing Source Cards. Use Making Source Cards, "MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources" and "MLA Works Cited Page: Books" as guides for your source cards.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we create source cards and see their value in a research paper? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 19th:
    FIVE Source Cards (one for each source: four online articles and one book) and TWENTY Research Cards (a minimum of three cards per source). Use these class samples: Book Source Card and Website Source Card. See How to Create Note Cards for a Research Paper as a guide for your research cards. Use "MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources" and "MLA Works Cited Page: Books" as a guide for your source cards.

    DUE TUESDAY, MAY 23rd:

  • Outline of your Research Paper (handouts will be provided): see Sample Outline and Outline Format in Research Paper Instructions.

    DUE FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman font
  • proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Monday, May 15th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose one of the following to answer:
  • How did you choose your four online resources (the website articles you will use for your research paper)?
  • If you did not do the homework, answer this one. How do you plan on finding your online resources? (Hint: which of these sources will you use and why? News articles, colleges, non-profit organizations, and/or google scholar)

    Show HW: Show your four URL's for the online sources that you will use for your research paper.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    Show owed HW.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read "Helpful Hints to Help You Evaluate the Credibility of WWW Resources" from George Mason University
  • Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we determine criteria for evaluating credible, online sources? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 19th:
    FIVE Source Cards (one for each source: four online articles and one book) and TWENTY Research Cards (a minimum of three cards per source). See How to Create Note Cards for a Research Paper as a guide for your research cards. Use "MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources" and "MLA Works Cited Page: Books" as a guide for your source cards.

    DUE TUESDAY, MAY 23rd:

  • Outline of your Research Paper (handouts will be provided): see Sample Outline and Outline Format in Research Paper Instructions.

    DUE FRIDAY, MAY 26th:
    RESEARCH PAPER (25% of the 3rd marking period): What is a research paper? A research paper is a document in which you prove or defend a thesis (the answer to your "why" or "how" question; the thesis is 1-2 sentences that is the roadmap and focus for your entire paper) with ideas, facts and statements of multiple, diverse resources.
    Research Paper Instructions include the following:

  • 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman font
  • proper heading that includes your name, teacher's name, class name, class period, date (the due date of the research paper), title (centered), and your last name and page # on each page (in the right hand corner)
  • Do not use any form of first person (I, me, my, we, our, etc.) or second person (you, your, yours, us, etc.).
  • Five, cited sources: one source must be an approved book, and the remaining four must be approved online sources. All sources must be cited in the essay at least once.
  • Reference to the interview data and a conclusion based on the results.
  • Outline, pie graphs, and works cited page must be attached to your research paper (they do not count as the 5-7 pages of writing).
  • You MUST cite the source when you are using or referring to someone else's words or ideas, when you use information gained through interviewing another person, and when you use any statistic.
  • You do not have to cite a source when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, your own conclusions, common knowledge (common sense observations or generally accepted facts) or when you are writing your own experimental results.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking).
  • Friday, May 12th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are your methods of judging the credibility (value or worth) of an online source? Share at least two methods.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    Show owed HW.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read "Helpful Hints to Help You Evaluate the Credibility of WWW Resources" from George Mason University
  • Begin HW. Common Core Standards:
  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we determine criteria for evaluating credible, online sources? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, MAY 15th:
    Research and find FOUR online sources (show the URLs) on your research topic (use your essential research question to guide you). Bring in URLs (website addresses) USING THESE SOURCES ONLY:
  • a reputable news source (such as: New York Times, Fox News, CNN, Wall Street JOURNAL, NBC, ABC, BBC)
  • an academic university/college
  • a non-profit organization (such as: ACLU, Boys and Girls Club of America, Public Broadcasting Service, ASPCA)
  • a Google Scholar article

    *For assistance in understanding how to evaluate online sources, read "Helpful Hints to Help You Evaluate the Credibility of WWW Resources" from George Mason University

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -30 points): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Thursday, May 11th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What can you conclude about the benefits of creating pie graphs?

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    Show HW: Essential Research Question and Topics for your Ten Supplementary Questions.

    3. Work Period:

  • Finish yesterday's pie graphs on age.
  • Create two new pie graphs that track the data of the answers you collected from your interviews. See sample provided in class.
  • FINISH AND TURN IN ALL FOUR PIE GRAPHS based on your research data. This is for classwork credit!
  • Reflection: Why is data collection and pie graph composition useful for a research paper?

    4. Introduce HW. Read "Helpful Hints to Help You Evaluate the Credibility of WWW Resources" from George Mason University

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we create pie graphs by analyzing our interview data for our research papers? DUE MONDAY, MAY 15th:
    Research and find FOUR online sources (show the URLs) on your research topic (use your essential research question to guide you). Bring in URLs (website addresses) USING THESE SOURCES ONLY:
  • a reputable news source (such as: New York Times, Fox News, CNN, Wall Street JOURNAL, NBC, ABC, BBC)
  • an academic university/college
  • a non-profit organization (such as: ACLU, Boys and Girls Club of America, Public Broadcasting Service, ASPCA)
  • a Google Scholar article

    **For assistance in understanding how to evaluate online sources, read "Helpful Hints to Help You Evaluate the Credibility of WWW Resources" from George Mason University

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Wednesday, May 10th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose one of the following questions to answer.
  • What conclusions can you draw from your data (interviews)?
  • If you did not do the interviews, answer this one: What can you predict about the answers from your interviewees?

    Show HW: Show the book you've chosen for your research paper and the interview data.

    2. Work Period:

  • Turn your data interviewees into two pie charts (one for the adults and one for the kids). See samples provided.
  • Create your ESSENTIAL RESEARCH QUESTION. It MUST be a "Why" or "How" question. All of your ten supplementary questions (composed previously) should support your ESSENTIAL QUESTION. Here are some samples from other students: Why have some countries been more successful in the transition from Communism than others? How have conceptions of race changed in the U.S. since the 1960's? How do different presidents affect political parties since the 1980's? The point is that your ESSENTIAL QUESTION should be asking about new trends, developments, or outcomes that are not obvious ("HOW" questions) or the causes of a specific event or general trend ("WHY" questions).
  • Identify a topic for each of your TEN SUPPLEMENTARY RESEARCH QUESTIONS.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we analyze our data (interviews) and compose a clear essential question? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 11th:

  • Create your ESSENTIAL RESEARCH QUESTION. It MUST be a "Why" or "How" question. All of your ten supplementary questions (composed previously) should support your ESSENTIAL QUESTION. Here are some samples from other students: Why have some countries been more successful in the transition from Communism than others? How have conceptions of race changed in the U.S. since the 1960's? How do different presidents affect political parties since the 1980's? The point is that your ESSENTIAL QUESTION should be asking about new trends, developments, or outcomes that are not obvious ("HOW" questions) or the causes of a specific event or general trend ("WHY" questions).
  • Identify topics for each of your TEN SUPPLEMENTARY RESEARCH QUESTIONS. For example, for the following questions: "What factors can corrupt a cop?" The topic would be police corruption. "How much evidence is required to convict a suspect?" The topic would be evidence for conviction.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Tuesday, May 9th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Study for today's vocabulary quiz #4.

    Show HW: Show any owed HW.

    2. Work Period:

  • Vocabulary List #4 QUIZ
  • Create a vocabulary card from a previous list.
  • Create your ESSENTIAL RESEARCH QUESTION. It MUST be a "Why" or "How" question. All of your ten supplementary questions (composed previously) should support your ESSENTIAL QUESTION. Here are some samples from other students: Why have some countries been more successful in the transition from Communism than others? How have conceptions of race changed in the U.S. since the 1960's? How do different presidents affect political parties since the 1980's? The point is that your ESSENTIAL QUESTION should be asking about new trends, developments, or outcomes that are not obvious ("HOW" questions) or the causes of a specific event or general trend ("WHY" questions).
  • Identify a topic for each of your TEN SUPPLEMENTARY RESEARCH QUESTIONS.
  • Prepare for tomorrow's HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we improve our vocabulary and prepare an essential research question? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MAY 10th:
  • Bring in one library/electronic/store-bought NON-FICTION (true; real facts) book (minimum of 150 pages) on your research topic. The book must be modern (within the last 20 years).
  • Conduct DATA RESEARCH (interviews) on your research topic. Ask 5 adults (over 21 years old) and 5 kids (under 21 years old) the following question: What do you think about ___________________'s (your research topic) relevance to modern society? Please provide the age, gender, and city of residence for each interviewee (person being interviewed).

    DUE THURSDAY, MAY 11th:


  • Create your ESSENTIAL RESEARCH QUESTION. It MUST be a "Why" or "How" question. All of your ten supplementary questions (composed previously) should support your ESSENTIAL QUESTION. Here are some samples from other students: Why have some countries been more successful in the transition from Communism than others? How have conceptions of race changed in the U.S. since the 1960's? How do different presidents affect political parties since the 1980's? The point is that your ESSENTIAL QUESTION should be asking about new trends, developments, or outcomes that are not obvious ("HOW" questions) or the causes of a specific event or general trend ("WHY" questions).
  • Identify topics for each of your TEN SUPPLEMENTARY RESEARCH QUESTIONS. For example, for the following questions: "What factors can corrupt a cop?" The topic would be police corruption. "How much evidence is required to convict a suspect?" The topic would be evidence for conviction.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Monday, May 8th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Finish viewing the film, Fences. Compare and contrast (find similarities and differences) the film and August Wilson's play.

    Show HW: Show any owed HW.

    2. Work Period: Prepare for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we find comparisons and contrasts between the film version and August Wilson's play, Fences? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MAY 9th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #4 AND the ROOTS: EX (outside), FACIL (easy), and IN (inside). 10% of the 3rd marking period.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 10th:

  • Bring in one library/electronic/store-bought NON-FICTION (true; real facts) book (minimum of 150 pages) on your research topic. The book must be modern (within the last 20 years).
  • Conduct DATA RESEARCH (interviews) on your research topic. Ask 5 adults (over 21 years old) and 5 kids (under 21 years old) the following question: What do you think about ___________________'s (your research topic) relevance to modern society? Please provide the age, gender, and city of residence for each interviewee (person being interviewed).

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Friday, May 5th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: View the film, Fences. Compare and contrast (find similarities and differences) the film and August Wilson's play.

    Show HW: Show the vocabulary list #4 flashcards and any owed HW.

    2. Film Viewing: View the film version of the play, Fences.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we find comparisons and contrasts between the film version and August Wilson's play, Fences? DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 9th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #4 AND the ROOTS: EX (outside), FACIL (easy), and IN (inside). 10% of the 3rd marking period.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MAY 10th:

  • Bring in one library/electronic/store-bought NON-FICTION (true; real facts) book (minimum of 150 pages) on your research topic. The book must be modern (within the last 20 years).
  • Conduct DATA RESEARCH (interviews) on your research topic. Ask 5 adults (over 21 years old) and 5 kids (under 21 years old) the following question: What do you think about ___________________'s (your research topic) relevance to modern society? Please provide the age, gender, and city of residence for each interviewee (person being interviewed).

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Thursday, May 4th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: View the film, Fences. Compare and contrast (find similarities and differences) the film and August Wilson's play.

    Show HW: Show the rewrite for the Midterm Essay.

    2. Film Viewing: View the film version of the play, Fences.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we find comparisons and contrasts between the film version and August Wilson's play, Fences? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MAY 5th:
  • Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #4 AND the ROOTS: EX (outside), FACIL (easy), and IN (inside). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 9th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #4 AND the ROOTS: EX (outside), FACIL (easy), and IN (inside). 10% of the 3rd marking period.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: View the film, Fences. Compare and contrast (find similarities and differences) the film and August Wilson's play.

    2. Exit Slip: Complete the Exit Slip on the film, Fences and August Wilson's play. Turn it in for a grade.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we find comparisons and contrasts between the film version and August Wilson's play, Fences? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, MAY 4th:
  • Rewrite your midterm exam essay. Highlight the corrections. Bring in the original midterm with the teacher's edits. You can type or handwrite the rewrite.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 5th:

  • Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #4 AND the ROOTS: EX (outside), FACIL (easy), and IN (inside). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 9th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #4 AND the ROOTS: EX (outside), FACIL (easy), and IN (inside). 10% of the 3rd marking period.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Tuesday, May 2nd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up:
  • Fill out the goal sheet for the 3rd marking period. What is your SMART Goal? (Be ready to share with your table mates and new captain)
  • Read over the midterm essay and see the teacher's corrections. Add your writing goals to the goals sheet.
  • Add graded essays and tests to your portfolio folder (received in class today). Review all graded materials, and add more writing goals to your goals sheet.

    Show HW: Show the HW ten questions and predictive answers on your research topic.

    2. Discuss/Share:


  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Introduce List #4

    3. Work Period: Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 11 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we set appropriate goals for the 3rd marking period and improve our vocabulary skills? DUE THIS THURSDAY, MAY 4th:
  • Rewrite your midterm exam essay. Highlight the corrections. Bring in the original midterm with the teacher's edits. You can type or handwrite the rewrite.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MAY 5th:

  • Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #4 AND the ROOTS: EX (outside), FACIL (easy), and IN (inside). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 9th:

  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #4 AND the ROOTS: EX (outside), FACIL (easy), and IN (inside). 10% of the 3rd marking period.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Monday, May 1st, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Which question for your research topic are you most interested in finding the answer for? Explain your reasons. (write 2-3 sentences)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Finish writing the TEN, open-ended questions (Who, What, When, Where, Why and How questions; not yes or no questions) for your research topic. Question starters include the following: How does...? What are the barriers to...? How has the struggle for ________________ changed over time? How can ___________________affect___________? How does______________affect modern society today?

  • Predict the answers for each of the ten questions.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or information texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we choose a research topic and create ten research questions for our upcoming research paper? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MAY 2nd:
  • Finish the classwork: write the TEN, open-ended questions (Who, What, When, Where, Why and How questions; not yes or no questions) for your research topic. Question starters include the following: How does...? What are the barriers to...? How has the struggle for ________________ changed over time? How can ___________________affect___________? How does______________affect modern society today?
  • Predict the answers for each of the ten questions above.

    MAKE-UP OWED HW:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due last WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.
  • Friday, April 28th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose ONE of your three research topics (generated in the previous days). What can you predict that you would find about your chosen, research topic? Write 2-3 sentences.

    Turn in owed HW: Thematic Essay on Fences and the grading rubric and anything else you owe (today's the last day of the 2nd marking period!).

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Now that you've narrowed down to ONE research topic, write TEN, open-ended questions (Who, What, When, Where, Why and How questions; not yes or no questions). Question starters include the following: How does...? What are the barriers to...? How has the struggle for ________________ changed over time? How can ___________________affect___________? How does______________affect modern society today?

  • If you're done early, predict the answers for each of the ten questions.

    4. Make up owed HW (all owed assignments are due by the end of the day today, the last day of the 2nd marking period!).

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or information texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we choose a research topic and create ten research questions for our upcoming research paper? MAKE-UP OWED HW:
  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due on WEDNESDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Thursday, April 27th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Answer one of the following questions. Answer in 2-3 sentences.
  • Do you have a strong opinion on a current social or political issue in the news?
  • Have you read or seen a news story recently that has piqued your interest or made you angry or anxious? Explain.
  • Do you have a personal issue, problem or interest that you would like to know more about? Explain.
  • Is there an aspect of a class that you are interested in learning more about? Explain.

    Turn in owed HW: Thematic Essay on Fences and the grading rubric and anything else you owe.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: FINISH yesterday's work in your College Writing section of your notebook, do the following:

  • Brainstorm a list of THREE TOPICS that interest you (think of a topic that could help guide a career or academic path, or even just a personal interest or concern). Here are some suggestions: the history of education, race relations, immigration policies, drug abuse, mental illness, the history of baseball or football, climate change, etc. Here are 50 more research paper topics.
  • Write TWO QUESTIONS that you'd like answers to for each topic. Question starters include the following: How does...? What are the barriers to...? How has the struggle for ________________ changed over time? How can ___________________affect___________? How does______________affect modern society today?
  • What are THREE key words for each topic (that's a total of NINE KEY WORDS) that you could use to research your topic online? You may want to look online to get ideas for key words.

    4. Make up owed HW (all owed assignments are due tomorrow, the last day of the 2nd marking period!).

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or information texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we choose a research topic for our upcoming research paper? MAKE-UP OWED HW:
  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due YESTERDAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Wednesday, April 26th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: If you could choose any topic to research from the play Fences, what would you research and why?

    Turn in HW: Thematic Essay on Fences and the grading rubric

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your College Writing section of your notebook, do the following:

  • Brainstorm a list of THREE TOPICS that interest you (think of a topic that could help guide a career or academic path, or even just a personal interest or concern). Here are some suggestions: the history of education, race relations, immigration policies, drug abuse, mental illness, the history of baseball or football, climate change, etc.
  • Write TWO QUESTIONS that you'd like answers to for each topic. Question starters include the following: How does...? What are the barriers to...? How has the struggle for ________________ changed over time? How can ___________________affect___________? How does______________affect modern society today?
  • What are THREE key words for each topic (that's a total of NINE KEY WORDS) that you could use to research your topic online? You may want to look online to get ideas for key words.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or information texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we choose a research topic for our upcoming research paper? MAKE-UP OWED HW:
  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences was due TODAY (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Tuesday, April 25th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Do ICE (INTRODUCE the quote, CITE the quote, and EXPLAIN the quote) for one of the following quotes. Make sure to connect the quote to one of the themes--figurative fences or American Dream.
  • "I'm gonna be a daddy" (p. 66).
  • "I'm just saying I've got to find a way to get rid of that shadow, Mama" (p. 97).
  • "I just stay with my music cause that's the only way I can find to live in the world" (p. 18).

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review thematic essay requirements on Fences (see HW).

    3. Work Period: Work on composing your essay (due tomorrow!).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare to write our thematic essay on a theme (figurative fences or the pursuit of the American Dream) in Fences? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th:
  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Monday, April 24th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: View Shakespeare's famous quotes to honor his birthday (which was yesterday, April 23rd). Which quote is your favorite and why? Which quote connects to the theme you've chosen to focus on for your thematic essay--figurative fences or the American Dream?

    Show HW: 6 quotes and ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain each quote).

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Review thematic essay requirements on Fences (see HW).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare to write our thematic essay on a theme (figurative fences or the pursuit of the American Dream) in Fences? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th:
  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Do not use any form of "I" in your essay. Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Friday, April 21st, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose one of the following questions to help you for your introduction of your upcoming thematic essay. Write 2-3 sentences.
  • What quality of Fences resonates (connects) with you and why? Refer to a character, a relationship between characters or an event.
  • How is your thesis statement universal? Refer to the theme (figurative fences or the American Dream) and explain how it applies to all people throughout time.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Finish discussing the answers to Act II questions in Fences.

    3. Work Period: Choose 6 quotes (look at your HW notes on Fences) that support your thesis and do ICE (INTRODUCE each quote so it connects to your thesis, CITE each quote, and EXPLAIN each quote in your own words so it supports your thesis). Finish for HW (due Monday). See example: When Candy overhears George and Lennie talking about owning a piece of land, Candy's emptiness begins to fill with the American dream that George and Lennie share. Candy tells George, "Tell you what--suppose I went in with your guys? That's $350 I'll put in" (p. 35). George's reserved reaction prompts Candy to bare her soul to George and join in on the dream, which quickly breeds hope and newfound friendship for all of them.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare to write our thematic essay on a theme (figurative fences or the pursuit of the American Dream) in Fences? DUE MONDAY, APRIL 24th:
    ICE for 6 quotes in Fences: Choose 6 quotes (look at your HW notes on Fences) that support your thesis and do ICE (INTRODUCE each quote so it connects to your thesis, CITE each quote, and EXPLAIN each quote in your own words so it supports your thesis). Finish for HW (due Monday). See example: When Candy overhears George and Lennie talking about owning a piece of land, Candy's emptiness begins to fill with the American dream that George and Lennie share. Candy tells George, "Tell you what--suppose I went in with your guys? That's $350 I'll put in" (p. 35). George's reserved reaction prompts Candy to bare her soul to George and join in on the dream, which quickly breeds hope and newfound friendship for all of them.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade; -10 points each day late): Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant influence in Fences and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs (3-4, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED pages), with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include SIX direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote; TWO quotes per body paragraph) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Sample Essay and thematic essay outline as guides. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 3rd marking period (and it will count as a homework assignment in the 2nd marking). Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Thursday, April 20th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What would your thesis statement be for a thematic (a theme is a lesson from the text; a universal truth) paper on Fences, by August Wilson, on the figurative fences or the American Dream? The thesis statement is a road map for a paper, and it tells the reader what to expect for the rest of the paper. Your thematic thesis should answer how and why a theme is presented throughout a paper. Your thematic thesis must include the title of the work of literature and the playwright (or author). Here are sample, model thesis statements:
  • In Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, by Anne Frank, the theme of empathy exists in horrific conditions.
  • One major theme in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is that having a dream breeds hope, friendship and determination, which enables one to to strive onward in life with a sense of importance.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.
  • Discuss the answers to Act II questions in Fences.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we compose a thesis statement for one of the themes (figurative fences or the pursuit of the American Dream) Fences? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th:
  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Fences (for homework credit for the 2nd marking period; 25% of the 3rd marking period grade): more details coming soon!

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Wednesday, April 19th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Read August Wilson's quote on the universality of theater: "Theater asserts that all of human life is universal. Love, honor, duty, betrayal belong and pertain to every culture or race. They way they are acted out on the playing field may be different, but it is theater that illuminates and confers upon the universal the ability to speak for all men." Do you agree with this statement? Explain your reasoning. (Write 2-3 sentences)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: In your LA section, answer the following questions (be prepared to discuss with the class):

  • How does August Wilson portray the universality of the human race in Fences? Refer to a page number and cite evidence (one direct quote) that supports your answer.
  • Do you think people of a different culture and time period could connect with the characters of Fences? If yes, how? If not, why not?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand and apply the universality of Fences? MAKE-UP HOMEWORK: DUE TODAY, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19th:
  • Find two news articles (not sports; each article should be a minimum of 5 paragraphs) from either CNN or FOX NEWS. Print out the news articles or e-mail them to hconn@schools.nyc.gov. READ the articles. WRITE TWO well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences for each paragraph) in which you answer this question for each article: What figurative fences (obstacles or protective shields) or American Dream exists for the people in each article? Include two quotes (one sentence for each quote) for each paragraph.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Friday, April 7th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up:
  • Study for the Vocabulary List #3 Quiz with a partner or independently.
  • Work on finding news articles (see the HW assignments).

    2. Work Period: Vocabulary List #3 Quiz

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How do we prove our vocabulary acquisition in an assessment? DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19th (the day we return from spring break):
  • Find two news articles (not sports; each article should be a minimum of 5 paragraphs) from either CNN or FOX NEWS. Print out the news articles or e-mail them to hconn@schools.nyc.gov. READ the articles. WRITE TWO well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences for each paragraph) in which you answer this question for each article: What figurative fences (obstacles or protective shields) or American Dream exists for the people in each article? Include two quotes (one sentence for each quote) for each paragraph.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Thursday, April 6th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose one of the following questions. Answer in 2-3 complete, detailed sentences.
  • What are Rose's American Dream and Troy's American Dream?
  • How are Rose's figurative fences contrasting to Troy's figurative fences in Fences? (Challenge question!)

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their table mates' answers with the class.

    3. Gallery Walk: Students will walk around the classroom and answer two of the Act II questions that are posted on various poster papers. They will provide citations (one-sentence quotes with page numbers, properly cited) and analysis (a total of 2-3 sentences).

    4. Exit Slip: What can you conclude about the characters' (choose two of these characters: Troy, Rose, Cory, Lyons, Gabriel and Alberta) accomplishments of their American Dreams in Fences? Consider the figurative fences (symbolizing obstacles or protective shields) in the characters' lives.

    SWBAT: Students will be able to understand how characters in Fences create figurative fences in their lives to help them achieve or prevent them from achieving their American Dream. Students will be able to have textual evidence to help them prepare for the summative assessment on Fences in which they analyze the influence of the figurative fences in the characters' lives and their pursuit of the American Dream.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How do the characters' figurative fences affect their pursuit of the American Dream in Fences? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, APRIL 7th:
  • QUIZ on List #3 and the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Know each word's the definition and be able to write an original sentence for each word. Know the roots, too!

    DUE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19th:

  • Find two news articles (not sports; each article should be a minimum of 5 paragraphs) from either CNN or FOX NEWS. Print out the news articles or e-mail them to hconn@schools.nyc.gov. READ the articles. WRITE TWO well-developed paragraphs (10-12 sentences for each paragraph) in which you answer this question for each article: What figurative fences (obstacles or protective shields) or American Dream exists for the people in each article? Include two quotes (one sentence for each quote) for each paragraph.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous days' assignments.

  • Wednesday, April 5th, 2017: SAT

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prove our knowledge of reading comprehension, vocabulary, writing skills and mathematics on the SAT? DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 7th:
  • QUIZ on List #3 and the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Know each word's the definition and be able to write an original sentence for each word. Know the roots, too!

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Tuesday, April 4th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Answer the following question. What are strategies for success in answering multiple-choice questions (hint: you can use these strategies on the SAT tomorrow!)?
    What is Rose's view of a fence?
    A. an obstacle
    B. a link to her past
    C. a link to her future
    D. a protection

    Show HW: Act II Notes

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. Fences Discussion of Act I: Students share their answers to the Discussion Questions on Fences. Questions will be answered by what students posted around the room.

    4. HW Reminders and work on HW (if time allows).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand the characters' choices as they encounter fences and pursue the American Dream in Fences? SAT is TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5th:
  • Study the SAT VOCABULARY WORDS and the ROOTS.
  • SAT Practice Test--this is a full SAT (from the College Board). Use it to practice for the real one on April 5th!
  • Prep Factory: Free Test Prep resource
  • Khan Academy: You can learn anything you want here for free!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 7th:

  • QUIZ on List #3 and the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Know each word's the definition and be able to write an original sentence for each word. Know the roots, too!

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Monday, April 3rd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Finish this sentence. Fences, by August Wilson, is a play about... (Write in great detail)

    Show HW: Vocabulary List #3 flashcards

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. Fences Discussion of Act I: Students share their answers to the Discussion Questions on Fences. Questions will be answered by what students posted around the room.

    4. HW Reminders and work on HW (if time allows).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we analyze the symbolism of fences and the characters' pursuits of the American Dream in Fences? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, APRIL 4th:
  • Read the rest of the play (Act II; pp. 59-101) in Fences. Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    SAT THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5th:

  • Study the SAT VOCABULARY WORDS and the ROOTS.
  • SAT Practice Test--this is a full SAT (from the College Board). Use it to practice for the real one on April 5th!
  • Prep Factory: Free Test Prep resource
  • Khan Academy: You can learn anything you want here for free!

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 7th:

  • QUIZ on List #3 and the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Know each word's the definition and be able to write an original sentence for each word. Know the roots, too!

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Friday, March 31st, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are your opinions about Troy as a parent in Fences? Explain your answer. (Write 2-3 sentences)

    Show HW: Two pages of notes (5 quotes and analysis for each theme) on Act I in Fences.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    2. Fences Discussion: Gallery Walk: Discussion Questions on Fences. Questions will be posted around the room. Students will post their answers on at least three questions (post their names) to get credit. We will share answers with the class.

    3. HW Reminders and work on HW (if time allows).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we analyze the symbolism of fences and the characters' pursuits of the American Dream in Fences? DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, APRIL 3rd:
  • Vocabulary List #3 Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #3 AND the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read the rest of the play (Act II; pp. 59-101) in Fences. Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    SAT ON WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5th:

  • Study the SAT VOCABULARY WORDS and the ROOTS.
  • SAT Practice Test--this is a full SAT (from the College Board). Use it to practice for the real one on April 5th!
  • Prep Factory: Free Test Prep resource
  • Khan Academy: You can learn anything you want here for free!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, APRIL 7th:

  • QUIZ on List #3 and the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Know each word's the definition and be able to write an original sentence for each word. Know the roots, too!

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Thursday, March 30th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Compile your portfolio folders, add graded essays and all graded materials (including exit slips), and write in goals, strengths and weaknesses in the goals sheet.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    2. Vocabulary Read-Aloud: Read aloud List #3.

    3. HW Reminders and work on HW (if time allows).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we improve our vocabulary skills and prepare for the SAT? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 31st:
  • Read pp. 21-58 (rest of Act 1) in Fences (copies are available in class). Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    DUE THIS COMING MONDAY, APRIL 3rd:

  • Vocabulary List #3 Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #3 AND the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read the rest of the play (Act II; pp. 59-101) in Fences. Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    SAT ON WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5th:

  • Study the SAT VOCABULARY WORDS and the ROOTS.
  • SAT Practice Test--this is a full SAT (from the College Board). Use it to practice for the real one on April 5th!
  • Prep Factory: Free Test Prep resource
  • Khan Academy: You can learn anything you want here for free!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, APRIL 7th:

  • QUIZ on List #3 and the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Know each word's the definition and be able to write an original sentence for each word. Know the roots, too!

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Wednesday, March 29th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Listen to Midterm Exam instructions.

    2. Work Period: Read the passage provided in the Midterm Exam. Annotate. Finish writing the central idea essay for the Midterm Exam.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How can we be effectively assessed on our reading and writing skills in a central idea essay? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 31st:
  • Read pp. 21-58 (rest of Act 1) in Fences (copies are available in class). Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    DUE NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 3rd:

  • Vocabulary List #3 Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #3 AND the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read the rest of the play (Act II; pp. 59-101) in Fences. Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    SAT ON WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5th:

  • Study the SAT VOCABULARY WORDS and the ROOTS.
  • SAT Practice Test--this is a full SAT (from the College Board). Use it to practice for the real one on April 5th!
  • Prep Factory: Free Test Prep resource
  • Khan Academy: You can learn anything you want here for free!

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, APRIL 7th:

  • QUIZ on List #3 and the ROOTS: BIBLIO (book; words like bibliography and bibliophile), PHIL/PHILE (love; words like philanthropy, pedophile, and bibliophile), NOM (name; words like nominate and misnomer), NEO (new; words like neologism and neophyte), OMNI (all; words like omnivorous, omnipotent, and omniscient), OLOGY (study of; words like psychology and biology), VERA (truth; words like veracious and veracity). Know each word's the definition and be able to write an original sentence for each word. Know the roots, too!

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Tuesday, March 28th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Listen to Midterm Exam instructions.

    2. Work Period: Read the passage provided in the Midterm Exam. Annotate. Prepare to write the central idea essay for the Midterm Exam.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • How can we be effectively assessed on our reading and writing skills in a central idea essay? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29th:
  • FINISH THE MIDTERM EXAM (you don't need to study for this exam; you're being tested on your ability to follow the directions and your reading and writing skills; 25% of the 2nd marking period): You will write a central idea essay, using a text provided. You will write 3 paragraphs, with the body paragraph containing 10-12 sentences. Remember, you will choose a central idea (main idea or theme) from the text provided. You will also identify one literary technique (suggestions include: characterization, conflict, or setting) that develops the central idea. You should annotate as you read the text, focusing on evidence that supports the central idea and literary technique. You should use at least 2-3 quotes (one sentence each) to include in the body paragraph of your essay.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 31st:

  • Read pp. 21-58 (rest of Act 1) in Fences (copies are available in class). Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read the rest of the play (Act II; pp. 59-101) in Fences. Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Monday, March 27th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are some strategies for success on the reading section of the SAT?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. SAT Preparatory Practice and Tips: Brainstorm helpful tips for success on the SAT. Check out these great resources, too!

  • SAT Practice Test--this is a full SAT (from the College Board). Use it to practice for the real one on April 5th!
  • Prep Factory: Free Test Prep resource
  • Khan Academy: You can learn anything you want here for free!

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare for the SAT by sharing website resources and helpful strategies for success on the Reading Section? DUE THIS TUESDAY, MARCH 28th-WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period): You will write a central idea essay, using a text provided. You will write 3 paragraphs, with the body paragraph containing 10-12 sentences. Remember, you will choose a central idea (main idea or theme) from the text provided. You will also identify one literary technique (suggestions include: characterization, conflict, or setting) that develops the central idea. You should annotate as you read the text, focusing on evidence that supports the central idea and literary technique. You should use at least 2-3 quotes (one sentence each) to include in the body paragraph of your essay.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 31st:

  • Read pp. 21-58 (rest of Act 1) in Fences (copies are available in class). Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read the rest of the play (Act II; pp. 59-101) in Fences. Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Friday, March 24th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: As students for many years (at least 11 years already!), you've read a lot of literature! What do you believe are the most common themes in literature and the most common literary techniques? Explain reasoning for your choices. You may want to refer to Common List of Themes and Literary Techniques and Devices.

    SHOW HW: Show the Rewrite of your Argumentative Essay on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (highlight the corrections) and show the original essay with the teacher's edits.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. Review the Notes for Fences: Here are the quotes that work well for Act 1, Scene 1 (we identified the first four). You need to include analysis for each quote as well.

  • Fence: Troy feels the racial divide when he asks his boss, "Why you got the white mens driving and the colored lifting?" (p. 2)
  • American Dream: Troy wants to help himself and others when he approaches his union and says, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3).
  • American Dream: Rose's idea of success is being a wife, and she says, "I told him if he wasn't the marrying kind, then move out of the way so the marrying kind could find me" (p.6).
  • Fence: Troy recognizes the fence that prevents African-Americans from being successful. Troy says that Cory will not be successful because "the white man ain't gonna let him get nowhere with that football" (p. 8).
  • Fence: Troy has a poor, distrusting relationship with his son, Lyons, who regularly asks Troy for money. Troy says to Lyons, "you was in the neighborhood cause it's my payday" (p. 14). Troy feels that Lyons is too lazy to find work. "I'm just supposed to haul people's rubbish and give my money to you cause you too lazy to work" (p. 17).

    4. EXIT SLIP (turn in at the end of class for a grade on an 8-point scale for class credit)

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare for our Midterm Exam on the Central Idea Essay? DUE THIS TUESDAY, MARCH 28th-WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period): You will write a central idea essay, using a text provided. You will write 3 paragraphs, with the body paragraph containing 10-12 sentences. Remember, you will choose a central idea (main idea or theme) from the text provided. You will also identify one literary technique (suggestions include: characterization, conflict, or setting) that develops the central idea. You should annotate as you read the text, focusing on evidence that supports the central idea and literary technique. You should use at least 2-3 quotes (one sentence each) to include in the body paragraph of your essay.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 31st:

  • Read pp. 21-58 (rest of Act 1) in Fences (copies are available in class). Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read the rest of the play (Act II; pp. 59-101) in Fences. Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES (WITH AT LEAST 5 QUOTES AND ANALYSIS FOR EACH THEME) in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Friday, March 24th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: As students for many years (at least 11 years already!), you've read a lot of literature! What do you believe are the most common themes in literature and the most common literary techniques? Explain reasoning for your choices. You may want to refer to Common List of Themes and Literary Techniques and Devices.

    SHOW HW: Show the Rewrite of your Argumentative Essay on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (highlight the corrections) and show the original essay with the teacher's edits.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. Review the Notes for Fences: Here are the quotes that work well for Act 1, Scene 1 (we identified the first four). You need to include analysis for each quote as well.

  • Fence: Troy feels the racial divide when he asks his boss, "Why you got the white mens driving and the colored lifting?" (p. 2)
  • American Dream: Troy wants to help himself and others when he approaches his union and says, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3).
  • American Dream: Rose's idea of success is being a wife, and she says, "I told him if he wasn't the marrying kind, then move out of the way so the marrying kind could find me" (p.6).
  • Fence: Troy recognizes the fence that prevents African-Americans from being successful. Troy says that Cory will not be successful because "the white man ain't gonna let him get nowhere with that football" (p. 8).
  • Fence: Troy has a poor, distrusting relationship with his son, Lyons, who regularly asks Troy for money. Troy says to Lyons, "you was in the neighborhood cause it's my payday" (p. 14). Troy feels that Lyons is too lazy to find work. "I'm just supposed to haul people's rubbish and give my money to you cause you too lazy to work" (p. 17).

    4. EXIT SLIP (turn in at the end of class for a grade on an 8-point scale for class credit)

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare for our Midterm Exam on the Central Idea Essay? DUE THIS TUESDAY, MARCH 28th-WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29th:
  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period): You will write a central idea essay, using a text provided. You will write 3 paragraphs, with the body paragraph containing 10-12 sentences. Remember, you will choose a central idea (main idea or theme) from the text provided. You will also identify one literary technique (suggestions include: characterization, conflict, or setting) that develops the central idea. You should annotate as you read the text, focusing on evidence that supports the central idea and literary technique. You should use at least 2-3 quotes (one sentence each) to include in the body paragraph of your essay.

    DUE NEXT FRIDAY, MARCH 31st:

  • Read pp. 21-58 (rest of Act 1) in Fences (copies are available in class). Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 4th:

  • Read the rest of the play (Act II; pp. 59-101) in Fences. Take notes on the themes of FENCES (figurative or symbolic) and the AMERICAN DREAM in a T-chart, spider web graphic organizer, or Cornell Notes in the LA section of your notebook. You MUST include quotes (with page numbers) and analysis (explanation of the quotes and how they support the theme of Fences and the American Dream). Each quote should be 1-2 sentences long with a page number. Heres a citation example: Troy said, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3). You MUST fill in a minimum of TWO, FULL PAGES OF NOTES in a T-CHART, SPIDER WEB, or CORNELL NOTES. This is a double-credit (20 points) HW assignment.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Thursday, March 23rd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are your first impressions of this play, Fences? Explain your reasoning in 2-3 sentences.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud of Fences: Read pp. 11-20 (Act 1, Scene 1). Take notes on evidence and analysis of fences and the characters' American Dream. You can choose to take notes in one of the following formats: T-Chart format, Cornell Notes format, or spider web graphic organizer. Here are the quotes that work well for Act 1, Scene 1 (we identified the first four). You need to include analysis for each quote as well.

  • Fence: Troy feels the racial divide when he asks his boss, "Why you got the white mens driving and the colored lifting?" (p. 2)
  • American Dream: Troy wants to help himself and others when he approaches his union and says, "Give everybody a chance to drive the truck" (p. 3).
  • American Dream: Rose's idea of success is being a wife, and she says, "I told him if he wasn't the marrying kind, then move out of the way so the marrying kind could find me" (p.6).
  • Fence: Troy recognizes the fence that prevents African-Americans from being successful. Troy says that Cory will not be successful because "the white man ain't gonna let him get nowhere with that football" (p. 8).
  • Fence: Troy has a poor, distrusting relationship with his son, Lyons, who regularly asks Troy for money. Troy says to Lyons, "you was in the neighborhood cause it's my payday" (p. 14). Troy feels that Lyons is too lazy to find work. "I'm just supposed to haul people's rubbish and give my money to you cause you too lazy to work" (p. 17).

    4. HW Reminder

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand the significance of Fences and the American Dream in the opening scene? DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 24th:
  • REWRITE the thematic essay on Frederick Douglass' novel. Bring in the original essay (with Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin's edits) and highlight (with color or underlining) the corrections on your rewrite. You may type, handwrite or show the corrected essay on an electronic device.

    DUE THIS TUESDAY, MARCH 28th-WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29th:

  • MIDTERM EXAM (25% of the 2nd marking period): You will write a central idea essay, using a text provided. You will write 3 paragraphs, with the body paragraph containing 10-12 sentences. Remember, you will choose a central idea (main idea or theme) from the text provided. You will also identify one literary technique (suggestions include: characterization, conflict, or setting) that develops the central idea. You should annotate as you read the text, focusing on evidence that supports the central idea and literary technique. You should use at least 2-3 quotes (one sentence each) to include in the body paragraph of your essay.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose one of the following questions to answer. Write 2-3 sentences.
  • What is your personal 'American Dream' (ideal for success to be achieved with hard work and determination) and how can you compare and contrast it to Troy's American Dream?
  • What fence (literal or figurative) do you have in your life, and how can you compare and contrast your fence to Troy's fence?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud of Fences: Read pp. 5-20 aloud (Act 1, Scene 1). Take notes on evidence and analysis of fences and the characters' American Dream. You can choose to take notes in one of the following formats: T-Chart format, Cornell Notes format, or spider web graphic organizer.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand the significance of Fences and the American Dream in the opening scene? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 24th:
  • REWRITE the thematic essay on Frederick Douglass' novel. Bring in the original essay (with Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin's edits) and highlight (with color or underlining) the corrections on your rewrite. You may type, handwrite or show the corrected essay on an electronic device.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Tuesday, March 21st, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Fences, the play is about the pursuit of the American Dream, which is the ideal that every American can achieve success through hard work and determination. As the characters are pursuing their own American Dreams, they are dealing with literal and figurative (like symbolic) fences, such as the obstacles of the historical time period of 1957 (segregation, racism, post-war trauma, financial struggles, and more). Why do you believe it's important to study this play and its message?

    Show HW: "I Hear America Singing" Model Poem

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. Read-Aloud of Fences: Read pp. 1-5 aloud (Act 1, Scene 1). Take notes on the fences (literal or figurative) and the characters' American Dream. You can choose to take notes in any of the following formats: T-Chart format, Cornell Notes format, or spider web graphic organizer.

    4. Work Period: Begin the Act 1, Scene 1 Journal (Symbolism of Fences OR the Characters' Pursuit of the American Dream). For each journal, you must have two quotes (one sentence each). Each journal must be one, handwritten or typed page.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand the significance of Fences and the American Dream in the opening scene? DUE THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 24th:
  • REWRITE the thematic essay on Frederick Douglass' novel. Bring in the original essay (with Ms. Conn/Ms. Sarlin's edits) and highlight (with color or underlining) the corrections on your rewrite. You may type, handwrite or show the corrected essay on an electronic device.

    Make up owed Homework: See previous day's assignments.

  • Monday, March 20th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Read the poem, "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman. Answer the following questions:
    1.) What's the rhyme scheme?
    2.) What's the poet's tone (feeling, attitude toward the subject)?
    3.) Identify an example of each of the following figurative language: repetition, personification, metaphor. Be ready to explain the purpose for each one.
    4.) What's the poet's purpose in writing this poem?
    5.) What's the theme (poet's message)?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share one of their answers with the class.

    3. Introduce and Begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we analyze the poem, "I Hear America Singing" and prepare to compose our own model poem? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, MARCH 21st:
  • Model Poem Worksheet (like Madlibs) for "I Hear America Singing"
  • Friday, March 17th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose one of the following questions to answer. Write 2-3 sentences.
  • How do fences empower through ownership?
  • How do fences oppress through prohibition?
  • How does the past/history provide fences in our lives?
  • What fences exist for students at ITHS?

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    Show owed HW.

    3. Read-Aloud/Sharing: Sharing of "Fences" poems. Discussion questions:

  • What message is the poet trying to convey to his/her readers or listeners?
  • What is the emotional effect of the poem?
  • What figurative language can you clearly identify? (Repetition, imagery, metaphor, rhyme scheme, etc.) How does the figurative language influence the poet's message?
  • Can you connect to the poem in your own life, in the world around you, or in a story you've read or movie you've seen? Explain.

    4. Anticipation Guide and Whole-Class Discussion: Write whether you agree or disagree with each statement. Explain your reasons.

  • A man's only responsibility is to take care of his family's needs (food, clothing, shelter), but he does not need to like his children or his wife.
  • Having good friends and a good family are more important than having a prestigious career.
  • As humans, we have to build fences to keep loved ones in and evil ones out.
  • From what you know of the 1950's and 1960's, America has changed significantly in its treatment of African-Americans.
  • If you or your family was in desperate need of something and you didn't have any money, you would steal to provide for your family.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare to read Fences, the play? N/A
    Thursday, March 16th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose one of the following questions, and research on your electronic device and/or use your prior knowledge. Write the following title: Preparing to Read Fences. Write 2-3 sentences for your answer.
  • Read the biography of playwright, August Wilson, who wrote Fences. What are three facts in his life that you believe influenced his portrayal of romantic relationships and the African-American experience in his writing (both plays and poetry).
  • Describe the events, society, people, music, entertainment industry, and any other qualities of life in America in 1957.
  • How can baseball be a metaphor for life?
  • Define the American Dream.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    Show owed HW.

    3. Read-Aloud/Sharing: Sharing of "Fences" poems. Discussion questions:

  • What message is the poet trying to convey to his/her readers or listeners?
  • What is the emotional effect of the poem?
  • What figurative language can you clearly identify? (Repetition, imagery, metaphor, rhyme scheme, etc.) How does the figurative language influence the poet's message?
  • Can you connect to the poem in your own life, in the world around you, or in a story you've read or movie you've seen? Explain.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare to read Fences, the play?

    MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous days' assignments) by TOMORROW, FRIDAY (last day of the marking period)

    MAKE UP THEMATIC ESSAY, IF YOU HAVEN'T TURNED IT IN (25% of the 1st marking period grade):

  • THIS WAS DUE LAST WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

  • Wednesday, March 15th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Prepare for today's vocabulary quiz #2.

    Show owed HW.

    2. Work Period: List #2 QUIZ and EXTRA CREDIT opportunities (see the additional handout)

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we improve our vocabulary skills and prove our vocabulary knowledge in an assessment?

    MAKE UP OWED HW (see previous days' assignments) by THIS FRIDAY (last day of the marking period)

    MAKE UP THEMATIC ESSAY, IF YOU HAVEN'T TURNED IT IN (25% of the 1st marking period grade):

  • THIS WAS DUE LAST WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

  • Monday, March 13th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Finish your "Fences" poem. You MUST turn in your poem by the end of class TODAY! Compose an original, 6-stanza (each stanza must contain 4 lines each) poem with the title, FENCES. You must emulate (imitate) aspects (qualities) of the poem, "Caged Bird" by Maya Angelou. You MUST include these FOUR aspects of the poem to emulate:
  • Imagery (i.e. "orange sun rays" and "wings are clipped")
  • Repetition (i.e. "sings of freedom")
  • Rhyme scheme of abcb (b lines rhyme)
  • Metaphor (i.e. free bird compares to a free person and caged bird compares to a slave)

    Show HW: Resume Rewrite (show your original resume with Ms. Conn's edits and the rewrite) and vocabulary flashcards.

    2. Work Period: Prepare for Wednesday's vocabulary quiz on List #2.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we compose an original poem that emulates the "Caged Bird" by Maya Angelou? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15th:
  • VOCABULARY QUIZ on List #2 (10% of the 1st marking period grade)
  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES: Make sure that you have ALL warm-ups (include the dates and answers; if you don't write the questions, then make sure you can figure out the question based on the answer you provided). You will be able to earn up to 10 extra credit points on your FINAL MARKING PERIOD GRADE! Rewrite a graded paper and earn an extra credit HW, too!

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK:

  • THIS WAS DUE LAST WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Friday, March 10th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Our next work of literature is a play called Fences. What can you predict about the plot and characters in this play?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Compose an original, 6-stanza (each stanza must contain 4 lines each) poem with the title, FENCES. You must emulate (imitate) aspects (qualities) of the poem, "Caged Bird" by Maya Angelou. You MUST include these FOUR aspects of the poem to emulate:

  • Imagery (i.e. "orange sun rays" and "wings are clipped")
  • Repetition (i.e. "sings of freedom")
  • Rhyme scheme of abcb (b lines rhyme)
  • Metaphor (i.e. free bird compares to a free person and caged bird compares to a slave)

    **You will have today in class and Monday in class to complete this poem. You MUST turn in the poem at the end of class on Monday to earn classwork credit!

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we compose an original poem that emulates the "Caged Bird" by Maya Angelou? DUE THIS MONDAY, MARCH 13th:
  • Resume Rewrite: Rewrite your resume (bring in the original resume as well).
  • Vocabulary List #2 Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #2 AND the ROOTS: CULP/CULPA (blame; guilt; words like culpable and culprit), MAN/MANI (hand; words like manifest, manicure, manipulate, and maneuver); SENT/SENTI (feeling; words like sentiment, sentimental, and resent), TANG (feel/touch; words like tangible and tangent), TRANS (across; words like transcendent, transportation, and trans-gender). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.
  • FINISH the "Fences" poem in class (you may want to work on it over the weekend--Saturday, March 11th or Sunday, March 12th) and turn it in for classwork credit on Monday, March 13th.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15th:

  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES: Make sure that you have ALL warm-ups (include the dates and answers; if you don't write the questions, then make sure you can figure out the question based on the answer you provided). You will be able to earn up to 10 extra credit points on your FINAL MARKING PERIOD GRADE! Rewrite a graded paper and earn an extra credit HW, too!
  • QUIZ on List #2 (10% of the 1st marking period grade)

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK:

  • THIS WAS DUE LAST WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Thursday, March 9th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Read "Caged Bird" poem by Maya Angelou. Choose one of the following questions. Write 2-3 sentences.
  • What emotional effects do you believe the poet wants to leave with her readers and why?
  • What literary technique (such as imagery, rhythmic pattern, or metaphor) is used and how does the technique contribute to the overall message of the poem?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.
  • Introduce SAT Vocabulary List #2.

    3. Work Period: Begin working on HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we analyze emotional impact and literary techniques in a poem about the struggle for freedom? DUE MONDAY, MARCH 13th:
  • Resume Rewrite: Rewrite your resume (bring in the original resume as well).
  • Vocabulary List #2 Flashcards: Create flashcards for all 25 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #2 AND the ROOTS: CULP/CULPA (blame; guilt; words like culpable and culprit), MAN/MANI (hand; words like manifest, manicure, manipulate, and maneuver); SENT/SENTI (feeling; words like sentiment, sentimental, and resent), TANG (feel/touch; words like tangible and tangent), TRANS (across; words like transcendent, transportation, and trans-gender). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the list). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15th:

  • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES: Make sure that you have ALL warm-ups (include the dates and answers; if you don't write the questions, then make sure you can figure out the question based on the answer you provided). You will be able to earn up to 10 extra credit points on your FINAL MARKING PERIOD GRADE! Rewrite a graded paper and earn an extra credit HW, too!
  • QUIZ on List #2 (10% of the 1st marking period grade)

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK:

  • THIS WAS DUE LAST WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, March 8th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Choose one of the following questions. Write 2-3 sentences.
  • Did the film clips from 12 Years a Slave accurately represent historical facts? Explain your answer.
  • What emotional effects do you believe the director of 12 Years a Slave wants to leave on his audience?

    Show HW: 50 Attitudes of Gratitude

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Viewing of film clip (chapter 11) from 12 Years a Slave. What are your impressions of the film clip? How did the scenes bring to life what we read in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: How are these two narratives comparable (they are both true stories written by former slaves)?

    4. Exit Slip (turn in for credit)

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we evaluate the purpose and value of viewing a film version of slavery in the 1800's? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
  • THIS WAS DUE LAST WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, March 7th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Why do you believe it's valuable to view the film version of slavery in the 1800's?

    Show owed HW

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Viewing of a clip from 12 Years a Slave (chapter 4, before the nudity, chapter 6, chapter 7, chapter 9 and chapter 10). What are your impressions of the film clip? How did the scene bring to life what we read in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: How are these two narratives comparable (they are both true stories written by former slaves)?
  • Period 7 ONLY: We will distribute the Exams (scantrons and test packets) and review the answers as a whole class.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we evaluate the purpose and value of viewing a film version of slavery in the 1800's? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8th:
  • 50 Attitudes of Gratitude: Write a list of 50 things you are grateful for. Here are questions to get you thinking about gratitude: What if someone gave you 1 million dollars in exchange for your eyes? Your hands? Your legs? Your ability to speak? Do you realize what precious, priceless gifts you carry with you every day? Are you grateful for modern medicine, immunizations, clean, drinking water, nutritious food, accessible food, food that you can buy at the grocery store and not hunt or pick with your bare hands? Are you grateful for a roof over your head, clothing to choose from in your closet, pillows, blankets, and a mattress? Are you grateful for heat during the winter, a microwave, an oven, and a freezer? Are you grateful for modern technology, like your cell phone, TV, ipod, dvd's, and internet access? Are you grateful for family, friends, teachers, classmates, free public education, and free speech? Are you grateful for access to shopping malls, movie theaters, beaches, bodegas, and subway stations?

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK:

  • THIS WAS DUE LAST WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Monday, March 6th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What can you anticipate (expect) seeing when viewing a film clip on slavery in the American south in the 1800's? Refer to visuals, interactions between characters, sounds, etc.

    Show HW: Response Journal

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.
  • Read a table mate's response journal. Share one sentence or two that resonates with you (you agree with, connect to, or find very interesting).

    3. Work Period:

  • Viewing of a clip from 12 Years a Slave. What are your impressions of the film clip? How did the scene bring to life what we read in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: How are these two narratives comparable (they are both true stories written by former slaves)?
  • Period 7 ONLY: We will distribute the Exams (scantrons and test packets) and review the answers as a whole class.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand how Douglass' memoir fits in our unit on the struggle for freedom? DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8th:
  • 50 Attitudes of Gratitude: Write a list of 50 things you are grateful for. Here are questions to get you thinking about gratitude: What if someone gave you 1 million dollars in exchange for your eyes? Your hands? Your legs? Your ability to speak? Do you realize what precious, priceless gifts you carry with you every day? Are you grateful for modern medicine, immunizations, clean, drinking water, nutritious food, accessible food, food that you can buy at the grocery store and not hunt or pick with your bare hands? Are you grateful for a roof over your head, clothing to choose from in your closet, pillows, blankets, and a mattress? Are you grateful for heat during the winter, a microwave, an oven, and a freezer? Are you grateful for modern technology, like your cell phone, TV, ipod, dvd's, and internet access? Are you grateful for family, friends, teachers, classmates, free public education, and free speech? Are you grateful for access to shopping malls, movie theaters, beaches, bodegas, and subway stations?

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK:

  • THIS WAS DUE LAST WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Friday, March 3rd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Write 2-3 sentences in your response.
  • What slavery exists today, in 2017? You may refer to slavery in other countries or only America.

    Turn in any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Frederick Douglass' Exam Returns and Review: We will distribute the Exams (scantrons and test packets) and review the answers as a whole class.

    4. Introduce and begin HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand how Douglass' memoir fits in our unit on the struggle for freedom? DUE MONDAY, MARCH 6th:
  • Response Journal: Throughout the narrative, Douglass makes several important points over and over. Write two, handwritten pages (or one, typed, double-spaced page). You may type on an electronic device if you choose. You must write your perspective (your point of view or attitude toward a subject) on ONE of these points, and you must research an online source that supports or negates (denies) your perspective. Give credit to your online source by introducing your citation with the following: According to____________ (name of web page), dated_________, "quote" (author, page #). Write about one point in your response journal. Select from one of these major points:
  • justice for slaves
  • no one can be enslaved if she or he has the ability to read, write, and think
  • the way to enslave someone is to keep them from all learning
  • slaves were treated no better than, sometimes worse than, livestock (animals)
  • by encouraging depravity (corruption, immorality) men come to learn to hate freedom
  • the religiousness of the slaveholders is hypocritical and used to justify their actions
  • history of slavery
  • power and influence of song for slaves

    MAKE UP HOMEWORK:

  • THIS WAS DUE ON WEDNESDAY (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Thursday, March 2nd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Write 2-3 sentences in your response.
  • What event in Douglass' memoir was most memorable and why?

    Turn in any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share #1:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Mini-Lesson/Review of Douglass' journey in his memoir: Frederick Douglass proved that the struggle for freedom influenced him and developed his identity. His famous quote, "If there is no struggle, there is no progress" resonates in his life's journey. First, he was separated from his mother as an infant. Then, his mother died when he was about 7 years old, though he barely knew her in his young life. Douglass had to endure seeing his aunt brutally beaten, along with countless other slaves, being ranked among the animals, enduring bloody whippings by Mr. Covey, seeing how religious masters were the most cruel, and getting jailed after an escape attempt. Douglass was provided with minimal clothes and coarse sleeping conditions. When he learned to read and write, he had to deal with the harsh reality of knowledge. With knowledge comes great responsibility. He survived the horrible years of slavery through communal songs, friendly competition (i.e. my master is better than your master), religious faith in divine intervention (he claimed that he received better treatment from masters because of divine providence), Mrs. Auld teaching him to read, bribing white boys to teach him to read (by giving them bread), learning to write from the shipyards and his master's spelling books, his resolute plan to escape slavery, carrying the symbolic, lucky root, his attack of Mr. Covey, teaching his fellow slaves how to read, accomplishing his escape from slavery, getting married to Anna, changing his name to Frederick Douglass, earning his own money from employment, and ultimately joining the anti-slavery movement as one of the most famous abolitionists of all time!

    4. Discuss/Share #2:

  • Each chosen group (from yesterday) will present their creative chapter title or significant quote from the assigned chapter(s). They will also provide a visual presentation of the title or quote.
  • Review the answers to the Exam on Douglass' memoir.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand how Douglass' memoir fits in our unit on the struggle for freedom? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
  • THIS WAS DUE YESTERDAY (-10 points each day late): THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, March 1st, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Which theme did you choose for your thematic essay and why?

    Turn in HW: Thematic Essay and any owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.
  • As a whole class discuss the following questions: What do you believe was Frederick Douglass' purpose in writing his memoir? What did he want to teach us, his future readers?

    3. Work Period: In groups of 3-4 students (of your choice), compose a chapter title or find a significant quote from your assigned chapter. Be ready to explain why your creative title or significant quote fit for your assigned chapter.

    4. Work Period Sharing: Each group will present their creative chapter title or significant quote from the chapter. They will also provide a visual presentation of the title or quote.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand Douglass' purpose and main themes in his memoir? MAKE UP HOMEWORK:
  • THIS WAS DUE TODAY: THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, February 28th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: EXAM on The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

    Show HW: Two T-Charts and Questions on the novel.

    2. Work Period: Work on the THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences. You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel in the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    3. Discuss/Share: Discuss the Thematic Essay due tomorrow and the supportive materials detailed in the Work Period.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • How can we prepare for the thematic essay and prove our knowlege of Douglass' memoir in an assessment? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st:
  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: value of education, dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences (for each body paragraph). You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel throughout the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period. Each day late will lead to -10 points.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Monday, February 27th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Why is education significantly valued by slaves (such as the slaves in Douglass' narrative) and why is education not significantly valued by high school students today?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read Frederick Douglass' memoir and answer all of these Questions for Douglass' Narrative (this is due TOMORROW, Tuesday, February 28th).
  • DUE TOMORROW: Compose your T-Charts: one T-Chart based on chapters I and II (pages 19-27) and the other T-Chart is one of your choice. Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) for each T-Chart that supports a theme of your choice. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes or one of the following suggested themes: dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Analyze each quote (1-2 sentences). You may use any of these sentence starters for the analysis:
  • This supports the theme because...
  • Readers may infer that this example means...
  • On page 17, paragraph ____(number), it said that...
  • According to the text, in paragraph _____(number)...
  • From the reading, in paragraph_____...
  • Work on the thematic essay.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare for the thematic essay and the exam on Douglass' memoir? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:
  • Compose two more T-Charts based on chapters I and II (pages 19-27) AND one T-Chart of your choice (anywhere in the novel, after chapter II). Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) for each T-Chart that supports a theme of your choice. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes or one of the following suggested themes: dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Analyze each quote (1-2 sentences). You may use any of these sentence starters for the analysis:
  • This supports the theme because...
  • Readers may infer that this example means...
  • On page 17, paragraph ____(number), it said that...
  • According to the text, in paragraph _____(number)...
  • From the reading, in paragraph_____...


  • Answer all of these CHAPTER QUESTIONS for Douglass' Narrative. THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS=30 points.
  • EXAM on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. It will be multiple-choice questions based on these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. Bring a #2 pencil. It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (after the vacation):

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences. You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel in the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Friday, February 17th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Compose a new T-Chart based on chapters I and II (pages 19-27). Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) from these chapters that support a theme of your choice. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes or one of the following suggested themes: dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Analyze each quote (1-2 sentences). You may use any of these sentence starters for the analysis:
  • This supports the theme because...
  • Readers may infer that this example means...
  • On page 17, paragraph ____(number), it said that...
  • According to the text, in paragraph _____(number)...
  • From the reading, in paragraph_____...

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read Frederick Douglass' memoir and answer all of these Questions for Douglass' Narrative (this is due Tuesday, February 28th).
  • Work on the thematic essay.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we prepare for the thematic essay and the exam on Douglass' memoir? DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28th (after the vacation):
  • Compose two more T-Charts based on chapters I and II (pages 19-27) AND one T-Chart of your choice (anywhere in the novel, after chapter II). Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) for each T-Chart that supports a theme of your choice. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes or one of the following suggested themes: dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Analyze each quote (1-2 sentences). You may use any of these sentence starters for the analysis:
  • This supports the theme because...
  • Readers may infer that this example means...
  • On page 17, paragraph ____(number), it said that...
  • According to the text, in paragraph _____(number)...
  • From the reading, in paragraph_____...


  • Answer all of these CHAPTER QUESTIONS for Douglass' Narrative. THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS=30 points.
  • EXAM on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. It will be multiple-choice questions based on these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. Bring a #2 pencil. It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (after the vacation):

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences. You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel in the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Thursday, February 16th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Fill out the Goals Sheet for the 2nd Semester. What are your goals and what do you want to improve this semester in College Readiness English? (Insert in new portfolio folder for the spring semester)

    Show HW: Show Frederick Douglass' journal entry HW.

    2. Discuss/Share:

  • Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.
  • Introduce Thematic Essay requirements.

    3. Work Period:

  • Read Frederick Douglass' memoir and answer all of these Questions for Douglass' Narrative (this is due Tuesday, February 28th).
  • Work on thematic essay.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we identify our goals for this semester and address the thematic essay requirements? DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28th (after the vacation):
  • Answer all of these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS=30 points.
  • EXAM on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. It will be multiple-choice questions based on these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. Bring a #2 pencil. It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st (after the vacation):

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Choose a theme from A Huge List of Common Themes. Suggested themes include the following: dangers of ignorance, evils of racism, injustice, knowledge vs. ignorance, manipulation, and will to survive. Answer the following question throughout the essay: Which theme has the most significant role in Douglass' life and why? Include sophisticated vocabulary from SAT Vocabulary Lists. You will be graded on the following: Grading Rubric. You will be graded on Ideas/Content/Analysis, Command of Evidence, Organization/Language, and Conventions (Grammar). You should write 5 paragraphs, with the introduction and conclusion paragraphs containing 4-6 sentences. The body paragraphs should contain 10-12 sentences. You should include at least three direct quotes (1-2 sentences per quote) from the novel in the body paragraphs. You should use ICE (introduce each quote, cite each quote, and explain how each quote supports the theme). Use this Thematic Essay Outline and Sample Essay as a guide. Also, refer to Writing Assignment Expectations. This essay will be worth 25% of the 1st marking period.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, February 15th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Quiz on SAT Vocabulary List #1 and roots (fem, magna, belli, ben, and mal).

    2. Work Period:

  • Work on HW due tomorrow: Frederick Douglass' Journal Entry: Write a journal entry (personal diary) for Frederick Douglass in which he describes his struggles as a slave. Write in first person (I, my, me, etc.). Writing requirements: 10-12 sentences in a well-developed paragraph, use sophisticated language (you may incorporate words from SAT Vocabulary), handwritten or typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman) is acceptable, and proper heading (your full name, the date, your teacher's name, the class name, class period, and the assignment title). Remember the power of language, and refer to Douglass' writing style. Do your best to speak in his writing voice.
  • Read Frederick Douglass' memoir and answer all of these Questions for Douglass' Narrative (this is due Tuesday, February 28th).

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand the importance of communication in Frederick Douglass' narrative and in SAT vocabulary for college preparation? DUE TOMORROW, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16th:
  • Frederick Douglass' Journal Entry: Write a journal entry (personal diary) for Frederick Douglass in which he describes his struggles as a slave. Write in first person (I, my, me, etc.). Writing requirements: 10-12 sentences in a well-developed paragraph, use sophisticated language (you may incorporate words from SAT Vocabulary), handwritten or typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman) is acceptable, and proper heading (your full name, the date, your teacher's name, the class name, class period, and the assignment title). Remember the power of language, and refer to Douglass' writing style. Do your best to speak in his writing voice.

    DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:

  • Answer all of these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS=30 points.
  • EXAM on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. It will be multiple-choice questions based on these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. Bring a #2 pencil. It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on STRUGGLE AND PROGRESS in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and Up From Slavery: An Autobiography. Details to come! It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, February 14th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Why is good communication (the imparting or exchanging of information or news) so important in preparing for college and developing relationships? Think about what you can GENERALIZE (make a universal statement; similar to stereotype) about people who have strong communication skills. You may use personal and/or textual evidence to support your answer.

    *Love Poem Distribution: "How Do I Love Thee?" in honor of Valentine's Day!

    Show HW: T-Charts for pp. 17-18 in Douglass' memoir.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Student volunteers discuss the second page (p. 18) of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Mr. Douglass is forced to have ignorance and a limited relationship with his mother. Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) on p. 18 that support one of these themes: knowledge vs. ignorance OR motherhood. Analyze each quote (1-2 sentences). You may use any of these sentence starters:

  • This supports the theme because...
  • Readers may infer that this example means...
  • On page 17, paragraph ____(number), it said that...
  • According to the text, in paragraph _____(number)...
  • From the reading, in paragraph_____...

    4. Work Period: Take notes in the LS section on the following Strategies for Vocabulary Study:

  • Visual Strategies: Draw a picture or research an image on the internet.
  • Auditory Strategies: Record yourself saying the vocabulary words aloud. Use a camera or your phone to record yourself.
  • Kinesthetic Strategies: Take notes or write down the vocabulary words a few times. The use of pen and paper has been proven (by Psychological Science to help boost the memory and the ability to process new information.
  • Mnemonic Devices: These are techniques or memory aids to help you remember. Example: Longevity has "long" in the word, so it's easy to remember the definition: long life.

    5. Exit Slip: Do you believe that Douglass communicates the themes of struggle and progress in the first two pages of his memoir? Use textual evidence (a quote or a paraphrase is acceptable) to support your answer.

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand the importance of communication in Frederick Douglass' narrative and in SAT vocabulary for college preparation? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:
  • QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1 AND the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Know each vocabulary word's definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=10% of the 1st marking period grade.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16th:

  • Frederick Douglass' Journal Entry: Write a journal entry (personal diary) for Frederick Douglass in which he describes his struggles as a slave. Write in first person (I, my, me, etc.). Writing requirements: 10-12 sentences in a well-developed paragraph, use sophisticated language (you may incorporate words from SAT Vocabulary), handwritten or typed (double-spaced, 12 point font, Times New Roman) is acceptable, and proper heading (your full name, the date, your teacher's name, the class name, class period, and the assignment title). Remember the power of language, and refer to Douglass' writing style. Do your best to speak in his writing voice.

    DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:

  • Answer all of these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS=30 points.
  • EXAM on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. It will be multiple-choice questions based on these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. Bring a #2 pencil. It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on STRUGGLE AND PROGRESS in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and Up From Slavery: An Autobiography. Details to come! It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Monday, February 13th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: How do you believe Douglass and Washington were able to accomplish success considering their personal struggles as slaves?

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the second page (p. 18) of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Mr. Douglass is forced to have ignorance and a limited relationship with his mother. Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) on p. 18 that support one of these themes: knowledge vs. ignorance OR motherhood. Analyze each quote (1-2 sentences). You may use one of these sentence starters:

  • This supports the theme because...
  • Readers may infer that this example means...

    CHECK OUT YOUR COPY OF NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteer students will share their work period findings on the theme of affliction and textual evidence. Choose from one of the following sentence starters:

  • On page 17, paragraph ____(number), it said that...
  • According to the text, in paragraph _____(number)...
  • From the reading, in paragraph_____...

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know already about slaves' relationships with their parents? What do you want to know? What did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we identify textual evidence to support themes of motherhood and ignorance in Frederick Douglass' narrative? DUE TOMORROW, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14th:
    FINISH TODAY'S AND FRIDAY'S CLASSWORK:
  • Read the first page (p. 17) of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Mr. Douglass experiences affliction (a state of pain and suffering) as a slave. Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) on p. 17 that support his affliction.
  • Read the second page (p. 18) of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Mr. Douglass is forced to have ignorance and a limited relationship with his mother. Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) on p. 18 that support one of these themes: knowledge vs. ignorance OR motherhood. Analyze each quote (1-2 sentences). You may use one of these sentence starters:
  • This supports the theme because...
  • Readers may infer that this example means...

    DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:

  • QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1 AND the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Know each vocabulary word's definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=10% of the 1st marking period grade.

    DUE THIS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16th:

  • TBA

    DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28th:

  • Answer all of these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. THREE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS=30 points.
  • EXAM on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. It will be multiple-choice questions based on these Questions for Douglass' Narrative. Bring a #2 pencil. It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    DUE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st:

  • THEMATIC ESSAY on STRUGGLE AND PROGRESS in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and Up From Slavery: An Autobiography. Details to come! It will be 25% of the 1st marking period.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Friday, February 10th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Compare and Contrast Frederick Douglass' life (see the synopsis on the back of the memoir) and Booker T. Washington's life (see Up From Slavery: An Autobiography? Identify at least one similarity and at least one difference. Consider how they both endure affliction (pain and suffering).

    Show HW: Vocabulary Flashcards for List #1.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read the first page (p. 17) of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Mr. Douglass experiences affliction (a state of pain and suffering) as a slave. Find three examples (cite the quotes and paragraph #) on p. 17 that support his affliction.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteer students will share their work period findings on the theme of affliction and textual evidence. Choose from one of the following sentence starters:

  • On page 17, paragraph ____(number), it said that...
  • According to the text, in paragraph _____(number)...
  • From the reading, in paragraph_____...

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know already about the slavery experience? What do you want to know? What did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we compare and contrast Booker T. Washington's autobiography to Frederick Douglass' autobiography? DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:
  • QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1 AND the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Know each vocabulary word's definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=10% of the 1st marking period grade.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Thursday, February 9th, 2017: SNOW DAY

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand and identify themes and supporting, textual evidence in Booker T. Washington's Autobiography: Up From Slavery?

    DUE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10th:

  • Create flashcards for all 30 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1 AND the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:

  • QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1 AND the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Know each vocabulary word's definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=10% of the 1st marking period grade.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Wednesday, February 8th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are your first impressions of Booker T. Washington's 1st person account about a slave's experience in Up From Slavery? Write 1-2 sentences.

    Show HW: binder/notebook with labeled sections and folder.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read up to page 6 in Booker T. Washington's Up From Slavery: An Autobiography (excerpts).

  • What is one theme (central idea; main topic or message) in the text?
  • Identify two examples of textual evidence (one sentence each) to support your chosen theme. (huge list of common themes)
  • Analyze (explain 1-2 sentences in your own words for each example) how each example of textual evidence supports the theme you've chosen.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteer students will share their work period findings on themes, textual evidence and analysis.

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know already about the slavery experience? What do you want to know? What did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand and identify themes and supporting, textual evidence in Booker T. Washington's Autobiography: Up From Slavery?

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10th:

  • Create flashcards for all 30 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1 AND the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:

  • QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1 AND the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Know each vocabulary word's definition. Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=10% of the 1st marking period grade.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Tuesday, February 7th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What are benefits to reading 1st person accounts about a slave's experience as opposed to reading historical accounts in a textbook? Identify at least two benefits.

    Show owed HW.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read up to page 3 in Booker T. Washington's Up From Slavery: An Autobiography (excerpts).

  • What is one theme (central idea; main topic or message) in the text?
  • Identify two examples of textual evidence (one sentence each) to support your chosen theme. (huge list of common themes)
  • Analyze (explain 1-2 sentences in your own words for each example) how each example of textual evidence supports the theme you've chosen.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteer students will share their work period findings on themes, textual evidence and analysis.

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know already about the slavery experience? What do you want to know? What did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze the development over the course of a text.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we understand and identify a theme and supporting, textual evidence in Booker T. Washington's Autobiography: Up From Slavery? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8th:
  • Bring in the notebook/binder you are using for this class, with LABELED, DIVIDED SECTIONS: Warm-Ups and Aims (WA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), College Writing (CW), and Homework (HW). Bring in a folder that you will be using for this class as well.

    DUE THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10th:

  • Create flashcards for all 30 words in SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1 AND the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Write the vocabulary word and part of speech (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) on the front of the card. Write the definition and an original sentence (not the sentence provided on the lists). *You may use an electronic flashcard app.

    DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15th:

  • QUIZ on SAT VOCABULARY LIST #1. Know each vocabulary word's definition and the ROOTS: BELLI (war), BEN (good), FEM (woman), MAGNA (large), MAL (bad). Be able to write an original sentence for each vocabulary word. QUIZ VALUE=10% of the 1st marking period grade.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Monday, February 6th, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: What were your strengths in the argumentative/creative writing assignment? What qualities of your argumentative/creative writing do you need to improve?

    Turn in HW writing assignment: Turn in your argumentative/creative writing HW assignment.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work Period: Read your assigned section of Essential Rules of this English Class. Prepare to present it to the class.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Each table will present their assigned section of the Essential Rules of this English Class. Student presenters can be creative acting, read-aloud using visuals, or any attention-grabbing presentation of the rules.

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know already about class rules? What do you want to know? What did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • W.11-12.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively improve our writing skills and understand the class rules? DUE THIS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8th:
  • Bring in the notebook/binder you are using for this class, with LABELED, DIVIDED SECTIONS: Warm-Ups and Aims (WA), Literary Analysis (LA), Language Skills (LS), College Writing (CW), and Homework (HW). Bring in a folder that you will be using for this class as well.

    ***LATE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY: If you turn in a late, informal homework assignment (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor), you will automatically earn half-credit. Each homework assignment is worth 10 points, so if it's turned in late (one day, 10 days, 20 days, etc.), you will earn only 5 points for the assignment. TURN IN WORK ON TIME! Major, formal homework assignments that are 100 points will have -10 points deducted for each day late (without a legitimate, approved note from a parent/guardian/doctor).

    Make up owed HW (see previous days' assignments)

  • Friday, February 3rd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: READ the following: An essay might have a strong thesis statement, meticulous research, and a unique perspective, but if the introduction doesn't grab the audience's interest, readers may not read past the first few sentences. Effective writers present information in a way that is engaging and captivating. WRITE and ANSWER the following: List three creative techniques that writers can use in order to grab a reader's attention.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Work on the HW writing assignment.

    Common Core Standards:

  • W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • W.11-12.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively prepare to study The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and improve our vocabulary skills? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6th:
    CREATIVE OR ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING: Using AT LEAST 10 of the words in SAT Vocabulary List #1, you will write a story on one (CHOOSE ONE) of the following:
  • Argumentative Writing: Is struggle required for progress?
  • Creative Writing: The topic will be on Struggle and Progress. You may want to write about a stranger's struggle, a fictional character's troubles, a celebrity's achievements, hardships around the world, etc.

    You MUST focus on struggle and progress in your writing (whether you choose the argumentative option or the creative option). You should refer to the key words of struggle and progress throughout the writing, and you are encouraged to use synonyms, such as the following: adversity, difficulty, advancement, and growth. You MUST use AT LEAST 10 of the vocabulary words from SAT List #1 and underline them! You MUST use your chosen, vocabulary words (from the list) correctly in writing that makes sense. Write two, single-spaced, handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page (with 12 point, Times New Roman font). Your heading MUST include the following: your name, teacher's name, date, class name, period, and title (Creative Writing or Argumentative Writing). If you don't have access to a printer, you may choose to e-mail the writing before class time on Monday to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment):

  • For students who were not able to open the sample resumes HERE, try this link to a sample resume.
  • Thursday, February 2nd, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: In the past 24 hours, you've encountered strangers (on the subway/bus, at the corner store, walking down the street). Choose one stranger and imagine his/her struggles. (Write 1-2 sentences)

    Turn in Resume HW/Seat Assignments/Attendance.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table with the CAPTAIN. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3. Discuss/Share #2: Introduce and read-aloud List #1. Also, take notes on the roots for some of the vocabulary words: belli, ben, fem, magna, and mal. See Roots as a guide.

    4. Introduce and Begin HW.

    5. K/W/L Exit Slip: What do you know about SAT Vocabulary? What do you want to know? What new vocabulary words did you learn today?

    Common Core Standards:

  • L.11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively prepare to study The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and improve our vocabulary skills? DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6th:
    CREATIVE OR ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING: Using AT LEAST 10 of the words in SAT Vocabulary List #1, you will write a story on one (CHOOSE ONE) of the following:
  • Argumentative Writing: Is struggle required for progress?
  • Creative Writing: The topic will be on Struggle and Progress. You may want to write about a stranger's struggle, a fictional character's troubles, a celebrity's achievements, hardships around the world, etc.

    You MUST focus on struggle and progress in your writing (whether you choose the argumentative option or the creative option). You should refer to the key words of struggle and progress throughout the writing, and you are encouraged to use synonyms, such as the following: adversity, difficulty, advancement, and growth. You MUST use AT LEAST 10 of the vocabulary words from SAT List #1 and underline them! You MUST use your chosen, vocabulary words (from the list) correctly in writing that makes sense. Write two, single-spaced, handwritten pages OR one typed, double-spaced page (with 12 point, Times New Roman font). Your heading MUST include the following: your name, teacher's name, date, class name, period, and title (Creative Writing or Argumentative Writing). If you don't have access to a printer, you may choose to e-mail the writing before class time on Monday to hconn@schools.nyc.gov.

    Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment):

  • For students who were not able to open the sample resumes HERE, try this link to a sample resume.
  • Wednesday, February 1st, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: Read and interpret this famous quote in your own words. "If there is no struggle, there is no progress." --Frederick Douglass
  • Do you agree with this quote? Explain reasoning for your answer.

    Turn in Resume HW/Seat Assignments/Attendance.

    2. Discuss/Share #1: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Choose a CAPTAIN at your table. Captains will gather their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their answers with the class.

    3.Work Period: Pre-Reading for The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: Read the SAT Vocabulary Lists and use at least three SAT words in your answers below.
    1.) What are the key words in the quote from the Warm-Up?
    2.) What are synonyms (similar meanings) for the key words?
    3.) Explain how this quote connects to your own life, today's society, or works of literature (novels, short stories, movies, plays, etc.).
    4.) What's your prior knowledge of Frederick Douglass, the author of this quote? If you have no prior knowledge, what can you infer about his life from this quote?
    5.) Based on this Biography of Frederick Douglass, identify one struggle and one achievement of Frederick Douglass.

    4. Discuss/Share #2: Volunteers share their answers for the Work Period questions.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively prepare to study The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass? Make up owed HW (see previous day's assignment):
  • For students who were not able to open the sample resumes HERE, try this link to a sample resume.
  • Tuesday, January 31st, 2017: 1. Warm-Up: If you were a teacher/administrator, how would you design the perfect class for high school students? Consider activities, skills needed to learn, type of teacher, type of classroom, type of students, etc. Write a list of TOP TEN qualities of THE PERFECT CLASS FOR LEARNING AND SUCCESS.

    2. Discuss/Share: Turn and talk with your table mates and share your warm-up answers at your table. Choose a CAPTAIN at your table. Captains will gather the TOP THREE QUALITIES OF THEIR PERFECT CLASS from their table mates' answers. Captains from each table will share their TOP THREE QUALITIES with the class.

    3.Work Period Questions on English Skills for College and Beyond:
    1.) What were your impressions of the English Regents?
    2.) What skills and strategies that you implemented on the English Regents Exam will be helpful or applicable in college and beyond?
    3.) What are your college and career plans?
    4.) What English skills (vocabulary, reading comprehension, writing essays, SAT strategies, etc.) do you want to work on this semester and why?
    5.) What questions or concerns do you have about this English class?

    4. Introduce HW.

    Common Core Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • How can we effectively prepare to be successful in the spring semester of English class? DUE TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1st:
  • Bring in your resume OR e-mail your resume to hconn@schools.nyc.gov (before this class tomorrow). If you e-mail your resume, please write your full name and class period in the subject. Use these resume resources to guide you in creating YOUR OWN RESUME. Your resume MUST be only one page. It is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED to TYPE your resume.